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Madeline Hunter Lesson Plan

Teacher: Ms. Sierra Adams


grade
Subject Area: English
Destroying Stereotypes
Unit Title: Power of Story - Gaining Perspectives
12 of 15

Grade Level: 12th


Lesson Title:
Lesson#:

Objectives (2-5 objectives stating expected learner outcomes.)


1. Students understand how the author uses figurative language to
strengthen writing.
2. Students grasp the value of self-love.
1. Students realize the positives to working in a group setting.
2. Students recognize the danger of discriminating

Standards:

Vocabulary Acquisition and Use


5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and
nuances in word meanings.
Production and Distribution of Writing
4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development,
organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Range of Writing
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection,
and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a
range of tasks, purposes.

Assessments:
Self-Love activity
Extended Definition
Materials/Resources Needed:
Wonder by RJ Palacio
Daily Journal
Duration: 90 Minutes
Anticipatory Set (List specific statements or activities you will
use to focus students on the lesson for the day.)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

DEAR time (15 minutes)


Free write in daily journal (10 minutes)
Extended definition of discrimination activity (20 minutes)
Small group rubric creation (20 minutes)
Figurative language mini-lesson (10 minutes)
Self-Love Activity (15 minutes)

Objective/Purpose (For the students benefit, explain what the


students will be able to do by the end of the lesson and why
these objectives are important to accomplish.)

3. Students understand how the author uses figurative language to strengthen


writing.
o This is valuable information because it will strengthen students ability
to be more descriptive and broaden the range of tools they can use in
their writing.
4. Students grasp the value of self-love.
o No one ever tells children enough that they need to learn how to love
themselves; everyone just assumes people know how. You have to fill
yourself up before you can give yourself to others.
Students realize the positives to working in a group setting.
o Teamwork is crucial and an essential part of life.

Input (What information is essential for the student to know


before beginning and how will this skill be communicated to
students?)
Students must have a foundational definition of discrimination, which
they should indeed based on discussions weve had in class while
reading Wonder.
Model/Check for Understanding/Guided Practice (If you will be
demonstrating the skill or competence, how will this be done?)
Extended Definition

(Adapted from Peter Smagorinsky)


I will ask students to write an extended definition of a particular kind of
discrimination. Throughout the unit we have considered the effects of the
discrimination, on both the person who discriminates and the person who is
being discriminated against. We have looked at questions of discrimination in
a variety of situations using examples from current events, from your
personal experiences and observations, and from literature. In some cases,
there has been disagreement on what counts as discrimination. Your task is
to write an essay in which you provide an extended definition of
discrimination of a particular kind, such as gender discrimination in the
workplace, racial discrimination in housing, religious discrimination in school,
age discrimination in hiring or any other sort that interests you.
To do so provide the following:
- A general introduction in which you provide an overview for your
definition
- A set of rules or criteria that state clearly what discrimination is and is
not
- For each criterion, an example from literature, current events, or your
personal experiences that illustrates the rule at work; at least half of
your examples must come from literature studied in class.
- For each criterion, a counterexample from literature, current events or
your personal experiences that appears to meet the conditions of the
rule yet that lacks some essential ingredient; at least half of your
counterexamples must come from the literature studied in class
- For each example and counterexample, a warrant that clearly explains
why the rule is or is not being met

For your whole argument, a counterargument expressing the


viewpoint of someone who might disagree with you.
- For the counterargument, a rebuttal in which you defend your position
- Conventional grammar, spelling, punctuation and usage throughout
your essay
- Evidence of having written at least one rough draft that has been
submitted for peer evaluation
Extended Definition Rubric
Category
A
B
C
D
F
Introductor The writer
The writer
The writer
The writer
There is no
y
clearly
identifies the identifies the includes an introductio
Paragraph
identifies the topic and
topic and
opening
n.
topic of the
summarizes
summarizes
paragraph
paper and
the criteria,
the criteria,
but does
summarizes
but one or
but both
not clearly
the criteria
the other
explanations explain the
in the
lacks clarity. are sketchy
topic or the
definition.
and/or
criteria.
worded
unclearly.
Criteria
Each
Most, but
Some, but
The writer
There are
criterion is
not all, of
not all, of
makes an
few or no
worded so
the criteria
the criteria
effort at
criteria.
that the
are worded
are worded
writing
reader
so that the
so that the
criteria, but
clearly
reader
reader
the wording
understands clearly
clearly
makes it
what is and
understands understands difficult to
is not
what is and
what is and
understand
included in
is not
is not
what is
the
included in
included in
included in
definition.
the
the
the
definition.
definition.
definition
and what is
not.
Examples
Each
Most, but
Some, but
The writer
There are
example is
not all,
not all,
provides
few or no
explained in contrasting
examples
examples,
examples.
sufficient
examples
are
but its not
detail so
are
explained in clear how
that the
explained in sufficient
they are
reader
sufficient
detail so
related to
clearly sees
detail so
that the
the criteria.
how it
that the
reader
supports the reader
clearly sees
criterion.
clearly sees
how they
how they
support the
support the
criteria.
criteria.
Contrastin
Each
Most, but
Some, but
The writer
There are

g examples

contrasting
example is
explained in
sufficient
detail so
that the
reader
clearly sees
how it
supports the
criterion.

