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Third Grade Dust

Bowl Integrated
Thematic Unit

Kira Howe
EDU 555
Dr. Powell
Fall 2016

Table of Contents

Teaching Philosophy Statement


Dust Bowl Integrated Unit Plan
o Literature selections and Materials
o Lesson One: Cultural Differences
o Lesson Two: Literature Group: Paper doll
o Lesson Three: Literature Groups: Story Map
o Lesson Four: Literature Groups: Clocks
o Lesson Five: Literature Groups: Paper Doll Take
2

Lesson Six: Science: Creating Prairies


o Lesson Seven: Science: Dust Bowl Simulation
o Lesson Eight: Wrap up: Cultural Differences
Highly Effective Teaching
o

Teaching
Philosophy
Teaching provides a feeling of accomplishment each day, regardless of
how your lesson went, the modifications you had to make that were
unplanned, or the questions that were developed from the learning that
were unplanned as well, every day is different. As educators we have the
ability to change our teaching styles, techniques and strategies with each
passing year, month, week and day. Allowing us to provide our students
with an ever-evolving classroom centered on social-emotional development
and their academic success.
As an educator I strive to create an environment centered on the
growth of a student as a whole, beyond just the academics, but their
social-emotional development and how they handle day-to-day situations
that may arise. Much like Ralph Tyler and John Dewey I believe that

building on a childs experiences outside of the classroom are the driving


force behind teaching our students to learn a new topic, strategy or idea
that

once

may

have

been

unfamiliar

to

them.

Making

real-world

connections in the classroom to promote the social-emotional and academic


growth needed for a child has been and will continue to be an important
factor in how my classroom is designed. We cannot expect a child to learn
or understand something that is unfamiliar, has no value or no connection
to their life outside of our classrooms.
As an educator it is important that we engage in reflective
practices (Sage Colleges Conceptual Framework) that help us evolve our
teaching to benefit our students learning outcomes. I must ensure my
students are given adequate opportunities to become civic members of our
community. In order to ensure they are given these opportunities I must
be sure to plan and prepare learning opportunities centered around
community

involvement

both

inside

our

classroom

and

outside

our

classroom. I must develop an environment that the students regard as


being safe and promotes a culture centered on learning.

When I develop

my teaching opportunities I must have open communication with my


students about their learning and engage the students in the learning
opportunity. And lastly as an educator I must maintain my professional
responsibilities by attending professional development, communication with
parents and families about their students learning, being a reflective
practitioner, and most importantly modeling the expectations that I have
for my students in a professional manner daily.

(Charlotte Danielson

Framework)
Teaching

is

career

that

takes

dedication,

patience,

and

perseverance for the changes that the educational field faces. The most
important information I learned as an undergraduate student was that we
as teachers are life long learners. I remind myself daily that each day is a
new learning opportunity to share with my students and we as teachers
are always evolving.

Literature Selection and Materials


Literature:
The Great American Dust Bowl
Voices of the Dust Bowl
Dont Forget Winona

Discovering Cultures

Materials:
Lesson One:
- Discovering Cultures
- Anchor chart
- Traditions Paragraph

Lesson Two:
- Main Idea Worksheet
- Venn diagram worksheet
- Paper Doll
o Googly eyes
o Markers
o Glue
o Pencils
o Felt
o Other craft materials
Lesson Three:
- Story map
o Markers
o Brass fastener
- Opinion paragraph
Lesson Four:
- Graphic Organizer
- Hour in the Life paragraph
- Main Idea worksheet
- Clock Craft
o Markers
o Pencils
o Brass fastener

Lesson Five:
- Paper doll
o Markers
o Glue
o Googly eyes
o Pencils
o Other craft materials
- Venn diagram paper plate
o Glue
o Pencils
Lesson six
- Recording sheets
- Planning sheets
- Hair dryer
- Sand
- Pipe cleaners (grass)
- Foil pans
Lesson Seven
- Recording sheet
- Signs
- Dice
Lesson Eight
- Narrative
- Paper dolls from lesson five

Kira Howe
Lesson one
3rd Grade
Cultural Differences
Discovering Cultures
Context for Learning

Learning Needs Category

Number of Students

ADHD

Autism

Visual Impairment

Supports, Accommodations,
Modifications, and/or
Pertinent IEP Goals
Repeat directions often
Post a clear schedule
Teacher proximity
Follow behavior plan
established
Collaborate with special
education teacher
Breaks as needed
Follow behavior plan
established
Teacher proximity
Small groups
Sensory breaks as
needed
Preferential seating
near board and teacher
Directions written on
board are to be written
on paper for them to
have at desk
Collaborate with special
education teacher
Repeat directions
Teacher proximity

Central Focus

The theme for the unit is the Dust Bowl and the cultural differences between the children then and
our students now. As third graders the students will look at the cultural influences that characters
in four books had that effect their way of life. They will make comparisons from cultural influences
from these characters to themselves.
Teaching cultural differences and diversity to our students bring a sense of awareness to the idea
that we all come from different traditions, backgrounds and cultures. The students will be able to
expand on these differences by creating a paper doll of themselves and comparing it to the main
characters in the graphic novel that their literature group has read.
The unit will provide the students with the opportunities to develop their speaking and listening
skills in ELA by having independent discussions surrounding a topic or idea, identifying the main
idea and character traits of characters in a story, read independently, create a book talk
presentation, a story wheel and a book tasting. They will also be completing a science activity that
will require them to complete a simulation about the hardships faced during the Dust Bowl. They
will make connections in social studies to identify the differences from cultures then and now and
they will create a paper to help them make those comparisons between themselves and the
characters from the books. Additionally in math they will create The unit identifies and addresses
many of the key common core standards and skills that third grade students need to read, read and
speak in ELA, social studies, science and math as well as the integrated portion of movement and
the arts.

Goal:

Content Standards/Objectives

Engage in a discussion about culture


Respond to the question what is culture
Write and describe a tradition using details
Identify cultural similarities

Common Core Content Standard

NYS ELA Common Core Standard


Speaking and Listening 3.1: Engage effectively in
a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one,
in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners
on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others
ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Learning Objectives

I.

When asked the question, What does


culture look like? students will
construct a one-sentence response
using their understanding of culture, to
be applied to an anchor chart.

NYS ELA CCLS: W.3.5: Production and


Distribution of Writing: With guidance and
support from adults, respond to questions and
suggestions from peers and add details to
strengthen writing as needed.

II.

Students will compose a 3 to 5 sentence


paragraph about a tradition they have
within their family.

NYS ELA Common Core Standard


Speaking and Listening 3.1: Engage effectively in
a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one,
in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners
on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others
ideas and expressing their own clearly.

III.

In their respective learning groups


Students will discuss 3 geographic
factors from our communities that
allowed people to settle in the
community

New York State Social Studies Standard: 3.5:


Communities share cultural similarities and
differences across the world.

New York State Social Studies Standards: 3.3


Geographic factors often influence where people
settle and form communities. People adapt to and
modify their environment in different ways to
meet their needs.

Vocabulary/Concepts/Language

Academic Language

Culture
Diversity
Traditions
Communities
Geographic factors
This unit will be a follow up to what the students have learned about communities and cultural
differences from K-3. The students will have an understanding of the terms but at a beginner or
intermediate level. During the anticipatory set of this lesson the students will activate their prior
knowledge and background knowledge of cultural diversity and differences among communities by
making connections to their own geographic location and their own traditions. The students have
been researching different geographic regions in social studies throughout the school year this will
be a skill that is at the intermediate to mastery level for 3rd grade standards.
The lesson will reflect on cultural diversity and how it looks among their peers and students. They
will brainstorm their ideas about what is cultural diversity and what culture looks like. Students
will have key vocabulary terms and ideas introduced by the teacher through; reading and group
discussions. The students will be introduced to the vocabulary terms by the teacher where they (the
teacher) will read the term and define the term, each will be placed on the board for the remainder
of the unit and will be added to as needed. Students will revisit them at the close of the unit.
Students will be required to write a 3-5-sentence paragraph explaining a tradition that they
participate in within their family or their community. When the students are finished with their
writing they will turn and talk to heir neighbor. The neighbor will be required to present their peers
tradition; each student will be required to share out with the class what they learned about their
partners tradition.
The students will be exposed to the terms and ideas surrounding culturally repeatedly throughout
the unit to deepen their learning and understanding of the topic. The paragraph and share-out will
be used to assess the students understanding of the topics.
Rationale

Students will gather and interpret data, a key social studies practice for third graders. They will
work to make connections between their culture and the culture of the characters in readings,
pictures and videos. They will work to develop their literacy, speaking and listening, and writing
skills by:
Listening to teachers read-aloud from informational texts
Partner-Share about a topic

Write to inform others about a tradition they have


Students are expected to understand different cultures; their communities and their geographic
make up for third grade social studies. Making this lesson an important introductory lesson for a
unit surrounding the comparison of cultural differences from now to another time period. They will
work individually, with a group, and one-on-one with partners to develop and deepen these skills.
They will use the document read aloud to help develop their knowledge of culture. They will work
together to collaborate using the document and their knowledge to produce the definition for
culture. (Engerstrom, 1987) For the students who struggle with writing it will allow them peer
support as well as a chance to present ideas orally to their partner during an area of instruction that
they may otherwise struggle.
The lesson will require students to use various learning styles to meet the need of our visual
learners, auditory learners as well as the kinesthetic learners. The lesson will start by introducing a
simple idea and continue to build to a more complex order so that subsequent ideas can be
integrated within our unit plan.(Reigeluth, 1999)
Essential Questions
(Focus Questions)

1.
2.
3.
4.

What is Culture?
What does culture look like?
How are we culturally different from one another?
What is a tradition?

Assessments:
Type of Assessment

Formative

Description of assessment

Modifications to the assessment so that all


students could demonstrate their learning.

Evaluation Criteria - What evidence of student


learning (related to the learning objectives and
central focus) does the assessment provide?

Anchor Chart:
Take 5 minutes to
brainstorm and write 1sentence using background
knowledge answering:
What is Culture?

All Students : Write one sentence


answering the question what is
culture?

