Welcome From The Mayor

Las Vegas just finished celebrating its 100th birthday in 2005 and economic indicators project a very bright future for our businesses, families and friends. For more than a decade, the Las Vegas Valley has enjoyed the distinction of being one of the fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the United States. With this growth has come great prosperity and a thriving economy that has paid for new schools, roads and recreational facilities, and brought unlimited choices for shopping and professional services. While the city of Las Vegas is known internationally as the entertainment capital of the world, not many know that it is an exceptional place to do business. Las Vegas leads the nation in new job creation, housing and business growth. The fact is, beyond the neon is a metropolis that has systematically transformed itself into an exceptional place for business and development. Each year, in ever-increasing numbers, American and international firms are relocating to the valley and thriving in this sophisticated business environment. The Las Vegas metro area is a flourishing business center free of corporate income, unitary, inventory, franchise, personal income, estate/gift and inheritance taxes. This booming business community offers companies efficient and cost-effective telecommunications and transportation systems, and easy access to many major western markets. But most importantly, Las Vegas offers the opportunity for a quality lifestyle with a feeling of neighborhood for the people lucky enough to call it home. For business, for pleasure, for life, Las Vegas is the center of it all. I invite you to become part of the excitement of the thriving Las Vegas community.

Oscar B. Goodman Mayor, City of Las Vegas

Table of Contents

Introduction
Mayor’s Welcome Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Land Use
Existing Land Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Future Land Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 City of Las Vegas Estimated Property Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 City of Las Vegas Assessed Value of Real Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

SPECIAL THANKS TO: Mayor
Oscar B. Goodman

Business Climate
Frequently Asked Questions About Las Vegas Tourism . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Las Vegas at a Glance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 How to Open a Business in Las Vegas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 How to Incorporate a Business in Nevada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 How to Obtain a Business License . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 How to Write a Business Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 How to Find Venture Capital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Commercial Development Process Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Development Service Center “One Stop Shop” Help Guide . . . . . 16 Real Estate Financing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Construction & Impact Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Planning & Develpment Application Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Largest Non-Gaming Employers in Las Vegas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Largest Gaming Employers in Las Vegas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Fastest Growing Industries in Las Vegas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Forbes 2,000 Companies with a Major Presence in Las Vegas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Customer Service & Back Office Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Telecommunications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Major Business Parks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Office Parks & Buildings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Planning & Development Department Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Building Permits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Business Licenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Capital Improvements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Utility Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Total Amount of Taxable Retail Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Nevada Taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Taxes & Incentives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Population
Population Trends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Historical Housing Counts & Population Estimates . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Population Change & Income by ZIP Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Population Comparison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Demographics Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Councilman, Ward 3
Gary Reese (Mayor Pro Tem)

Councilman, Ward 4
Larry Brown

Quality of Life
Cost of Living . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Metro Las Vegas Housing Facts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Master Planned Communities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Climate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Recreation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

Councilman, Ward 5
Lawrence Weekly

Councilman, Ward 2
Steve Wolfson

Councilwoman, Ward 1
Lois Tarkanian

Councilman, Ward 6
Steven D. Ross

Community Affairs
Public Safety - Fire & Rescue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Las Vegas Fire Stations Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Las Vegas Fire & Rescue - Important Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Public Works. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Field Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Municipal Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Human Resources Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Information Technologies Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Leisure Services Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Neighborhood Services Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

City Manager
Douglas A. Selby

Deputy City Manager
Steven P. Houchens

Deputy City Manager
Elizabeth N. Fretwell

Deputy City Manager
Orlando Sanchez

Office of Business Development Director
Scott D. Adams

Labor
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
This publication is a joint effort of the Office of Business Development and the Planning and Development Department. You may contact them at:

The Southern Nevada Workforce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Employment by Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Fastest Growing Occupations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Employment Projections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Employment & Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Unemployment Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Mean Wages by Occupation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Workers’ Compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Redevelopment Agency
Overview of the Redevelopment Agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Recent Redevelopment Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Redevelopment Agency Assistance Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Letter from the Executive Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 City of Las Vegas Redevelopment Agency Fast Track Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Redevelopment Area Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

Planning & Development Director
Margo Wheeler

CONTRIBUTING STAFF Office of Business Development
Jimmie Pegues, Brenda J. Hughes

Planning and Development
Richard Wassmuth

Location/Transportation
Office of Business Development
400 Stewart Ave. Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 (702) 229-6551 www.lasvegasnevada.gov/obd

Central Access to Major Markets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Airports & Air Cargo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Common Carrier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Trucking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Railways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Regional Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

Nevada Development Authority
Introduction/Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

Planning and Development
Rita Schoonmaker

Contact Information
Economic Development Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Workforce Development Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Regulatory Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Research Agencies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Chambers of Commerce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Las Vegas City Hall Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

CREATIVE Creative Director
Erich Victa, Victagraphics, LLC

Planning and Development Department
Development Services Center 731 South 4th St. Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 (702) 229-6301 www.lasvegasnevada.gov/planning

Maps
Council Ward/Zip Code Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Master Planned Communities Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Directional Map of Downtown Las Vegas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Art Director
Larry Fukuoka, Victagraphics, LLC

Printing
CLV Graphic Arts Services

Preface
We are pleased to provide you with the most useful business tool the city of Las Vegas has to offer the Las Vegas Community Profile. The Las Vegas Community Profile is designed to give readers a thumbnail sketch of the Las Vegas community. Many of you have heard about the strength of Las Vegas as a gaming and entertainment venue, but we are certain the following pages will provide insight into what Las Vegas has to offer as a place to live, work and do business. As you view the pages that follow, you will find information on an array of topics such as business and redevelopment, labor, demographics, land use, transportation and quality of life, accompanied by accurate facts and figures. We believe the information found in this booklet is well-suited to answer many of the basic questions you may have about the Las Vegas Metropolitan Statistical Area. We believe the information is vital whether you are planning to expand an already existing business or relocate a new business to our community. Readers will find the booklet a great source of information about doing business in Las Vegas, and we hope it will help you succeed with your company. If you have suggestions on how we can improve our publication, please take a moment to contact us. We look forward to working with you throughout the coming year should you decide to relocate or expand your enterprise to Las Vegas.

Frequently Asked Questions About Las Vegas Tourism
LAS VEGAS TOURISM: BY THE NUMBERS Questions 2004 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. How many visitors come to Las Vegas? What is tourism’s economic impact? How many convention delegates visit? How many conventions are held per year? Convention’s non-gaming impact? What is Clark County’s gaming revenue? What is Las Vegas’ gaming revenue? What is the average gambling budget per trip? What is Las Vegas’ city-wide occupancy? What is Las Vegas’ hotel occupancy? What is Las Vegas’ motel occupancy? What is Las Vegas’ weekend occupancy? What is Las Vegas mid-week occupancy? What is the U.S. national average occupancy? Total enplaned/deplaned airline passengers? What is the average nightly room rate? How many hotel rooms are in Las Vegas? What is the average # of nights tourists stay? What percent of visitors are under 21? What is the average age of visitors? What percent are first-time visitors? What percent of visitors are from So. California? What percent of visitors are international? 37,388,781 $33.7 Billion 5,657,796 24,463 $6.9 Billion $8.7 Billion $6.8 Billion $545 88.6% 92.0% 68.7% 95.0% 85.5% 61.3% 41,441,531 $90 131,503 3.6 nights 10% 49.0 19% 27% 13% Answers 2005 38,566,717 $36.7 Billion 6,166,194 22,154 $7.6 Billion $9.7 Billion $7.6 Billion $627 89.2% 91.8% 72.0% 95.0% 86.6% 63.1% 44,267,362 $103 133,186 3.5 nights 9% 47.7 18% 29% 12%
BUSINESS CLIMATE

Sincerely,

City of Las Vegas Office of Business Development City of Las Vegas Department of Planning and Development

Source: Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority (March 2006)

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Las Vegas at a Glance
Existing Land Use
Size: 131.2 square miles Average Elevation: 2,162 feet Population Density Per Square Mile: 4,390 Population: 575,973 Water Tender: 1 Fire Stations: 15 Insurance Rating: Class 1 Peak Day Demand: 476,000,000 gallons per day Hardness: 284 MG/L

How to Open a Business in Las Vegas
Steps for Opening a Business in Las Vegas
Step One: Create a Corporation, Limited Liability Company, Partnership or Sole Proprietorship Legal Organization. Corporations and Limited Liability Companies (LLC) created must file Articles of Incorporation or Articles of Organizations with the Nevada Secretary of State. (http://sos.state.nv.us) Contact: Nevada Secretary of State Office 555 E. Washington Ave., Ste. 2900 Las Vegas, NV 89101 (702) 486-2880 Step Two: Obtain a Fictitious Name Certificate (DBA): If you choose to use a name other than your own, you must file a fictitious business name with the Clark County Clerk’s Office to identify the owner(s). This action applies to all forms of ownership – corporations, LLCs, sole proprietorships and partnerships. For additional information, visit the Clark County Web site at: www.accessclarkcounty.com/clerk/FNN.htm Select: County Service (Departments A-D) Clerk Quick Index Fictitious Firm Name subject to a use tax. All of the necessary forms, as well as detailed information, can be obtained from the Department of Taxation's Web site at: http://tax.state.nv.us Contact: Department of Taxation 555 E. Washington Ave, Ste. 1300 Las Vegas, NV 89101 (702) 486-2300 Step Five: Obtain a Local Business License: In the state of Nevada, all new businesses are required to obtain a license within the city/county in which they operate. From the city of Las Vegas Web site, you can complete and submit the business license application and review its corresponding instructions. Web Address: www.lasvegasnevada.gov Select: Departments Finance & Business Services Business Services Division General Licensing
BUSINESS CLIMATE

