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Understanding the U.S.

Constitution
Grade 5
UNIT PLAN
SST 309 04
Alexandra Mularoni

Table of Contents

Unit Overview
Unit Rationale
Considering the Learners
Enduring Understanding
o Compelling and Supporting Questions
o Behavioral Objectives
o Key Concepts
o Important Knowledge and Skills
Assessments
o Performance Task
o U.S. Constitution Quiz
Unit Calendar
o Daily Instruction Abstracts
Catalog of Lessons
o Hooking Lesson
o Concept-Formation Lesson
o Working with Texts Lesson
o Academic Vocabulary Activity
Reflection
Resources

Unit Overview
This unit was created to teach students about the important of the U.S. Constitution,
focusing on how the U.S. Constitution effect students lives now and in the future.
Students are expected to have prior knowledge of the events leading up the creation of
the Constitution. In this unit plan, we will build of this prior knowledge and learn about
the reasons behind the creation, the functions and purposes the Constitution serves, the
protection of basic rights, and how students have an active role in their society. During
this learning process, we will cover new terms, which the students are except to learn
these through an academic vocabulary activity and classroom discussions. The students
will actively participate in three well-designed lesson plans that were created to help
them answer the units compelling question: How does the U.S. Constitution effect
your life now and in the future?
Unit Rationale
Teaching students social understanding and civic competence are the two main goals of
social studies education. Civic competence or democratic citizenship is the ability to
make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good as citizens of a culturally
diverse, democratic society in an interdependent world. (Parker 3) Throughout this unit,
I expect students to learn about the writing of the U.S. Constitution and the importance it
serves in their lives today. The U.S. Constitution was written after much delegation and
debate, and still has a significant impact on our societydictating the laws and rights of
this country.
Through studying the constitution students will learn some of their rights as Americans,
begin to comprehend the legislative process, and how to participate in change.
This content will be cover through a series of activities: real-life experience of using
their rights in the classroom through mock elections and freedom of speech, classroom
debates regarding controversies in the constitution, and developing a classroom
constitution to exercise their participation in societies.
Considering the Learners
Before starting this unit, students should have prior knowledge and comprehend details
about Colonial America, the Stamp Act, the Boston Tea Party, the Revolutionary War, and
a sense of government. This unit hopes to challenge students to learn to apply the U.S.
Constitution to their lives. To take responsibility for their rights. To spark inquiry and a
different way of thinking. I can assume there may be some challenges with getting
students interest in dissecting the purpose of the U.S. Constitution, I hope to tackle this
issue by making this unit as interactive as possible. I want students to feel engaged in
classroom decision making, challenged by debates, and valued in mock elections. I hope
to keep interest by connecting knowledge of the constitution to their everyday lives, such
as how to exercise their rights as citizens.

Enduring Understanding/Big Idea:


Developing the Constitution was a process that involved debates and disagreements. The
U.S. Constitution is an enduring, living document filled with controversies.
Compelling Question:
How does the U.S.
Constitution effect
your life now and in
the future?

Supporting Questions:
What is a constitution?
Who were the individuals that took part in writing
the U.S. Constitution?
How many amendments were in the original U.S.
Constitution?
What comprises were made in the construction of
the Constitution?

Behavioral Objectives:
Students will be able to (say I CAN):
I can describe powers of government under the Articles of Confederation. (U3.3.1)
I can list problems the country faced under the Articles of Confederation. (U3.3.2)
I can explain why the U.S. Constitution was written. (U3.3.3)
I can define the principle of federalism and the ways it is expressed through the
sharing and distribution of power as stated in the Constitution. (U3.3.6)
I can list the concerns people had about individual rights and the reasons the Bill
of Rights was needed for ratification. (U3.3.7)
I can label the rights within the First, Second, Third, and Fourth Amendments of
the U.S. Constitution. (U3.3.8)
I can comprehend how democracy relies peoples participation. (D2.Civ.2.3-5.)
I can explain the origins and functions of the government. (D2.Civ.5.3-5.)
I can develop narratives about imagined experiences relating to this unit.
(CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.3)
I can use technology to create short research projects. (CCSS.ELA.Literacy.CCRA.W.6-7)
I can read and comprehend complex literature and informational texts.
(CCSS.ELA-Literarcy.CCRA.R.10)
Key Concepts:
Important Knowledge:
Important Skills:
-First, Second, Third, and
-Importance of the U.S.
-Apply their rights to
Fourth Amendment
Constitution
themselves
-Constitution
-Their rights
-Identify Amendments
-Federalism
-The different the
-Understand the
-Bill of Rights
Amendments
Constitution
-Ratification
-The distribution of power
-Rights

Assessments
Description of Informal Assessments:
Overview and Rationale for Paper and
-Reviewing previous knowledge through Pencil Quiz/Test (see attached
open discussion to check students
test/quiz):
comprehension
-Giving 3-2-1 Prompts throughout this The students will be given a multiple
unit for assessment of the students and
choice 11 question quiz. This will be used
guide teaching decisions
to assess the students knowledge of the
-Exit cards will be used to assess
Constitution and their understanding
students comprehension by requiring
them to answer specific material related
questions.
-Observing students throughout course
work to assess understanding.
Performance Assessment Overview, Rationale, and Objectives (see attachments
for directions to teacher, student directions, and handout):
The purpose of this performance task assessment is to provide the teacher and students
information on how well the students understand the U.S Constitution.
Students will have the opportunity to use the information they have learned throughout
this unit to demonstrate how well they know the material. They will also learn what
they need to work on personally throughout this assessment.
Creative writing prompt
Using what you have learned about the U.S. Constitution answer the following prompt
creatively. You must use supporting facts to reason your answer.
The U.S. Constitution is made up of 27 Amendments. Amendments are changes
made to the Constitution. If you had the chance to make an amendment to the U.S.
Constitution what would you change, and why? Please answer as creatively as you
wish, but you must use reasoning to support you answer.

Instructions:
This assessment will be given to 5th graders after they complete their unit on the
constitution. The teacher will read the writing prompt aloud to the students, giving clear
directions for them to follow, and check for understanding.
Creative writing prompt
Using what you have learned about the U.S. Constitution answer the following prompt
creatively. You must use supporting facts to reason your answer.
The U.S. Constitution is made up of 27 Amendments. Amendments are changes made to
the Constitution. If you had the chance to make an amendment to the U.S. Constitution
what would you change, and why? Please answer as creatively as you wish, but you must
use reasoning to support you answer.

Rubric
Learning Targets
25 points

I clearly

Comprehension of understand what an


amendments and
amendment is
the question.

I correctly

made a change
(amendment) to the
U.S. Constitution
I have created one
Creativity in
amendment that is
answer
well-detailed

I have included
multiple reasons why
I chose the
amendment

Supporting the
answer

I have given multiple


supporting statement
behind my answer.
My reasoning is well
detailed.

15 points
5 points
I moderately
I minimally
understand what an
understand what an
amendment is
amendment is
I made a fairly
I made change to the
correct change to
constitution
the constitution
I created a semi I created one
detailed amendment
amendment but
need more detail
I included some
reasoning for why I I barely included
chose the
reasoning behind
amendment.
my choice.
I have given I gave a supporting
some
statement behind
supporting
my answer. I do
statement
not have detailed
behind my
reasoning.
answer. I have
detailed

reasoning.

U.S. Constitution Quiz


Directions: This is multiple choice quiz, select one answer for each question. Each
question is worth 2 points.
1. What is the Constitution?
a. A set of laws that citizens must follow
b. A document that disputes citizens rights
c. A written plan for governing the nation
2. What do the first three words in the U.S. Constitution imply?
We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union,
establish Justice..(D2.Civ.2.3-5.)
a. They show great leadership of the U.S.
b. They demonstrate the importance democracy is for the U.S.
c. They show the power of government
3. What document explains how power is shared between the national and state
government? (U3.3.1)
a. Declaration of Independence
b. The Constitution
c. Treaty of Government
4. There are three levels of government in the U.S. What are they? (D2. Civ.1.35.)
a. Congress, senate, judiciary
b. Judicial, executive, parliament
c. Local, state, national
5. A system of government in which the national and state governments share
power is called a ____________ government. (U3.3.1)
a. democratic
b. federal
c. republican
6. How can the Constitution be changed? (D2.Civ.2.3-5.)
a. Amendments
b. Protests
c. It cannot be changed
7. Which branch of government enforces the law? (D2. Civ.5.3-5.)
a. Executive
b. Legislative

c. Judicial
8. How many total amendments are there to the Constitution? (D2.Civ.3.3-5.)
a. 36
b. 10
c. 27
9. What amendments make up the Bill of Rights? (U3.3.7)
a. The first 5
b. The first 10
c. The first 15
10. True or False? The Bill of Rights is an important addition to the U.S.
Constitution because it includes the specific rights that American citizens
have. (U3.3.7)
a. True
b. False
11. Dividing power between the states and the national government is called
____________? (U3.3.6)
a. Federalism
b. Separation of powers
c. Checks and balances

Answer Key
1. C
2. B
3. B
4. C
5. B
6. A
7. A
8. C
9. B
10. A
11. A

Unit Plan Calendar: Understanding the U.S. Constitution


Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Hooking lesson:
Introduce
Compelling
Question

Review the
problems faced
under the
Articles of
Confederation

Teach about the


Constitutional
Convention
Why was it
convened?
Representation?

