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Day 1: Laboratory Safety

Date of Lesson: NA
Grade Level: 10th
Time Needed: 1 hr 30 min

Teacher: Chelsea Lloyd


Subject Area: Science
Topic: Laboratory Safety

Standards Addressed
CCR.W.9-10.2.d
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic and
convey a style appropriate to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely
readers.
CCR.W.9-10.2.e
Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and
conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
Content Objective: Introduce laboratory safety procedure as well as address safety procedures
for interdisciplinary unit production. Establish a safety team who will be responsible for the
procedures during the production. These are the students that are not part of another team on the
production.
Materials Needed
Record sheet
Pencil
Goggles
Activity: Groups of students will travel through stations set up around the laboratory. Each
station will display a variety of safety hazards and inappropriate laboratory procedures. Students
will discuss with groups and write down their observations.
Laboratory Safety Synthesis: Class discussion of observations followed by Laboratory Safety
Procedures and Rules Manual development. This manual will be used by the class throughout
the year. Students are expected to use appropriate scientific language in the development of
procedures and rules. Copies will be made and distributed throughout the class.
The safety team will be defined by the end of this class. This group of students needs to be free
from other theatrical production responsibilities as well as fully confident that they can maintain
a safe and professional laboratory environment and act as models for their peers.

Connection to Radioactive
The development of the safety team is the first step toward scientific integration into the
theatrical production at the end of the unit. Laboratory safety was no doubt utilized in Marie
Curies lab and we hope to recreate that setting on stage.
Special Considerations
Students that are challenged by data recording can discuss their observations with their group
and with the class during the activity. Students may also give input to the rules manual orally or
written, whichever comes naturally.
Teacher Goals
Be sure to include any and all students that are not already committed to a different production
team

Day 2: Periodic Table of the Elements History/ Introduction


Date of Lesson: n/a
Teacher: Chelsea Lloyd
Grade Level: 10th
Science: Chemistry
Time:Time: Ongoing throughout unit but
strongly emphasized and introduced during the third
day. 90 minutes.
Periodic Table of the Elements: History and Themes
Standards Addressed:
CCR.RL.9-10.7
Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text into visual form (e.g.,
a table or chart) and translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an
equation) into words.
CCR.RL.9-10.3
Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as
they are used in a specific
scientific or technical context relevant to grades 910 texts and topics.
Content Objectives: Students will understand the historical development of the Periodic Table
including the timeline and the reasoning behind its organization. Major theme discussed will be
relationships between groups of elements and the relationships between groups within the table.

Unit Project: Discuss Radioactive and begin building their own periodic table for the classroom.
Students will create Element cards representing the properties of each element as well as the
date it was discovered and who received credit for discovery. Different groups of students will be
responsible for different groups of elements represented in the periodic table.
Assessment: At units completion, the class periodic table will be complete. Students receive
credit when their element cards are complete with correct information.
Connection to Radioactive
The theme of relationships is present throughout the book Radioactive and is displayed in this
lesson through the exploration of the thematic organization of the periodic table of the elements.
Elements are all different from one another but they are related to one another through their basic
structure and function. Humans are similar in that no two people are alike but our basic structure
and function are similar.
Teacher goals
Be sure everyone in class has access to resources and materials to research and design their
element cards.
Special Considerations
If students do not have access to research materials outside of school, I will have resources
available in my classroom during lunch and after school.

Day 3: Radioactivity
Date of Lesson: NA
Grade Level: 10th
Time Needed: 1 hr 30 min

Teacher: Chelsea Lloyd


Subject Area: Science
Topic: Radioactivity and Half lives

Standards Addressed
CCR.RL.9-10.7
Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text into visual form (e.g.,
a table or chart) and translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an
equation) into words.
CCR.W.9-10.2.d

Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic and
convey a style appropriate to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely
readers.
CCR.W.9-10.2.e
Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and
conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

Content Objectives: Students will learn that the definition of radioactive decay is the property
of some elements or isotopes that spontaneously emit particles of energy by the disintegration of
their atomic nuclei. Students will also understand that the amount of time for a sample of a
radioactive substance to decay by half is that substances half life.
Discuss Radioactive and why it may be dangerous to have so much exposure to radioactive
elements, such as Marie Curie did. Relationships between elements will be explored as we
discover how radioactive decay occurs and can result in the development of a different element.
Materials needed
M&Ms
Shoe boxes
pencil
paper