The students are required to write at least 1


sentence answering what is culture. If they
can write 1 sentence this demonstrates that
they have some understanding of the topic
at hand. If they give a list of words this
shows that they may have an understanding
but will need support from peer or teacher
to develop their idea into a sentence.

Visually impaired Students: Given


piece of paper rather then a sticky
note

Autism and ADHD Students: Re-read


prompt as needed, dictate sentence to
peer or staff to write, copy their
dictation to sticky note or piece of
paper, share orally

Summative

Traditions Paragraph:
Students must write 3-5
sentences about a tradition
they share with their
family. They will then pair
up with a peer to share
their tradition.

All Students: Writing prompt on the


board, given orally and on the top of
their writing paper.
Visually Impaired Students: Prompt
highlighted on page and read orally as
needed
Autism and ADHD Students: Prompt
highlighted on page, read orally as
needed, give oral explanation to peer

Possible responses may be:


People who have different religions
Families of different races
The food that people eat such as
Indian, Chinese, Japanese etc.
Groups of people who share the
same ideas, foods, religion and race.
Students are expected to respond to the
question. They will be evaluated on whether
they could answer the question with at least
one example of culture (race, religion, food,
country etc.) If they write a complete
sentence using more then one example they
will be at the mastery level, 1 example is the
intermediate and a word or incomplete
sentence is beginning level. The students
may write a phrase or word associated with
culture and it be corrected, however they
must have a complete sentence to be at the
mastery level.
The information will be used to set the pace
for the lesson and to identify which students
to pair with whom according to their
understanding.
Students are required to write 3 to 5
sentences about a tradition.
Students will earn 3 points for having 3 or
more sentences written that correctly
answer the writing prompt. Students will
receive 2 points for having 3 sentences with
little details. They will earn 1 point for
having under 3 sentences and few details
about their tradition.
For students who struggle with writing,

or teacher, copy the teacher written


sentences after given orally.

visual impairment, autism or ADHD use


modifications as needed. If they are unable
to form legible writing they must present
orally to the teacher.

Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks


Procedure
Anticipatory Set
5-10 minutes

Learning Tasks and


Instructional Strategies
10-20 minutes

Teacher will:
1. Introduce the theme
of the lesson: Culture
Diversity and the
Unit theme of the
Dust Bowl: Present
the anchor chart with
the Question; What is
culture?
2. Ask students to
brainstorm ideas
surrounding culture
3. Ask students to write
at least one sentence
describing their
understanding of
What is Culture?
1. Ask students what is
culture?
2. Define culture for the
students, ask them if
any one has changed
their minds about
culture and ask them
to share their new
understanding
3. What does culture

Students will:
1. listen to the
instructions
2. brainstorm ideas
about culture,
words, phrases,
stories
3. Record at least one
sentence
answering; what is
culture?

Modifications (RTI/UDL Strategies)


All Students: Prompt written on anchor
chart

1. Answer the question;


what is culture?
2. Share new
understanding of
culture after hearing
definition
3. Think-pair-share their
ideas with partners
4. Share ideas allowed

All Students: Prompt written on anchor


chart

Visually Impaired Students: Prompt on


anchor chart, prompt on paper at their desk,
use full sheet of paper instead of sticky note
Autism and ADHD Students: Prompt on
anchor chart, prompt on paper at their desk,
give their oral explanation to a peer or adult.

Visually Impaired Students: Prompt on


anchor chart, prompt on paper, teacher
proximity, repeating of question as needed.
Autism and ADHD Students: Prompt on
anchor chart, prompt on paper, teacher
proximity, repeating of question as needed

4.
Independent
Practice/Exploration of
Concepts
30 minutes

1.

2.

Closure
10-15 minutes

1.
2.
3.

4.
5.

look like?
Ask students to share
their ideas
Instruct students to
write a 3-5 sentence
paragraph about a
tradition. Ask students
to answer what is a
tradition?
Give the students 2530 minutes to write
with details a tradition
their family shares
Call students back to
learning groups or rug
Read aloud
Discovering cultures
Ask the students to
share the tradition
they hold within their
family
How are we
culturally different
from one another?
Set expectations for
the literature groups
with new books.
Group 1: The Great
American Dust Bowl,
Group 2: Voices of the
Dust, Group 3: The
Dust Bowl and Group
4: Dont Forget
Winona. You will read
the stories over 2 days
and each group will be

1. brainstorm about
what a tradition is
2. write a 3-5
sentence
paragraph about a
tradition their
family shares using
details.
1. Move back to
designated area
2. Listen to
discovering
cultures
3. Share your families
tradition
4. Answer how are
we culturally
different from one
another?
5. Follow teacher
directions for
tomorrows
activities

All Students: Prompt written on paper


Visually Impaired Students: Prompt
written on paper, prompt highlighted,
prompt repeated as needed
Autism and ADHD Students: Prompt
written on paper, prompt highlighted,
prompt repeated as needed, one-on-one
support from aide or teacher
All Students: Prompt written on board
Visually Impaired Students: prompt
written on board, prompt written on piece
of paper, repeated as needed
Autism and ADHD Students: prompt
written on board, prompt written on piece
of paper, repeated as needed, teacher/aide
proximity, call to attention

responsible for
completing activities
to follow their
characters and
themselves to help us
make comparisons
between the culture
during a specific time
period: the Dust Bowl,
and our lives
Student Product:
Anchor Chart
Traditions Paragraph
Instructional Resources, Materials and References: (Including all images used.)
"Elaboration Theory (Reigeluth) - Learning Theories." Learning Theories. N.p., 2016. Web. 11 Dec. 2016.
Figure 1. The Structure Of A Human Activity System (Engestrm, 1987, P. 78. ACTIVITY THEORY AND EXPANSIVE
DESIGN (n.d.): n. pag. Web. 10 Dec. 2016.

What Is Culture?

Name:____________________________

Cultural Diversity: Traditions


Describe a family tradition that you have with your family, you
community shares, or one that you have witnessed. Write a 3-5sentence paragraph about this tradition. Please use details and be
prepared to share with the class!

________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________
Draw a picture of your tradition:

Kira Howe
Lesson two
3rd Grade
The Dust Bowl
Various Literature Groups
Approx. 120 minutes

Context for Learning


Learning Needs Category

Number of Students

ADHD

Autism

Visual Impairment

Supports, Accommodations,
Modifications, and/or
Pertinent IEP Goals
Repeat directions often
Post a clear schedule
Teacher proximity
Follow behavior plan
established
Collaborate with special
education teacher
Breaks as needed
Follow behavior plan
established
Teacher proximity
Small groups
Sensory breaks as needed
Preferential seating near
board and teacher
Directions written on
board are to be written
on paper for them to
have at desk
Collaborate with special
education teacher
Repeat directions
Teacher proximity

Central Focus

The theme for the unit is the Dust Bowl and the cultural differences between the children then and our
students now. As third graders the students will look at the cultural influences that characters in four
books had that effect their way of life. They will make comparisons from cultural influences from these
characters to themselves.
Teaching cultural differences and diversity to our students bring a sense of awareness to the idea that we
all come from different traditions, backgrounds and cultures. The students will be able to expand on these
differences by creating a paper doll of themselves and comparing it to the main characters in the graphic
novel that their literature group has read.
The unit will provide the students with the opportunities to develop their speaking and listening skills in
ELA by having independent discussions surrounding a topic or idea, identifying the main idea and
character traits of characters in a story, read independently, create a book talk presentation, a story wheel
and a book tasting. They will also be completing a science activity that will require them to complete a
simulation about the hardships faced during the Dust Bowl. They will make connections in social studies
to identify the differences from cultures then and now and they will create a paper to help them make
those comparisons between themselves and the characters from the books. Additionally in math they will
create The unit identifies and addresses many of the key common core standards and skills that third
grade students need to read, read and speak in ELA, social studies, science and math as well as the
integrated portion of movement and the arts.

Goal:
Identify 4 details from the text to support the main idea
Construct a Venn diagram identifying 4 similarities and 4 differences
Create a paper doll representation of a book character
Work in a group to create a project
Present ideas on a topic with a group
Objectives (should be specific and measureableusing Blooms Taxonomy Word List)

Content Standards/Objectives

Common Core Content Standard

Vocabulary/Concepts/Language

Learning Objectives

NYS ELA CCLS: R.I. 3.2-Determine the main


idea of a text; recount the key details and explain
how they support the main idea.

1. When given the primary source,


Discovering Cultures students will
create a graphic organizer containing
the main idea and 4 Details from the
reading.

NYS ELA CCLS: R.L. 3.9-Compare and


contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories
written by the same author about the same or
similar characters (e.g., in books from a series).

2. Students will construct a Venn diagram


of 4 differences and 4 similarities
between themselves and their book
character with 4/4 identified for both;
similarities and differences.

NYS Arts Standards:


Standard 1: Students will actively engage in the
processes that constitute creation and
performance in the arts (dance, music, theatre,
and visual arts) and participate in various roles in
the arts.

3.

Visual Arts:
Students will make works of art that explore
different kinds of subject matter, topics, themes,
and metaphors. Students will understand and use
sensory elements, organizational principles, and
expressive
images to communicate their own ideas in works
of art. Students will use a variety of art materials,
processes, mediums, and techniques, and use
appropriate technologies for creating and
exhibiting visual art works.
NYS ELA CCLS R.L.3.3: Describe characters
in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or
feelings) and explain how their actions contribute
to the sequence of events.
Academic Language
Culture

Students will create a paper doll with 5


characteristics of their books character
using the materials provided with 100%
accuracy, 5/5 correct.

4. Students will present as a group at least


5 out of 5 (100% accuracy)
characteristics of their books main
character.

Diversity
The Dust Bowl
Characteristics
This unit will be a follow up to what the students have learned about communities and cultural differences
from K-3. The students will have been introduced to the topic of culture and diversity. During this lesson
they will identify characteristics of a book character including what they infer their culture was like
during the Dust Bowl. They will have a large depth of background knowledge on characteristics and how
to identify them. They will be at the very beginning stages of the understanding the Dust Bowl and the
vocabulary terms used throughout presentations and discussions. These terms will appear frequently
through the remainder of their lesson and they will complete a vocabulary worksheet at the close of the
unit.

