You are on page 1of 43

BUSINESS RESEARCH METHODS

TOPIC: FACTORS AFFECTING


EMPLOYABILITY OF IMT NAGPUR
STUDENTS

Submitted by,
Section E
Group 1
Name
1
2
3
4
5
6

Aakash Kar
Alisha Ansari
Harshit Arora
Kanika Kashyap
Vishal Rathi
Yoshita Dutta

Roll No
2015256
2015257
2015279
2015280
2015317
2015318

Page | 1

ABSTRACT
The basic aim of this Project is to understand the factors that come into play when an IMT
Nagpur students sits for his final placements. After an in depth analysis of IMT Nagpur
students we shall be able to conclude the role of various factors that both can increase or
decrease a andidates chances when he sits for a campus interview.
Through Analysis and discussions we found out that, it is not only because of the academic
success of students nad prior work experience but also various other factors that are
influencing their emplyability. These factors affect each student in a different manner but a
trend can be observed regarding the direction of these factors.
From the analysis of respondents we can make out the following infrences ome inferences The trend of employment has significantly shifted from applicants being pro package
to applicants being more concentrated on the type of job the company is offering.
The manner a applicant uses his or her personality also affects their employability.
Non conventional activities like Industrial Visits, guest lectures and live project aslo
affects ones employability.
Thus, with all these comparisons and findings we can conclude that it is not only the
conventional factors but also some other non conventional ones that play an important role in
an IMT Nagpur students employability.
Keywords:- S.I.P., CGPA, Placed, CTC.

Page | 2

INTRODUCTION
The topic of the research tells us that what parameters are important that determine the better
placement opportunities for the students of IMT-N. For e.g. We take into consideration only a
students CGPA and assume that better academic performance will fetch you a better
placement. But, after the research we found that there are factors other than academic
performance as well that play an important role in a students placement personality, their
participation in various committees or forums, and the knowledge gained from their
respective internships and live projects.
The topic is extremely crucial from the future perspective of the students as these results will
help us and the upcoming batches to figure out the points that will ultimately help them in
securing a good placements. Also, not only for placement purposes, student managers would
equally focus on their overall development which will, as a result, lead to better placement
opportunities.
Honing the overall personality is also essential for future purposes as a B-school provides a
holistic development. Investing ones efforts and doing brilliantly only in academics doesnt
guarantee the highest package on campus. A student manager should be pro-active and street
smart as well to be better prepared for the professional life that awaits us. A corporate
conditioning is also required. This is where the committees and forums come into the picture.
The Placement Committee, Corporate Communications Committee, Corporate Interactions
Committee have been successful to some extent in providing a fair idea of how things are
done, wherein student managers deal with off-the-cuff situations as well.
Interaction with high-level professionals of companies gives knowledgeable insight to the
students that will help them in future. The various guest lectures organized also aims at
bringing experienced people and their ventures, the obstacles faced by them, what they
learned and how they implemented their learnings in obtaining a successful career, how to
deal with people and so on.
Along with these factors, we aim at gauging what factors do the student managers think is
important for them in securing a good job, and the scope of this importance.
Academics undoubtedly plays the most important role, as it imparts the basic knowledge
required to become eligible for a job. It is a pre-requisite to obtain a good job. Along with it,
are the factors that would help in the opening of new avenues that would prepare students for
a better level in their respective careers.
This would happen due to better levels of efficiency, work-life balance, professionalism than
those who werent engaged in any extra-curricular activities that would enhance an
individuals character.

Page | 3

Research Questions
1. What are the benefits of Guest lectures while sitting for placement process?
2. Does the Summer Internship Program (SIP) affect a students likeability to convert a companies
offer?
3. What is the relation of work-experience and final placement process?
4. Does the experience gained from Industrial visits conducted by college affect a students
employment?
5. What is the impact of being involved in committee and forums during final placement process?
6. What is the role of personality types while sitting for final placement process?
7. What is the relation between students specialization and employment?
8. Does taking part in intercollege competition affect ones chance to convert a companys offer?
9. How does CGPA affect a candidates prospect of final placements?
10. Does taking any other course or project help your prospect in final placements?