BUSINESS CLIMATE

Utilities/Services
Electric Supplier: Nevada Power Company Distributor: Nevada Power Company Generating Capacity: 2,161 Megawatts Peak Load: 4,969 megawatts Major Energy Sources: coal, natural gas, purchase power Residential Rates: Customer Charge: $6.00 per meter per month Consumption Charge per kWh All Usage: $0.9133 + 0.00039 Commercial/Industrial Transmission Rates: Customer Charge: $280.00 per meter per month Facility Charge: $1.22 per kW Demand Charge per kWh Summer Demand On-Peak Mid-Peak Off-Peak Other Periods $8.33 $0.47 $0.00 $0.22 $0.08985 $0.07607 $0.05739 $0.07541

Government
Type: Council/Manager Total Budget: 2002/2003 2003/2004 2004/2005 2005/2006

$692,922,464 $879,809,087 - $1,227,617,791 - $1,193,833,716

Combined Property Tax Rate: 3.2812 per $100.00 assessed value Entity Property Tax-rate Trend 2000/2001 - .6783 2001/2002 - .6765 2002/2003 - .6765 2003/2004 - .6765 2004/2005 - .6765 2005/2006 - .6765 Planning Commission: Yes Industrial Plans Approval: Yes Zoning Regulations: Yes Industrial Revenue Bond (IRB) Financing: Yes IRB Limit: $10,000,000 Repayment Period: Up to 40 years by law IRB Funds May Be Used For: land, buildings, equipment and manufacturing

Rates: 2-inch meter Daily Service Charge: $0.3820 Consumption Rate/1,000 gallons Tier I: $1.05; Tier I Max Charge – 40,000 Gallons: $53.46* Tier II $1.75; Tier II Max Charge – 80,000 Gallons: $123.46* Tier III $2.38; Tier III Max Charge – 560,000 Gallons: $1,265.86* Tier IV $3.02; Tier IV Max Charge, Over 560,000 Gallons the Rate is $3.02 + Service Charge ** Includes Service Charge

Sewer
Service Provider: City of Las Vegas Sanitary: Coverage 100% Storm: Coverage: 0% Treatment Plant: Secondary trickling filter and chemical treatment for phosphorous removal, activated sludge for ammonia removal, filtration Capacity: 102,000,000 gallons/day Present Load: 68,400,000 gallons/day

Contact: Dept. of Finance & Business Services 400 Stewart Ave., 3rd Floor Las Vegas, NV 89101 (702) 229-6281 www.lasvegasnevada.gov Step Six: If required, obtain a special permit. As a new business, you may be required by the city to obtain additional permits from Health, Police, Fire or Building and Safety Departments. Please see contact information below: Agency: State Contractors Board www.nscb.state.nv.us (702) 486-1100 Public Transportation Permits www.state.nv.us/b&i/tsa (702) 486-3303 Air Quality Permits www.co.clark.nv.us/air_quality (702) 455-5942 Elderecare/Other Care-Related Businesses www.hr.state.nv.us (702) 486-6515 Restaurants/Food Service www.cchd.org (702) 759-1258 For more information contact the Nevada Small Business Development Center at: www.nsbdc.org
Source: Nevada Small Business Development Center (July 2005)

Natural Gas
Supplier: El Paso Natural Gas Co. & Kern River Distributor: Southwest Gas Corp. Rating: Varies from 1,010 to 1,030 BTU/CF Industrial Rates: 2005 - 2006 Small Customer: $21.50 per meter per month + $1.11618 per therm Medium Customer: $30.00 per meter per month + 1.06563 therm

Solid Waste
Container Service Rates – Quarterly 2Wk Pu 6Wk Pu $229.26 $496.53 $459.27 $878.31 $688.89 $1,260.00 $918.51 $1641.75 7Wk Pu $596.61 $1,056.82 $1,515.15 $1,974.30

Contact: Clark County Clerk 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy., 6th Floor Las Vegas, NV 89155 (702) 455-4431 Step Three: Obtain a State Business License: All businesses operating in Nevada must obtain a state business license issued by the Department of Taxation. You will need to obtain your state business license, sales and use tax permits and seller’s permit. All of the necessary forms, as well as detailed information, can be obtained from the Department of Taxation's Web site at: http://tax.state.nv.us Select: General Purpose Forms you will need to complete: 1. Nevada Business Registration Form 2. Supplemental Application Form

Emergency Services
Police Personnel: 4,289 Full-Time Positions Commissioned Officers: 2,100 Civilian: 1,180 Detention Services: 689 Airport: 70 Fire & Rescue Personnel: Total Uniformed/Civilian: 622 Fire Equipment: Pumpers/Engines: 19 Ladder Trucks: 6 Mobile Command Post: 1 Hazmat Vehicle: 1 Paramedic Rescue Units: 17 Mobile Air and Light Unit: 1 Heavy Rescue Unit: 1 Bomb Squad: 1

1 Yard 2 Yard 3 Yard 4 Yard

Las Vegas Contact:
Large Customer: $150.00 per meter per month + $1.01213 per therm Office of Business Development 400 Stewart Ave. 2nd Floor Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 (702) 229-6551 (702) 385-3128 fax Web site: www.lasvegasnevada.gov/OBD E-mail: OBD@lasvegasnevada.gov

Water
Supplier: Las Vegas Valley Water District Source: Colorado River (Lake Mead), wells Maximum Daily Capacity: 745,000,000 gallons per day 2005 Demand Forcast: 177,902,634,000 gallons

Source: Office of Business Development (January 2006)

Contact: Department of Taxation 555 E. Washington Ave., Ste. 1300 Las Vegas, NV 89101 (702) 486-2300 Step Four: If required, obtain a retail sales permit. Every business owner must check with the Department of Taxation to determine if a resale permit and/or an exemption certificate is required, or if the business is

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How to Incorporate a Business in Nevada
Incorporating a Business in Nevada
The laws of the state of Nevada are considered to be very liberal with respect to the formation and maintenance of corporations. The statutory law in Nevada, for the most part, tracks that of Delaware, which attracts a large number of corporations. In Nevada, there are no IRS information-sharing agreements, stockholders are not public record, and annual fees are nominal. The only actions necessary to keep a corporation in good standing are to maintain a resident agent in the state and to file a list of current officers and resident agents annually with the Secretary of State before the anniversary date of the formation of the corporation. The Articles of Incorporation do not require a specification of the exact nature of the business to be conducted. A statement that a business will conduct lawful activity is considered sufficient. The name of a corporation cannot be the same or deceptively similar to the name of any existing corporation in the state; however, clearance may be obtained in advance from the Secretary of State as to the acceptability of a proposed name, which may be reserved for a period of time upon payment of a small fee. There are provisions for professional corporations, limited partnerships, limited liability companies, close corporation and non-profit corporations, the rules of which are similar to those in most other states. Before proceeding with the actual formation of a corporation, applicants may wish to consult with an attorney to assure compliance with all applicable rules and regulations. International companies relocating to Las Vegas should hire an immigration attorney and use respective embassy or consulate commercial sections for help with industryspecific products. For convenient reference, a delineation of the fees charged by the Secretary of State for filing of articles is set forth as follows: Amount Fees $75,000 or less . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$75.00 Over $75,000 and not over $200,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$175.00 Over $200,000 and not over $500,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$275.00 Over $500,000 and not over $1,000,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$375.00 Over $1,000,000 For the first $1,000,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$375.00 For each additional $500,000 or fraction thereof . . . . . . . . . . . .$275.00 Maximum fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$35,000.00 Same-day 24-hour service is available for an additional fee of $125.00.
Further information may be obtained by accessing: http://sos.state.nv.us
Source: Nevada Secretary of State (October 2005)

How to Obtain a Business License
Obtaining a Business License in Las Vegas
A business license is required to operate a business in the city of Las Vegas. Each of the following government entities has its own licensing agency that issues licenses to businesses located within that particular entity: Las Vegas, Clark County, Boulder City, Henderson, Mesquite, North Las Vegas and the state of Nevada. The location, type of business and mode of operation will determine the type of license necessary and political entity from whom the license should be obtained. CITY OF LAS VEGAS
Finance and Business Services Div. 400 Stewart Ave. Las Vegas, NV 89101 (702) 229-6281 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. www.lasvegasnevada.gov

BUSINESS CLIMATE

BUSINESS CLIMATE

CITY OF NORTH LAS VEGAS
Business License 2200 Civic Center Dr. North Las Vegas, NV 89030 (702) 633-1521 8:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. www.cityofnorthlasvegas.com

CLARK COUNTY
Business License Department 500 Grand Central Pkwy., 3rd Fl. Las Vegas, NV 89106 (702) 455-4252 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. www.co.clark.nv.us/

CITY OF HENDERSON
Business License 240 Water St., P.O. Box 95050 Henderson, NV 89009 (702) 267-1730 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. www.cityofhenderson.com

STATE OF NEVADA (BUSINESS LICENSE)
Nevada Department of Taxation 555 E. Washington Ave., Ste. 1300 Las Vegas, NV 89101 (702) 486-2300 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. http://tax.state.nv.us

CITY OF MESQUITE
City Hall – Mesquite 10 E. Mesquite Blvd. Mesquite, NV 89027 (702) 346-5295 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. www.mesquitenv.com/services/

General Licenses
Within 30 days of opening your business, you must apply for a general license at the city of Las Vegas Department of Finance and Business Services. Applications for a home occupation business may be filed at the Development Services Center at 731 S. 4th St. Sole proprietorships with no sales and no employees are not required to obtain a sales tax permit. All others must apply at the Department of Taxation. When applying for a business license, the applicant will be asked for copies of the following documents as applicable: Articles of Incorporation, Certificate of Fictitious Firm Name, State License Documentation, Insurance Binder or Letter of Intent, Original Bond, a letter of authorization, and a lease for use or proof of ownership of the business location. In addition, applicants representing corporations should have the name, title, Social Security Number, date of birth, citizenship, residential address, telephone number and percent ownership in the company of the top three corporate officers and the local manager. The name and address of the corporation’s Nevada resident agent is also needed.