Rationale

Students will gather and interpret data, a key social studies practice for third graders. They will work to
make connections between their culture and the culture of the characters in readings, pictures and videos.
They will work to develop their literacy, speaking and listening, and writing skills by:
Listening to teachers read-aloud from informational texts
Work collaboratively in groups with their peers
Create work of art to build an audience understandings on a topic/character
Identify the main idea of a text using key details from that text
Develop important social skills by working collaboratively with others on a project
Students are expected to understand different cultures; their communities and their geographic make up
for third grade social studies. Making this lesson an important introductory lesson for a unit surrounding
the comparison of cultural differences from now to another time period. They will work individually, with
a group, and one-on-one with partners to develop and deepen these skills. They will use the document
read aloud to help develop their knowledge of culture. They will work together to collaborate using the
document and their knowledge to produce the definition for culture. (Engerstrom, 1987) For the students
who struggle with writing it will allow them peer support as well as a chance to present ideas orally to
their partner during an area of instruction that they may otherwise struggle.
The lesson will require students to use various learning styles to meet the need of our visual learners,
auditory learners as well as the kinesthetic learners. The lesson will start by introducing a simple idea and
continue to build to a more complex order so that subsequent ideas can be integrated within our unit
plan.(Reigeluth, 1999)

Essential Questions

1. What is the Dust bowl?

(Focus Questions)

2. How might their culture be different from ours?


3. What are the similarities and differences you share with the character in your
book?

Assessments:
Type of Assessment

Formative

Summative

Description of assessment

Modifications to the assessment so that all


students could demonstrate their learning.

Evaluation Criteria - What evidence of student


learning (related to the learning objectives and
central focus) does the assessment provide?

Main Idea: Write the main


idea and 4 details from the
informational text read aloud
by the teacher: Discovering
Cultures using the main idea
graphic organizer provided

All Students : Write the main idea and 4


details

The students are expected to have 4 details


from the text that help support their idea of
what the main idea is.

Venn Diagram: After


reading in their literature
groups they will create a
Venn diagram comparing the
lead character in their text to
themselves using 4
differences and 4
similarities.

Visually impaired Students: Enlarged


text, directions re-read,
Students who can identify 4 details will be able
directions/prompt highlighted, work with to share-out and pair with their peers who have
a peer
less then 4 details.
Autism and ADHD Students: One
word or phrase answer, can draw
pictures to describe the detail/main idea,
orally explain their understanding, oneon-one with aide or peer student
All Students: Write 4 similarities and 4
differences using a Venn Diagram

Students with less then 4 details and who


struggle to identify the main idea will be
paired with peers who have completed the
graphic organizer.

Students will be evaluated on a points system.


They will receive full credit for having 8
points; 4 similarities and 4 differences. For
Visually Impaired Students: Enlarged each similarity or difference they have they
text, directions re-read/highlighted, work will earn a point up to 8 points awarded total.
with a peer or aide
If the student has 8 points with 4 similarities
Autism and ADHD Students: One
and 4 differences they will be at the mastery
word or phrase, draw to show
level.
understanding, orally share with aide or
teacher
Anything below 8 will be at the developing
stage and will be retaught during the closure of
the lesson by both peer input and the teacher

Summative

Introduction of their
character: Students will
work in their literature
groups to create a paper doll
that looks like their main
character. They will be
required to identify 5
characteristics of their
character and present these
ideas to the class.

All Students: Work collaboratively to


create a paper doll book character
Visually Impaired Students:
Highlighted directions, directions read
allowed, aide support, peer support
Autism and ADHD Students: Aide
support, peer support, teacher proximity,
check for understanding, peer and
teacher reminders

instruction.
Students will be evaluated on how they work
collaboratively to create a project.
They will be expected to identify 5
characteristics of the main character and create
a paper doll that showcases the characteristics
and culture of the character using the materials
provided

Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks


Procedure
Anticipatory Set
5-10 minutes

Learning Tasks and


Instructional Strategies
30 minutes

Independent
Practice/Exploration of

Teacher will:
1. Show a video
about the Dust
Bowl: Brainpop

1. Ask: What is the


Dust Bowl?
2. Ask: How might
their culture have
been different then
ours?
3. Present a
powerpoint
presentation about
the dust bowl
Literature Groups
1. Have students break

Students will:
1. Watch a video about the
dust bowl

Modifications (RTI/UDL Strategies)


All Students: Watch video
Visually Impaired Students: Preferential
seating

1. Answer: What is the


dust bowl?
2. Answer: How might
their culture have
been different then
ours?

Autism and ADHD Students: preferential


seating, other seating options (crates, yoga
balls)
All Students: Prompt written on anchor chart
Visually Impaired Students: Prompt on
anchor chart, prompt on paper, teacher
proximity, repeating of question as needed.
Autism and ADHD Students: Prompt on
anchor chart, prompt on paper, teacher
proximity, repeating of question as needed

1. break into literature


groups

All Students: Prompt written on paper

Concepts
60 minutes
2.

3.

4.

5.

into their literature


groups
Group 1: The Great
American Dust Bowl
will read 30 pages.
Group 2: Voices of the
Dust Bowl will read 15
pages. Group 3: The
Dust Bowl will read 15
pages, and Group 4:
Dont Forget Winona
will read 10 pages
Will give directions:
Each group is expected
to read the allotted
amount of pages then
complete a Venn
diagram activity
comparing themselves
to the main character of
their story. 15 Minutes
given for completion
Allow 3-5 students to
share some similarities
and differences they
have on the Venn
Diagram
Explain that the
literature groups will
now work together to
create a paper doll using
the materials provided.
The doll must look like
and share the same
characteristics (at least
5) as the main character
from their story. They

2. Group 1: The Great


American Dust Bowl
will read 30 pages.
Group 2: Voices of
the Dust Bowl will
read 15 pages. Group
3: The Dust Bowl will
read 15 pages, and
Group 4: Dont Forget
Winona will read 10
pages
3. Read the allotted
pages then complete a
Venn diagram activity
comparing themselves
to the main character
of their story. 15
minutes given for
completion
4. 3-5 students will share
their similarities and
differences on their
Venn diagram
5. work in their literature
groups to create a
paper doll using the
materials provided.
Create a doll that
looks like their book
character and shares
the same
characteristics (at least
5) as their book
character. Then they
will share out their
paper doll to the
remaining literature

Visually Impaired Students: Prompt written


on paper, prompt highlighted, prompt
repeated as needed
Autism and ADHD Students: Prompt
written on paper, prompt highlighted, prompt
repeated as needed, one-on-one support from
aide or teacher

Closure
10-15 minutes

will be given 25
minutes to work to
complete this project.
They are expected to
share their character
with the class so if they
finish early they may
work together to
develop how they want
to introduce their
character to their peers.
1. Call students back
to attention to begin
share out.
2. Ask each group to
share their book
character paper doll
3. What is the dust
bowl? And using
details from your
book and your book
character doll give
examples of how
their culture may
have been different
then ours

groups.

1. move back to
desks and or rug
2. share their group
book character
doll
3. Answer questions

All Students: participate in discussion based


questions and share out of their book
character
Visually Impaired Students: teacher
proximity, aide support, preferential seating
Autism and ADHD Students: teacher
proximity, aide support, check for
understanding, targeted questions

Student Product:
Main Idea Graphic Organizer
Venn Diagram
Paper Doll character
Instructional Resources, Materials and References: (Including all images used.)
"Elaboration Theory (Reigeluth) - Learning Theories." Learning Theories. N.p., 2016. Web. 11 Dec. 2016.
Figure 1. The Structure Of A Human Activity System (Engestrm, 1987, P. 78. ACTIVITY THEORY AND EXPANSIVE
DESIGN (n.d.): n. pag. Web. 10 Dec. 2016.

"Great Depression - BrainPOP." BrainPOP. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2016.

Main Idea Worksheet

Name:_____________________________________________

Date:______________________________________________________

Main Idea:

I know this because

Detail 1:

Detail 2:

Detail 3:

Detail 4:

Name:____________________________________

Venn Diagram Activity

Identify 4 similarities and 4 differences between you and the book


character from your literature circles book selection.

Kira Howe
Lesson Three
3rd Grade
The Dust Bowl
Story Map
Context for Learning
Learning Needs Category

Central Focus

Number of Students

Supports, Accommodations,
Modifications, and/or
Pertinent IEP Goals
ADHD
2
Repeat directions often
Post a clear schedule
Teacher proximity
Follow behavior plan
established
Autism
1
Collaborate with special
education teacher
Breaks as needed
Follow behavior plan
established
Teacher proximity
Small groups
Sensory breaks as needed
Visual Impairment
2
Preferential seating near
board and teacher
Directions written on
board are to be written
on paper for them to
have at desk
Collaborate with special
education teacher
Repeat directions
Teacher proximity
The theme for the unit is the Dust Bowl and the cultural differences between the children then and our
students now. As third graders the students will look at the cultural influences that characters in four
books had that effect their way of life. They will make comparisons from cultural influences from these

characters to themselves.
Teaching cultural differences and diversity to our students bring a sense of awareness to the idea that we
all come from different traditions, backgrounds and cultures. The students will be able to expand on these
differences by creating a paper doll of themselves and comparing it to the main characters in the graphic
novel that their literature group has read.
The unit will provide the students with the opportunities to develop their speaking and listening skills in
ELA by having independent discussions surrounding a topic or idea, identifying the main idea and
character traits of characters in a story, read independently, create a book talk presentation, a story wheel
and a book tasting. They will also be completing a science activity that will require them to complete a
simulation about the hardships faced during the Dust Bowl. They will make connections in social studies
to identify the differences from cultures then and now and they will create a paper to help them make
those comparisons between themselves and the characters from the books. Additionally in math they will
create The unit identifies and addresses many of the key common core standards and skills that third
grade students need to read, read and speak in ELA, social studies, science and math as well as the
integrated portion of movement and the arts.