Research Objectives
1. To examine the benefits of guest lectures during placement process.
2. To study a relationship between SIP and the final placement process.
3. To draw conclusions about the relation between work-experience and final placement
process.
4. To understand if experience gained from industrial visits affect students employment.
5. To determine the impact of involvement in committee and forums during final placement
process.
6. To understand the role of personality types while sitting for final placement process.
7. To examine the relation between students specialization and final employment.
8. To study if taking part in intercollege competition affect ones chance to convert a companys
offer.
9. To examine a students CGPA effect on a candidates prospect of final placements.
10. To draw conclusions if taking any other course or project help your prospect in
Final placements

Page | 4

REVIEW OF LITERATURE
Only one study has been conducted so far, which is similar to the research topic Factors
Affecting Employability of IMT Nagpur Students. This study is by Roessier, Richard T. in
which the researcher analyzes the factors affecting employment success.

The study is named Factors Affecting Employment Success and Quality of Life: A One Year
Follow-up of Students in Special Education. As part of this study thirty-eight high-school
special education students were surveyed after graduation concerning their work history,
career roles, involvement with social agencies, life satisfaction and career skill ratings.
Approximately 50 percent of the group was competitively employed, mostly part time.

Although this study is not the same as ours but is does look into the factors, which effect a
students employment. This survey was done after a year of completing education in special
courses such as MBA, M. Tech, etc. Where as in case of our study we focus on both external
as well as external factors during their MBA, which affect a students chances of getting final
placement.

Page | 5

THEORITICAL FRAMEWORK
Research Variables & their Objectives
The variables used & their objectives in our research are1. Package- This is the amount of influence the package will have on the attractiveness
of the job description.
2. Company Brand perception- This is the amount of influence the brand image will
have on the attractiveness of the job description e
3. Specialization- This is a measure of the importance of the specialization (graduation
as well as masters) in candidate skills.
4. CGPA- This is measure of the academic performance of the candidate and its effect
on the profile.
5. Work Experience- This is measure of the relevance of work ex. on the profile of the
candidate.
6. S.I.P- This is an indicator of how much the summer internship process has
contributed to the employees skill set and profile.
7. Guest lectures- This is an indication of whether the guest lectures attended by the
candidate have affected the skill set of the candidate.
8. Industrial Visits- This is an indication of whether the Industrial visits attended by the
candidate have affected the skill set of the candidate.
9. Live projects- This is an indication of whether the live projects completed by the
candidate have affected the skill set of the candidate.
10. Personality- This is indicator of the effect of personality type on candidates likely
selection.
11. Past Performance (10th, 12th, Graduation Percentage)-Relevance of past
performance on future job prospects.
12. Current Performance (Current CGPA)-Relevance of current performance in future
job prospects.
13. Job Description- This is the characteristics of the job.
14. Candidate Profile - This is the skill set or profile required in the candidate or the
amount of influence the profile will have on the attractiveness of the job description.
15. Professional Course The relevance of professional course done with future job
prospects.

Page | 6

HypothesisH1. Package- The higher the CTC of the job, the better is the job description and higher
will be the number of applications.
H2. Brand Perception- The better the brand image of the company offering the job, the
more will be the application and more likely would be the selection.
H3. Specialization- The more relevant the specialization of the candidate has the more
his/her profile is suitable for jobs.
H4. CGPA- The higher the CGPA of the candidate, the more his/her profile becomes
suitable for jobs.
H5. Experience- The more relevant work experience the candidate has the more his/her
profile is suitable for jobs.
H6. S.I.P. - The S.I.P process determines the skill set of the candidate which in turn
determines his/her placement.
H7. Guest Lectures - The Guest lectures determines the skill set of the candidate which
in turn determines his/her placement.
H8. Industrial Visit - The industrial visits determines the skill set of the candidate which
in turn determines his/her placement.
H9. Live Projects - The Live projects determines the skill set of the candidate which in
turn determines his/her placement.
H10. Personality - The personality of the candidate affects his/her chances of getting
placed.
H11. Past Performance (10th, 12th, Graduation Percentage) - The past performance of
candidates determines the future job prospects.
H12. Candidate Profile - The better the profile, higher will be the employability.

Page | 7

H13. Job Description- The better the profile the higher the chance of application and
better employability.
H14. Professional course: Doing professional course has a significant relatioship with
student employability.