Special Licenses
Some businesses must obtain a special license. These businesses include: burglar alarm installation, child care, gun sales and distribution, gaming, liquor sales and distribution, locksmiths, massage, martial arts, pawnbrokers, psychic arts and secondhand dealers. Restaurants and taverns opening in the city’s Entertainment District qualify for reduced rates on their liquor licenses. To obtain an application or receive more information, please contact the city of Las Vegas Department of Finance and Business Services at (702) 229-6321.

Secretary of State 555 E. Washington Ave., Suite 2900 Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 (702) 486-2880

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How to Obtain a Business License

(continued)

How to Write a Business Plan
How to Write a Business Plan
There is no formula for writing a business plan. Each plan will be as unique as the business and its owner(s). The plan should reflect the personality and management style of the company. The business plan should be in writing and contain only those specific areas of operation that will directly affect the company’s success. It should be only as long as is necessary and should contain only the general plan and financial data. Generally, about ten pages should be sufficient. Management should write the plan – not rely on others who will not be involved in decision making. Finally, the plan is just that – a plan. It serves only to guide the business, not dictate decisions. If used correctly, it can become the most valuable tool the small-businessperson has.
BUSINESS CLIMATE

License fees and methods of assessment are not uniform among the political entities in the Las Vegas Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is suggested that firms considering a new facility in southern Nevada contact the respective licensing agencies to determine what the fees will be. Below is a sample of a “gross schedule” of license fees, based on a six-month gross for a city of Las Vegas license.
BUSINESS CLIMATE

LICENSE FEE GROSS SCHEDULE (SAMPLE) Six-Month Gross
$0 - $12,000 12,001 - 18,000 18,001 - 24,000 24,001 - 30,000 30,001 - 45,000 45,001 - 90,000 90,001 - 135,000 135,001 - 180,000 180,001 - 240,000

6-Month Fee
$25.00 30.00 42.00 54.00 66.00 78.00 90.00 100.00 120.00

Six-Month Gross
240,001 - 300,000 300,001 - 360,000 360,001 - 420,000 420,001 - 480,000 480,001 - 540,000 540,001 - 600,000 600,001 - 660,000 660,001 - 720,000 720,001 - 780,000

6-Month Fee
167.00 200.00 230.00 270.00 300.00 350.00 370.00 400.00 440.00

Six-Month Gross

6-Month Fee

780,001 - 840,000 470.00 840,001 - 900,000 500.00 900,001 - 960,000 540.00 960,001 - 1,020,000 570.00 1,020,001 - 1,080,000 600.00 1,080,001 - 1,140,000 640.00 1,140,001 - 1.200,000 670.00 1,200,001 - and over multiply gross sales by .00056.

Sample Business Plan Outline:
A business plan should cover the 10 topics below, along with supporting materials. Note: Section 10 is the most detailed; section one may be written last.

State of Nevada Business License
Per NRS 364A.130, all companies that conduct business within the state of Nevada are required to obtain a Nevada Business License. An application for a business license must be made to the Department of Taxation. To obtain an application, contact the department at http://tax.state.nv.us

BUSINESS PLANS - 10 TOPICS ✓ Executive Summary ✓ The Company (Present Situation) ✓ Objectives ✓ Management and Personnel ✓ Market Analysis - Customers

✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓

Competition Market Strategy Pricing and Profitability Operations Financial Statements

For more information, contact the Nevada Small Business Development Center at: www.nsbdc.org
Source: Nevada Small Business Development Center (July 2005)

Who Has Jurisdiction
Assorted government agencies have specific jurisdiction over various functions involved in starting a business in Nevada. In order to clarify which level of government to consult for assistance, the following list is provided.

WHO HAS JURISDICTION
Forming a New Corporation Registering a Foreign Corporation Workers’ Compensation (State) Written Workplace Safety Program Sales Tax Business Tax Other Taxes Unemployment Insurance Contractor's License Motor Vehicles Property Tax Air Pollution Permits Business Licenses Fictitious Name State State State State State State State State State State County County Local County Nevada Secretary of State Nevada Secretary of State Nevada Division of Industrial Relations Nevada Division of Industrial Relations Nevada Department of Taxation Nevada Department of Taxation Nevada Department of Taxation Nevada Employment Security Nevada Contractors' Board Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles Clark County Assessor Clark County Air Pollution Respective Licensing Department County Clerk

Source: City of Las Vegas Finance and Business Services, City of Las Vegas Office of Business Development (January 2006)

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How to Find Venture Capital
Locating Operating/Venture Capital
One of the keys to a successful business startup is the ability to obtain and secure appropriate financing. Raising capital is the most basic of all business activities, but it can be a frustrating process. While by law the city of Las Vegas cannot offer operating capital to businesses, the information below focuses on other ways a small business can raise money. There are several resources to consider when looking for financing.

Commercial Development Process Flow
Quick Overview: Commercial Property Development
PROPOSED COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT PROCESS FLOW Process Steps
Assemble property and eliminate all unnecessary property lines Review applicable land use and development standards for the site Apply for land entitlements and privileged licenses Prepare required engineering studies and civil improvement plans Prepare architectural, structural, plumbing, electrical, mechanical, and fire protection plans for building permit Respond to corrections and provide revisions to plan check comments Pay fees for plans review, sewer connection, traffic mitigation and desert conservation Obtain building permit and begin construction Call for site inspections as required by Building, Construction Services, Fire and the Planning Department Obtain a final inspection from the building department and apply for your Certificate of Occupancy Obtain approved business license from Planning, Fire, Health District and Business Licensing departments

BUSINESS CLIMATE

Procedural Tasks
Revert subdivided property to eliminate all unnecessary property lines. Utilize reversionary final maps or parcel maps to assemble your site early in the development process. Review existing land use and zoning designations for the site you intend to develop. Your plans may require you to apply for various land entitlements or privileged business licenses. Meet with the Planning Department to determine what, if any, land entitlements will be required before you can begin any construction on your development site. The conditions of approval associated with your land entitlements will require you to prepare and complete various engineering studies and civil improvement plans. Your architect will be required to submit an application for a building permit for your proposed development. The building permit application will be reviewed against your land entitlements and building and fire codes before it is approved for construction. The failure of the owner, architect, or contractor to respond to revisions requested throughout the plan check process will cause unnecessary delays for approval of your proposed development. When your building permit application is approved, you will be required to pay the fees associated with the proposed development. Most of the fees collected are distributed to agencies other than the Building Department. Many permits are issued with deferred submittals. These permits will include "inspection holds" if the deferred submittals are not provided to the Building Department as required. Your approved building permit will include a series of required site inspections by various city agencies. The Building Department final inspection will be delayed if the other agencies have not approved the site for occupancy and signed your inspection hard card. No one can occupy a new development until a Certificate of Occupancy has been issued by the Building Department. Plan the opening of your establishment after you have received your Certificate of Occupancy for the site. In addition to your Certificate of Occupancy you must also have an approved business license prior to opening your doors for business. Each business must have a Certificate of Occupancy and a valid business license to operate in the city.