Content Standards/Objectives

Goal:
Work collaboratively to create a visual project
Write to inform someone of their opinion
Present on an idea or topic
Objectives
Common Core Content Standard
Learning Objectives
NYS ELA CCLS: W. 3.1- Write opinion pieces
1. Students will write a 3 sentence
on topics or texts, supporting a point
opinion paragraph about their
of view with reasons.
favorite part of a story
NYS ELA CCLS: 3.7- Use information gained
from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and
the words in a text to demonstrate understanding
of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key
events occur).
NYS ELA CCLS: R.I. 3.3- Describe the

2. Students will construct a story map

relationship between a series of historical events,


scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical
procedures in a text, using language that pertains
to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

containing 4 major events from a


story

NYS ELA CCLS: R.I. 3.3- Describe the


relationship between a series of historical events,
scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical
procedures in a text, using language that pertains
to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

3. Students will present a story map of


4 major events from a story

NYS ELA CCLS: S.L. 3.1- Engage effectively


in a range of collaborative discussions
(one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with
diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts,
building on others ideas and expressing their
own clearly.

Vocabulary/Concepts/Language

Rationale

Academic Language
Culture
Diversity
The Dust Bowl
Story Map
This unit will be a follow up to what the students have learned about communities and cultural differences
from K-3. The students will have been introduced to the topic of culture and diversity. During this lesson
they will identify characteristics of a book character including what they infer their culture was like
during the Dust Bowl. They will have a large depth of background knowledge on characteristics and how
to identify them. They will be at the very beginning stages of the understanding the Dust Bowl and the
vocabulary terms used throughout presentations and discussions. These terms will appear frequently
through the remainder of their lesson and they will complete a vocabulary worksheet at the close of the
unit.

Students will gather and interpret data, a key social studies practice for third graders. They will work to
make connections between their culture and the culture of the characters in readings, pictures and videos.
They will work to develop their literacy, speaking and listening, and writing skills by:

Reading a grade-level text on an agreed upon topic


Work collaboratively in groups with their peers
Write an opinion piece about the selected text
Create a story map with 4 major events
Students are expected to understand different cultures; their communities and their geographic make up
for third grade social studies. Making this lesson an important introductory lesson for a unit surrounding
the comparison of cultural differences from now to another time period. They will work individually, with
a group, and one-on-one with partners to develop and deepen these skills. They will use the document
read aloud to help develop their knowledge of culture. They will work together to collaborate using the
document and their knowledge to produce the definition for culture. (Engerstrom, 1987) For the students
who struggle with writing it will allow them peer support as well as a chance to present ideas orally to
their partner during an area of instruction that they may otherwise struggle.
The lesson will require students to use various learning styles to meet the need of our visual learners,
auditory learners as well as the kinesthetic learners. The lesson will start by introducing a simple idea and
continue to build to a more complex order so that subsequent ideas can be integrated within our unit
plan.(Reigeluth, 1999)
Essential Questions
(Focus Questions)

1.
2.
3.
4.

What is an event?
Why are events important when telling a story?
What is an opinion?
Who is your opinions on the dust bowl?

Assessments:
Type of Assessment

Description of assessment

Modifications to the assessment so


that all students could demonstrate
their learning.

Formative

Describe their favorite part


of the story: Students will
write a paragraph on their
favorite part of their story
thus far.

All Students: write an opinion


paragraph describing their favorite part
of the story thus far
Visually Impaired Students: Use
technology support such as a computer,
orally describe their favorite part to an

Evaluation Criteria - What evidence of


student learning (related to the learning
objectives and central focus) does the
assessment provide?
Students will not be graded on this formative
writing piece. However they will be assessed
on their comprehension skills. If the teacher
identifies that the student is struggling she will
hold small group informal session with the
literature group and use guiding questions to
help build the students understanding of the

adult to write

Summative

Story map: Students will


complete a story map about
their book with their groups.
The story map will have 4
major events that have
occurred in their reading
thus far.

story using both the students thoughts and


their peers thoughts on the story.

Autism and ADHD Students: Work


one-on-one with a teacher for their
writing. They can illustrate first before
writing.
All Students: work together to create a
story map
Visually Impaired Students:
Will have peer support and directions
read aloud to them.
Autism and ADHD Students: will have
peer support to complete task as well as
teacher and aide proximity to check their
understanding and pace of work.

They must all write at least 3 sentences and


have an illustration for their writing to consider
it acceptable.
The students will be evaluated on their
cooperativeness to work in their groups as well
as how detailed they are when creating their
story map.
To receive full credit they will need to have 4
major events that have occurred in the story.
They should have an illustration and a sentence
or more to explain their reasoning behind the
illustration.

Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks


Procedure
Anticipatory Set
5-10 minutes

Learning Tasks and


Instructional Strategies
20 minutes

Teacher will:
Students will:
1. Show a video about the
1. Watch dust bowl video
dust bowl: History Channel
2. Answer: where was the dust
2. Where was the dust bowl?
bowl?

1. Show timeline of major


events that happened
during the dust bowl:
Timeline
2. What are events?
3. Why are events
important when telling
a story?

1. View timeline
2. Answer: what are
events?
3. Answer: why are events
important when telling a
story?
4. Answer: what is an
opinion?

Modifications (RTI/UDL Strategies)


All Students:
Visually Impaired Students:
preferential seating to the board or
visuals used
Autism and ADHD Students: teaching
proximity, one-on-one support from aide
or peer, repeated directions or phrases
All Students:
Visually Impaired Students:
preferential seating to the board or
visuals used, highlighted directions
Autism and ADHD Students: teacher
proximity, one-on-one support from aide

Independent
Practice/Exploration of
Concepts
60 minutes

4. What is an opinion?
5. After learning all we
have what is your
opinion on the dust
bowl and the events
that have been
happening in your
story?
1. Send students back
to their desks to
write an opinion
paragraph their
books about the
dust bowl. They
will be given 15
minutes to write
and illustrate.
2. Set timer for 15
minutes, when
timer sounds
students will hand
in their writing.
3. Ask students to
complete their
reading Group 1:
The Great
American Dust
Bowl will read 30
pages. Group 2:
Voices of the Dust
Bowl will read 15
pages. Group 3:
The Dust Bowl
will read 15 pages,
and Group 4:
Dont Forget
Winona will read

5. Answer: what is your


opinion on the dust
bowl?

1. write an opinion
paragraph about their
favorite part in their
book about the dust
bowl and include an
illustration. They
will be given 15
minute to complete.
2. Move into their
literature groups at
the end of the timer.
3. Read within their
literature groups the
allotted pages
4. Complete a story
map with their
partners describing 4
major events that
have taken place thus
far. They must write
at least 1 sentence
per event and include
an illustration.

or peer, repeated directions or phrases

All Students:
Visually Impaired Students:
preferential seating to the board or
visuals used, handouts enlarged,
highlighted directions
Autism and ADHD Students: teacher
proximity, one-on-one support from aide
or peer, repeated directions or phrases

Closure
10-15 minutes

10 pages
4. Instruct students to
complete a story
map like the
example they have.
It must include 4
major events with
illustration and at
least 1 sentence to
describe the event.
1. Have students
come to the rug
with their literature
group
2. Allow the groups
to present their
literature groups
story map.

1. Move to rug with


literature group
2. Present their
literature groups
story map.

All Students: present their projevt


Visually Impaired Students:
preferential seating to the board or
visuals used, handouts
Autism and ADHD Students: teacher
proximity, one-on-one support from aide
or peer, repeated directions or phrases

Student Product:
Favorite part of their story writing
Story map
Instructional Resources, Materials and References: (Including all images used.)
"Dust Bowl Major Events." Dust Bowl Major Events Timeline | Preceden. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Dec. 2016.

"Elaboration Theory (Reigeluth) - Learning Theories." Learning Theories. N.p., 2016. Web. 11 Dec. 2016.
Figure 1. The Structure Of A Human Activity System (Engestrm, 1987, P. 78. ACTIVITY THEORY AND EXPANSIVE
DESIGN (n.d.): n. pag. Web. 10 Dec. 2016.
History.com Staff. "Dust Bowl." History.com. A&E Television Networks, 2009. Web. 12 Dec. 2016.

Story Map Wheel


Create an illustration that describes your book and include the book title on the circle. Cut out the circle on the black
lines and use a brass brad to fasten this page to your 4 major event wheel on the following page.

Name:_______________________

Dust Bowl Opinion Writing

Give your opinion about your groups literature selection by writing


your favorite part of the story. Follow your paragraph by including an
illustration. Please write at least 3 sentences in your paragraph.

______________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________

Kira Howe
Lesson Four
3rd Grade
Clocks
Context for Learning

Central Focus

Learning Needs Category

Number of Students

Supports, Accommodations,
Modifications, and/or
Pertinent IEP Goals
ADHD
2
Repeat directions often
Post a clear schedule
Teacher proximity
Follow behavior plan
established
Autism
1
Collaborate with special
education teacher
Breaks as needed
Follow behavior plan
established
Teacher proximity
Small groups
Sensory breaks as
needed
Visual Impairment
2
Preferential seating
near board and teacher
Directions written on
board are to be written
on paper for them to
have at desk
Collaborate with special
education teacher
Repeat directions
Teacher proximity
The theme for the unit is the Dust Bowl and the cultural differences between the children then and
our students now. As third graders the students will look at the cultural influences that characters

in four books had that effect their way of life. They will make comparisons from cultural influences
from these characters to themselves.
Teaching cultural differences and diversity to our students bring a sense of awareness to the idea
that we all come from different traditions, backgrounds and cultures. The students will be able to
expand on these differences by creating a paper doll of themselves and comparing it to the main
characters in the graphic novel that their literature group has read.
The unit will provide the students with the opportunities to develop their speaking and listening
skills in ELA by having independent discussions surrounding a topic or idea, identifying the main
idea and character traits of characters in a story, read independently, create a book talk
presentation, a story wheel and a book tasting. They will also be completing a science activity that
will require them to complete a simulation about the hardships faced during the Dust Bowl. They
will make connections in social studies to identify the differences from cultures then and now and
they will create a paper to help them make those comparisons between themselves and the
characters from the books. Additionally in math they will create The unit identifies and addresses
many of the key common core standards and skills that third grade students need to read, read and
speak in ELA, social studies, science and math as well as the integrated portion of movement and
the arts.