Candidate Profile

Package CTC

Specilization

Brand Perception

Job Description

CGPA
Page | 8

10th Score

Professional Course

Placement
Graduation Percentage

12th Score

S.I.P.

Work Experience

Industrial Visits

Guest Lecture

Live Projects

Personality Type
Since our research topic is

placement preferences of IMT Nagpur batch 2014-16, various skill sets, past
performance, present performance, prior job experience are all independent variables
because they are those of the candidate & determine his or her personality. On the other
hand, the skill sets required in job is dependent on candidates personality or not, the
factors on which selection of job depends & the factors on which the ability of candidate

Page | 9

being selected from his characteristics irrelevant of his or her performance on job
interview & GD is to be determined. This is our research interest.
From this research topic we can find out the relevance between various factors & any
such hypothesis if found true, can be the base of further research in which we can do a
careful analysis & decide how to implement it IMT Nagpur so as to enhance the number
of placements. This research can be used as secondary data for further exploration to
serve the organizations & future student managers interests.
1. Variables
Sl. No.

Variable Type

Independent variable

Dependent Variable

S. No.
1

Variable Name
1.
2.
3.
4.

Package (CTC)
Brand Perception
Specialization
Work Experience

Variable Name
1. Package (CTC)
2. Brand Perception
3. Specialization
4. CGPA
5. Work Experience
6. S.I.P
7. Guest Lecture
8. Industrial visits
9. Live Projects
10. Personality type
11. 12th Percentage
12. 10th Percentage
13. Graduation percentage
14. Professional course
15. Candidate profile
16. Job description
Placement

Variable Type
Category

Page | 10

5. S.I.P
6. Guest Lecture
7. Industrial visits
8. Live Projects
9. Personality type
10. Professional course
11. Candidate profile

1.
2.
3.
4.

CGPA
12th Percentage
10th Percentage
Graduation percentage

Continous

METHODOLOGY
1. Philosophy: Pragmatism
2. Approach: Deductive and Applied
3. Research Strategy: Multi-Way Strategy
4. Research Design: Cross-sectional and Experimental
5. Types of Research: Analytical
6. A Survey Instrument (questionnaire) will be developed with questions based on the
above mentioned boundaries. Each value will lead to a hypothesis (e.g. CTC plays an
important role in students employability). The questions in the questionnaire will seek
to test these hypotheses. For this research we have chosen IMT, Nagpurs 2014-16
batch as a population to collect the primary data. Data was collected from the random
sample of 90 students. The primary objective of the project was to find the factors,
which affect the placements of students of IMT Nagpur. The population consists of the
whole batch and sample consists of 90 students.
7. Descriptive Statistics and Inferential Statistics will use the SPSS software.

Page | 11

8. Data Collection Method: - Data was collected by floating the form to all the students
of 2014-16 batch. The data was collected between 27th of February and 3rd of March. As
most of the students had come back for Convocation on 3rd. The questionnaire was
designed in such a way that most questions were compulsory. Almost 45 % of data was
collected before 3rd and rest was collected on 3rd.

QUESTIONNAIRE
Sir Francis Galton, an English polymath was the first one to introduce the use of the
questionnaire in surveys. In survey research, a questionnaire is widely used as an instrument
that comprises of a set of questions to be asked to the participants of the survey relating to the
study of the research. Questionnaires usually ask questions that elicit ideas and behaviors,
preferences, traits, attitudes and facts, which have a direct, or an indirect effect on the
research topic.
Questionnaires can be administered in a variety of modes, such as face-to-face, telephone,
paper-and-pencil, and computerized. The computerized questionnaire administration mode is
used in an online survey or a web-based survey. A survey of this type is a widely used survey
method, which requires participants to answer the questionnaire posted on the Internet.
For our study we used an Internet based Google form as our survey questionnaire. The survey
questionnaire consisted of questions regarding the factors, which directly or indirectly
affected a students employability. The questionnaire used was as follows: -

Student Survey
Name: .

Roll No:.

Date of Birth: .

Phone No:.........