BUSINESS CLIMATE

VENTURE CAPITAL RESOURCES Types of Loans
Short-Term Loans Long-Term Loans

Purpose
Working capital, accounts receivables and lines of credit Real estate, equipment, facilities, durable goods, furniture, vehicles One year

Term

Normally one to seven years; up to 25 years for real estate and equipment

SBA Loans
7(a) Loan Guaranty Program (LGP) Expand or renovate facilities, purchase machinery, working capital Serves women, veteran and minorityowned businesses Business Startups and businesses with less than $6 million in sales Finance export businesses Five to 10 years for working capital; 25 years for real estate and fixed assets Max: $700,000 Term same as 7(a) LGP Max Loan: $250,000 Term same as 7(a) LGP Max Loan: $150,000 or 85% of loan amount 10-year working capital; 10-15 years for machinery; 25 years for real estate Max Loan: $250,000 Up to 5 years SBA provides 85% guarantee Max Loan: $200,000 Up to 25 years Max Loan: $1.25 million Up to 20 years Max Loan: $100,000 - $1,300,000 Max Loan; $500 - $35,000 Term is variable

7(a) Pre-Qualification Loan Program Low Documentation Loans SBA Export Express Loans

CAPLines (Five programs available) International Trade Loans

Provide working capital needs

Finances businesses engaged in international trade to purchase warehouse facilities, equipment , etc. Provides long-term, fixed assets subordinate mortgage financing for acquisition or renovation of capital assets Working capital, machinery Fills gap between available venture capital and needs of business Provides debt equity investment and management assistance Internet-based service that provides information on business startup to angel investors interested in providing venture capital

SBA 504 Loan Program

7(m) Microloan Program Small Business Investment Company

ACE-Net Angel Capital Electronic Network

Loans: $250,000 - $5 million

VENTURE CAPITAL RESOURCES Agency
Angel Capital Association Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology Nevada Ventures

Web Site
www.angelcapital association.org www.newnevada.com

Agency
Sierra Angels Vegas Valley Angels

Web Site
www.sierraangels.com www.angel-investor-network.com

www.nvven.com

Technology Business Alliance of Nevada

www.technevada.org/sponsor

For more information, contact the Office of Business Development at (702) 229-6551.
Source: Office of Business Development (January 2006)

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Development Service Center “One Stop Shop” Help Guide
Initial contact with the city may be in many forms, since the development process relates to both off-site and on-site development projects. Whether customers are obtaining a permit for a perimeter fence, a new building, remodel or street/landscaping improvements, the Development Services Center is the first point of contact. Listed below is a guide for services provided at the Development Services Center.
BUSINESS CLIMATE

Real Estate Financing
Financing a project is central to economic development and redevelopment. The availability of financing is one of the most critical factors in real estate development, affecting what gets built, where, when, and by whom. Few developers can complete a project using their own money. Most look to private sector lenders, equity investors, for financial assistance. Typically most lenders will only lend up to 60% - 80% of a project. Developers bridge this gap by providing their own equity, or equity from a partnership or joint venture. Public participation, especially providing incentives, is generally based on the understanding that a project would not happen but for the use of incentives to finance it. Included below is a typical private sector financial process along with some public sector financial tools that can be utilized when developing a project.

BUSINESS CLIMATE

DEVELOPMENT SERVICES GUIDE Building and Safety Information Desk
Building permit applications On-site plans checks ■ Plans check submittals ■ Call (702) 229-6251 for general information and appointments
■ ■

Cashier’s Desk
All fees are paid here Approved permits are picked up here after payment ■ Building code appeal applications ■ Call (702) 229-6251 for general information and appointments
■ ■

Part I: Private Sector Real Estate Financing Process
Typically the financing options of developers are limited only by the economics of the project—the attractiveness of the financing package to investors. The financial structure that the developer chooses can have a significant impact on the profitability of a project. Below is a typical financing procedure for a real estate project: 1. A developer obtains or contracts to purchase or lease a parcel of land and then prepares a development plan. 2. The developer secures a long-term, fixed-interest rate mortgage from a long-term lender or institutional investor such as an insurance company. 3. Since the developer is expected to provide equity, he/she secures a letter of intent from an anchor tenant promising to locate in the building. With a long-term lending commitment the developer can then go to a commercial bank to obtain a short-term construction loan or operating capital. 4. Construction loans are drawn down as construction is completed.

Plans Information Desk
Setbacks and zoning Height of buildings ■ Home-based business and business license ■ Demographics and future planning ■ Call (702) 229-6301 for general information and appointments
■ ■

Public Works Land Development Desk
Civil/off-site plans and bonds Encroachments, deviations and covenants ■ Subdivisions and civil mylars ■ Sewer taps, water taps, driveways, cuts, sidewalk replacement ■ Call (702) 229-6371 for general information and appointments
■ ■

Fire Protection Office/Special Use Hazards (Fuel/Propane/HAZMAT) (2nd Floor)
Utility civil drawings (i.e., zoning changes, use permits, variances, etc.) ■ Building plan ■ Special use hazards (fuel/Propane/HAZMAT) ■ Fire protection systems (fire sprinklers/fire alarms) ■ Call (702) 229-5397 for general information and appointments

Public Works Development Coordination Section (2nd Floor)
■ ■

Comments and coordination prepared for land use applications Call (702) 229-6578 for general information and appointments

Part II: Public Sector Financing Tools
Public entities often use bonds to finance various projects and services. Bonds are especially useful for redevelopment projects that may involve a substantial investment, but lack financial resources. Bonds help communities spread the cost of a project over its life span. Public debt, in the form of municipal bonds, provides a community with the ability to build now and repay debt later with future income. Public use bonds are used for purposes such as highways, schools, bridges, sewers, jails, parks and government buildings. A major benefit of bonds is a relatively low interest rate. Below are examples of public/local funding tools used for development projects:

Public Works Flood Control Section (2nd Floor)
Drainage studies Reviews civil improvement plans for drainage ■ Comments prepared for land use applications ■ Call (702) 229-6541 for general information and appointments
■ ■

Public Works Transportation Planning Section (2nd Floor)
■ ■

Comments and coordination prepared for land use applications Call (702) 229-6578 for general information and appointments

PUBLIC SECTOR FINANCING TOOLS Other Public Works Sections (2nd Floor)
Right of Way, 731 S. 4th St. – Call (702) 229-6541 Roadway Planning, 731 S. 4th St. – Call (702) 229-6541 Sanitary Sewer Planning, 731 S. 4th St. – Call (702) 229-6541 Survey (West Service Center), 3001 Ronemus Dr. – Call (702) 229-2450

Public Works Plans Library (2nd Floor)
Civil plans, subdivisions copy/storage Capital Improvement plans/storage Call (702) 229-2149 for general information and appointments

Tax Increment Financing
Tool to help fund private development in strategic areas ■ Public investment is reimbursed by future incremental tax revenue ■ Finances infrastructure, property acquisition, relocation assistance, façade improvements

General Obligation Bonds
Usually requires voter approval Funds major projects that do not otherwise have a revenue source such as arenas, parks, museums, offices, infrastructure, land write-downs ■ Backed by full faith and credit of the local government
■ ■

Public Use Revenue Bonds
Types include utilities, transportation, education, and non-essential public items ■ Paid solely from the earnings of a particular project ■ May have to be backed by debt service ■ Often does not require a public referendum

Type of Plans Review
Building Plan Review Civil Improvements Plans Review Subdivision Maps

Department
Building and Safety Department Public Works Land Development Division Planning and Development Department

Contact Phone Number
(702) 779-6251 (702) 229-6371 (702) 229-6301

Industrial Revenue Bonds/ Private Activity Bonds
Used for land, building and machinery Project must increase employment, job retention, etc. ■ Qualifies for tax exemption under “Small Issues Exception” ■ Limited to $10 million
■ ■

Tax Abatements (State)
Provides for a reduction or exemption of taxpayers obligation to pay taxes ■ Usually only applies to the incremental tax created from the development ■ Often applies to property taxes, sometimes sales taxes ■ Can be legislated or negotiated ■ Easy to understand and implement

Federal Grants & Loans
New Market Tax Credits ■ Investors receive up to 39%. Project must remain viable for seven years. SBA 504 Loans ■ Used to purchase/remodel existing buildings and capital equipment ■ Long-term fixed rate for small businesses: $4 million for manufacturing, $2 million for special purpose ■ Financed: 50% bank; 40% SBA; 10% equity

For more information, contact the Department of Planning and Development at (702) 229-6301.
Source: Planning and Development Department (January 2006)

For more information contact the Office of Business Development at (702) 229-6551.
Source: International Economic Development Council (2005); Office of Business Development (January 2006)

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Construction & Impact Fees
CITY OF LAS VEGAS BUILDING PERMIT FEES, SEWER & WATER CONNECTION FEES & IMPACT FEES*
BUSINESS CLIMATE

Planning & Development Department Application Fees
PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT - FEE SCHEDULE
Title 18 (Subdivisions & Related)
Tentative Map Final Map Parcel Map Extension of Time Vacation Petition Boundary Line Adjustment Waiver Application (non-public hearing) Waiver Application (public hearing) Notification/Advertising Fee $750 $750 $300 $300 $500, plus Notification/Advertising Fee $300 $300 $300, plus Notification/Advertising Fee $300

Fee Type

Costs/Fees
$35 issuance fee for each permit ■ $14 minimum permit fee, plus a zoning check fee if applicable ■ Building permit fees are based on construction valuation. – $561 for the first $100,000 of valuation, plus $3.10 for each additional thousand dollars of valuation.

BUSINESS CLIMATE

Building Permit Fees

Title 19 (Zoning Applications - General)

Plans Review Fees

65% of the building permit fee and 5% Zoning Check Fee ■ Additional Residential Combination Fees: – Mechanical Permit Fee is 15% of Building Permit Fee – Plumbing Permit Fee is 20% of Building Permit Fee – Electrical Permit Fee is 20% of Building Permit Fee

Sewer Connection Fees

$1,720 Equivalent Residential Unit (ERU). ■ Commercial fee is a percentage of ERU. ■ Fee percentage is dependent on the type of business. ■ Fees are based on occupancy usage and number of drainage fixtures. ■ Each fixture is counted to determine the fee – sink, toilet, hose bib, etc. ■ Single family home fee is $1,720 each. ■ Condo fees are $1,720 plus $774 for each fixture outside dwelling. ■ Apartment fees are $1,204 plus $774 each fixture outside dwelling.
■ ■

State of Nevada Transportation Fees

$.75 per square foot for commercial construction. For residential construction, the fee is $700 per single family dwelling.