Describe federalism
and the
sharing/distribution
of power

ConceptFormation
Lesson:

Day 6

Day 7

Day 8

Day 9

Day 10

Teach about the


Bill of Rights

Working with
Texts Lesson
Plan

Introduce
Performance
Assessment
Due on Day 10

Applied focus on the


First-Fourth
Amendments

Class Review

Academic
Vocabulary
Activity

In class work
period

Lets make a
Petition!

U.S. Constitution
Quiz
Performance
Assessment Due

Daily Instruction Abstracts:


Day 1: Hooking Lesson: Introducing the Compelling Question
On the first day, students will be introduced to the U.S. Constitution, the role it played in
the past and the active role it plays in their lives now. The students will learn this
information through the Hooking Lesson where they will be introduced to the units
compelling question: How does the U.S. Constitution effect your life now and in the
future? This lesson will allow students to compare differences and similarities of the
effects of the Constitution in the past and now, which will help them begin to answer the
compelling question.

Hooking Lesson can be found in the Catalog of Lessons

Day 2: Problems faced under the Articles of Confederation


On the second day, students will learn about how the Country failed under the Articles of
Confederation. The teacher instruction will include, going over the lack of national army,
distribution of power, government role, and money issues. The teacher will then review
the effects these problems had on the Country and how these problems led to the
Constitutional Convention. Through this students will gain a better understand of why the
U.S. Constitution was written and how it fixed some of these problems

Day 3: The Constitutional Convention


On the third day, students will learn more about the Constitutional Convention. Starting
with a small review of what led to the Constitutional Convention, then covering why the
Constitutional Convention was convened, and its role in writing the Constitution. Student
will gain an understanding of why the people came together and created the
Constitutional Convention, why the Constitution was written, what the Constitution
fixed, who the Constitution represented, and what roles people had in writing the
Constitution. The teacher most cover all of these parts in order to students understanding.

Day 4: Federalism: The Sharing and Distribution of Power


On the fourth day, students will learn about the principle of federalism. Teacher
instruction will include defining the term federalism with a student friendly definition.
Next the teacher will focus on how federalism is expressed through the sharing and
distribution of powers stated in the Constitution. Students will get a better understanding
on how power is distributed in a federal government: power is shared between the
national/federal government and the state governments.

Day 5: Concept-Formation Lesson: Lets Make a Petition!


On the fifth day, students will be introduction to the word petition with a heavy focus
on teaching them how democracy relies on peoples participation and how they can
participate in making rule changes. Throughout this lesson students will be given
different examples of petitions, together the students and teacher will identify a petitions
critical attributes, and then develop our own definition for the concept petition. After, the
student will be asked to create their own petition.

Concept-Formation Lesson can be found in the Catalog of Lessons


Day 6: The Bill of Rights

On the sixth day, students will learn about the Bill of Rights. Teacher instruction will
include going over why colonist decided the Bill of Right was needed, the importance of
the Bill of Rights, who wrote the Bill of Rights, and the amendments that make of the
Bill of Rights. The students will also participate in an Academic Vocabulary Activity: If
You Can Keep It which will help them get a better understanding of the vocabulary
terms used in this unit, while using their prior knowledge to complete the worksheet
connected to the Bill of Rights.

Academic Vocabulary Activity can be found in the Catalog of


Lessons
Day 7: Working with Texts Lesson Plan: What does the U.S.
Constitution say and what does it mean?
On the seventh day, students will be actively participating in the Working with Texts
Lesson Plan. Through a series of readings and activities this lesson will teach what the
Constitution says and what it means. The students will go from amendment to
amendment learning in their terms what each amendment mean. This will better their
understanding of the U.S. Constitution and help the answer the compelling question.
Students will be doing quick write journals throughout the lesson as way of note taking
and increasing deeper level thinking.

Working with Texts Lesson Plan can be found in the Catalog of


Lessons
Day 8: Performance Assessment
On the eighth day, students will be introduced to the units performance assessment. The
students will the performance assessment handout and copy of the rubric. The purpose of
this performance task assessment is to provide the teacher with information on how well
the students understand the U.S Constitution. Students will have the opportunity to use
the information they have learned throughout this unit to demonstrate how well they
know the material. They will also learn what they need to work on personally throughout
this assessment. The teacher will read the writing prompt aloud to the students, giving
clear directions for them to follow, and check for understanding. The rest of the class
period will be an independent work period, allowing the student to ask questions and get
the help they need.
Creative writing prompt

Using what you have learned about the U.S. Constitution answer the following prompt
creatively. You must use supporting facts to reason your answer.
The U.S. Constitution is made up of 27 Amendments. Amendments are changes made to
the Constitution. If you had the chance to make an amendment to the U.S. Constitution
what would you change, and why? Please answer as creatively as you wish, but you must
use reasoning to support you answer.

Performance Assessment Task can be found under Assessments


Day 9: The First, Second, Third, and Fourth Amendment of the U.S.
Constitution
On the ninth day, students will learn in depth about the First through Fourth Amendment.
The teacher will describe each of the rights found in the Amendments and explain the
importance of these rights. The goal of this class period is to help students learn that they
have rights and how these rights effect their lives. Through this students will be able to
combine all their knowledge and completely answer the units compelling question.

Day 10: Class review


On the tenth day, the unit will be wrapped up with a class discussion review all the was
covered throughout the unit. The students will have an opportunity to ask questions, lead
discussions, and share their compelling question answers. After the review students, will
take a short quiz: The U.S. Constitution Quiz, and turn in their performance assessment
task.

The U.S. Constitution Quiz can be found under Assessments

Catalog of Lessons
Hooking Lesson: The U.S. Constitution
Your Name(s): Alexandra Mularoni
Length of lesson: 60 minutes
Compelling Question:
How does the U.S. Constitution effect your life now and in the future?
Overview:
Students will be introduced to the U.S. Constitution, the role it played when it was first
written and the active role it plays in their lives now. This lesson will allow students to
compare differences and similarities of the effects of the Constitution in the past and now,
which will help them begin to answer the compelling question.
Objectives:
Through this lesson students will be able to briefly explain what the U.S. Constitution
was written. (U3.3.3) The students will be able to describe their rights provided through
the Constitution. (U3.3.8) The students will also be able to examine the Constitution and
understand the purposes it serves the country. (D2.Civ.3.3-5.)
Anticipated student conceptions or challenges to understanding:
I anticipate students will struggle with relating the importance of the Constitution to their
everyday lives along with relating it their future lives. Students may also be challenged
by understanding what their civic responsibilities are to their country and rights they are
given through citizenship. Students also may not know what the Constitution is or what
part of the Constitution directly affects them.
Materials/Evidence/Sources
-YouTube Access
-The Constitution Lyrics
-SchoolHouse Rock Video
-Copies of the Bill of Rights
-Constitution Video
Assessment:
Students will be assessed through both formal and informal assessments. Informal
assessments will include participation classroom discussions, listening to the students,
and observing the students throughout the lesson. The students will be formally assessed

based off their responses to the writing prompt give at the end of the lesson. The prompt
will be graded using the rubric created for this activity.
Instructional Sequence: By the end of this lesson, you should have introduced
students to the compelling question for the unit.
1. Good Morning 5th Grade students! Today we are going to dive into a new
unit about the U.S. Constitution! How many of you know what the
Constitution is? (Allow students to respond) Does anyone know why the
Constitution is so important? (Allow students to respond, encourage answers)
Throughout this lesson we are going to learn how the U.S.
Constitution effects our lives now and in the future! At the
end of this lesson you will be given a writing prompt to write a short essay
which will be graded using the rubric. (Approx. 7 mins)
Open up power point
Pass out rubrics while talking
2. Pass out copies of song lyrics and open YouTube and play the School of Rock:
The Constitution video. (Appox. 5mins)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnVmIrAiQB8
Ask students to follow allow with lyrics
Ask students for their thoughts about the video
What did you think of this video?
3. Praise student answer. As a class we are going to go over the lyrics and pick
out all the important purposes the Constitution serves mentioned in the video.
(Approx. 10 mins)
Go stanza by stanza with students highlighting parts
Write these parts on the board
Encourage participation
4. Review each purpose as a class. Go over the important purposes, check for
understanding, and develop student friendly definitions as a class for
terms/purposes that are harder to understand. (Approx. 10 mins)
Ask students if the understand what each purpose means
Create definitions as a class
5. Once understanding is reached, move forward. Play YouTube video: Why
wasnt the Bill of Rights originally in the Constitution? (Approx. 8 mins)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMCDikASE4o
Ask students pay close attention, because they will have to answer
questions
Once video is done playing ask students:
What are some rights the Constitution outlines?
What purpose do the Bill of Rights serve?