Goal:

Content Standards/Objectives

Tell time to the minute


Create a clock to represent an hour in the life of a book character
Identify the main idea of the story using 4 details from the text
Create an informative writing piece about an hour in your life

Common Core Content Standard

Learning Objectives

NYS ELA CCLS: R.I. 3.2-Determine the main


idea of a text; recount the key details and explain
how they support the main idea.

1. Students will identify the main idea of a text


using 4 details from the text

NYS Math CCLS 3.MD.1-Tell and write time to


the nearest minute and measure time intervals in
minutes. Solve word problems involving
addition and subtraction of time intervals in
minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a
number line diagram.
NYS Math CCLS 3.MD.1-Tell and write time to
the nearest minute and measure time intervals in
minutes. Solve word problems involving
addition and subtraction of time intervals in
minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a
number line diagram.
NYS ELA CCLS: W 3.3-Write narratives to
develop real or imagined experiences or
events using effective technique, descriptive
details, and clear event sequences.

Vocabulary/Concepts/Language

2. Students will describe the hour in the life of the


main character from their literature groups book
using 6 events from the story as details

3. Students will compose a writing and


illustration piece using 6 events that happen
during an hour in their life.

Academic Language
Minutes
Hours
Clock
Cultural differences
This unit will be a follow up to what the students have learned about communities and cultural
differences from K-3. The students will have an understanding of the terms but at a beginner or
intermediate level. During the anticipatory set of this lesson the students will activate their prior
knowledge and background knowledge of cultural diversity and differences among communities by
making connections to their own geographic location and their own traditions. The students have
been researching different geographic regions in social studies throughout the school year this will
be a skill that is at the intermediate to mastery level for 3rd grade standards.
The lesson will reflect on cultural diversity and how it looks among their peers and students. They
will brainstorm their ideas about what is cultural diversity and what culture looks like. Students
will have key vocabulary terms and ideas introduced by the teacher through; reading and group
discussions. The students will be introduced to the vocabulary terms by the teacher where they (the

teacher) will read the term and define the term, each will be placed on the board for the remainder
of the unit and will be added to as needed. Students will revisit them at the close of the unit.
Students will be required to write a 3-5-sentence paragraph explaining a tradition that they
participate in within their family or their community. When the students are finished with their
writing they will turn and talk to heir neighbor. The neighbor will be required to present their peers
tradition; each student will be required to share out with the class what they learned about their
partners tradition.
The students will be exposed to the terms and ideas surrounding culturally repeatedly throughout
the unit to deepen their learning and understanding of the topic. The paragraph and share-out will
be used to assess the students understanding of the topics.
Rationale

Students will gather and interpret data, a key social studies practice for third graders. They will
work to make connections between their culture and the culture of the characters in readings,
pictures and videos. They will work to develop their literacy, speaking and listening, and writing
skills by:
Work collaboratively with a group
Identify hour and minute time increments
Identify activities that can be completed in hour and minute increments
Identify the main idea of the text using details from the text to support their main idea
Create a clock to represent 6 activities their character can complete in an hour
Students are expected to understand different cultures; their communities and their geographic
make up for third grade social studies. Making this lesson an important introductory lesson for a
unit surrounding the comparison of cultural differences from now to another time period. They will
work individually, with a group, and one-on-one with partners to develop and deepen these skills.
They will use the document read aloud to help develop their knowledge of culture. They will work
together to collaborate using the document and their knowledge to produce the definition for
culture. (Engerstrom, 1987) For the students who struggle with writing it will allow them peer
support as well as a chance to present ideas orally to their partner during an area of instruction that
they may otherwise struggle.
The lesson will require students to use various learning styles to meet the need of our visual
learners, auditory learners as well as the kinesthetic learners. The lesson will start by introducing a
simple idea and continue to build to a more complex order so that subsequent ideas can be
integrated within our unit plan.(Reigeluth, 1999)

Essential Questions
(Focus Questions)

1.
2.
3.
4.

How many minutes are in an hour?


What is one activity we can do that takes us 1 minute?
How about an hour?
What do you think an hour in the life of someone who lived in a different
culture like your book characters would be like? Difficult or easy?

Assessments:
Type of Assessment

Formative

Summative

Description of assessment

Modifications to the assessment so that all


students could demonstrate their learning.

Evaluation Criteria - What evidence of student


learning (related to the learning objectives and
central focus) does the assessment provide?

Main Idea: Students will


complete the main idea
worksheet to identify the
main idea of the book
using 4 details from the
story.

All Students: Write the main idea and 4


details

The students are expected to have 4 details


from the text that help support their idea of
what the main idea is.

Clocks: Students will


create a clock spinner. The
clock will represent an
hour in the life of their
book character. They must
describe 6 events that
happen in that hour using
details from the text

Visually impaired Students: Enlarged


text, directions re-read,
Students who can identify 4 details will be able
directions/prompt highlighted, work with to share-out and pair with their peers who have
a peer
less then 4 details.
Autism and ADHD Students: One
word or phrase answer, can draw
pictures to describe the detail/main idea,
orally explain their understanding, oneon-one with aide or peer student
All Students: Students will create a
graphic clock that describes an hour in
the life of their book character using 6
details from text
Visually Impaired Students: larger
piece of paper, aide/teacher support
Autism and ADHD Students:
Aide/teacher support, 4 events
instead of 6 events, blocking on page

Students with less then 4 details and who


struggle to identify the main idea will be
paired with peers who have completed the
graphic organizer.
Students will receive a 6 out of 6 if the have
6 events identified and represented on their
clock. They may use illustrations or writing
to describe these events. The students will
lose a point for each event that is missing or
an event that does not coincide with the
story they were responsible for reading.

Summative

with too much text/illustrations


Hour in the Life: Students All Students: Write about an hour in
will create a writing piece their life.
about an hour in their own
Visually Impaired Students: larger
life. They will need to
piece of paper, aide/teacher support
identify 6 events that
happen in an average hour
for them either at home or Autism and ADHD Students:
Aide/teacher support, 4 events instead
school.
of 6 events, blocking on page with too
much text/illustrations

The students will not be evaluated on how


much they write. They are required to have
6 events described in the writing with
enough detail to help an audience visualize
an hour in their life.
They will illustrate their hour in a pair of
shoes after they have finished their writing
piece.

Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks


Procedure
Anticipatory Set
5-10 minutes

Teacher will:
1. Show a video:
BrainPop Time

Students will:
1. Watch the video about
time

Modifications (RTI/UDL Strategies)


All Students: Watch the video
Visually Impaired Students: preferential
seating to the board

Learning Tasks and


Instructional Strategies
40 Minutes

1. Introduce the
vocabulary terms,
hour, minute, clock.
2. When we look at our
clock how many
minutes are in one
hour? How do we
know this?
3. If there is 60 minutes
in one hour What is
an activity we can
complete in an hour?

1. Define/ brainstorm
definitions for
vocabulary terms
2. Answer: How many
minutes are in one
hour?
3. Answer: what is an
activity we can
complete in an hour?
4. Watch the video
5. Answer: What is any
activity we can do

Autism and ADHD Students: teacher/aide


proximity, preferential seating to the board
All Students: respond to questioning
Visually Impaired Students:, questions
written on board or anchor chart, key
vocabulary words written on chart/sentence
strip, directions on worksheets highlighted and
read orally
Autism and ADHD Students: directions
repeated, questions repeated, preferential
seating, directions for worksheet highlighted
and read orally

Independent
Practice/Exploration of
Concepts

4. Show a video: 60
seconds
5. What is any activity
we can do that will
take 1 minute? (place
answers from 5-10
students on anchor
chart)
6. Explain directions for
Hour in the life writing
piece: Now that we
have identified all of
these activities we can
do in a minute and an
hour. You now will
write an informative
paragraph to tell us
your audience about
an hour in your life.
You must include 6
events or activities
that happen in one
hour of your life. You
can use your home life
or school life.
7. Set timer for 20
minutes at the end of
the timer students will
hand in their work.
Uncompleted work
will be saved to makeup during free choice
time.
1. Explain that today
they will finish their
readings in their

that will take 1


minute?
6. As the teacher
explains directions
students will
brainstorm 6 events
that can happen in one
hour. They will
brainstorm using a
graphic organizer.
7. Write a paragraph
describing an hour in
your life. Use the
graphic organizer to
help. At the end of the
20 minutes hand in
the work.
Uncompleted work
will be finished during
free time.

All Students: finishing group reading,


1. Finishing reading
in literature groups complete the main idea worksheet, work in
2. Complete the main group to build a clock to describe an hour in

60 minutes

literature groups
2. Explain directions for
main idea worksheet.
You will have 15
minutes to complete
the main idea
worksheet like we
have done for other
readings. Please use 4
details from your book
to support the main
idea.
3. Set the timer for 15
minutes. When timer
sounds the students
will come to the rug to
hear the directions for
the remaining activity.
4. Explain they will now
have 45 minutes to
work with their group
to create a clock. Just
how we created a
graphic organizer for
an hour in our life we
will now make a clock
that is broken into 6
events. The clock will
represent an hour in
your book characters
life. The 6 sections are
for 6 events that could
happen in an hour in
their life. Use details
from the text. You will
use a brass brad to

idea worksheet for


the book using 4
details from the
text.
3. Move to the rug at
the end of the 15
minutes for
directions
4. Work in their
literature groups
to complete the
clock activity. They
will work to
illustrate and write
6 events that
would happen in
an hour in the life
of their book
character. They
will then ask for
teacher/aide
support to help use
the brass brad
fastener to put
their clock wheel
together.

their book characters life.


Visually Impaired Students: highlighted
directions, directions repeated orally, enlarged
text or worksheet, blocking on pages with a lot
of writing or illustrations
Autism and ADHD Students: extended time,
4 events instead of 6, highlighted directions,
teacher/ aide support and proximity.

Closure
10-15 minutes

fasten the wheel


together. Please use
color and details in
your illustrations.
1. Allow students to
share their clocks
2. Ask: What do you
think an hour in the
life of someone who
lived in a different
culture like your
book characters
would be like?
Difficult or easy?