Sex:

Specialization (at IMT):

Please answer the questions by circling the number beside your answer or writing in your
answer
Q1

Marital Status:
Married

1
Page | 12

Unmarried
Q2

Highest Qualification (before coming to IMT):


Post Graduate

Undergraduate

Certification Course

Q3

Specialization or major in the following like science in 12th or B.com in undergraduate:


12th
Science

Commerce

Arts

Graduation...
Post-Graduation (if any).
Certification course .
Q4

CGPA/Percentage in:
10th
50-60%

61-70%

71-80%

81-90%

91-100%

61-70%

71-80%

81-90%

91-100%

12th
50-60%

Graduation
Post-Graduation (before IMT)
Post-Graduation (in IMT)
Q5

Professional courses completed (if any):


Yes

No

Page | 13

Q6

Work experience (if any):


0-1year

1-2year

2-3year

3-4year

4 & above
Q7

Q8

Do you think that your job experience enhanced your chances of getting a better job?
Yes

No

How much emphasis did you give to the following factors before applying for any
company at IMT Nagpur? Rate them on a scale of 1 to 6 (1 being lowest & 6 being
highest):
1

CTC
Offered
Name of
the
company
Job
Descriptio
n
Location
Offered
Job
relevance
with the
specializat
Page | 14

ion

Q9

Q10

Are you an:


Introvert

Extrovert

Do you believe that this personality helps during the interview process?
Yes

No

No clue

Q11 Were you involved in any committee or any forums?


Yes

No

Q12 If yes, then how much did it count in building up your resume?
Very High

High

Moderate 3

Q13

Low

Very Low

How much do you think the following activities conducted by IMT Nagpur helped in
building your skills, rate them on a scale of 1 to 6 (1 being lowest & 6 being
highest):
1

Industrial
Visits
Guest
Lectures
Live
Projects
Mock
Interviews
SIP
Experienc
e
Page | 15

Events &
Competiti
on

VARIABLE MAP IN QUESTIONNAIRE


Sr No
1
Q
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

13
14

Variable
Package
Company Brand perception
Specialization
CGPA
Work Experience
S.I.P
Guest lectures
Industrial Visits
Live projects
Personality
Past Performance (10th, 12th,
Graduation Percentage)
Current Performance (Current
CGPA)
Job Description
Candidate Profile

15

Professional Course

12

Questionnaire
Q8 (a) CTC Offered
Q8 (b) Name of the Company
Q3 Specialization
Q4 (e) CGPA in PG in IMT
Q6 & Q7
Q13 (e) SIP experience
Q13 (b) Guest lectures
Q13 (a) Industrial Visits
Q13 (c) Live projects
Q8 & Q10
Q4 (a), Q4(b), Q4(c), Q4(d)
Q4 (e)
Q8 (c) Job Description
Q8 (e) Job relevance with the
specialization
Q4 Professional courses
completed (if any):

ANALYSIS
Before we test the Hypothesis in SPSS here is a brief introduction of few of SPSS
termenolofgis: A chi-squared test, also referred to as

test (or chi-square test), is a statistical hypothesis

test in which the sampling distribution of the test statistic is a chi-square distribution when
Page | 16

the null hypothesis is true. Test statistics that follow a chi-squared distribution arise from an
assumption of independent normally distributed data, which is valid in many cases due to the
central limit theorem. A chi-squared test can then be used to reject the hypothesis that the data
are independent.
The test is used to determine whether there is a significant difference between the expected
frequencies and the observed frequencies in one or more categories. Does the number of
individuals or objects that fall in each category differ significantly from the number you we
except.
The P-value is the level of marginal significance within a statistical hypothesis test,
representing the probability of the occurrence of a given event. The p-value is used as an
alternative to rejection points to provide the smallest level of significance at which the null
hypothesis would be rejected.
Hypothesis 1
Placement * Package Crosstabulation
Count
Package

not important
Placement

somewhat not

somewhat

important

important

Total
very
important

important

Unplaced

17

Placed

18

33

14

73

19

38

23

90

Total

Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2Value

df

sided)

.048

Likelihood Ratio

9.478

.050

Linear-by-Linear Association

4.006

.045

Pearson Chi-Square

N of Valid Cases

9.566

90

a. 5 cells (50.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum


expected count is .19.