6. Praise student responses. Pass out copies of the Bill or Rights. Students
together we are going to pick out and describes right that we think are
important to us! (Approx. 8 mins)
Go over each right, check for understanding
Allow students to decide how important each right is to them
Write the chosen important rights on the board
7. Ask students to reflect on the purposes highlighted earlier and the rights
highlighted.
Point out similarities: the function they serve (Approx. 10 mins)
The U.S. Constitution serves to outline the American
government, this includes designing laws, distributing power,
and protecting rights. The rights and purposes we highlighted
throughout this lesson are both important functions the
Constitution provides.
Point out differences: how the important function affect us.
The purposes we highlighted in the first video dont seem to
indirectly affect us, but what we dont notice is that these
functions are very important. We notice the importance of our
rights quickly because they directly affect us and outline how
to live in our society.
Encourage answers and thoughts
Allow opportunity to ask questions
8. Pass out writing prompts. Read directions clearly and check for understanding.
(Approx. 10 mins)
Using what you have learned about the U.S. Constitution answer the
following prompt creatively. You must use supporting facts to reason
your answer.
Prompt: Throughout this lesson we learned about the different
purposes and rights that are found in the U.S. Constitution.
Using what you have learned pick one right and one purpose to
write about, describe to me the right and purpose, how they
affect your life now and in the future, and why you
chose these two.
Allow students to ask questions.

Rubric:
Learning Targets
25 points

I clearly

Comprehension of understand what


Rights and
right I chose
Purpose

I clearly
understand what a
purpose I chose

I correctly
chose one right and
one purpose
I creatively

Creativity in
explained how the
answer
right and purpose
affect me
I have included

multiple reasons why


they affect me

Supporting the
answer

I have given multiple


supporting statement
behind my answer.
My reasoning is well
detailed.

15 points
I moderately

understand what the


right/purpose I
chose
I correctly chose one
right or one purpose

5 points
I minimally
understand what
rights and purposes
are
I wrote about the
different rights or
purposes

I attempt to creatively
explained how the
purpose/right affect
me

I included some
reasoning for why
they affect me

I explained how the


purpose/right affect
me
I barely included
reasoning behind
my choice.

I have given I gave a supporting


some
statement behind
supporting
my answer. I do
statement
not have detailed
behind my
reasoning.
answer. I have
detailed
reasoning.

Lyrics:
Hey, do you know about the U.S.A.?
Do you know about the government?
Can you tell me about the Constitution?
Hey, learn about the U.S.A.
In 1787 I'm told
Our founding fathers did agree
To write a list of principles
For keepin' people free.
The U.S.A. was just startin' out.
A whole brand-new country.
And so our people spelled it out
The things that we should be.
And they put those principles down on paper and called it the Constitution, and it's been
helping us run our country ever since then. The first part of the Constitution is called the
preamble and tells what those founding fathers set out to do.
We the people,
In order to form a more perfect union,
Establish justice, insure domestic tranquility,
Provide for the common defense,
Promote the general welfare and
Secure the blessings of liberty
To ourselves and our posterity
Do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.
In 1787 I'm told
Our founding fathers all sat down
And wrote a list of principles
That's known the world around.
The U.S.A. was just starting out
A whole brand-new country.
And so our people spelled it out
They wanted a land of liberty.
And the Preamble goes like this:
We the people,
In order to form a more perfect union,
Establish justice, insure domestic tranquility,
Provide for the common defense,
Promote the general welfare and
Secure the blessings of liberty
To ourselves and our posterity
Do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.
For the United States of America...

Bill of Rights
The first ten Amendments to the Constitution were passed
in 1791 and are collectively known as the Bill of Rights.
The ten Amendments included in the Bill of Rights allow
the following rights and freedoms to all Americans.
1. The First Amendment grants freedom of speech,
freedom of press, freedom of assembly, and the right to
protest.
2. The Second Amendment grants the right to bear arms
3. The Third Amendment states that soldiers cannot take
over a home during war or peace without the homeowners
permission.
4. The Fourth Amendment protects Americans from
unreasonable and unlawful search and seizure of property.
5. The Fifth Amendment allows all citizens due process
and states that a person cannot be forced to serve as a
witness against himself when accused of a crime.
6. The Sixth Amendment provides a speedy and public
trial by jury for all who are accused of a crime.
7. The Seventh Amendment also allows a trial by jury to
be held for certain civil disputes.
8. The Eighth Amendment prevents those accused of
suffering cruel and unusual punishment.
9. The Ninth Amendment states that no ones
Constitutional rights should be used to infringe upon the
rights of another citizen.
10. The Tenth Amendment provides each state with
powers that are not specifically assigned to the nations
government in the Constitution.

Concept Formation Lesson Plan Format


Your Name(s): Alexandra Mularoni
Length of lesson: Approximately 60 minutes
Title of lesson: Lets Make a Petition!
Overview:
This lesson was made to teach students about the concept petition. Throughout this lesson
students will be given different examples of petitions, together we will identify a petitions
critical attributes, and then develop our own definition for the concept petition. Lastly,
students will be asked to write their own petition and will be assessed based off their
writings.
Objectives:
Through this lesson students will be able to understand how democracy relies on peoples
participation and how they can participate in making rule changes. (D2.Civ.2.3-5.,
D2.Civ.4.3-5.) Students will also be able to write coherent petitions which appropriately
meet the learned criteria. (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.4.)
Anticipated student conceptions or challenges to understanding.
I anticipate some students will struggle with being able to understand how that can make
changes through petitions. Another concern is students may struggle with developing the
definition for petition and having a grasp on the concept. Lastly, students may have
difficulties creating their own petition. I intend to face this challenges by present very
clear and defined examples of the concept. I will check for understanding before
continuing through the lesson. I will use informal assessments, observations, to check for
comprehension. Finally, I will create clear and concise criteria for writing petition
assessment.
Materials/Evidence/Sources:
-Lecture notes
-Blank sheets of paper
-Youtube access
Assessment:
I plan to use both formal and informal assessments throughout this lesson. I will be
informally assessing students throughout the lesson based on student observations and
discussion participation to check for comprehension. I will be formally assessing students
based on a writing portion, similar to an essay. The writing portion will be graded using a
rubric which evaluates content, writing skills, and rationale.

Instructional Sequence:
1. Good morning class! Today we will be continuing our unit on the U.S. Constitution
by discussing the concept petition and creating our own definition! (Approx. 2 minutes)
2. (Have the word Petition written on the board) Provide students with examples of a
petition. (Approx. 10 minutes)
Written example (write on board):
I am going to make a petition for long recess because I believe 5th graders
need more time outside to release energy, get physical exercise, more time
to relax. Would you sign this petition? Why?
Conduct a class discussion based on the above statement, point out critical
attributes in the petition example: the 3 reasons why I am making a
petition.
3. Provide students with video clip example: (Approx. 10 minutes)
http://www.today.com/parents/give-me-break-mom-starts-petition-requiredaily-recess-sons-t47416
Video clip of mother petition on Change.org
https://www.change.org/p/prince-william-county-school-board-bring-backreal-recess-for-our-kids
Online petition example
Point out the attributes in both examples:
Mother sees a PROBLEM and wants to make a CHANGE, she gives
REASONS why her SOLUTION is fitting, and creates a PETITION for
people to SIGN.
4. Create a definition as a class including the critical attributes that make a petition.
(approx. 5 minutes):
A petition is document made by an individual who wants to CHANGE a
PROBLEM. The petition includes REASONS to back up beliefs and a
SOLUTION. The last thing a petition needs is SIGNATURES to show that
people agree.
5. Ask students to create their own petition, something they would like to change about
the constitution! (Approx. 35 minutes)
Give examples of petitions made is History
http://study.com/academy/lesson/petition-of-right-of-1628-definitionsummary.html
Check for understanding and clarity before letting them being their petition
writing.

Teaching with Texts Lesson


Your Name(s): Alexandra Mularoni
Length of lesson: Approximately 60 minutes
Compelling Question: What is the U.S. Constitution and what does it mean?
Title: What does the U.S. Constitution say and what does it mean?
Overview:
This lesson is a primary text lesson of the U.S. Constitution Unit. This lessons purpose is
to engage students in learning about the U.S. Constitution. The lesson hopes to relate the
importance of the Constitution to the lives of the students. Through a series of readings
and activities this lesson will teach what the Constitution says and what it means.
Objectives:
Through this lesson students will be able to identify how the U.S. Constitution addressed
the problems faced under the Articles of Confederation. (U3.3.2) The student will be able
to identity the three branches of government and duties of each branch. (D2.Civ.1.3-5)
The student will know their rights protected under the first 10 Amendments and be able
to understand how the U.S. government gains its power from the people. (U3.3.8 and
D2.Civ.2.3-5).
Anticipated student conceptions or challenges to understanding:
I anticipate students will struggle with understanding the wording and comprehending the
meaning of the Constitution. Students may also be challenged by understanding the
divisions of power and what their civic responsibilities are to their country. Students also
may not be familiar enough with the Constitution and struggle with reading the
document.
Materials/Evidence/Sources
-Student copies of the Constitution
-Student Copies of the Bill of Rights
-Power point: U.S. Constitution, What is says and What it Means.
-Youtube video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mKPmobWNJaU
-Bill of Right Song Lyrics
-Journals
Assessment:

Students will be assessed through both formal and informal assessments. Informal
assessments will include participation classroom discussions, listening to the students,
and observing the students throughout the lesson. The students will be formally assessed
based off their quick write journals. The quick write journals will be graded using a
rubric which evaluates social studies content, writing skills, and reasoning.
Instructional Sequence:
1. Good morning class, today we will be learning about the importance of the U.S.
Constitution together! We are going to go through a power point as a class and
have open discussions throughout the lesson. Throughout this lesson will be doing
quick write journals on the different Articles. These journals will be collected at
the end of lesson and graded based on a rubric evaluating your responses. We are
going to begin by taking a quick glance at the Constitution. (Approx. 5mins)
Pass out rubrics while talking
2. Pass out student copies of the U.S. Constitution (Approx. 10-15 mins)
Allow them to look over the document
Ask questions (Write these questions on the board)
Does anyone know when this document was written?
Does this document seem important?
Why do you think its important?
3. Praise students answers. Open up power point, Lets find out all about this
document together! (Approx. 7 mins)
Introduce power point, The U.S. Constitution, What it is and What it
means?
Start with the Preamble, go over what it says
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mKPmobWNJaU
(Play Video)
Ask them to do quick write in their journals
What do you think the Preamble means, why?
Classroom discussion, ask students to share
4. Praise participation. Continue through power point. (Approx. 7mins)
Article 1, go over what it says and what it means
Quick write in their journals, ask them to create a bubble chart which
separates the power of government into three branches.
Ask for students to share their charts
Draw your own on the board
5. Praise shared bubble charts. Continue through power point. (Approx. 10mins)
Article 2, go over what it says and what it means

Classroom discussion- apply to their lives now:


Ask about the current president
Ask if they know what voting is?
Do they know people in their lives who vote?
Do they plan on voting the future?
Observe if they are taking notes.
6. Praise discussion. Continue with power point. (Approx. 5 mins)
Article 3, review what it says what it and what it means
Quick write in journal:
What is the U.S. Supreme court?
Ask for students to share
7. Praise participation. Continue with power point. (Approx. 5mins)
Article 4, go over what it says and what is means.
Quick write in journal:
What main purpose does Article 4 serve?
Create a chart on the board for shared answers
Define what the main purpose is: Article 4 serves to hold states
accountable to state laws and court orders.
8. Praise shared answers. Continue with power point. (Approx. 10 mins)
Article 5, go over what it says and what it means
Classroom discussion
How can changes be made to the Constitution?
What are these changes called?
What is your role in these changes?
Pass out Bill of Rights (example of amendments)
Pass out Bill of Rights Song Lyrics
Instead of a quick write learn the song as a class.
9. Praise participation. Continue with power point. (Approx. 5 mins)
Article 6, go what is says and what it means
Quick write in journal:
Relate this to your lives,
What are state and public officials?
Do you know any state or federal officials?
Ask students to share.
10. Praise shared responses. Continue with power point. (Approx. 5 mins)
Article 7, go over what is says and what it means
Quick write in journal:

How does this Article address the problems faced under the
Articles of Confederation?
What is ratification?
Ask students to share their answers.
11. Praise shared answers. End of power point, Think, Pair, Share (Approx. 7 mins)
Final Slide- Think, Pair, Share: What is the U.S. Constitution and what
does it mean? activity:
Ask the students to reflect back on their notes and quick write
journals when writing what they think the U.S. Constitution is and
what they think it means.
Allow students 5 minutes to answer the question before pairing
them up with a partner.
Pair up students and ask them to discuss their answers with each
other, allow them another 5 minutes to discuss.
Ask the students to share their answers together to the class.
Collect quick write journals.
Quick Write Journal Rubric
Learning Targets
Comprehension of
Articles and the
question.

Clearly answers
the questions

Supporting the
answers

25 points
I clearly understand
all the different
Articles
I correctly
understood what the
question was asking
of me
I answered all parts
the question
thoughtfully
I was able to use my
prior knowledge to
do as asked in my
answer
I have given multiple
supporting statement
behind my answer.
My reasoning is well
detailed.

15 points
I moderately
understand majority
the different Articles
I partially understand
what the question
was asking me

5 points
I minimally
understand some
of the different
Articles

I answer majority of
the question
thoughtfully
I demonstrated prior
knowledge in my
answer

I answered part of
the question
I attempted to
used prior
knowledge in my
answer

I have given some


supporting statement
behind my answer. I
have detailed
reasoning.

I gave a
supporting
statement behind
my answer. I do
not have detailed
reasoning.

THE CONSTITUTION
of the United States
We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice,
insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare,
and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish
this Constitution for the United States of America.

Article. I.
SECTION. 1.
All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States,
which shall consist of a Sen- ate and House of Representatives.

SECTION. 2.
The House of Representatives shall be composed of Mem- bers chosen every second Year by
the People of the several States, and the Electors in each State shall have the Quali - cations
requisite for Electors of the most numerous Branch of the State Legislature.
No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the Age of twenty ve
Years, and been seven Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected,
be an Inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen.
[Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may
be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers, which shall be
determined by adding to the whole Number of free Persons, including those bound to
Service for a Term of Years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three fths of all other Persons.]*
The actual Enumeration shall be made
within three Years after the rst Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within
every subsequent Term of ten Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct. The Number
of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each State shall have
at Least one Representative; and until such enumeration shall be made, the State of New
Hampshire shall be entitled to chuse three, Massachusetts eight, Rhode-Island and
Providence Plantations one, Connecticut ve, New-York six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania
eight, Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North Carolina ve, South Carolina ve, and
Georgia three.

When vacancies happen in the Representation from any State, the Executive Authority
thereof shall issue Writs of Election to ll such Vacancies.
The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other Of cers; and shall have
the sole Power of Impeachment.

SECTION. 3.
The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, [chosen
by the Legislature there- of,]* for six Years; and each Senator shall have one Vote.
Immediately after they shall be assembled in Consequence of the rst Election, they shall be
divided as equally as may be into three Classes. The Seats of the Senators of the rst Class
shall be vacated at the Expiration of the second Year, of the second Class at the Expiration of
the fourth Year, and of the third Class at the Expiration of the sixth Year, so that one third
may be chosen every second Year; [and if Vacan- cies happen by Resignation, or otherwise,
during the Recess of the Legislature of any State, the Executive thereof may make
temporary Appointments until the next Meeting of the Legislature, which shall then ll such
Vacancies.]*
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES
1

No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty Years, and been
nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant
of that State for which he shall be chosen.
The Vice President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no
Vote, unless they be equally divided.
The Senate shall chuse their other Of cers, and also a President pro tempore, in the Absence
of the Vice President, or when he shall exercise the Of ce of President of the United States.
The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeach- ments. When sitting for that
Purpose, they shall be on Oath or Af rmation. When the President of the United States is
tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no Person shall be convicted without the
Concurrence of two thirds of the Members present.
Judgment in Cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from Of ce, and
disquali cation to hold and enjoy any Of ce of honor, Trust or Pro t under the United States:
but the Party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial,
Judgment and Punishment, according to Law.

SECTION. 4.
The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall
be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by
Law make or alter such Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators.
The Congress shall assemble at least once in every Year, and such Meeting shall be [on the
rst Monday in December,]* unless they shall by Law appoint a different Day.

SECTION. 5.
Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns and Quali cations of its own
Members, and a Majority
of each shall constitute a Quorum to do Business; but a smaller Number may adjourn from
day to day, and may be authorized to compel the Attendance of absent Members, in such
Manner, and under such Penalties as each House may provide.
Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its Members for disorderly
Behaviour, and, with the Concurrence of two thirds, expel a Member.
Each House shall keep a Journal of its Proceedings, and from time to time publish the same,
excepting such Parts as may in their Judgment require Secrecy; and the Yeas and Nays of the
Members of either House on any question shall, at the Desire of one fth of those Present, be
entered on the Journal.
Neither House, during the Session of Congress, shall, with- out the Consent of the other,
adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other Place than that in which the two Houses
shall be sitting.

SECTION. 6.
The Senators and Representatives shall receive a Compen- sation for their Services, to be
ascertained by Law, and paid out of the Treasury of the United States. They shall in all
Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach of the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during
their Attendance at the Ses- sion of their respective Houses, and in going to and return- ing
from the same; and for any Speech or Debate in either House, they shall not be questioned
in any other Place.
No Senator or Representative shall, during the Time for which he was elected, be appointed
to any civil Of ce under the Authority of the United States, which shall have been created, or
the Emoluments whereof shall have been encreased during such time; and no Person
holding any Of ce under the United States, shall be a Member of either House during his
Continuance in Of ce.
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES
2

SECTION. 7.
All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives; but the Senate
may propose or concur with Amendments as on other Bills.
Every Bill which shall have passed the House of Represen- tatives and the Senate, shall,
before it become a Law, be presented to the President of the United States; If he ap- prove
he shall sign it, but if not he shall return it, with his Objections to that House in which it shall
have originated, who shall enter the Objections at large on their Journal, and proceed to
reconsider it. If after such Reconsideration two thirds of that House shall agree to pass the
Bill, it shall be sent, together with the Objections, to the other House, by which it shall
likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two thirds of that House, it shall become a Law.
But in all such Cases the Votes of both Houses shall be determined by Yeas and Nays, and
the Names of the Persons voting for and against the Bill shall be entered on the Journal of

each House respectively, If any Bill shall not be returned by the President within ten Days
(Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the Same shall be a Law, in
like Manner as if he had signed it, unless the Congress by their Adjournament prevent its
Return, in which Case it shall not be a Law.
Every Order, Resolution, or Vote to which the Concur- rence of the Senate and House of
Representatives may be necessary (except on a question of Adjournment) shall be presented
to the President of the United States; and before the Same shall take Effect, shall be
approved by him, or be- ing disapproved by him, shall be repassed by two thirds of the
Senate and House of Representatives, according to the Rules and Limitations prescribed in
the Case of a Bill.