1. Share clocks with


other peers
2. Answer: What do you
think an hour in the
life of someone who
lived in a different
culture like your book
characters would be
like? Difficult or easy?

All Students: share clocks


Visually Impaired Students: preferential
seating to the board/teacher, question written
on board/anchor chart
Autism and ADHD Students: teacher/aide
proximity

Student Product:
Graphic organizer
Hour in the life paragraph
Main idea worksheet
Clock activity
Instructional Resources, Materials and References: (Including all images used.)
"Elaboration Theory (Reigeluth) - Learning Theories." Learning Theories. N.p., 2016. Web. 11 Dec. 2016.
"Elapsed Time - BrainPOP." BrainPOP. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2016.

Figure 1. The Structure Of A Human Activity System (Engestrm, 1987, P. 78. ACTIVITY THEORY AND EXPANSIVE
DESIGN (n.d.): n. pag. Web. 10 Dec. 2016.
Http://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8Otqvcomhl4VHMdP4mG6Tw. "Welcome To FD Videos - 10 Things That Can Happen In 60 Seconds." YouTube.
YouTube, 09 May 2015. Web. 13 Dec. 2016.

Hour in the Life Graphic Organizer


Name:_______________________________________________
Use the graphic organizer to identify 6 activities you complete in 1 hour. You will use these activities to help
you write your paragraph on the next page

Spend an Hour in My Life

Hour in the life paragraph


Name:_______________________________________________

Using your graphic organizer and the 6 activities you would complete in an hour please write a paragraph. You
need to have enough details for your audience to understand what spending an hour in your life is like. Follow
your writing with a drawing.

Main Idea Worksheet


Name:_______________________________________

Main Idea:

I know this because

Detail 1:

Detail 2:

Detail 3:

Detail 4:

Kira Howe
Lesson Five
3rd Grade
Paper Doll
Context for Learning

Central Focus

Learning Needs Category

Number of Students

ADHD

Autism

Visual Impairment

Supports, Accommodations,
Modifications, and/or
Pertinent IEP Goals
Repeat directions often
Post a clear schedule
Teacher proximity
Follow behavior plan
established
Collaborate with special
education teacher
Breaks as needed
Follow behavior plan
established
Teacher proximity
Small groups
Sensory breaks as
needed
Preferential seating
near board and teacher
Directions written on
board are to be written
on paper for them to
have at desk
Collaborate with special
education teacher
Repeat directions
Teacher proximity

The theme for the unit is the Dust Bowl and the cultural differences between the children then and

our students now. As third graders the students will look at the cultural influences that characters
in four books had that effect their way of life. They will make comparisons from cultural influences
from these characters to themselves.
Teaching cultural differences and diversity to our students bring a sense of awareness to the idea
that we all come from different traditions, backgrounds and cultures. The students will be able to
expand on these differences by creating a paper doll of themselves and comparing it to the main
characters in the graphic novel that their literature group has read.
The unit will provide the students with the opportunities to develop their speaking and listening
skills in ELA by having independent discussions surrounding a topic or idea, identifying the main
idea and character traits of characters in a story, read independently, create a book talk
presentation, a story wheel and a book tasting. They will also be completing a science activity that
will require them to complete a simulation about the hardships faced during the Dust Bowl. They
will make connections in social studies to identify the differences from cultures then and now and
they will create a paper to help them make those comparisons between themselves and the
characters from the books. Additionally in math they will create The unit identifies and addresses
many of the key common core standards and skills that third grade students need to read, read and
speak in ELA, social studies, science and math as well as the integrated portion of movement and
the arts.

Goal:

Content Standards/Objectives

Engage in a discussion about culture


Create a paper doll of themselves
Compare and contrast between book character and your self
Create paper plate Venn diagram

Common Core Content Standard

NYS ELA CCLS: R.L. 3.3-Describe characters


in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or
feelings) and explain how their actions
contribute to the sequence of events.
NYS Arts Standard: Standard 1: Students will
actively engage in the processes that constitute
creation and performance in the arts (dance,
music, theatre, and visual arts) and participate in
various roles in the arts.
Visual Arts Key Idea: Students will make works
of art that explore different kinds of subject
matter, topics, themes, and metaphors. Students
will understand and use sensory elements,
organizational principles, and expressive images
to communicate their own ideas in works of art.
Students will use a variety of art materials,
processes, mediums, and techniques, and use
appropriate technologies for creating and
exhibiting visual art works.
NYS ELA CCLS: R.L. 3.9-Compare and
contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories
written by the same author about the same or
similar characters (e.g., in books from a series).
NYS Arts Standard: Standard 1- Students will
actively engage in the processes that constitute
creation and performance in the arts (dance,
music, theatre, and visual arts) and participate in
various roles in the arts.

Learning Objectives

1. Students will create a paper doll


representation of themselves
with 6 out of 6 characteristics
2. Students will select materials that
represent them as an indvidual

3. Students will construct a paper


plate Venn diagram with
6similarities and 6 differences
between life we experience today
and the life experienced in the
setting of their story.

Vocabulary/Concepts/Language

Academic Language
Culture
Diversity
Compare
Contrast
characteristics
This unit will be a follow up to what the students have learned about communities and cultural
differences from K-3. The students will have an understanding of the terms but at a beginner or
intermediate level. During the anticipatory set of this lesson the students will activate their prior
knowledge and background knowledge of cultural diversity and differences among communities by
making connections to their own geographic location and their own traditions. The students have
been researching different geographic regions in social studies throughout the school year this will
be a skill that is at the intermediate to mastery level for 3rd grade standards.
The lesson will reflect on cultural diversity and how it looks among their peers and students. They
will brainstorm their ideas about what is cultural diversity and what culture looks like. Students
will have key vocabulary terms and ideas introduced by the teacher through; reading and group
discussions. The students will be introduced to the vocabulary terms by the teacher where they (the
teacher) will read the term and define the term, each will be placed on the board for the remainder
of the unit and will be added to as needed. Students will revisit them at the close of the unit.
Students will be required to write a 3-5-sentence paragraph explaining a tradition that they
participate in within their family or their community. When the students are finished with their
writing they will turn and talk to heir neighbor. The neighbor will be required to present their peers
tradition; each student will be required to share out with the class what they learned about their
partners tradition.
The students will be exposed to the terms and ideas surrounding culturally repeatedly throughout
the unit to deepen their learning and understanding of the topic. The paragraph and share-out will
be used to assess the students understanding of the topics.

Rationale

Students will gather and interpret data, a key social studies practice for third graders. They will
work to make connections between their culture and the culture of the characters in readings,
pictures and videos. They will work to develop their literacy, speaking and listening, and writing
skills by:
Create a paper doll representation of themselves
Use various materials to create a doll that is unique to them
Create paper plate Venn diagrams to compare and contrast similarities and differences
Students are expected to understand different cultures; their communities and their geographic
make up for third grade social studies. Making this lesson an important introductory lesson for a
unit surrounding the comparison of cultural differences from now to another time period. They will
work individually, with a group, and one-on-one with partners to develop and deepen these skills.
They will use the document read aloud to help develop their knowledge of culture. They will work
together to collaborate using the document and their knowledge to produce the definition for
culture. (Engerstrom, 1987) For the students who struggle with writing it will allow them peer
support as well as a chance to present ideas orally to their partner during an area of instruction that
they may otherwise struggle.
The lesson will require students to use various learning styles to meet the need of our visual
learners, auditory learners as well as the kinesthetic learners. The lesson will start by introducing a
simple idea and continue to build to a more complex order so that subsequent ideas can be
integrated within our unit plan.(Reigeluth, 1999)

Essential Questions
(Focus Questions)

1.
2.
3.
4.

How is our life different from the people who lived during the dust bowl?
How might our lives be similar?
Would you want to have lived in Oklahoma during the Dust Bowl?
What is a characteristics

Assessments:
Type of Assessment

Description of assessment

Modifications to the assessment so that all


students could demonstrate their learning.

Evaluation Criteria - What evidence of student


learning (related to the learning objectives and
central focus) does the assessment provide?

Summative

Paper plate Venn


diagram: Students will
create a paper plate Venn

All Students: create a paper plate Venn


diagram.

Students will be evaluated on a points


system. They will be awarded 1 point per
similarity and difference written. 8 possible

Diagram. The Venn


diagram will be labeled
correctly and must contain
6 similarities and 6
differences.
Summative

Paper Doll: Students will


construct a paper doll that
looks like them. They will
identify 6 characteristics
that are unique to them
and record them on the
worksheet. They will use
materials provided to
decorate

Visually Impaired Students:


highlighted directions, aide support
Autism and ADHD Students: paper
plates already glued and put together, 4
similarities, 4 differences, re-direction as
needed, teacher/aide support
All Students: students will create a
paper doll that represents themselves
with 6 characteristics.

points can be given.

Visually Impaired Students:


highlighted directions, aide support

They will be considered mastery for having


5 out of 6 characteristics anything below
will needed to be re-taught in a small group
or one-on-one with the teacher or an aide.

Autism and ADHD Students: extended


time, teacher/aide support

Students that earn under 6 points will be


considered developing and will need to be
re-taught during small group or one-on-one
Students will receive 1 point for each
characteristic that they identify on their
worksheet.

Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks


Procedure
Anticipatory Set
5-10 minutes

Learning Tasks and


Instructional Strategies
10-20 minutes

Teacher will:
1. Review the paper doll
that was created by
each group. What is a
characteristic?

1. Brainstorm
similarities between
our life and people of
the Dust Bowls lives
write the ideas on
Venn Diagram anchor
chart
2. Brainstorm
differences between

Students will:
1. Answer: What is a
characteristic?