General Plan Amendment Master Plan of Streets & Highways Amendment Rezoning Extension of Time (non-public hearing) Extension of time (public hearing) Administrative Site Development Plan Review (non-public hearing) Site Development Plan Review (non-public hearing) Site Development Plan Review (public hearing) Review of Condition (non-public hearing) Review of Condition (public hearing) Special Use Permit Variance Administrative Deviation Waiver Application (non-public hearing)* Waiver Application (public hearing)* Development Agreement Temporary Commercial Permit Home Occupation Permit Street Name Change All Other Applications (non-public hearing) All Other Applications (public hearing) Notification/Advertising Fee

$1,000, plus Notification/Advertising Fee $900, plus Notification/Advertising Fee $700, plus Notification/Advertising Fee $300 $300, plus Notification/Advertising Fee $500 $500 $500, plus Notification/Advertising Fee $300 $300, plus Notification/Advertising Fee $500, plus Notification/Advertising Fee $300, plus Notification/Advertising Fee $100 $300 $300, plus Notification/Advertising Fee $1,000, plus Notification/Advertising Fee $100 $50 $300, plus Notification/Advertising Fee $300 $300, plus Notification/Advertising Fee $300

Habitat Conservation Plan

$550 per acre. Fees go toward acquiring habitat for the desert tortoise and other endangered fauna and flora. ■ Administration fee - $25.00
■ ■

Title 19 (Special Purpose Districts)
Development Plan Review Minor Modification Major Modification $700 $300 $500, plus Notification/Advertising Fee

Title 19 (Summerlin Applications)

Park Impact Fees

$.36 per square foot of habitable area for residential construction. Fees used to create parks. Regional Connection Charges – Example: Residential home with 3/4” meter - $8,300 – Example: Commercial Development with 2” meter - $42,000
Source: Las Vegas Valley Water District, (702) 870-2011 or (800) 252-2011; www.snwa.com ; “click Uniform Design & Construction Standards,” click “Section 8, Rate Schedule”

City Referral Group Minor Modification Major Modification Minor Deviation Major Deviation

$300 $300 $700, plus Notification/Advertising Fee $300 $300, plus Notification/Advertising Fee

Title 19 (Sign Certificates, Tags and Permits)**
On-Premise Sign (no certificate) On-Premise Sign (with certificate) Off-Premise Sign Off-Premise Sign Renewal Special Event Sign Civic Event/Political Sign Development Entry Sign Community Interior Sign Subdivision Development Sale Sign Subdivision Directional Sign Weekend Directional Sign Construction Sign $300 $.50/square foot $.50/square foot $.50/square foot $100 per event No fee $100 per sign $100 per sign $100 per sign $100 per sign $100 per sign $50/square foot

Water Connection Fees

* For additional information on city service fees, please access the city of Las Vegas’ Web site at: www.lasvegasnevada.gov, then click: “I want to apply for;” click “Permits” then click “Fees and Payment.”
Source: City of Las Vegas Building and Safety Department (January 2006)

Title 19 (Other Fees)

Department of Building and Safety City of Las Vegas 731 S. 4th St. Las Vegas, NV 89101 (702) 229-2406

Annexation Appeal of Director's Decision Zoning Verification Letter Address Change Request Satellite Parking Agreement

$300 $300 $100 $100 $200

* Applies to “stand alone” waiver applications (e.g., re: distance limitations or development standards under Title 19). ** These fees represent Planning & Development Deptartment fees only. Other fees may apply (e.g., Building & Safety fees). For more information, contact the Planning and Development Department at (702) 229-6301.
Source: Planning and Development Department (January 2006)

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Largest Non-Gaming Employers
LARGEST NON-GAMING EMPLOYERS IN LAS VEGAS - 2006
Name
BUSINESS CLIMATE Clark County School District Nellis Air Force Base Clark County State of Nevada Las Vegas Metropolitan Police University of Nevada, Las Vegas University Medical Center City of Las Vegas Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center U.S. Postal Service Knipp Brothers Industries Central Telephone - Nevada City of North Las Vegas Community College of Southern Nevada Citibank National Association GES Exposition Services, Inc. America West Airlines, Inc. Freeman Decorating Services Bechtel SAIC Company LLC Desert Springs Hospital Household Credit Services Nevada Power Company Fluor Constructors Silver State Disposal Services, Inc.

Fastest Growing Industries
No. of Employees
34,000 plus 11,000 plus 9,000 to 9,999 5,000 to 5,999 4,500 to 4,999

Industry
Elementary & Secondary Schools National Security Executive & Legislative Offices Combined State Government Police Protection Colleges and Universities General Medical and Surgical Hospitals Executive & Legislative Offices Combined General Medical and Surgical Hospitals Postal Service Residential Framing Contractors Wired Telecommunications Carriers Executive & Legislative Offices Combined Junior Colleges Credit Card Issuing Convention & Trade Show Organizers Scheduled Passenger Air Transportation Convention and Trade Show Organizers Physical/Engineering/Biological Research General Medical and Surgical Hospitals Credit Card Issuing Electric Power Distribution Power Communication System Constructors Solid Waste Landfill

As of November 2005, the industrial employment count for the Las Vegas Paradise Metropolitian Statistical Area (MSA) was 898,800. Construction accounted for 106,100 jobs; 25,200 were manufacturing; 152,900 were trade, transportation and utilities; 10,200 were information technologies; 51,300 were financial activities; 108,100 were professional and business services; 59,400 were education and health care; 267,100 were in leisure and hospitality and 90,900 were in government. Each major industry group, with the exception of telecommunications, created new jobs over the past year.
Business 2.0 Magazine ranked Las Vegas number one as "where the jobs are going," hottest job growth for this decade, 2003 - 2013.

BUSINESS CLIMATE

LAS VEGAS MSA GROWTH INDUSTRIES
3,500 to 3,999 3,000 to 3,499 2,500 to 2,999 2,000 to 2,499 1,500 to 1,999

Industry
Motor Vehicle Parts Manufacturing Architectural & Structural Metals Non-Depository Credit Intermediation Transportation Equipment Manufacturing Other Ground Passenger Transportation Activities Relative to Credit Intermediation Electronic Instrument Manufacturing Paper/Paper Product Merchant Wholesalers Electronics & Appliance Stores ISPs & Web Search Portals

Growth Rate %
6.7 6.0 5.9 5.7 5.7 5.6 5.6 5.6 5.1 5.1

1,000 to 1,499

For more information access: www.nevadaworkforce.com
Source: Nevada Department of Employment Training and Rehabilitation (January 2006)

Forbes 2000 Companies
FORBES 2000 COMPANIES WITH A MAJOR PRESENCE IN LAS VEGAS
Forbes Rank 1 4 27 Company Name Citigroup Bank of America Wells Fargo Merrill Lynch Home Depot US Bancorp Coca-Cola Walgreen HCA Union Pacific Clear Channel Communications Forbes Rank 328 339 446 604 664 723 801 842 869 887 1,020 Company Name Johnson Controls Coca-Cola Enterprises Pulte Homes Kerr-McGee Southwest Airlines MGM Mirage KB Homes PacifiCare Health Harrah's Entertainment Caesars Entertainment AMR 1,114 1,120 1,196 1,303 1,354 1,979 Forbes Rank 1,060 1,070 1,088 Company Name UAL Delta Airlines International Gaming Technology Las Vegas Sands Rite Aid Northwest Airlines Continental Airlines Mandalay Resort Group Sierra Pacific Resources

For additional information visit: www.nevadaworkforce.com
Source: State of Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (2nd Quarter 2005)

Largest Gaming Employers
LAS VEGAS
Hotel/Casino
Bellagio, LLC Wynn MGM Grand Hotel Mandalay Bay Resort Mirage Casino Hotel Rio Suite Hotel & Casino Caesars Palace Treasure Island Flamingo Hilton Rampart Casino

No. of Employees
9,500 - 9,999 9,000 - 9,999 8,000 - 8,499 8,000 - 8,499 5,000 - 5,999 4,599 - 4,999 3,500 - 3,999 3,500 - 3,999 3,500 - 3,999 3,500 - 3,999

Hotel/Casino
Excalibur Hotel Circus Circus Casino Harrah's Las Vegas Las Vegas Hilton

No. of Employees
3,000 - 3,999 3,000 - 3,499 3,000 - 3,499 3,000 - 3,999

44 72 97 121 218 221 288 299

DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS
Hotel/Casino
Golden Nugget Stratosphere Tower California Hotel

No. of Employees
2,500 - 2,999 2,000 - 2,499 1,500 - 1,999

For additional information visit: www.nevadaworkforce.com
Source: Nevada Dept. of Employment Training and Rehabilitation (2nd Quarter 2005)

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Customer Service & Back Office Operations
EXISTING LAS VEGAS AREA BACK OFFICE/CALL CENTERS (Henderson, Las Vegas, North Las Vegas)
BUSINESS CLIMATE

