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MODULE TITLE

The Tourism System

Module Code
Semester of Delivery
State whether module is
Mandatory, Elective or
Option
Level (4/5/6/7)
Credit Points
Assessment Pattern:
Components & Weighting
Pre-Requisite Modules (if
applicable)
Breakdown of Student
Learning Hours by Type*

19-4T01-01L
1 and 2
Mandatory/ Elective: According to route

Module Leader & School


Module Banding
Will Module be offered via
Blackboard?
Date of Original Approval
Date of Next Review
1

4
20
50% Coursework
50% Coursework
None
24 hours lectures
16 hours seminars
8 hours computer lab
152 hours directed and independent learning
Clare Speed and Richard Lewis
School of Sport and Leisure Management
C
Yes

RATIONALE
Students of tourism, as potential managers of the tourism industry,
require knowledge and understanding of the way in which the supplyside of tourism is structured and how it operates. This Module aims to
introduce students to the scope and nature of the tourism industry,
products and destinations. It examines components of the tourism
system involved in the supply of tourism products across public, private
and voluntary sectors and considers the consequences and
management implications resulting from tourism supply. The Module
prepares students to develop a systematic and critical spatial
awareness of tourism across generating-, transit- and destination
regions and provides a foundation for the study of Tourism
Development at level 5.

SUMMARY OF AIMS
The Module aims to allow students to:

acquire foundation-level knowledge of the nature of tourism supply


and the key characteristics of tourism products, destinations and
the tourism industry;

identify the basic features and roles of different tourism industry


sectors within the composite tourism industry and consider issues
and trends affecting those sectors and the organisations within
them;
identify the general relationships between the tourism industry and
the tourist destination and appreciate the principal differences in
management objectives between the public, private and voluntary
sectors;
evaluate the various impacts of tourism and the management
techniques associated with those impacts;
compare theory to practice;
critically assess and systematically analyse tourism resources;
use data effectively.

ANTICIPATED LEARNING OUTCOMES


On successful completion of this Module students will be able to:

identify and explain the nature of tourism supply and the key
characteristics of tourism products, destinations and the tourism
industry and their relationship to the tourist (KU);
define and evaluate the basic features of the visitor attractions,
accommodation, transport, intermediaries and ancillary services
sectors (KU);
recognise the role of each of these sectors within the composite
tourism industry (P);
discuss the principal differences in management objectives in the
public, private and voluntary sectors (C);
analyse issues and trends affecting sectors and organisations
within the tourism industry (C);
explain the general relationships between the tourism industry and
the tourist destination (P);
evaluate the economic, socio-cultural and environmental impacts of
tourism and their management (C).

Apply destination management principles to an actual destination by


critically assessing and systematically analysing tourism resources and
using data effectively (application).
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LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGY AND METHODS,


INCLUDING RESOURCES
The Module will involve a series of lectures, seminars, fieldwork and
independent study. The lectures, drawing on theory and the industry
experience of Centre for Tourism staff, will provide a basic introduction
to the key issues and general principles and will direct students to
further reading to be completed within student self-study time each
week. The possibility of employing guest speakers within the lecture

programme will be investigated, using industrial links established by the


Centre for Tourism. However, it is recognised that this will be
dependent upon the commitment of industrialists and will have financial
resource (AVL) implications.
Weekly small-group seminars will be designed to allow key issues to be
discussed in more depth. The seminars will provide an interactive
environment and will be student-led, based on investigative issues and
the further reading assigned within the lectures. Student-centred
learning will also be assisted by the use of local fieldwork relating to a
longitudinal urban tourism CAL project and a Blackboard web site. The
urban tourism CAL project has been developed and designed
according to Centre for Tourism staff interest and expertise in Urban
Tourism, Geographical Information Systems (GIS) skills and the use of
MapInfo software. A series of IT-based workshops will be run to
provide students with a basic introduction to electronic mapping, the
concept of GIS and the use of MapInfo software.
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ASSESSMENT AND FEEDBACK STRATEGY AND METHODS


The learning outcomes will be assessed using a combination of
formative and summative coursework. One element of coursework will
take the form of a phase test based on knowledge of tourism
foundation topics with formative feedback in class time. The other
element of coursework will be centred around the urban tourism CAL
project and explicitly linked to the learning outcome concerned with the
application of destination management principles to an actual
destination. Group presentations will be used as a formative
coursework component providing feedback to assist the completion of
a more comprehensive individual written report as a summative
coursework component. All Module assessment will be tutor assessed.

SPECIFIC ASSESSMENT CRITERIA


Students achieving a pass in this module will demonstrate:

presentation of work to degree-level standard;


a grasp of the relevant issues and a depth of understanding;
the ability to express ideas clearly and grammatically;
the provision of relevant examples from the tourism literature to
illustrate ideas;
that wider reading and self-study has taken place;
accurate interpretation of data;
correctly applied destination management principles in practice;
effective engagement in problem solving and analysis.

Additionally, coursework will be judged on evidence that the student


has:

demonstrated the ability to work with others (Group presentation);


demonstrated the ability to work under pressure (Group
presentation and Individual written report).

INDICATIVE CONTENTS, READING LIST AND RESOURCES


Indicative Content
The following curriculum will be covered within the Module:

tourism as a system and supply-side definitions of tourism;


the key characteristics of tourism products;
the destination as a tourism product and its management;
the key characteristics of the tourism industry;
in-depth foci on individual tourism industry sectors - visitor
attractions, accommodation, transport, intermediaries and ancillary
services
management objectives of the public, private and voluntary sectors;
issues and trends affecting the tourism industry;
the relationship between the tourism industry, the tourist destination
and the tourist;
economic, socio-cultural and environmental impacts.

Indicative Reading
Cooper, C, Fletcher, J, Gilbert, D, and Wanhill, S, (1998), Tourism
Principles and Practice. Harlow, Essex, Longman.
Holloway, J C, (1998), The Business of Tourism, 5th Edition, Harlow,
Essex, Longman.
Mathieson, A, and Wall, G, (1982), Tourism: Economic, Physical and
Social Impacts, Harlow, Essex, Longman.
Mill, R C, and Morrison, A, (1992), The Tourism System: An
Introduction, New Jersey, Prentice Hall.
Page, S, (1995), Urban Tourism, London, Routledge.
Youell, R. (1998) Tourism: An Introduction, Harlow, Essex: Longman.
Tourism Management journals
Travel Trade Gazette
Travel Weekly
* a selection of relevant web sites will be linked to the Blackboard site.
Resources

MapInfo software
Blackboard learning environment
dedicated computer suite
dedicated computer support
MapInfo/GIS software
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MODULE BANDING OTHER THAN A


C