SECTION. 8.
The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay
the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States;
but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform throughout the United States;
To borrow Money on the credit of the United States;
To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the
Indian Tribes;
To establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization, and uni- form Laws on the subject of
Bankruptcies throughout the United States;
To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and x the Standard of
Weights and Measures;
To provide for the Punishment of counterfeiting the Securi- ties and current Coin of the
United States;
To establish Post Of ces and post Roads;
To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors
and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries;
To constitute Tribunals inferior to the supreme Court;
To de ne and punish Piracies and Felonies committed on the high Seas, and Offenses against
the Law of Nations;
To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules concerning Captures
on Land and Water;
To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use shall be for a longer
Term than two Years;
To provide and maintain a Navy;
To make Rules for the Government and Regulation of the land and naval Forces;

To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union, suppress
Insurrections and repel Invasions;
To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the Militia, and for governing such Part of
them as may be employed in the Service of the United States, reserving to the States
respectively, the Appointment of the Of cers, and the Authority of training the Militia
according to the discipline prescribed by Congress;
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES
3

To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding
ten Miles square) as
may, by Cession of particular States, and the Acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of
the Government of the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places
purchased by the Consent of the Legislature of the State in which the Same shall be, for the
Erection of Forts, Maga- zines, Arsenals, dock-Yards and other needful Buildings; -And
To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the
foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the
United States, or in any Department or Of cer thereof.

SECTION. 9.
The Migration or Importation of such Persons as any of the States now existing shall think
proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the Year one thousand eight
hundred and eight, but a Tax or duty may be imposed on such Importation, not exceeding
ten dollars for each Person.
The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in Cases of
Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety may require it.
No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed.
[No Capitation, or other direct, Tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion to the Census or
Enumeration herein before directed to be taken.]*
No Tax or Duty shall be laid on Articles exported from any State.
No Preference shall be given by any Regulation of Com- merce or Revenue to the Ports of
one State over those of another: nor shall Vessels bound to, or from, one State, be obliged to
enter, clear, or pay Duties in another.
No Money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in Con- sequence of Appropriations made by
Law; and a regular Statement and Account of the Receipts and Expenditures of all public
Money shall be published from time to time.
No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Of ce of
Pro t or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present,
Emolument, Of ce, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.

SECTION. 10.
No State shall enter into any Treaty, Alliance, or Confedera- tion; grant Letters of Marque and
Reprisal; coin Money; emit Bills of Credit; make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender
in Payment of Debts; pass any Bill of At- tainder, ex post facto Law, or Law impairing the
Obligation of Contracts, or grant any Title of Nobility.
No State shall, without the Consent of the Congress, lay any Imposts or Duties on Imports or
Exports, except what may be absolutely necessary for executing its inspection Laws: and
the net Produce of all Duties and Imposts, laid by any State on Imports or Exports, shall be
for the Use of the Treasury of the United States; and all such Laws shall be subject to the
Revision and Controul of the Congress.
No State shall, without the Consent of Congress, lay any Duty of Tonnage, keep Troops, or
Ships of War in time of Peace, enter into any Agreement or Compact with another State, or
with a foreign Power, or engage in War, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent Danger
as will not admit of delay.
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES
4

Article. II.
SECTION. 1.
The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America. He shall
hold his Of ce during the Term of four Years, and, together with the Vice Presi- dent, chosen
for the same Term, be elected, as follows:
Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of
Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State
may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Of
ce of Trust or Prof- it under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector.
[The Electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by Ballot for two Persons, of
whom one at least shall not be an Inhabitant of the same State with themselves. And they
shall make a List of all the Persons voted for, and of the Number of Votes for each; which List
they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the Seat of the Govern- ment of the United
States, directed to the President of the Senate. The President of the Senate shall, in the
Presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the Certi cates, and the Votes
shall then be counted. The Person having the greatest Number of Votes shall be the
President, if such Number be a Majority of the whole Number of Electors appointed; and if
there be more than one who have such Majority, and have an equal Number of Votes, then
the House of Representatives shall immediately chuse by Ballot one of them for President;
and if no Person have a Majority, then from the ve highest on the List
the said House shall in like Manner chuse the President. But in chusing the President, the
Votes shall be taken by States, the Representation from each State having one Vote; A
quorum for this Purpose shall consist of a Member or Members from two thirds of the States,
and a Majority of all the States shall be necessary to a Choice. In every Case, after the
Choice of the President, the Person having the greatest Number of Votes of the Electors shall

be the Vice President. But if there should remain two or more who have equal Votes, the
Senate shall chuse from them by Bal- lot the Vice President.]*
The Congress may determine the Time of chusing the Electors, and the Day on which they
shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout the United States.
No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen
of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the
Of ce of President; neither shall any person be eligible to that Of ce who shall not have
attained to the Age of thirty ve Years, and been fourteen Years a Resident within the United
States.
[In Case of the Removal of the President from Of ce, or of his Death, Resignation, or Inability
to discharge the Powers and Duties of the said Of ce, the Same shall devolve on the Vice
President, and the Congress may by Law provide for the Case of Removal, Death,
Resignation or Inability, both of the President and Vice President, declaring what Of cer shall
then act as President, and such Of cer shall act ac- cordingly, until the Disability be removed,
or a President shall be elected.]*
The President shall, at stated Times, receive for his Services, a Compensation, which shall
neither be increased nor diminished during the Period for which he shall have been elected,
and he shall not receive within that Period any other Emolument from the United States, or
any of them.
Before he enter on the Execution of his Of ce, he shall take the following Oath or Af rmation:I do solemnly swear (or af rm) that I will faithfully execute the Of ce of President of the
United States, and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the
Constitution of the United States.
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES
5

SECTION. 2.
The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and
of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States;
he may require the Opinion, in writing, of the principal Of cer in each of the executive
Departments, upon any Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Of ces, and he shall
have Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offenses against the United States, except in
Cases of Impeachment.
He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties,
provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with
the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and
Consuls, Judges of the supreme Court, and all other Of cers of the United States, whose
Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by Law:
but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of such in- ferior Of cers, as they think
proper, in the President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.
The President shall have Power to ll up all Vacancies that may happen during the Recess of
the Senate, by granting Commissions which shall expire at the End of their next Session.

SECTION. 3.
He shall from time to time give to the Congress Informa- tion of the State of the Union, and
recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient; he may, on extraordinary Occasions, convene both Houses, or either of
them, and in Case of Disagreement between them, with Respect to the Time of
Adjournment, he may adjourn them to such Time as he shall think proper; he shall receive
Ambassadors and other public Ministers; he shall take Care that the Laws be faith- fully
executed, and shall Commission all the Of cers of the United States.

SECTION. 4.
The President, Vice President and all civil Of cers of the United States, shall be removed from
Of ce on Impeach- ment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and
Misdemeanors.
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES
6

Article. III.
SECTION. 1.
The judicial Power of the United States, shall be vested
in one supreme Court, and in such inferior Courts as the Congress may from time to time
ordain and establish. The Judges, both of the supreme and inferior Courts, shall hold their Of
ces during good Behaviour, and shall at stated Times, receive for their Services, a
Compensation, which shall not be diminished during their Continuance in Of ce.

SECTION. 2.
The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, in Law and Equity, arising under this
Constitution, the Laws of the United States, and Treaties made, or which shall be made,
under their Authority; - to all Cases affecting Ambassa- dors, other public Ministers and
Consuls; - to all Cases of admiralty and maritime Jurisdiction; - to Controversies to which the
United States shall be a Party; - to Controversies between two or more States; - [between a
State and Citizens of another State;-]* between Citizens of different States,
- between Citizens of the same State claiming Lands under Grants of different States, [and
between a State, or the Citi- zens thereof;- and foreign States, Citizens or Subjects.]*
In all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, and those in which a
State shall be Party, the supreme Court shall have original Jurisdiction. In all the other Cases
before mentioned, the supreme Court shall have appellate Jurisdiction, both as to Law and
Fact, with such Exceptions, and under such Regulations as the Con- gress shall make.
The Trial of all Crimes, except in Cases of Impeachment; shall be by Jury; and such Trial shall
be held in the State where the said Crimes shall have been committed; but when not
committed within any State, the Trial shall be at such Place or Places as the Congress may
by Law have directed.

SECTION. 3.
Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levy- ing War against them, or in
adhering to their Enemies, giv- ing them Aid and Comfort. No Person shall be convicted of
Treason unless on the Testimony of two Witnesses to the same overt Act, or on Confession in
open Court.
The Congress shall have Power to declare the Punishment of Treason, but no Attainder of
Treason shall work Corrup- tion of Blood, or Forfeiture except during the Life of the Person
attainted.
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES
7

Article. IV.
SECTION. 1.
Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each State to the public Acts, Records, and judicial
Proceedings of every oth- er State. And the Congress may by general Laws prescribe the
Manner in which such Acts, Records and Proceedings shall be proved, and the Effect thereof.