Warrants

The writer
clearly
explains how
each
example and
contrasting
example
illustrates
the criterion
to which it is
related.
The
conclusion
both
summarizes
the
definition
and extends
it to provide
a new
insight
based on the
thinking that
has gone
into the
definition.
The writers
introduction,
each
criterion,
and
conclusion
are
separated
into different
paragraphs.
For the most

Conclusion

Form

Mechanics,

not all,
contrasting
examples
are
explained in
sufficient
detail so
that the
reader
clearly sees
how they
support the
criteria.
The writer
explains how
most
examples
and
contrasting
examples
illustrate the
criteria to
which they
are related.
The
conclusion
summarizes
the
definition
but does
little to
extend it to
provide a
new insight
based on the
thinking that
has gone
into the
definition.
The writers
introduction,
each
criterion,
and
conclusion
and
separated
into different
paragraphs.
For the most

not all,
contrasting
examples
are
explained in
sufficient
detail so
that the
reader
clearly sees
how they
support the
criteria.
The writer
explains how
some
examples
and
contrasting
examples
illustrate the
criteria to
which they
are related.
The
conclusion
summarizes
the
definition
but does not
extend it to
provide a
new insight
based on the
thinking that
has gone
into the
definition.

provides
contrasting
examples,
but its not
clear how
they are
related to
the criteria.

few or no
examples.

The writer
makes an
effort to
relate the
examples
and
contrasting
examples
to the
criteria, but
this
The writing
is all in one
paragraph
or the
paragraph
divisions
appear
arbitrary.

There are
few or no
warrants.

The writers
introduction,
each
criterion,
and
conclusion
are
separated
into different
paragraphs.
The writing

The writing
is all in one
paragraph
or the
paragraph
division
seems
arbitrary.

The writing
is all in one
paragraph
or the
paragraph
division
seems
arbitrary.

The writing

The writing

The writing
is all in one
paragraph
or the
paragraph
divisions
appear
arbitrary.

Spelling,
Grammar,
Use

part, the
writing is
clear and
free of
problems.

part, the
writing is
clear and
free of
problems.

includes
some
problems
that impede
the readers
effort to
understand
what the
writer is
saying.

includes
many
problems
that
impede the
readers
effort to
understand
what the
writer is
saying.

includes
many
problems
that
impede the
readers
effort to
understand
what the
writer is
saying.

Closure (What method of review and evaluation will be used to


complete the lesson?)
Wrinkled-Wanda Self-Love activity
I will handout a premade blank cutout of a girl and boy to students.
They will follow the instructions below:
1. Students come up to the front and will write unkind, rude, and
disrespectful statements all over their outline.
2. These are statements that could be made to another person like,
Youre a loser, Nobody likes you, You are dumb.
3. Identify the drawing as a girl named Wanda.
4. After Wanda is completely filled with a variety of negative
comments, have the participants crumple the drawing, and then
un-crumple it.
5. The leader will hold the crumpled piece of paper to the class.
6. Explain to the class that this drawing is an example of what
negative comments can do to a person who is bullied.
7. Bullying comments can destroy a persons self image and often
leads to a defeated body language in the victim.
8. Next, draw the same outline of a full body person on another
piece of flip chart paper.
9. This time write as many positive comments on the drawing as
possible.
10.
Statements like, You did such a nice job, or I enjoy your
friendship, you're great, you're smart"

11.

Fill it with really nice statements.

12.

Cut this drawing out, but dont wrinkle it.

13.

Post this drawing in the room.

14.

This person is now just called Wanda.

15.

What is the difference between the two?

Independent Practice (List homework/seatwork assignment to


be given to students to ensure they have mastered the skill
without teacher guidance.)
Narrative Knowing Essay: We will be having our final workshop in a
week. Students are expected to continue to revise their drafts and read
Wonder pages 234-258.

Revised Lesson Plan


Teacher: Ms. Sierra Adams
School: E.A. Laney High School
12th grade

Grade Level:

Content Area: English


Stereotypes

Title: Destroying
Lesson #: 12 of

15
REVISED*** Late start due to snow; shorten class period by 15 minutes
(Original is Madeline Hunter Lesson)
Modification made: I decided to cut the collaboration on the rubric in
half because I felt the extended definition and the self-love activity
were too important to cut short.
Content Standard(s) addressed by this lesson:

Vocabulary Acquisition and Use


5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and
nuances in word meanings.
Production and Distribution of Writing
4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development,
organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Range of Writing
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection,
and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a
range of tasks, purposes.

Understandings:
Discrimination is harmful and hurtful. Every action has a reaction.
Evidence Outcomes:
5. Students understand how the author uses figurative language to
strengthen writing.