In small groups, students will place one hundred M&Ms face up into the shoe box. Someone in
the group will be the designated data recorder.
Group members will take turns shaking the box of M&Ms for 5 seconds. After each shake,
students will open the box and remove all M&Ms that are no longer face up. The recorder will
record how many are left after each shake. They will continue to shake and remove M&Ms until
there are none left.
From this data, students can graph and calculate the half life of the M&Ms.
Assessment
After the experiment, students will individually write their reflection to the following questions.
-Compare and contrast the radioactive elements on the periodic table. What do they have in
common with each other in terms of their chemical structure?
-The Curies risked their health to make what turned out to be an important scientific discovery:

the element known as radium. Scientists today continue to work hard to create new elements in
laboratories all over the world, but they usually take extensive safety precautions, which
sometimes slow down the pace of their research. With safety in mind, what kinds of risks
should scientists take in their research? Who should determine whether an experiment is
genuinely safe?
Teacher Goals
Be sure students do not eat the M&Ms until the experiment is complete. Replace lot of M&Ms
before each class.
Special Considerations
Those students who are unable to participate fully in this activity, for whatever reason, may have
an opportunity to experience radioactive decay

Connection to Radioactive
In this lesson the idea of relationships is explored through the radioactive decay of one element
which will eventually stabilize in the form of a different element. These two elements are related
even though the start and end products are different. The element of safety and radioactivity are
discussed and Marie Curie is used as an example of someone who was exposed to radioactivity
through her work.

DAY 4: Lesson Plan: Phosphorescence


Date of Lesson: NA
Grade Level: 10th
Time Needed: 1 hr 30 min

Teacher: Chelsea Lloyd


Subject Area: Science
Topic: Exothermic Chemical Reactions

Standards Addressed
CCR.RL.9-10.3
Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or
performing technical tasks.
CCR.RL.9-10.3
Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as
they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 910 texts and topics.
CCR.W.9-10.2.f

Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or
explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
Materials Needed:
15mL of ethyl acetate
3mg of 9,10-bis(phenyethynyl) anthracene
1g of sodium acetate
800mg of TCPO (bis(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)oxalate)
3mL of hydrogen peroxide added last to initiate the reaction.
General Laboratory Equipment
Safety goggles
Gloves
Objectives:
Students will be able to describe the difference between exothermic and endothermic reactions.
Students will complete the phosphorescence experiment as an example of an exothermic
reaction.
1.
Introduction discussion about the differences in endothermic reactions and exothermic reactions.
To start the discussion we will pull examples from our everyday experiences and make a class
master list. Examples such as cooking an egg would fall into the category of an endothermic
reaction because it uses heat as it rearranges its protein structure. A burning candle could be used
as an exothermic example. The flame gives off energy as heat.

2.
I will model the experimental procedure in front of the class as we read through the steps
together. Then students will break into pre designated laboratory groups. Students follow
directions to complete the phosphorescence experiment.
Assessment
Upon completion of the experiment, students will reflect on the success of their experiment. In a
cohesively written conclusion, students will explain if and how they would change their
procedural methods in the event that the experiment did not result in phosphorescence. If the
experiment was successful, students will reflect on what went right and why.
Special Considerations
Because I will have completed the experiment for the whole class, students who are physically
unable to perform the laboratory tasks will be able to see the procedure and outcomes in action.

Teaching Goals
Maintain close proximity to all laboratory stations to ensure safe handling of materials
Connection to Radioactive
This experiment, when done correctly, results in an end material that will glow similarly to the
way radium did in the book Radioactive. This is the experiment that will be recreated on stage
during the final theatrical production at the end of the unit. The safety team that was defined
earlier in the unit will be responsible for this.

me and examples of natural selection in Montana. (4 minutes)


4. Rework their concept maps and conclusion. (4 minutes) .
Assessment:
We will have the students make concept maps before and after the lesson
assess their
knowledge on the subject.
Special Considerations:
Students with colorblindness will have different outcomes in demonstration
fitness. This
could be a very applicable learning experience for the study of natural
selection.
The activity is conducive to kinesthetic learners.
Teaching Goals:
Our goal is to make knowledge accessible to students in a way easily
understood through
the use of a game.
This lesson addresses NGSS: LS4.B, LS4.C, HS-L