Telecomunications
Las Vegas’ early adoption of fiber optics and digital switching technologies has made it one of the most sought-after locations in the United States for companies seeking competitive advantages in the information age. Las Vegas’ disaster-free region has also made it the site for the Nevada Network Access Point, North America’s number one Disaster Avoidance Center, free of hurricanes, tornados, earthquakes and ice storms. The NAPs are unique facilities that provide access to more than 100 telecommunications providers at a location away from natural disasters. No facility in the United State has more in-building, on-net national backbone connections from separate tier-one providers. The system has superior carrier interconnectivity with over 3,000 fiber and direct fiber connections. Primary Nevada NAP national fiber backbones are Sprint, Cox, XO Communications, SPC, MCI-UUnet, 360 Communications, Time Warner, Broad Wing, QWest, ELI, Level 3, Xspedius, SBC and Wiltel.
Source: Switch Communications Group (March 2006)

Year Established 1984 1994 1998 1996 1995 1995 1999 2000 1996 1996 1998 2000 1999 2000 1997 1997 1997 1998 1998 1998 1998 1999 1999 2000 2001 2001 2001 2002 2002 2003 2003

Company Name Citibank/CitiGroup HSBC Ramada Vacations NOS Communications 1st National Bank of Marin ClientLogic Nextel Partners Ford Motor Credit Williams-Sonoma Bank of America Sunterra SITEL Corporation Nextel Partners Expedia UPS Teleservices RMA First Performance Corp. California State Auto Assoc. Sallie Mae ADT Security Fairfield Acceptance Miles Kimball Credit Acceptance Corp. Avery Dennison HCA Healthcare IMPAC Estate Recoveries, Inc. NuTek, Inc. Liberty Group American Recovery Services Worldwide Asset Servicing

Location Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Henderson Las Vegas Las Vegas N. Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Henderson Las Vegas Las Vegas Henderson Las Vegas Henderson Henderson Las Vegas Las Vegas

Type of Operation Credit Card Processing Credit Card Processing Time Share Sales and Customer Svc. Telecommunications Credit Card Processing Software Support Services Communications Indirect Financing Catalogue Sales Indirect Auto Loan Processing Time Share Sales and Customer Svc. Outsourced Customer Svc. Support Phone Sales/Customer Service Travelscape.com Software Support Services Collections Collections Claims Processing Student Loans/Collections Customer Service Time Share Sales and Customer Svc. Catalogue Sales Collections Financial Shared Services Center Patient Account Services Medical Billing Credit Card Collections Phone Sales/Customer Service Inbound and Outbound Call Center Commercial Accnts. Rec. Mngmnt. Collection Services/Call Center

# of Employees 2,200 1,350 1,300 1,100 900 775 700 700 600 500 500 500 500 500 450 400 140 275 275 220 180 300 100 90 260 90 15 150 75 89 110

BUSINESS CLIMATE

Further, Sprint, the local telephone company, has spent over $1 billion dollars to upgrade to a high-band fiber optics network and digital switching phone lines. The entire system is tied into a “sonet ring” network to prevent service outages. The following companies also operate fiber Sonet Technology: Cox Communications, IDACOMM, XO and Xspedius. AT&T, Nextlink and Collocation Solutions also operate points of presence in Las Vegas. The wireless assets in Las Vegas include KeyOn, Cingular Wireless, Cox Communications, Digital Satellite Services, Direct TV, Dish Direct Network, Great Western Communications and Silver State Wireless. Las Vegas continues to expand its telecommunications network and is suited to meet the needs of businesses in the 21st Century.

10 LARGEST TELECOMMUNICATIONS & NETWORKING EMPLOYERS IN LAS VEGAS AND THEIR PRODUCTS Company
Sprint

Products and Services
LAN, WAN, payphones, internet, PBX, key systems, Centrex, data, video conferencing, DSL, custom calling features, voicemail, long distance, PCS, pre-paid calling cards

Cox Communications Mpower Communications Nevada Telephone XO Communications Amtel Communications, Inc. SBC Communications Telepacific Communications Comtech Communications, Inc. Impulse Telecom Corp.

Broadband, high-speed Internet, cable television, business services Local & long distance phone service Local & long-distance Phone, ISDN, DSL, Payphones Local dial tone, long distance, Internet access, private line circuits, fiber optic connectivity, Web hosting, e-commerce Business phone systems, data & fiber optic cable, voice mail systems Local & long distance phone service Electronic parts/components, networking wire, connectors, plating, assembly services Commercial telephone systems, voice mail, paging, data cabling Local & long-distance phone, Internet, Web hosting, cellular, paging

Source: Las Vegas Perspective 2005 Edition Source: Switch Communication Group (March 2006); In Business Las Vegas Book of Business Lists, 2006

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Major Business Parks
MAJOR BUSINESS PARKS
Park Name
BUSINESS CLIMATE Las Vegas Technology Center

Planning & Development Department Applications
Size
270 Acres

Major Tenants
Sierra Health Services, Steinberg Diagnostics, State Farm Insurance, Mountain View Hospital, Multi Pure Corp. Hqtrs., Nevada Title, On the Web Stores, Target General, Veterans Administration, Shift 4, Progressive Casualty Insurance Las Vegas Premium Outlets, World Market Center, Internal Revenue Service, Molasky Corporate Center Unique Enterprises, RLT Corp., U.S. Postal Service, Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, University Medical Center Quick Care, FBI, Urban Chamber of Commerce Bank of America, Household Bank, Humana Health Insurance of Nevada, Bechtel SAIC, Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts, Pacific Bell Coca-Cola, Owens Precision, Southwest Mechanical, Citi-Xpress Delivery, Office Plus Fairfield Acceptance, R&R Partners, Sallie Mae, Landowner Realty Executives Merrill Lynch, American Express Financial Services, Prudential

Subdivision map activity decreased during the past year in the city of Las Vegas. Tentative map applications decreased by more than 31%. However, the number of lots decreased by less than 10%. This may be due to the increased applications for condominium/mixed-use projects. Final maps decreased by more than 40% with the number of lots decreasing by 36%.
BUSINESS CLIMATE

PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT APPLICATIONS
2004 Tentative Maps Final Maps Tentative Map Lots/Units Final Map Lots/Units 108 126 13,395 9,777 2005 74 71 12,132 6,256 Percent Change -31.5% -43.7% -9.4% -36.0%

Parkway Center Las Vegas Enterprise Park

200 Acres 74 Acres

The Crossings Business Center

18.8 Acres

Spectrum of Las Vegas Corporate Pointe at Summerlin Center Canyons Center at Summerlin

17.1 Acres 4.96 Acres 6.68 Acres

Building Permits
In 2005, a total of 15,267 building permits were issued, 25% less than in 2004. The number of commercial/ industrial permits, as shown in the charts below, increased slightly. Total valuation in December 2005 was $134,465,929.

Source: In Business Las Vegas 2006, Las Vegas Business Press Book of Lists 2006

Office Parks & Buildings
OFFICE PARKS & BUILDINGS
Company Name
The Crossing Business Center at Summerlin Charleston Festival Sahara Rancho Corporate Center Centennial Gateway Cheyenne Corporate Center Corporate Pointe at Summerlin Centre Las Vegas Technology Center II Molasky Corporate Center Bank of America Plaza Rancho Gowan Business Park Canyons Center at Summerlin City Center West Wells Fargo Financial Center 1700 Vegas Drive Mountain View Professional Park Nevada Financial Center Rainbow Corporate Center Carson Building Westcliff House The Atrium Business Tower Longford Medical Center Red Feather Center Centennial Corporate Center The Plazas at Paseo Del Prado Park Sahara Office Center City Centre Place

BUILDING PERMITS
Gross Sq. Ft.
818,000 444,869 350,000 350,000 318,000 291,000 290,000 265,000 255,164 240,000 216,291 211,928 207,368 186,000 160,000 157,624 152,000 148,879 145,000 138,000 132,000 130,000 127,000 120,000 123,709 103,100

Lease Rates Per Sq. Ft. Per Month
$2.20 NNN, MG, FSG $2.10 - $3.20 NNN $2.20 FSG $1.50 - $4.00 NNN $2.20 - $2.25 MG $1.50 NNN $1.30 - $1.85 MG $3.00 - $3.50 MG $2.40 FSG $1.25 - $1.35 MG $2.10 - $2.25 FSG $2.35 - $2.40 FSG $1.85 FSG $1.25 NNN $1.95 NNN $2.45 FSG $2.25 MG $1.75 - $1.80 FSG $2.00 MG $1.85 FSG $2.20 MG $1.45 - $1.75 NNN $2.10 NNN $1.55 - $1.85 NNN $1.65 - $1.85 FSG $2.25 - $2.62 FSG 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

Total Building Permits
16,572 16,611 16,110 15,809 16,612 14,913 14,477 14,916 18,193 19,147 15,267

Percent Difference
0.6% 0.2% -3.0% 1.9% 5.1% 10.2% -2.9% 3.3% 21.6% 5.2% -25.0%

Commercial/ Industrial Permits
753 779 1,079 1,210 1,055 1,000 818 1,005 886 852 1,093*