6. Students grasp the value of self-love.


1. Students realize the positives to working in a group setting.
2. Students recognize the danger of discriminating

List of Assessments:
Self-Love activity
Extended Definition
Planned Lesson Activities
Name and Purpose of Lesson
Approximate Time and
Materials
How long do you expect the
activity to last and what materials
will you need?
Anticipatory Set

Destroying Stereotypes
Wonder by RJ Palacio
Daily Journal

1. DEAR time (15 minutes)

The hook to grab students


attention. These are actions and
statements by the teacher to
relate the experiences of the
students to the objectives of the
lesson. To put the students into a
receptive frame of mind.
To focus student attention
on the lesson.
To create an organizing
framework for the ideas,
principles, or information
that is to follow (advanced
organizers)
An anticipatory set is used any
time a different activity or new
concept is to be introduced.
Procedures
(Include a play-by-play account of
what students and teacher will do
from the minute they arrive to the
minute they leave your classroom.
Indicate the length of each
segment of the lesson. List actual
minutes.)
Teacher input
Modeling
Questioning strategies
Guided/Unguided:
- Whole-class practice
- Group practice
- Individual practice
- Check for understanding
- Other

2. Free write in daily journal (10


minutes)
3. Extended definition of
discrimination activity (20
minutes)
4. Small group rubric creation
(20 minutes)
5. Figurative language minilesson (10 minutes)
6. Self-Love Activity (15
minutes)

Students will Drop Everything


And Read. During this time I
will make sure the
whiteboard has the definition
of discrimination on it to lead
into the extended definition
activity. (15 minutes)
- Free write in daily journal (10
minutes)
- Extended definition of
discrimination activity. (20
minutes)
(Adapted from Peter Smagorinsky)
I will ask students to write an
extended definition of a particular
kind of discrimination. Throughout
the unit we have considered the
effects of the discrimination, on both
the person who discriminates and the
person who is being discriminated
against. We have looked at questions
of discrimination in a variety of
situations using examples from
current events, from your personal
experiences and observations, and
from literature. In some cases, there
has been disagreement on what
counts as discrimination. Your task is
to write an essay in which you
provide an extended definition of
discrimination of a particular kind,

such as gender discrimination in the


workplace, racial discrimination in
housing, religious discrimination in
school, age discrimination in hiring or
any other sort that interests you.
To do so provide the following:
- A general introduction in which
you provide an overview for
your definition
- A set of rules or criteria that
state clearly what
discrimination is and is not
- For each criterion, an example
from literature, current events,
or your personal experiences
that illustrates the rule at
work; at least half of your
examples must come from
literature studied in class.
- For each criterion, a
counterexample from
literature, current events or
your personal experiences that
appears to meet the conditions
of the rule yet that lacks some
essential ingredient; at least
half of your counterexamples
must come from the literature
studied in class
- For each example and
counterexample, a warrant
that clearly explains why the
rule is or is not being met
- For your whole argument, a
counterargument expressing
the viewpoint of someone who
might disagree with you.
- For the counterargument, a
rebuttal in which you defend
your position
- Conventional grammar,
spelling, punctuation and
usage throughout your essay
- Evidence of having written at
least one rough draft that has
been submitted for peer
evaluation
-

***activity removed due to


snow***Students will

collaborate on a small group


rubric for the Narrative
Essay. I want my students to
be involved in their learning
process. I will be walking
around to make sure
students are on task (20
minutes)
- Figurative language minilesson (10 minutes) Students
will take notes on different
types of figurative language
- Self-Love Activity (15
minutes)
Wrinkled-Wanda Self-Love activity
I will handout a premade blank cutout
of a girl and boy to students.
Students will follow the instructions
below:
-

Students come up to the front


and will write unkind, rude, and
disrespectful statements all
over their outline.

These are statements that


could be made to another
person like, Youre a loser,
Nobody likes you, You are
dumb.

Identify the drawing as a girl


named Wanda.

After Wanda is completely


filled with a variety of negative
comments, have the
participants crumple the
drawing, and then un-crumple
it.

The leader will hold the


crumpled piece of paper to the
class.

Explain to the class that this


drawing is an example of what
negative comments can do to

a person who is bullied.

Closure
Those actions or statements by a
teacher that are designed to bring
a lesson presentation to an
appropriate conclusion. Used to
help students bring things
together in their own minds, to
make sense out of what has just
been taught. Any questions? No.
OK, lets move on is not closure.
Closure is used:
- To cue students to the fact
that they have arrived at an

Bullying comments can destroy


a persons self image and often
leads to a defeated body
language in the victim.

Next, draw the same outline of


a full body person on another
piece of flip chart paper.

This time write as many


positive comments on the
drawing as possible.

Statements like, You did such


a nice job, or I enjoy your
friendship, you're great, you're
smart"

Fill it with really nice


statements.

Cut this drawing out, but dont


wrinkle it.

Post this drawing in the room.

This person is now just called


Wanda.

What is the difference between


the two?

Review:
- Students understand how the
author uses figurative
language to strengthen writing.
- Students grasp the value of
self-love.
- Students realize the positives
to working in a group setting.
- Students recognize the danger
of discriminating

important point in the


lesson or the end of a
lesson.
To help organize student
learning
To help form a coherent
picture and to consolidate.