Page | 17

A strong association between the CTC and placement is observed, , 2(4) = 9.566, p = .048 is
observed. Hence null hypothesis is rejected (p<0.05)
Also the highest number of responses recorded placed moderate level of importance to CTC
as 42.22% of people said they give CTC moderate level of importance. Out of this 42.22%
people, 5 respondents were unplaced whereas 33 were placed.
Hypothesis 2
Placement * Brand Perception Crosstabulation
Count
Brand Perception

Placement

somewhat not

somewhat

important

important

important

very important

Total

Unplaced

10

17

Placed

18

30

21

73

19

40

26

90

Total

Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2Value
Pearson Chi-Square
Likelihood Ratio
Linear-by-Linear Association
N of Valid Cases

df

sided)

.350

3.947

.267

.655

.418

3.283

90

a. 4 cells (50.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum


expected count is .94.

Page | 18

No association between the brand perception and placement is observed, , 2(3) = 9.566, p = .
350 is observed. Hence null hypothesis is accepted (p>0.05)
Also it was recorded that out of 90 responses 40 people believed that brand perception an
important factor. Out of these 40 recorded responses 30 students are placed.
Hypothesis 3
Placement * PGDM Specialisation Crosstabulation
Count
PGDM Specialisation
Dual
Placement

Unplaced
Placed

Total

finance

Finance

Full time

Marketing

Operations

Total

12

17

17

35

73

21

47

90

Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2Value

df

sided)

4.737a

.449

Likelihood Ratio

7.098

.213

N of Valid Cases

90

Pearson Chi-Square

a. 7 cells (58.3%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum


expected count is .38.

Page | 19

No association between the PGDM Specilization and placement is observed, , 2(5) = 4.737,
p = .449 is observed. Hence null hypothesis is accepted (p>0.05).
During the analysis it was observed that 52.22% of respondents were students with marketing
as their specialization for PGDM. Out of this 47 respondents 35 are placed students.
Hypothesis 4

Placement * pgdm cgpa Crosstabulation


Count
pgdm cgpa
1
Placement

Total

Unplaced

17

Placed

12

29

25

73

20

34

27

90

Total

Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2Value
Pearson Chi-Square
Likelihood Ratio
Linear-by-Linear Association
N of Valid Cases

df

sided)

.008

14.883

.011

5.396

.020

15.484

90

a. 7 cells (58.3%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum


expected count is .19.

Page | 20

A strong association between the CGPA scored by students suring their PGDM and placement
is observed, , 2(5) = 15.484, p = .008 is observed. Hence null hypothesis is rejected (p<0.05)
Hypothesis 5
Placement * Work Experience Crosstabulation
Count
Work Experience
0-1 years
Placement

Unplaced
Placed

Total

1-2 years

2-3 years

3-4 years

4 & above years

Total

17

42

13

69

51

16

12

86

Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2Value
Pearson Chi-Square
Likelihood Ratio
Linear-by-Linear Association
N of Valid Cases

df

sided)

4.457a

.348

3.635

.458

.978

.323

86

a. 6 cells (60.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum


expected count is .20.

Page | 21

No association between the prior work experience and placement is observed, 2(4) = 4.457,
p = .348 is observed. Hence null hypothesis is accepted (p>0.05)
During the analysis it was observed that 56.67% of respondents were students with work
experience of 0-1 years before entering PGDM course. Out of these 51 respondents 42 are
placed students, which was the highest across all the segments.
Hypothesis 6
Placement * SIP Crosstabulation
Count
SIP

not important
Placement

somewhat not

somewhat

important

important

Total

important

very important

Unplaced

11

17

Placed

26

38

73

29

49

90

Total
Chi-Square Tests

Asymp. Sig. (2Value

df

sided)

Pearson Chi-Square

3.711a

.446

Likelihood Ratio

4.294

.368

.320

.571

Linear-by-Linear Association
N of Valid Cases

90

a. 5 cells (50.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum


expected count is .19.

Page | 22

No association between the summer intership programm and placement is observed, 2(4) =
3.711, p = .446 is observed. Hence null hypothesis is accepted (p>0.05)
It was also observed that out of 90 respondents a total of 49 students regarded S.I.P. as an
important factor in their placement out of which 38 were placed.
Hypothesis 7

Placement * Guest Lectures Crosstabulation


Count
Guest Lectures
least

not

somewhat

somewhat

important

important

not important

important

Placement Unplaced
Placed
Total

very
important

important

Total

17

23

23

73

13

28

26

10

90

Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2Value
Pearson Chi-Square
Likelihood Ratio
Linear-by-Linear Association
N of Valid Cases

df

sided)

4.765a

.445

5.715

.335

.026

.871

90

a. 6 cells (50.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum


expected count is 1.13.