Modifications (RTI/UDL Strategies)


All Students: review the paper doll from their
literature groups
Visually Impaired Students: preferential
seating, questions written on the board

1. Brainstorm
similarities between
our life and people of
the Dust Bowls lives
2. Brainstorm
differences between
our life and people of
the Dust Bowls lives

Autism and ADHD Students: teacher/aide


proximity
All Students: brainstorm ideas
Visually Impaired Students:
Autism and ADHD Students:

Independent
Practice/Exploration of
Concepts
30 minutes

our life and people of


the Dust Bowls lives
write the ideas on
Venn diagram anchor
chart.
1. Have students work in
stations. They will
spend 15 minutes at
each. At one station
they will be making
their paper plate Venn
diagram and the other
station they will be
working on their
paper dolls.

1. Work at stations
where they spend 15
minutes on venn
diagram and 15
minutes making their
paper doll.

Closure
10-15 minutes

All Students:
Visually Impaired Students:
Autism and ADHD Students:

All Students:
Visually Impaired Students:
Autism and ADHD Students:

Student Product:
Instructional Resources, Materials and References: (Including all images used.)
"Elaboration Theory (Reigeluth) - Learning Theories." Learning Theories. N.p., 2016. Web. 11 Dec. 2016.
Figure 1. The Structure Of A Human Activity System (Engestrm, 1987, P. 78. ACTIVITY THEORY AND EXPANSIVE
DESIGN (n.d.): n. pag. Web. 10 Dec. 2016.
Kelly. "Paper Plates Make Great Venn Diagrams!" Homeschool Parent. N.p., 01 Jan. 1970. Web. 13 Dec. 2016.

Students will be given two paper plates that will be glued together to make a
Venn diagram. The students will label the Venn diagram and fill in their
similarities and differences. Below is an example of the expectations for this
activity.

Kira Howe
Lesson Six
3rd Grade
Cultural Differences
Creating Prairies

Creating a Prairie
Math Concept:

1. Integrated Thematic Topic: Dust Bowl


Prairies

Standards:
Dust Bowl Prairies Simulation
Measurement and Data 2.MD
2.MD.2: Measure and estimate liquid
volumes and masses of objects using standard
2. Essential Questions:
units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters
(l).1 Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to
What was the dust bowl?
solve one-step word problems involving
Where did the Dust Bowl happen?
masses or volumes that are given in the same
units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a
If we were farmers what do you think
beaker with a measurement scale) to
we could do to help stop the storms?
represent the problem.2
3. Essential Academic Terms:
Tasks:
-measure and estimate the sand/dirt needed
Dust Bowl
for the two prairie habitats.
Prairies
-record the measurement used for the
Weather
sand/dirt amounts
Wind
-Draw the plan of the prairie habitats before
the planting of the grass
4. Learning Outcomes/Objectives:
When given the set of materials students will
work in their challenge groups to brainstorm

Technology Concept:
Standards:
4.Innocative Designer- Students use a
variety of technologies within a design
process to identify and solve problems by
creating new, useful or imaginative solutions.
4d. Students exhibit a tolerance for
ambiguity, perseverance and the capacity to
work with open-ended problems.
6.Creative Communicator-Students
communicate clearly and express themselves
creatively for a variety of purposes using the
platforms, tools, styles, formats, and digital
media appropriate to their goals.
6b. Students create original works or
responsibly repurpose or remix digital
resources into new creations.
Tasks:
- Brainstorm ideas to build the prairie
- Use a pan to represent the field and
fill it with the sand/dirt
- Use a blow dryer to represent the

a plan for their prairie habitat. (Technology)


Given paper and pencil the students will use a
planning sheet to create a drawing of their
solutions to the problem. (Technology)

wind
record what happens when the
window blows on both the sandy
prairie and the prairie with the newly
planted grass

When given the set of materials students will


use their design to construct their prairies
within their groups with adult support.
(Engineering)

Science Concept:
Standards:
NYS NGSS: 3-LS4-3:Construct an argument
with evidence that
in a particular habitat some organisms can
survive well, some survive less well, and
some cannot survive at all.
NYS NGSS 3-ESS3-1: Make a claim about
the merit of a design solution that reduces
the impacts of a weather-related hazard.
Inquiry and Process Skills:
Communicating giving oral and written
explanations or graphic representations of
observations
Creating models displaying information,
using multisensory representations
Manipulating materials handling or
treating materials and equipment safely,
skillfully, and effectively
Task:
-Represent a weather phenomenon that has

Students will create the effects of wind by


using a blow dryer on their prairies
(Technology & Science)

Engineering Concept:
Standards:

Given a graphic organizer students will


analyze their prairies ability to successfully
stop the dust storm when the new plants have
been planted. (Science and Math)

5. Assessment:
- Students will complete a planning
-

sheet (individually and as a


group.)
Students will construct two
prairies to represent the dust bowl
and the plants planted by farmers
to stop the dust storm
-Students will discuss the
differences between the two
prairies
Students will record their findings
on a recording sheet

Key idea: Engineering design is an iterative


process involving modeling and optimization
used to develop technological solutions to
problems within given constraints.
Elementary Performance Indicators:
Student(s) will:

describe objects, imaginary or real,


that might be modeled or made
differently and suggest ways in which
the objects can be changed, fixed, or
improved
investigate prior solutions and ideas
from books, magazines, family,
friends, neighbors, and community
members
generate ideas for possible solutions,
individually and through group
activity; apply age-appropriate
mathematics and science skills;

taken place using materials provided


-record the materials used to create the
weather event

evaluate the ideas and determine the


best solution; and explain reasons for
the choices
plan and build, under supervision, a
model of the solution using familiar
materials, processes, and hand tools
discuss how best to test the solution;
perform the test under teacher
supervision; record and portray results
through numerical and graphic means;
discuss orally why things worked or
didn't work; and summarize results in
writing, suggesting ways to make the
solution better

Tasks:
- Use pipe cleaners to represent the
prairie grass needed
- Fill one pan tightly with prairie
grass and one loosely with the
prairie grass

Guiding Questions for Project-Based or Inquiry-Based Activities:


What is the problem (question) that needs to be solved (answered)? Plants can we use to help settle the soil so we lessen the
chances of a dust storm occurring?

Who has the problem (question)? The teacher and the students

Why is this problem (question) important to solve (answer)? If we dont find a solution the soil will be eroded and it will continue
to be picked up by the wind creating violent dust storms that cause damage.

Example of the Dust Bowl prairie set up:

Creating Dust Bowl Prairies

Brainstorm
My Ideas

Group Ideas

Drawing

Plan
List the materials being used and complete a final drawing of both Prairies

Describe what happened when the wind was blowing on each of your prairies. Did the newly planted grass help? Why or why not?
Illustrate a picture of what you saw happening.

Prairie 1:

Prairie 2:

Kira Howe
Lesson Seven
3rd Grade
Cultural Differences

Math Concept:
Standards:
Measurement and Data
NYS Math CCLS:
3.MD.1.:Tell and write time to the nearest
minute and measure time intervals in
minutes. Solve word problems involving
addition and subtraction of time intervals
in minutes, e.g., by representing the
problem on a number line diagram.
Tasks:
-simulate an hour in the life of a farmer
during the dust bowl

Dust Bowl Simulation


6. Integrated Thematic Topic: Dust Bowl
Simulation

Technology Concept:
Standards:

Dust Bowl Simulation


7. Essential Questions:
-

How did we stop the dust storms from


happening?
What was life like for the farmers?
How can we get away from the
hardships of the dust bowl

8. Essential Academic Terms:

Dust Bowl
Prairies
Weather
Wind

9. Learning Outcomes/Objectives:
When given the set of directions students will

4.Innocative Designer- Students use a


variety of technologies within a design
process to identify and solve problems by
creating new, useful or imaginative solutions.
4d. Students exhibit a tolerance for
ambiguity, perseverance and the capacity to
work with open-ended problems.
6.Creative Communicator-Students
communicate clearly and express themselves
creatively for a variety of purposes using the
platforms, tools, styles, formats, and digital
media appropriate to their goals.
6b. Students create original works or
responsibly repurpose or remix digital
resources into new creations.
Tasks:
- Roll dice and move to the next area of
the room labeled with that number
- Continue to roll until they reach
California or they find a job at one of
their locations

Science Concept:
Standards:
NYS NGSS: 3-LS4-3:Construct an argument
with evidence that
in a particular habitat some organisms can
survive well, some survive less well, and
some cannot survive at all.
NYS NGSS 3-ESS3-1: Make a claim about
the merit of a design solution that reduces the
impacts of a weather-related hazard.
Inquiry and Process Skills:
Communicating giving oral and written
explanations or graphic representations of
observations
Creating models displaying information,
using multisensory representations
Manipulating materials handling or
treating materials and equipment safely,
skillfully, and effectively

brainstorm their thoughts about the


simulation. (Technology)
Given paper and pencil the students will
record their vocabulary terms.(Technology)
When given a set of time students will
represent an hour in the life of a Dust Bowl
farmer. (Math)
When given the set of materials students will
simulate the life of a farmer during the Dust
Bowl. (Engineering)
Given a worksheet students will analyze and
record their experience during the dust bowl .
(Science and Math)

Engineering Concept:
Standards:
Key idea: Engineering design is an iterative
process involving modeling and optimization
used to develop technological solutions to
problems within given constraints.
Elementary Performance Indicators:
Student(s) will:

10. Assessment:
-

Students will investigate the life of


farmer during the dust bowl

Task:

-analyze the life of a farmer


-work cooperatively in a group

Students will create a dust bowl


simulation using the classroom

Students will identify key vocabulary


terms during the simulation

Students will record key vocabulary


terms

describe objects, imaginary or real,


that might be modeled or made
differently and suggest ways in which
the objects can be changed, fixed, or
improved
investigate prior solutions and ideas
from books, magazines, family,
friends, neighbors, and community
members
generate ideas for possible solutions,
individually and through group
activity; apply age-appropriate
mathematics and science skills;
evaluate the ideas and determine the
best solution; and explain reasons for
the choices
plan and build, under supervision, a
model of the solution using familiar
materials, processes, and hand tools
discuss how best to test the solution;
perform the test under teacher
supervision; record and portray results
through numerical and graphic means;
discuss orally why things worked or
didn't work; and summarize results in
writing, suggesting ways to make the

solution better
Tasks:
-identify how to solve the problem the farmer
is having
-simulate the life of the farmer
Guiding Questions for Project-Based or Inquiry-Based Activities:
What is the problem (question) that needs to be solved (answered)? We are farmers during the Dust Bowl how are we going to make
money to survive?