SECTION. 2.
The Citizens of each State shall be entitled to all Privileges and Immunities of Citizens in the
several States.
A Person charged in any State with Treason, Felony, or other Crime, who shall ee from
Justice, and be found in another State, shall on Demand of the executive Author- ity of the
State from which he ed, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having Jurisdiction of
the Crime.
[No Person held to Service or Labour in one State, under the Laws thereof, escaping into
another, shall, in Conse- quence of any Law or Regulation therein, be discharged from such
Service or Labour, but shall be delivered up on Claim of the Party to whom such Service or
Labour may be due.]*

SECTION. 3.
New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new State shall be
formed or erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the
Junction of two or more States, or Parts of States, without the Consent of the Legislatures of
the States con- cerned as well as of the Congress.
The Congress shall have Power to dispose of and make all needful Rules and Regulations
respecting the Territory or other Property belonging to the United States; and nothing in this
Constitution shall be so construed as to Prejudice any Claims of the United States, or of any
particular State.

SECTION. 4.

The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a Republican Form of
Government, and shall protect each of them against Invasion; and on Application of the
Legislature, or of the Executive (when the Legislature cannot be convened) against domestic
Violence.

Article. V.
The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose
Amendments to this Con- stitution, or, on the Application of the Legislatures of two thirds of
the several States, shall call a Convention for pro- posing Amendments, which in either
Case, shall be valid to all Intents and Purposes, as Part of this Constitution, when rati ed by
the Legislatures of three-fourths of the several States, or by Conventions in three fourths
thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Rati cation may be proposed by the Congress;
Provided that no Amendment which may be made prior to the Year One thousand eight
hundred and eight shall in any Manner affect the rst and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section
of the rst Article; and that no State, without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal
Suffrage in the Senate.
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES
8

Article. VI.
All Debts contracted and Engagements entered into, before the Adoption of this
Constitution, shall be as valid against the United States under this Constitution, as under the
Confederation.
This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance
thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United
States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound
thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding.
The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the several State
Legislatures, and all execu- tive and judicial Of cers, both of the United States and of the
several States, shall be bound by Oath or Af rmation, to support this Constitution; but no
religious Test shall ever be required as a Quali cation to any Of ce or public Trust under the
United States.

Article. VII.
The Rati cation of the Conventions of nine States, shall be suf cient for the Establishment of
this Constitution between the States so ratifying the Same.
Done in Convention by the Unanimous Consent of the States present the Seventeenth Day
of September in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and Eighty seven and of
the Independence of the United States of America the Twelfth In Witness whereof We have
hereunto subscribed our Names,

Go. Washington--Presidt: and deputy from Virginia

NEW HAMPSHIRE
John Langdon Nicholas Gilman

MASSACHUSETTS
Nathaniel Gorham Rufus King

CONNECTICUT
Wm. Saml. Johnson Roger Sherman

NEW YORK
Alexander Hamilton

NEW JERSEY
Wil: Livingston David Brearley Wm. Paterson Jona: Dayton

PENNSYLVANIA
B Franklin Thomas Mif in Robt Morris Geo. Clymer Thos. FitzSimons Jared Ingersoll James
Wilson Gouv Morris
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES
9

DELAWARE
Geo: Read
Gunning Bedford jun John Dickinson Richard Bassett
Jaco: Broom

MARYLAND
James McHenry
Dan of St. Thos. Jenifer Danl Carroll

VIRGINIA
John BlairJames Madison Jr.

NORTH CAROLINA

Wm. Blount
Richd. Dobbs Spaight Hu Williamson

SOUTH CAROLINA
J. Rutledge
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney Charles Pinckney
Pierce Butler

GEORGIA
William Few Abr Baldwin
Attest William Jackson Secretary
In Convention Monday September 17th, 1787. Present
The States of
New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Mr. Ham- ilton from New York, New Jersey,
Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia.
Resolved,
That the preceeding Constitution be laid before the United States in Congress assembled,
and that it is the Opinion
of this Convention, that it should afterwards be submitted to a Convention of Delegates,
chosen in each State by the People thereof, under the Recommendation of its Legisla- ture,
for their Assent and Rati cation; and that each Con- vention assenting to, and ratifying the
Same, should give Notice thereof to the United States in Congress assembled. Resolved,
That it is the Opinion of this Convention, that as soon as the Conventions of nine States shall
have rati ed this Constitution, the United States in Congress assembled should x a Day on
which Electors should be appointed by the States which shall have rati ed the same, and a
Day on which the Electors should assemble to vote for the Presi- dent, and the Time and
Place for commencing Proceedings under this Constitution.
That after such Publication the Electors should be ap- pointed, and the Senators and
Representatives elected: That the Electors should meet on the Day xed for the Election of
the President, and should transmit their Votes certi ed, signed, sealed and directed, as the
Constitution requires, to the Secretary of the United States in Congress assembled, that the
Senators and Representatives should convene at the Time and Place assigned; that the
Senators should appoint a President of the Senate, for the sole Purpose of receiving, opening
and counting the Votes for President; and, that after he shall be chosen, the Congress,
together with the President, should, without Delay, proceed to execute this Constitution.
By the unanimous Order of the Convention
Go. Washington-Presidt: W. JACKSON Secretary.
* Language in brackets has been changed by amendment.

THE AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE


UNITED STATES AS RATIFIED BY THE STATES

Preamble to the
Bill of Rights
Congress of the United States
begun and held at the City of New-York, on Wednesday the fourth of March,
one thousand seven hundred and eighty nine

THE Conventions of a number of the States, having at the time of their adopting the
Constitution, expressed a desire, in order to prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers,
that further declaratory and restrictive clauses should be added: And as extending the
ground of public con dence in the Government, will best ensure the bene cent ends of its
institution.
RESOLVED by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America,
in Congress assembled, two thirds of both Houses concurring, that the following Articles be
proposed to the Legislatures of the several States, as amendments
to the Constitution of the United States, all, or any of which Articles, when rati ed by three
fourths of the said Legislatures, to be valid to all intents and purposes, as part of the said
Constitution; viz.
ARTICLES in addition to, and Amendment of the Constitution of the United States of America,
proposed by Congress, and rati ed by the Legislatures of the several States, pursuant to the
fth Article of the original Constitution.
(Note: The rst 10 amendments to the Constitution were rati ed December 15, 1791, and
form what is known as the Bill of Rights.)

Amendment I.
Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free
exercise thereof; or abridg- ing the freedom of speech, or of the press, or the right
of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of
grievances.

Amendment II.
A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the
people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

Amendment III.
No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the
Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.

Amendment IV.

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, hous- es, papers, and effects, against
unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but
upon probable cause, supported by Oath or af rma- tion, and particularly describing the
place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Amendment V.
No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a
presentment or indictment of
a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in
actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same
offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case
to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due
process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES
11

Amendment VI.
In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by
an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed,
which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the
nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to
have compulsory process for obtaining wit- nesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of
Counsel for his defence.

Amendment VII.
In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right
of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise re- examined
in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.

Amendment VIII.
Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive nes imposed, nor cruel and unusual
punishments in icted.

Amendment IX.
The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or
disparage others retained by the people.

Amendment X.

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Con- stitution, nor prohibited by it to
the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

AMENDMENTS 11-27

Amendment XI.
Passed by Congress March 4, 1794. Rati ed February 7, 1795

(Note: A portion of Article III, Section 2 of the Constitution was modi ed by the 11 th
Amendment.)
The Judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or
equity, commenced or pros- ecuted against one of the United States by Citizens of another
State, or by Citizens or Subjects of any Foreign State.

Amendment XII.
Passed by Congress December 9, 1803. Rati ed June 15, 1804.

(Note: A portion of Article II, Section 1 of the Constitution was changed by the 12th
Amendment.)
The Electors shall meet in their respective states, and vote by ballot for President and VicePresident, one of whom,
at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves; they shall name in
their ballots the person voted for as President, and in distinct ballots the person voted
for as Vice-President, and they shall make distinct lists of
all persons voted for as President, and of all persons voted for as Vice-President, and of the
number of votes for each, which lists they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed
to the seat of the government of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate;the President of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the certi cates and the votes shall then be counted;-The person having the
greatest number of votes for President, shall be the President, if such number be a majority
of the whole number of Electors appointed; and if no person have such majority, then from
the persons having the highest numbers not exceeding three on the list of those voted for as
President, the House of Representatives shall choose immediately, by ballot, the President.
But in choos- ing the President, the votes shall be taken by states, the representation from
each state having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or
members from two-thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states shall be necessary to
a choice. [And if the House of Representa- tives shall not choose a President whenever the
right of choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of March next following, then
the Vice-President shall act as President, as in case of the death or other constitutional
disability of the President.-]* The person having the greatest number of votes as VicePresident, shall be the Vice-Presi- dent, if such number be a majority of the whole number
of Electors appointed, and if no person have a majority, then from the two highest numbers
on the list, the Senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum for the purpose shall
consist of two-thirds of the whole number of Senators, and a majority of the whole number
shall be necessary to

a choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to the of ce of President shall be eligible to


that of Vice-President of the United States.
*Superseded by Section 3 of the 20th Amendment.
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES
12

Amendment XIII.
Passed by Congress January 31, 1865. Rati ed December 6, 1865.