Percent Difference
3.5% 36.5% 1.5% 12.1% -12.8% -5.2% 18.2% 22.9% -11.8% -3.8% 28.0%

* This number is a combination of new, addition and remodel permits.
For more information, contact the Department of Building and Safety 731 S. 4th St., Las Vegas, NV 89101, (702) 229-6251
Source: City of Las Vegas Department of Building and Safety (February 2006)

Note: NNN = Triple Net, MG = Modified Gross, FSG = Full Service Gross For more information visit: http://propertyline.com
Source: In Business Las Vegas Book of Lists 2006; LV Business Press Book of Lists 2006, Propertyline.com

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Business Licenses
BUSINESS LICENSES License Year
BUSINESS CLIMATE

Utilities Rates
AVERAGE MONTHLY RESIDENTIAL UTILITY COSTS Percent Change
Service
Electricity Natural Gas Sewer Solid Waste Disposal Telephone Water * Includes service charge
Source: Individual utility companies; Las Vegas Perspective 2005

Active Business Licenses
23,724.00 24,929.00 26,218.00 27,161.00 28,391.00 30,516.00 31,150.00 33,784.00 35,489.00 37,278.00 35,630.00

Major Provider
Nevada Power Company Southwest Gas Corporation City of Las Vegas Republic Services of Southern Nevada Sprint Central Telephone Company Las Vegas Valley Water District

Average Cost*
$122.23 $39.74 $14.57 $11.33 $17.27 $36.07 BUSINESS CLIMATE

1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

5.1% 5.2% 3.6% 4.5% 7.5% 2.1% 8.5% 5.1% 5.0%

SOLID WASTE DISP0SAL - QUARTERLY CONTAINER SERVICE RATES
Container Size
1 yard 2 yard 3 yard 4 yard

2x week pick-up
$229.26 $459.27 $688.89 $918.51

6x week pick-up
$496.53 $876.31 $1,260.00 $1,641.75

7x week pick-up
$596.61 $1,055.82 $1,515.15 $1,974.30

Note: Urban Service Single-Family Residential Rate: $33.83 per quarter.

-4.4%

Source: Republic Services of Southern Nevada (July.2005)

For additional information, contact Business Services Division at (702) 229-6281.
Source: City of Las Vegas Business Services Division (February 2005)

ELECTRIC POWER COST COMPARISON - MAJOR WESTERN CITIES
Commercial Rates Provider
Nevada Power (Las Vegas) Sierra Pacific (Reno) AZ Public Service (Phoenix) LA Dept of W & P PG & E (San Jose) So. Cal. Edison (Los Angeles) San Diego G & E
Source: Las Vegas Perspective 2005

Industrial Rates
1,100,000 kWh & 2,500 kW
(Demand per month)

Residential Rates
Typical NV Power customer
(1,250 kWh per month)

Finance and Business Services 400 Stewart Ave. Las Vegas, NV 89101

21,600 kWh & 50 kW
(Demand per month)

Capital Improvements
Capital Improvement Projects
Las Vegas is consistently rated among the nation’s elite in growth and expansion. This growth has created the need for the city of Las Vegas to provide proper planning and resource management to fulfill its public service requirements. Each year, the city’s Capital Improvement Plan, a multi-year planning document, identifies and prioritizes the need for a variety of public improvements and coordinates their financing and construction time frames. The tables below show the identified needs for planned improvements and funding sources for FY 2006 as well as the total for the next five years. NOTE: Total FY 2006 Budget: $1,193,833,716.

$8.98 $9.97 $7.95 $8.90 $12.67 $11.44 $13.48

$7.88 $9.28 $5.53 $7.65 $11.11 $9.15 $12.58

$9.79 $11.34 $8.97 $10.42 $13.52 $14.55 $16.62

Water Rates
District water rates are based on a four-tier system to encourage conservation. The first tier represents indoor usage for most residential customers. The rate for the remaining tiers becomes increasingly higher. Thresholds mark the level of usage where one tier ends and another begins. Your property's usage thresholds are based on meter size: Tier I - $1.05, Tier II- $1.75, Tier III - $2.38 and Tier IV - $3.02. The following chart shows the maximum rates for the various meter sizes. For example, using the 3” meter, a company will pay $1.05 per 1,000 gallons for the first 80,000 gallons, plus a service charge of $20.36 ($84.00 + 20.36 = $104.36).

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS EXPENDITURES
(Amounts Expressed in Millions)

Department
Public Works Culture & Recreation Sanitation Public Safety General Government Economic Development Total Expenditures

FY 2006
$ 195.2 181.6 39.2 21.6 42.3 12.7 $ 492.6

FY 2005 - 10
$ 804.7 654.0 90.2 112.5 55.6 29.4 $ 1,716.4

COMMON RESIDENTIAL METER SIZES
Meter Size (inches)
5/8

Daily Service Charge
$0.1223

Tier
1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

Threshold (x1000 gallons)
0-5 5.01 - 10 10.01 - 20 20 & over 0 - 7.5 7.50 - 15 15.01 - 30 30 & over

Rate (per 1000 gallons)
$1.05 $1.75 $2.38 $3.02 $1.05 $1.75 $2.38 $3.02

Source: City of Las Vegas Department of Finance’s FY 2006 Budget in Brief Handbook

3/4

$0.1409

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Utility Rates
Water Rates - continued
COMMERCIAL METER SIZES
BUSINESS CLIMATE

Utility Rates
SEWER RATES SCHEDULE
USE CODE 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200 230 240 250 260 270 273 280 290 300 320 330 340 360 410 404 420 430 450 CLASSIFICATION Single Family Residence Two-Family Dwelling Apartment House / Residence Hotel / Assisted Living Apartments plus fixtures outside rooms Public Housing Mult-Family Residence plus fixtures outside rooms Mobile Home Residence & Mobile Home Parks Guest Quarters / Casita Recreation Vehicle Parks plus fixtures Motel/Hotel plus fixtures outside rooms Resort Hotels plus outside fixtures, rooms, casinos & restaurants Senior Apartments plus fixtures outside of dwelling units Casinos Business Not Separately Rated - Wholesale/Service Business Operations Not Separately Rated - Retail Sales (including motor vehicle sales & retail establishments serving food) Restaurant / take out only Restaurant / with seating under 45 Restaurant / with seating 45 or over Restaurants (High Strength) Taverns with Food Taverns without Food Hospital / Specialty Hospital Convalescent Care Facility / Nursing Home / Special Care Facility Custodial Institution Schools, Nurseries & Child Care Facilities Churches Laundromat Laundries High Water Users Sports Complex Mixed Use Offices, Except as otherwise listed Service Establishments, Except as otherwise listed Financial Institutions Theaters Maintenance, Renovation & Repair Shops Private Clubs Barber Shops Beauty Shops Clinics Day Spa Vacant Commercial Community Center Private (With / Without Parcel Number) Cinema Park (public or private) Night Clubs XX0..Domestic Strength Users XX1..High Strength Dairies XX2..High Strength Bottlers XX3..Restaurants w/Garbage Grinders XX4..Laundries XX5..County Property on City Sewer..Equal Rates XX6..North Las Vegas on City Sewer..Equal Rates SWIMMING POOLS 30,000 Gallons or less 30,001 to 99,999 Gallons 100,000 to 149,000 Gallons 150,000 to 199,000 Gallons 200,000 to 249,999 Gallons 250,000 to 299,999 Gallons 300,000 Gallons or more EACH UNIT & ERU EQUIVALENT Dwelling Unit Dwelling Unit Dwelling Unit Fixture Dwelling Unit Fixture Trailer Lot Dwelling Unit Vehicle Space Fixture Room Fixture Room Fixture Dwelling Unit Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Bed Bed Bed Student Fixture Fixture WATER USE x 0.85 90,000 WATER USE 90,000 Fixture WATER USE x 0.85 90,000 Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture Fixture ERU ERU ERU ERU ERU 1.00 1.00 0.70 0.45 0.70 0.45 1.00 0.60 0.70 0.45 0.60 0.75 0.60 1.50 0.50 0.45 1.50 0.45 0.65 0.45 0.65 1.33 1.33 1.00 0.65 1.20 0.75 0.50 0.10 0.25 0.45

(EFFECTIVE 2/1/2006)
ANNUAL SEWER AMT. $208.93 $208.93 $146.25 $94.02 $146.25 $94.02 $208.93 $125.36 $146.25 $94.02 $125.36 $156.70 $125.36 $313.40 $104.47 $94.02 $313.40 $94.02 $135.80 $94.02 $135.80 $277.88 $511.45 $208.93 $135.80 $250.72 $156.70 $104.47 $20.89 $52.23 $94.02 ** SEE BELOW ** SEE BELOW $62.68 ** SEE BELOW $94.02 $94.02 $62.68 $62.68 $62.68 $94.02 $62.68 $104.47 $94.02 $125.36 $52.23 $94.02 $73.13 $94.02 $135.80 $208.93 $273.70 $294.59 $392.79 $275.79 $208.93 $208.93

Meter Size (inches) 1

Daily Service Charge $0.1780

Tier 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

Threshold (x1000 gallons) 0 - 12.5 12.51 - 25 25.01 - 75 75.01 & over 0 - 25 25.01 - 50 50.01 - 250 250.01 & over 0 - 40 40.01 - 80 80.01 - 560 560.01 & over 0 - 80 80.01 - 160 160.01 - 1,440 1,440.01 & over 0 - 125 125.01 - 250 250.01 - 4,000 4,000.01 & over