Page | 23

No association between the Guest lectures conducted on campus and placement is observed,
2(5) = 4.765, p = .445 is observed. Hence null hypothesis is accepted (p>0.05)
It was also observed that out of 90 respondents a total of 28 students regarded these lectures
as somewhat important factor in their placement providing an interface between industry and
theoretical knowledge imparted at campus. Out of these 28 respondents 23 were placed, a
highest across all categories.
Hypothesis 8
Placement * Industrial visits Crosstabulation
Count
Industrial visits
least
important
Placement

not important

Total

somewhat not

somewhat

important

important

very
important

important

Unplaced

17

Placed

14

21

21

73

20

25

25

90

Total

Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2Value
Pearson Chi-Square
Likelihood Ratio
Linear-by-Linear Association
N of Valid Cases

df

sided)

3.806a

.578

4.710

.452

.254

.614

90

a. 7 cells (58.3%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum


expected count is 1.13.

Page | 24

Industrial Visits are organized by the Corporate Interaction Committee on campus to provide
student managers hands on experience of working in corporate world. No association
between the Industrial Visits and placement is observed, 2(5) = 3.806, p = .578 is observed.
Hence null hypothesis is accepted (p>0.05)
It was also observed that out of 90 respondents a total of 50 students regarded these visits as
somewhat important factor and important in their placement providing. Out of these 50
respondents 42 were placed which shows that 84% of students did benefit from these visits.
Hypothesis 9
Placement * Live Projects Crosstabulation
Count
Live Projects
least
important
Placement

not important

Total

somewhat not

somewhat

important

important

important very important

Unplaced

17

Placed

14

29

12

73

11

19

33

17

90

Total

Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2Value

df

sided)

5.733a

.333

Likelihood Ratio

7.465

.188

Linear-by-Linear Association

1.027

.311

Pearson Chi-Square

N of Valid Cases

90

a. 7 cells (58.3%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum


expected count is .94.

Page | 25

Live projects are independent assignments students take on to learn about a companies
operations. These projects can last from 1 week to 8 weeks and can be either field or virtual
in nature. No association between live projects and placement is observed, 2(5) = 5.733, p =
.333 is observed. Hence null hypothesis is accepted (p>0.05)
In the survey it was observed that a total of 33 respondents considered these projects
important and 29 out of which are placed respondents.
Hypothesis 10
Placement * Do you believe your personality type helps in cracking an interview
Crosstabulation
Count
Do you believe your personality type helps in
cracking an interview
No
Placement

No Clue

Unplaced
Placed

Total

Total
Yes

13

17

17

47

73

19

11

60

90

Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2Value

df

sided)

.556

Likelihood Ratio

1.293

.524

N of Valid Cases

90

Pearson Chi-Square

1.173

a. 2 cells (33.3%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum


expected count is 2.08.

Page | 26

Personalities are broadly of two types, introvert and extrovert. Some people make their these
personalities strength while some consider it to be as something that holds them back. No
association between live projects and placement is observed, 2(2) = 1.173, p = .556 is
observed. Hence null hypothesis is accepted (p>0.05)
The research shows that 60 of total respondents believe that their personalities do help them
in cracking the interview. Therefore these students consider their personality as their strength.
Also out of these 60 respondents 47 students are placed showing that they used their strength
to the maximum.
Hypothesis 11
Placement * Xth Percentage Crosstabulation
Count
Xth Percentage
2
Placement

Unplaced
Placed

Total

Total

13

17

12

56

73

15

69

90

Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2Value

df

sided)

.984

Likelihood Ratio

.032

.984

Linear-by-Linear Association

.031

.860

Pearson Chi-Square

N of Valid Cases

.032

90

a. 3 cells (50.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum


expected count is 1.13.

Page | 27

Placement * XIIth Percentage Crosstabulation


Count
XIIth Percentage
1
Placement

Total

Unplaced

10

17

Placed

14

46

73

18

56

90

Total

Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2Value

df

sided)

.902

Likelihood Ratio

.582

.901

Linear-by-Linear Association

.161

.688

Pearson Chi-Square

N of Valid Cases

.578

90

a. 3 cells (37.5%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum


expected count is 1.51.