Who has the problem (question)? The teacher and the students

Why is this problem (question) important to solve (answer)? If we do not find a job or we cannot get to California how will we make
money to support us and our families?

Resources
Teaching in the Fast Lane Dust Bowl Simulation Materials

Kira Howe
Lesson Eight
3rd Grade
Cultural Differences
Wrap-Up: Cultural Differences

Context for Learning


Learning Needs Category

Number of Students

ADHD

Autism

Visual Impairment

Supports, Accommodations,
Modifications, and/or
Pertinent IEP Goals
Repeat directions often
Post a clear schedule
Teacher proximity
Follow behavior plan
established
Collaborate with special
education teacher
Breaks as needed
Follow behavior plan
established
Teacher proximity
Small groups
Sensory breaks as needed
Preferential seating near
board and teacher
Directions written on
board are to be written
on paper for them to
have at desk
Collaborate with special
education teacher
Repeat directions
Teacher proximity

Central Focus

The theme for the unit is the Dust Bowl and the cultural differences between the children then and our
students now. As third graders the students will look at the cultural influences that characters in four
books had that effect their way of life. They will make comparisons from cultural influences from these
characters to themselves.
Teaching cultural differences and diversity to our students bring a sense of awareness to the idea that we
all come from different traditions, backgrounds and cultures. The students will be able to expand on these
differences by creating a paper doll of themselves and comparing it to the main characters in the graphic
novel that their literature group has read.
The unit will provide the students with the opportunities to develop their speaking and listening skills in
ELA by having independent discussions surrounding a topic or idea, identifying the main idea and
character traits of characters in a story, read independently, create a book talk presentation, a story wheel
and a book tasting. They will also be completing a science activity that will require them to complete a
simulation about the hardships faced during the Dust Bowl. They will make connections in social studies
to identify the differences from cultures then and now and they will create a paper to help them make
those comparisons between themselves and the characters from the books. Additionally in math they will
create The unit identifies and addresses many of the key common core standards and skills that third
grade students need to read, read and speak in ELA, social studies, science and math as well as the
integrated portion of movement and the arts.

Goal:
Write a narrative
Present on your own personal topic

Content Standards/Objectives

Common Core Content


Standard
NYS ELA CCLS : Writing
3.3Write narratives to develop
real or imagined experiences
or events using effective
technique, descriptive
details, and clear event
sequences.
NYS ELA CCLS: S.L. 3.4:
Report on a topic or text, tell
a story, or recount an
experience with appropriate
facts and relevant,
descriptive details, speaking
clearly at an understandable
pace.
NYS CCLS:S.L.3.6.: Speak
in complete sentences when
appropriate to task and
situation in order to provide
requested detail or
clarification.
NYS ELA CCLS : Writing
3.3Write narratives to develop
real or imagined experiences
or events using effective
technique, descriptive
details, and clear event
sequences.

Learning Objectives
1. Students will construct
a narrative paper with 7
out of 7 details from
their worksheet.

2. Students will present on


their culture to an
audience for at least 2
minutes.

3. Students will describe


events in detail from a
graphic oranizer

Vocabulary/Concepts/Language

Academic Language
Narrative
Dust Bowl
Culture
Diversity
This unit will be a follow up to what the students have learned about communities and cultural differences
from K-3. The students will have an understanding of the terms but at a beginner or intermediate level.
During the anticipatory set of this lesson the students will activate their prior knowledge and background
knowledge of cultural diversity and differences among communities by making connections to their own
geographic location and their own traditions. The students have been researching different geographic
regions in social studies throughout the school year this will be a skill that is at the intermediate to
mastery level for 3rd grade standards.
The lesson will reflect on cultural diversity and how it looks among their peers and students. They will
brainstorm their ideas about what is cultural diversity and what culture looks like. Students will have key
vocabulary terms and ideas introduced by the teacher through; reading and group discussions. The
students will be introduced to the vocabulary terms by the teacher where they (the teacher) will read the
term and define the term, each will be placed on the board for the remainder of the unit and will be added
to as needed. Students will revisit them at the close of the unit.
Students will be required to write a 3-5-sentence paragraph explaining a tradition that they participate in
within their family or their community. When the students are finished with their writing they will turn
and talk to heir neighbor. The neighbor will be required to present their peers tradition; each student will
be required to share out with the class what they learned about their partners tradition.
The students will be exposed to the terms and ideas surrounding culturally repeatedly throughout the unit
to deepen their learning and understanding of the topic. The paragraph and share-out will be used to
assess the students understanding of the topics.

Rationale

Students will gather and interpret data, a key social studies practice for third graders. They will work to
make connections between their culture and the culture of the characters in readings, pictures and videos.
They will work to develop their literacy, speaking and listening, and writing skills by:
Write a narrative
Presenting about their culture
Dress to inform peers and teachers about their culture

Students are expected to understand different cultures; their communities and their geographic make up
for third grade social studies. Making this lesson an important introductory lesson for a unit surrounding
the comparison of cultural differences from now to another time period. They will work individually, with
a group, and one-on-one with partners to develop and deepen these skills. They will use the document
read aloud to help develop their knowledge of culture. They will work together to collaborate using the
document and their knowledge to produce the definition for culture. (Engerstrom, 1987) For the students
who struggle with writing it will allow them peer support as well as a chance to present ideas orally to
their partner during an area of instruction that they may otherwise struggle.
The lesson will require students to use various learning styles to meet the need of our visual learners,
auditory learners as well as the kinesthetic learners. The lesson will start by introducing a simple idea and
continue to build to a more complex order so that subsequent ideas can be integrated within our unit
plan.(Reigeluth, 1999)
Essential Questions
(Focus Questions)

1. What is culture?
2. What is diversity
Assessments:

Type of Assessment

Summative

Description of assessment

Modifications to the assessment so


that all students could demonstrate
their learning.

Dress-up: Students will


dress up to inform the
students in their class about
their culture. They will talk
about their traditions, food,
language etc. They will
share a cultural treat.

All Students: dress to inform peers of


their culture
Visually Impaired Students:
preferential seating to the presentation
Autism and ADHD Students:
preferential seating to presentations,
teacher proximity

Evaluation Criteria - What evidence of


student learning (related to the learning
objectives and central focus) does the
assessment provide?
Students will be evaluated on their
participation, the presentation and the cultural
snacks or treats created or talked about.
For students with extenuating circumstances
they may describe their food using pictures or
videos if they are unable to share. This will
also be allowed for students who may not have
traditional dress for their culture available
Students will be given either a check or check
minus, check for completing the task or a
check minus for not completing it.

Summative

Narrative: students will


write a narrative about the
journey they had taken in
lesson 7. They will use their
recording sheet and the
phrases written to write the
narrative with details.

All Students: write a narrative about


their experience as a farmer in lesson 7
simulation
Visually Impaired Students:
highlighted directions, preferential
seating, teacher proximity
Autism and ADHD Students: teacher
proximity, highlighted directions,
directions repeated often

Students who do not receive a check they must


make-up their presentation.
Students will be expected to write a narrative
on their experience as a farmer. They must
include at least 7 out of the 20 details from
their recording sheet that they completed
during lesson 7.
They must have at least 7 details for it to be
considered mastery. Anything under 7 details
will be returned and a conference will be held
to help the student in need make the correct
edits.

Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks


Procedure
Anticipatory Set
5-10 minutes

Learning Tasks and


Instructional Strategies
30 minutes

Teacher will:
4. Set directions
for writing the
personal
narrative piece
that uses lesson
7 sevens
activities for
details
1. Set students up to write
the personal narrative
about the students
journey they had during
the dust bowl
simulation in lesson 7.

Students will:
1. Follow directions for
the personal narrative

Modifications (RTI/UDL Strategies)


All Students: follow directions
Visually Impaired Students: directions
repeated,aide support
Autism and ADHD Students: teacher
proximity, repeated directions

1. Write a narrative
containing 7 out of the
20 details they formed
yesterday on their
worksheet

All Students: write a narrative


Visually Impaired Students: directions
highlighted, repeated orally, aide support
Autism and ADHD Students: teacher
proximity, aide support directions repeated,
checks for understanding

Independent
Practice/Exploration of
Concepts
45 minutes

Closure
10-15 minutes

1. Have students set up


their areas with their
presentation
materials (food,
clothing etc.)
2. Facilitate the
presentation and
discussions (What is
culture? What is
diversity?)
1. Share some of what
you have learned
during these 8 lessons.
What did you like?
What did you not like?

1. Set up their areas


for presentations
2. Present on their
culture and share
food, clothing or
traditions

1. Share likes and dislikes


about the unit as well as
what they learned

All Students: present on a topic


Visually Impaired Students: teacher support
as needed, may present seated
Autism and ADHD Students: teacher support
with questioning, aide proximity during others
presentations

All Students: share thoughts on the unit


Visually Impaired Students: preferential
seating to the board
Autism and ADHD Students: teacher
proximity, aide support

Student Product:
Narrative paper
Presentation of items
Instructional Resources, Materials and References: (Including all images used.)
"Elaboration Theory (Reigeluth) - Learning Theories." Learning Theories. N.p., 2016. Web. 11 Dec. 2016.
Figure 1. The Structure Of A Human Activity System (Engestrm, 1987, P. 78. ACTIVITY THEORY AND EXPANSIVE
DESIGN (n.d.): n. pag. Web. 10 Dec. 2016.

Narrative writing
Name:______ ___________ _______________________________

You will use your recording sheet from the Dust Bowl simulation to help you write
a narrative writing piece about their journey through the steps of the simulation.
Use at least 7 details from your recording sheet! Have fun!

Highly Effective Teaching


When you are a highly effective teacher you employ various techniques and
strategies much like a classroom management plan. The teachers use these techniques to
help guide their instruction to provide engaging hands on learning. Teachers who are
highly effective they are nurturing, provide the students with sensory-rich experiences,
meaningful content, lessons provide opportunities for lots of movement, provide adequate
time, and meaningful feedback to help promote the childs learning growth.