(Note: A portion of Article IV, Section 2 of the Constitution was changed by the 13th
Amendment.)

SECTION 1.
Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the
party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place
subject to their jurisdiction.

SECTION 2.
Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Amendment XIV.
Passed by Congress June 13, 1866. Rati ed July 9, 1868.

(Note: Article I, Section 2 of the Constitution was modi ed by Section 2 of the 14th
Amendment.)

SECTION 1.
All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof,
are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or
enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United
States; nor shall
any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor
deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

SECTION 2.
Representatives shall be apportioned among the several States according to their respective
numbers, counting the whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed.
But when the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for President and Vice
President of the United States, Representatives in Congress, the Execu- tive and Judicial of
cers of a State, or the members of the Legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male

inhabit- ants of such State, [being twenty-one years of age,]* and citizens of the United
States, or in any way abridged, except for participation in rebellion, or other crime, the basis
of representation therein shall be reduced in the proportion which the number of such male
citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of age in such
State.

SECTION 3.
No person shall be a Senator or Representative in Con- gress, or elector of President and
Vice President, or hold any of ce, civil or military, under the United States, or under any
State, who, having previously taken an oath, as a member of Congress, or as an of cer of the
United States, or as a member of any State legislature, or as an executive or judicial of cer of
any State, to support the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in
insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof.
But Congress may by a vote of two-thirds of each House, remove such disability.

SECTION 4.
The validity of the public debt of the United States, au- thorized by law, including debts
incurred for payment of pensions and bounties for services in suppressing insurrec- tion or
rebellion, shall not be questioned. But neither the United States nor any State shall assume
or pay any debt
or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or rebellion against the United States, or any
claim for the loss or eman- cipation of any slave; but all such debts, obligations and claims
shall be held illegal and void.

SECTION 5.
The Congress shall have the power to enforce, by appropri- ate legislation, the provisions of
this article.
*Changed by Section 1 of the 26th Amendment.
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES
13

Amendment XV.
Passed by Congress February 26, 1869. Rati ed February 3, 1870.

SECTION 1.
The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the
United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

SECTION 2.
The Congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Amendment XVI.
Passed by Congress July 2, 1909. Rati ed February 3, 1913.

(Note: Article I, Section 9 of the Constitution was modi ed by the 16 th Amendment.)


The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source
derived, without apportion- ment among the several States, and without regard to any
census or enumeration.

Amendment XVII.
Passed by Congress May 13, 1912. Rati ed April 8, 1913.

(Note: Article I, Section 3 of the Constitution was modi ed by the 17th Amendment.)
The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, elected
by the people thereof, for six years; and each Senator shall have one vote. The electors in
each State shall have the quali cations requisite for elec- tors of the most numerous branch
of the State legislatures.
When vacancies happen in the representation of any State in the Senate, the executive
authority of such State shall issue writs of election to ll such vacancies: Provided, That the
legislature of any State may empower the executive thereof to make temporary
appointments until the people ll the vacancies by election as the legislature may direct.
This amendment shall not be so construed as to affect the election or term of any Senator
chosen before it becomes valid as part of the Constitution.

Amendment XVIII.
Passed by Congress December 18, 1917. Rati ed January 16, 1919. Repealed by the 21 st Amendment,
December 5, 1933.

SECTION 1.
After one year from the rati cation of this article the manufacture, sale, or transportation of
intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the
United States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for beverage purposes is
hereby prohibited.

SECTION 2.
The Congress and the several States shall have concurrent power to enforce this article by
appropriate legislation.

SECTION 3.

This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been rati ed as an amendment to the
Constitution by the legisla- tures of the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within
seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress.

Amendment XIX.
Passed by Congress June 4, 1919. Rati ed August 18, 1920.

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the
United States or by any State on account of sex.
Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appro- priate legislation.
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES
14

Amendment XX.
Passed by Congress March 2, 1932. Rati ed January 23, 1933.

(Note: Article I, Section 4 of the Constitution was modi ed by Section 2 of this Amendment.
In addition, a portion of the 12th Amendment was superseded by Section 3.)

SECTION 1.
The terms of the President and the Vice President shall end at noon on the 20th day of
January, and the terms of Sena- tors and Representatives at noon on the 3d day of January,
of the years in which such terms would have ended if this article had not been rati ed; and
the terms of their succes- sors shall then begin.

SECTION 2.
The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and such meeting shall begin at
noon on the 3d day of January, unless they shall by law appoint a different day.

SECTION 3.
If, at the time xed for the beginning of the term of the President, the President elect shall
have died, the Vice Presi- dent elect shall become President. If a President shall not have
been chosen before the time xed for the beginning of his term, or if the President elect shall
have failed to qualify, then the Vice President elect shall act as President until a President
shall have quali ed; and the Congress may by law provide for the case wherein neither a
President elect nor a Vice President shall have quali ed, declaring who shall then act as
President, or the manner in which one who is to act shall be selected, and such person shall
act accordingly until a President or Vice President shall have quali ed.

SECTION 4.

The Congress may by law provide for the case of the death of any of the persons from whom
the House of Representa- tives may choose a President whenever the right of choice shall
have devolved upon them, and for the case of the death of any of the persons from whom
the Senate may choose a Vice President whenever the right of choice shall have devolved
upon them.

SECTION 5.
Sections 1 and 2 shall take effect on the 15th day of Octo- ber following the rati cation of
this article.

SECTION 6.
This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been rati ed as an amendment to the
Constitution by the leg- islatures of three-fourths of the several States within seven years
from the date of its submission.

Amendment XXI.
Passed by Congress February 20, 1933. Rati ed December 5, 1933.

SECTION 1.
The eighteenth article of amendment to the Constitution of the United States is hereby
repealed.

SECTION 2.
The transportation or importation into any State, Territory, or possession of the United States
for delivery or use therein of intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is hereby
prohibited.

SECTION 3.
This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been rati ed as an amendment to the
Constitution by conven- tions in the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within
seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress.
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES
15

Amendment XXII.
Passed by Congress March 21, 1947. Rati ed February 27, 1951.

SECTION 1.

No person shall be elected to the of ce of the President more than twice, and no person who
has held the of ce of President, or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to
which some other person was elected President shall be elected to the of ce of President
more than once. But this Article shall not apply to any person holding the of ce of President
when this Article was proposed by Con- gress, and shall not prevent any person who may be
holding the of ce of President, or acting as President, during the term within which this
Article becomes operative from holding the of ce of President or acting as President during
the remainder of such term.

SECTION 2.
This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been rati ed as an amendment to the
Constitution by the leg- islatures of three-fourths of the several States within seven years
from the date of its submission to the States by the Congress.

Amendment XXIII.
Passed by Congress June 16, 1960. Rati ed March 29, 1961.

SECTION 1.
The District constituting the seat of Government of the United States shall appoint in such
manner as Congress may direct:
A number of electors of President and Vice President equal to the whole number of Senators
and Representatives
in Congress to which the District would be entitled if it were a State, but in no event more
than the least populous State; they shall be in addition to those appointed by the States, but
they shall be considered, for the purposes of
the election of President and Vice President, to be electors appointed by a State; and they
shall meet in the District and perform such duties as provided by the twelfth article of
amendment.

SECTION 2.
The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Amendment XXIV.
Passed by Congress August 27, 1962. Rati ed January 23, 1964.

SECTION 1.
The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any pri- mary or other election for
President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or
Representative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any
State by reason of failure to pay poll tax or other tax.

SECTION 2.
The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES
16

Amendment XXV.
Passed by Congress July 6, 1965. Rati ed February 10, 1967.

(Note: Article II, Section 1 of the Constitution was modi ed by the 25th Amendment.)

SECTION 1.
In case of the removal of the President from of ce or of his death or resignation, the Vice
President shall become President.

SECTION 2.
Whenever there is a vacancy in the of ce of the Vice Presi- dent, the President shall
nominate a Vice President who shall take of ce upon con rmation by a majority vote of both
Houses of Congress.

SECTION 3.
Whenever the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the
Speaker of the House of Representatives his written declaration that he is unable to
discharge the powers and duties of his of ce, and until he transmits to them a written
declaration to the contrary, such powers and duties shall be discharged by the Vice
President as Acting President.

SECTION 4.
Whenever the Vice President and a majority of either the principal of cers of the executive
departments or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit to the
President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their
written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his of
ce, the Vice President shall immediately assume the powers and duties of the of ce as Acting
President.
Thereafter, when the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the
Speaker of the House of Representatives his written declaration that no inability ex- ists, he
shall resume the powers and duties of his of ce un- less the Vice President and a majority of
either the principal of cers of the executive department or of such other body as Congress
may by law provide, transmit within four days to the President pro tempore of the Senate
and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President
is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his of ce. Thereupon Congress shall decide
the issue, assembling within forty-eight hours for that purpose if not in session. If the
Congress, within twenty-one days after receipt of the latter written declaration, or, if

Congress is not in session, within twenty-one days after Congress is required to assemble,
determines by two-thirds vote of both Houses that the President is unable to discharge the
powers and duties of his of ce, the Vice President shall continue to discharge the same as
Acting President; otherwise, the Presi- dent shall resume the powers and duties of his of ce.