Page | 28

Placement * graduation Percentage Crosstabulation


Count
graduation Percentage
1
Placement

Total

Unplaced

13

17

Placed

16

28

22

73

16

41

25

90

Total

Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2Value

df

sided)

Pearson Chi-Square

9.383a

.095

Likelihood Ratio

12.256

.031

.063

.801

Linear-by-Linear Association
N of Valid Cases

90

a. 8 cells (66.7%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum


expected count is .19.

Page | 29

Past performnce in Xth, XIIth and Graduation form the stepping stones for a business
managers into the B-School. They help build a managers basics.
No association between Xth, XIIth and placement of students is observed.

Xth, 2(2) = 0.032, p = .984 is observed.


XIIth, 2(3) = 0.578, p = .902 is observed.

Hence the null hypothesis is accepted in case of Xth and XIIth score as p>0.05.
On the other hand in case of graduation score, 2(5) = 9.383, p = .095 is observed. As the
p<0.05 we will reject the null hypothesis. Therefore we can say that there is a relationship
between the graduation percentage and employability of students as they are generally in lien
with the PGDM specialization.
Hypothesis 12

Placement * candidateprofile Crosstabulation


Count
candidateprofile

Placement Unplaced
Placed
Total

Total

least

not

somewhat not

somewhat

important

important

important

important

very
important

important

17

15

29

17

73

18

32

25

90

Page | 30

Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2Value
Pearson Chi-Square
Likelihood Ratio
Linear-by-Linear Association
N of Valid Cases

df

sided)

.068

10.219

.069

.089

.766

10.277

90

a. 7 cells (58.3%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum


expected count is .19.

This is the skill set or profile required in the candidate or the amount of influence the profile
will have on the attractiveness of the job description No association between candidate
profile and placement is observed, 2(5) = 10.277, p = .0.68 is observed. Hence null
hypothesis is accepted (p>0.05)
The research shows that 32 of total respondents believe that their profiles are beneficial
converting an interview. Also out of these 32 respondents 29 students were recorded as
placed.

Hypothesis 13

Page | 31

Placement * Job Description Crosstabulation


Count
Job Description

Placement

somewhat not

somewhat

important

important'

important

very important

Total

Unplaced

17

Placed

15

30

25

73

18

34

33

90

Total

Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2Value
Pearson Chi-Square
Likelihood Ratio
Linear-by-Linear Association
N of Valid Cases

df

sided)

3.256a

.354

3.094

.377

.000

.987

90

a. 3 cells (37.5%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum


expected count is .94.

The Job Description refers to the work that the students will have to do in the job. No
association between Job Description and placement is observed, 2(3) = 3.256, p = .354 is
observed. Hence null hypothesis is accepted (p>0.05)
The research shows that 34 of total respondents believe that job Description are an important
factor to analyze when applying for a job.
Hypothesis 14
Page | 32

Placement * Professional Course Certifications Crosstabulation


Count
Professional Course Certifications
yes
Placement

no

Total

Unplaced

15

17

Placed

65

73

80

10

90

Total

Chi-Square Tests

Value

df

Asymp. Sig. (2-

Exact Sig. (2-

Exact Sig. (1-

sided)

sided)

sided)

Pearson Chi-Square

.009a

.924

Continuity Correctionb

.000

1.000

Likelihood Ratio

.009

.925

Fisher's Exact Test


Linear-by-Linear Association
N of Valid Cases

1.000
.009

.603

.925

90

a. 1 cells (25.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum expected count is 1.89.

A lot of students in PGDM course opt for professional course during or before doing PGDm.
These courses are certified courses like Company sectratory, CFA, Charted Accountant, etc.
These are done to enhance ones skill set. No association between Professional courses done
by students and placement is observed, 2(1) = 0.009, p = .924 is observed. Hence null
hypothesis is accepted (p>0.05)

Page | 33

The research shows that 80 of total respondents had undergone a professional certification
courses either during or before PGDM course, out of which 65 were placed in the corporate
now.