Amendment XXVI.
Passed by Congress March 23, 1971. Rati ed July 1, 1971.

(Note: Amendment 14, Section 2 of the Constitution was modi ed by Section 1 of the 26th
Amendment.)

SECTION 1.
The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote
shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age.

SECTION 2.
The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Amendment XXVII.
Originally proposed Sept. 25, 1789. Rati ed May 7, 1992.

No law, varying the compensation for the services of the Senators and Representatives, shall
take effect, until an elec- tion of representatives shall have intervened.

Academic Vocabulary Activity


If You Can Keep It
Hakim, Chapter 42
Hakim, J. (2005). A History of US: From Colonies to Country 1735-1791 (pp. 186201). New York: Oxford University Press.
Hakims chapter 42, focuses on the significance of a having a good
bill of rights and writing the Bill of Rights in the United States Constitution.
A bill of rights guarantees individual rights such as freedom of religion,
freedom of press, and free speech. (Hakim 186)
James Madison who served in the first congress, wrote the first 10
amendments to the Constitution. These amendments are known as the Bill of
Rights. These amendments are very essential to us because they give
American citizens the freedoms and right we have in this country.
Before being this activity, please introduce the Bill of Rights to your
students. Have the students either read the Bill of Rights to themselves or
together as class. (pp 199)

Vocabulary list:
Directions: Please review this vocabulary words together with your students.
Amendment(s): (Noun) A change in words or meaning of a law.
Citizen: (Noun) A person who legally belongs to a country. I am a legal citizen of
the United States of America.
Legal: (Adjective) In agreement with the law. It is legal to drive with your
seat belt buckled
Congress: (Noun) The group of people who are responsible for making the laws of
a country.
Prohibiting: (Verb) To say something is not allowed. I am prohibiting you from
talking during quiet time.
Abridging: (Verb) To lessen the strength of something. Example: lessening the
strength of your freedoms and rights.
Petition: (Noun) A written document that people sign to make a change. Lets get
the 5th grade students to sign a petition to take longer lunch periods!
Government: (Noun) The group of people who make decisions for a country.
Militia: (Noun) People who are not part of a countrys armed forces, but are
trained like soldiers.
Infringed: (Verb) To limit or restrict someones rights.
Quarter: (Noun) A place where someone lives.
Trial: (Noun) A formal meeting with a judge and jury where crimes,
disagreements, etc. are discussed.
Jury: (Noun) A good of people who are chosen to make decisions in a legal
case.
Enumeration: (Verb) The naming of thing in a list, one after another.
Delegated: (Verb) To give control or power to someone. The final presentation
project was delegated to the best speaker.

Activity:
Directions: Based on the definitions given above, decide whether or not the bolded
word is used correctly in the following sentences:
(If used incorrectly, please write a sentence that uses the bolded word correctly.)
1. One day I wrote a petition about my dog getting his first bath, it was funny
story!
2. Sometimes my mom prohibits me from going out too late on a school night.
3. Our government is a group of people that were chosen to make decisions
about legal cases.
4. My neighbor is on trial for stealing a car from someone.
5. I delegated for too long in the morning, if I was quicker getting up I
wouldnt be as late most days.
6. My is in the Army, he is part of the United States Militia.
7. The congress makes and passes the laws of our country.
8. When I am bored, I make amendments on my nails, I like to paint them red
most often.
9. It is legal to see a rated R movie once you are 18 years old.
10.Whenever I go on vacation to other countries, I become a citizen there just
because Im there.

Bill of Rights
The first ten Amendments to the Constitution were
passed in 1791 and are collectively known as the Bill of
Rights. The ten Amendments included in the Bill of Rights
allow the following rights and freedoms to all Americans.
1. The First Amendment grants freedom of speech,
freedom of press, freedom of assembly, and the right to
protest.
2. The Second Amendment grants the right to bear arms
3. The Third Amendment states that soldiers cannot take
over a home during war or peace without the
homeowners permission.
4. The Fourth Amendment protects Americans from
unreasonable and unlawful search and seizure of
property.
5. The Fifth Amendment allows all citizens due process
and states that a person cannot be forced to serve as a
witness against himself when accused of a crime.
6. The Sixth Amendment provides a speedy and public
trial by jury for all who are accused of a crime.
7. The Seventh Amendment also allows a trial by jury to
be held for certain civil disputes.
8. The Eighth Amendment prevents those accused of
suffering cruel and unusual punishment.
9. The Ninth Amendment states that no ones
Constitutional rights should be used to infringe upon the
rights of another citizen.
10. The Tenth Amendment provides each state with
powers that are not specifically assigned to the nations
government in the Constitution.

Reflection
What did I know about the content of the unit when I started? What did I need to
learn or understand in order to plan this unit well? How did I incorporate revisions
based on peer feedback?
As a College Senior with little to no background in History, coming into a Social
Studies course this semester made me nervous. Through my elementary and high
school education, Social Studies was never a core subject in which we focused. I
skid by on memorization for exams and with the help of google I wrote an
occasional decent paper. Being honest I did not know much about the U.S.
Constitution and when I learned I had to create a unit plan based off it, I panicked.
I knew the U.S. Constitution was a document created in the past that outlined the
American citizens rights and the laws to be upheld in America. At this point,
youre most likely thinking That isnt very much prior knowledge, I was
thinking that too. I knew I had to learn much more in order to put a together a
well-designed unit plan. I first looked at the Social Studies Content Expectations
for Fifth Graders, I focused on the standards which covered the U.S. Constitution
and began researching what a Fifth Grader should know/ be able to do based off
standards U3.3 and D2.Civ.1.3-5 to D2.Civ.6.3-5. Some of the knowledge I had to
acquire included, learning about the Constitutional Convention, describing the
powers of national government and state governments, faults in the Articles of
Confederation, distribution of powers, the importance of the Bill of Rights, and
American Citizens rights. Creating this unit plan was a trial and error process,
when designing lesson plans I made numerous mistakes. Fortunately, I was given
both teacher and classmate feedback, through this I was able to see areas I need to
work on and what I am doing well. I used this feedback to better my lesson plans,
my revisions can be seen throughout my entire unit plan, but one specific example
of these improvements is my hooking lesson plan. When I first submitted my
lesson plan, it was clear I missed the target by a long shot. My hooking lesson did
not meet the criteria, but I was given the proper feedback to redesign my lesson
plan. I made improvements to make my lesson more engaging, interesting, and
create better assessments throughout the lesson.
How did planning this unit influence my vision of goals for social studies
education? How do I see using what I have learned in planning this unit for
planning in the future? What were the biggest challenges that I faced? What am I

most proud of? Now that I have begun planning lessons and units, how has this
changed my perspective of teachers and the decisions that they make?
As first, I did not enjoy the thought of teaching Social Studies, it seems boring and
useless to me. I dreaded the thought of this class and creating a well-designed unit
plan. Fortunately, this unit plan and my through observing other peers work I
realized how valued Social Studies education is for elementary students (and
onward). I learned there are engaging and creative ways to encompass various
goals for Social Studies education when presenting material to students. I
originally thought Social Studies could only be taught one very boring way, just by
reading about the historical events. This unit plan taught me about all the resources
and creative ideas that are available to teachers to help us accomplish our
envisioned goals. This knowledge will continue to help me in my future
classroom, I will continue to learn for new ways to teach content in active way that
encourages my students to learn and participate. This understanding and
perspective did not come easy, I face different challenges throughout creating this
unit plan. I struggled greatly creating a hooking lesson that would interest my
students and capture their attention for the rest of the unit. I was challenged by the
information I had to learn about the Constitution and the material that were less
interesting to me were harder to create exciting activities for my students. The
challenges I faced throughout the designing of this unit plan only made me more
proud of what I accomplished in this unit. I am proud that I completed this unit
plan with help and accepted that help, I am proud that I took responsibility and put
in the effort to learn about the material I did not know about, and lastly I am proud
myself for not giving up when I did not understand something. I learned a lot
during this course, especially about teachers techniques and thought processes.
We create lessons and present material in ways that we think best suit our students
learning styles and capabilities. We teach content in a particular order to help
students build off their prior knowledge. Student learning and comprehension is
what we strive to accomplish. This unit plan taught me all these valuable lessons
that will continue on with me in my future teaching career.

Resources:
Videos:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnVmIrAiQB8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mKPmobWNJaU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMCDikASE4o
http://www.today.com/parents/give-me-break-mom-starts-petition-requiredaily-recess-sons-t47416
o https://www.change.org/p/prince-william-county-school-board-bring-backreal-recess-for-our-kids
o http://study.com/academy/lesson/petition-of-right-of-1628-definitionsummary.html
o
o
o
o

Documents:
o
o

http://www.historyforkids.net/bill-of-rights.html
http://www.ushistory.org/documents/constitution.htm

Assessments:
o http://www.proprofs.com/quiz-school/quizreport.php?title=constitutiontest-1-practice_1&sid=115599573
o http://www.softschools.com/quizzes/social_studies/united_states_constituti
on/quiz935.html
Texts:

o Hakim, J. (2005). A History of US: From Colonies to Country 17351791 (pp. 186-201). New York: Oxford University Press.