CONCLUSION

Related Variables

Chi-Square Test
Value

P-Test Value

Significance

Placement & Brand

3.283

0.350

No

Placement & Package

9.566

0.48

Yes

Placement & CGPA

15.484

0.008

Yes

Placement & Specialization

4.737

0.449

No

Placement & Work Experience

4.457

0.348

No

Placement & SIP

3.711

0.446

No

Placement Guest Lecture

4.765

0.445

No

Placement & Industrial Visit

3.806

0.578

No

Placement & Live Projects

5.733

0.333

No

Placement & Belief in


Personality
Placement & Xth %

1.173

0.566

No

0.032

0.984

No

Placement & Xth %

0.578

0.902

No

Placement & Graduation

9.383

0.095

No

Placement & Candidates Profile

10.277

0.068

No

Placement & Job Description

3.256

0.354

No

Placement & Professional


Course Certification

0.009

0.924

No

Hence, Only Package and CGPA holds a significant relation with the Placement, other
than that every other Dependent Variable has no significant relation with the Independent
variable(Placement).

REFERENCES
Link:http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ421453
Page | 34

TRANSCRIPTS OF THE ANALYSIS

Page | 35

-BRM Group ProjectInstitute of Management Technology, Nagpur


Minutes of Meeting
Date:
16th January, 2016
21:30 hrs

Time:

20:00

to

Venue: LRC Hall

Attendees: All Present

1 Topics of Discussion:
The topic of the project was decided
Discussions over different research topics were
done

Page | 36

Every one contributed about different topics and


discussed the difficulties that can arise
Relevance of the topic was considered while
making the final decision
2 Adjournment: The next meeting will be held on 23 rd
Jan, 2016

-BRM Group ProjectInstitute of Management Technology, Nagpur


Minutes of Meeting
Date:
23th January, 2016
21:30 hrs

Time:

20:00

to

Venue: LRC Hall

Attendees: All Present

3 Topics of Discussion:
Page | 37

Brainstorming
Different methods were taken into consideration for
collecting the data
Decision was made on primary collection of data
keeping IMT-N as the scope of project
4 Adjournment: The next meeting will be held on 10 th
February, 2016

Page | 38

-BRM Group ProjectInstitute of Management Technology, Nagpur


Minutes of Meeting
Date:
10th February, 2016
21:30 hrs

Time:

20:00

to

Venue: LRC Hall

Attendees: All Present

1.Topics of Discussion:
Division of tasks
Seniors with different educational backgrounds were
targeted
Questionnaire was drafted keeping in mind different
factors affecting placements
2. Adjournment: The next meeting will be held on 23 rd
February, 2016

Page | 39

-BRM Group ProjectInstitute of Management Technology, Nagpur


Minutes of Meeting
Date:
23rd February, 2016
21:30 hrs

Time:

20:00

to

Venue: LRC Hall

Attendees: All Present

1.Topics of Discussion:
The proposal was finalised
The proposal was detailed in natured, containing all
the relevant information
To obtain a review of our proposal, it was presented
to the concerned faculty
2. Adjournment: The next meeting will be held on 27 th
February, 2016

Page | 40

-BRM Group ProjectInstitute of Management Technology, Nagpur


Minutes of Meeting
Date:
27th February, 2016
21:30 hrs

Time:

20:00

to

Venue: LRC Hall

Attendees: All Present

1.Topics of Discussion:
Necessary changes were made
Not all the variables and dimensions were
appropriate and required a bit of addition or
elimination to some of them
Relationships of the variable were modified under the
proper guidance
2. Adjournment: The next meeting will be held on 4th
March, 2016

Page | 41

-BRM Group ProjectInstitute of Management Technology, Nagpur


Minutes of Meeting
Date:
4th March, 2016
21:30 hrs

Time:

20:00

to

Venue: LRC Hall

Attendees: All Present

1.Topics of Discussion:
Testing, since we found certain output to be wrong,
analysed what went wrong
The result what we assumed did not match the
obtained result
Went through the complete procedure to check
whether our assumption was right or the obtained
result was more appropriate
2. Adjournment: The next meeting will be held on 15 th
March, 2016

Page | 42

-BRM Group ProjectInstitute of Management Technology, Nagpur


Minutes of Meeting
Date:
15th March, 2016
21:30 hrs

Time:

20:00

to

Venue: LRC Hall

Attendees: All Present

1.Topics of Discussion:
Finalisation and compilation
During this period everyone went through other team
members work and made some changes where
required in the final compilation.
2. Adjournment: The next meeting will be held on

Page | 43