Rate Meter (per 1000 Size gallons) (inches) $1.05 $1.75 $2.38 $3.02 $1.05 $1.75 $2.38 $3.02 $1.05 $1.75 $2.38 $3.02 $1.05 $1.75 $2.38 $3.02 $1.05 $1.75 $2.38 $3.02 6

Daily Service Tier Charge $1.9402 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

Threshold (x1000 gallons) 0 - 250 250.01 - 500 500.01 - 12,500 12,500.01 & over 0 - 400 400.01 - 800 800.01 - 24,000 24,000.01 & over 0 - 575 575.01 - 1,150 1,150.01 - 40,250 40,250.01 & over 0 - 850 850.01 - 1,700 1,700.01 - 59,500 59,500.01 & over

Rate (per 1000 gallons) $1.05 $1.75 $2.38 $3.02 $1.05 $1.75 $2.38 $3.02 $1.05 $1.75 $2.38 $3.02 $1.05 $1.75 $2.38 $3.02

BUSINESS CLIMATE

1

$0.2707

8

$3.0532

2

$0.3820

10

$4.3517

3

$0.6788

12

$6.3922

4

$1.0127

0.30

Addtional Monthly Charges Description
Southern Nevada Water Authority Commodity Charge Southern Nevada Water Authority Reliability Surcharge

Charge
$.10 for every 1,000 gallons used - Calculated as a percentage of water usage plus service charges: Residential – .25%; Commercial – 2.5%

What do the additional monthly charges mean in terms of my bill?
The new water rates are designed to have a very different impact on customers depending on how much water they use. The goal is to reduce water use, particularly among those with the greatest opportunity to conserve. The following chart, based on an average single-family residential water bill, provides a general idea of how the rate change might affect various residential customers.

500 510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590 600 700 720 730 740 ** ** ** ** ** ** ** CODE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

0.45 0.45 0.30 0.30 0.30 0.45 0.30 0.50 0.45 0.60 0.25 0.45 0.35 0.45 0.65 1.00 1.31 1.41 1.88 1.32

HOW THE NEW WATER RATES AFFECT RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS Usage Category
Lowest 20% Median Home Highest 20%

Monthly Consumption
6,600 gallons 15,100 gallons 32,400 gallons

Previous Bill
$11.29 $23.77 $58.18

New Bill
$12.49 $29.04 $80.61

Change
$1.20 $5.27 $22.43

0.10 0.25 0.50 0.65 0.85 1.00 1.30

$20.89 $52.23 $104.47 $135.80 $177.59 $208.93 $271.61

Source: City of Las Vegas Business License Department (January 2006)

Source: Las Vegas Valley Water District (January 2006)

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Total Amount of Taxable Retail Sales
Taxable retail sales for the Las Vegas MSA in 2005 was $32.4 billion.
TAXABLE RETAIL SALES
BUSINESS CLIMATE $31.00 $26.00 $21.00 $16.00 $11.00 $6.00 $1.00

Nevada Taxes
*Personal Property Taxes - The tax rate for 2005-2006 in the city of Las Vegas is $3.2812 per $100,000 of assessed value of a home. To calculate the tax on a home, let's assume you have a home with a taxable value of $100,000, located in the city of Las Vegas. To determine the assessed value, multiply the taxable value of the home ($100,000) by the assessment ratio (35%): $100,000 X .35 = $35,000 assessed value. To calculate the tax, multiply the assessed value by the tax rate ($3.2812 per hundred dollars of assessed value). $35,000 (assessed value) x .032812 (tax rate) = $1,148 taxes for the 2005-06 fiscal year. Intoxicating Liquor License & Taxes: The tax rate on liquor is based on the percentage of alcohol. Tax rates per gallon are:
BUSINESS CLIMATE

Las Vegas MSA

$32.4 $21.4 $22.8 $22.8 $24.5 $28.1

Sales
($Billions)

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

PERCENT ALCOHOL
0.5% - 14% More than 14% - 20% Over 22% Malt Beverage

TAX RATES
40 cents 75 cents $2.05 9 cents

For more information access: www.tax.state.nv.us
Source: State of Nevada Department Taxation (January 2006)

Nevada Taxes
The benefits to incorporating in Nevada are many. Businesses operating in Nevada are among the least taxed in the nation and are offered opportunities for tax deferrals and abatements based upon their job growth. The following taxes, common in many of the other 49 states, are not imposed in Nevada:

Contact the Nevada State Department of Taxation at www.tax.state.nv.us/taxes for further information.
Source: Nevada Department of Taxation (January 2006)

Department of Taxation 555 E. Washington Ave., Suite 1300 Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 (702) 486-2300

TYPE OF TAX
Franchise Tax Corporate Income Tax Unitary Tax Inventory Tax Personal Income Tax Special Intangible Tax Admissions Tax Sales Tax on Food Chain Store Tax Inheritance Tax

TAXES IMPOSED IN NEVADA
None None None None None None None None None None

Gaming Device Taxes and Fees
QUARTERLY SLOTS, GAMES & GAMING DEVICES FEES Type Regular Slots Dbl. Slots Triple Slots “21” Baccarat Big Six Bingo Craps Units X # Units X # Units X # Units X # Units X # Units X # Units X # Units X # Units Unit Tax @ $30.00 @ $60.00 @ $90.00 @ $150.00 @ $150.00 @ $150.00 @ $150.00 @ $150.00 Total Tax Total Tax Total Tax Total Tax Total Tax Total Tax Total Tax Total Tax Total Tax Type Fargo Bank Keno Poker Race Book Roulette Sports Book Devices Units X # Units X # Units X # Units X # Units X # Units X # Units X # Units Unit Tax @ $150.00 @ $150.00 @ $75.00 @ $150.00 @ $150.00 @ $150.00 @$30.00 Total Tax Total Tax Total Tax Total Tax Total Tax Total Tax X# Units X# Units

Taxes & Fees Imposed in Nevada
TYPE OF TAX
Sales & Use Tax* Personal Property Tax* State Business Privilege Tax Unemployment Compensation Tax State Business License Motor Vehicle Fuel Tax Lodging Tax Cigarette Tax Estate Tax Modified Business Tax Nevada Entertainment Tax

TAX RATES
7.75% + up to .75 at County’s option in $.25 increments $3.2812 per $100 assessed value $25.00/quarter per full-time employee and equivalent 2.95% of taxable wages +.05% for Career Enhancement $100.00 one-time fee Gasoline - $.23, Diesel - $.28, Aviation - $.02 per gallon. Combined County/State tax is $.28 - $.33 per gallon Statewide 1% room tax $.80 per pack of 20 cigarettes Maximum allowable against federal estate tax .65% of gross wages quarterly Tax of 10% applied to entertainment revenue

Note: Multiply the number of units times the fee to arrive at total tax per device.
Source: City of Las Vegas Business License Division (January 2006)

* There is no tax on food for home use or on prescription drugs.

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Taxes & Incentives
Tax-Based & Other Business Incentive Programs
Sales & Use Tax Abatement – An abatement of sales and use tax on eligible machinery and equipment is available to businesses with operations consistent to Nevada’s state plan for economic diversification and development. Qualifying criteria include a commitment to doing business in Nevada, minimum job creation, employment health plans and wage requirements. Sales Tax Deferral Program – The state of Nevada offers a sales and use tax deferment program to qualified industries that purchase specific types of capital equipment in excess of $100,000. Taxes can be deferred interestfree for up to five years. For more information, contact the Nevada Commission on Economic Development at: www.expand2Nevada.com. Personal Property Tax Abatement – An abatement of personal property tax is available to new and expanding businesses. Qualifying criteria include a commitment to doing business in Nevada, minimum job creation, employment health plans, minimum capital investment and wage requirements. For more information, contact the Nevada Commission on Economic Development at: www.expand2Nevada.com. Property Tax Abatement – Real and personal property tax abatement is available to qualified recycling businesses. At least 50% of the material or product must be recycled on site. Fifty percent of real and personal property tax can be abated for up to 10 consecutive years. An acknowledgement from local government entities and a commitment from the company to stay in Nevada is required.

The Southern Nevada Workforce
The Southern Nevada Workforce
Las Vegas ranks number one for job growth for 2003 – 2012, according to Business 2.0 Magazine. “Las Vegas is the fastest growing economy in the U.S. by any measure,” stated Price Waterhouse in 2005. The year 2005 was phenomenal for job growth in the Las Vegas MSA with a 7% increase, as well as a current unemployment rate of 3.5%, the lowest ever recorded. Construction accounted for 106,800 jobs; 768,100 jobs were service industry, 176,900 jobs were hotel/gaming and 91,800 were government jobs.
Source: Department Education, Training & Rehabilitation (January 2006)

BUSINESS CLIMATE

The Las Vegas regional workforce has a unique set of strengths, including high computer literacy rates, flexibility and mobility. Newly-relocated and expanding companies can draw from the very large labor pool of service industry personnel, providing these high-end marketing and administrative support centers with a plethora of upgradeable personnel. Because of the abundance of computer literate employees, the area is an attractive call center market. Businesses that provide moderate-to-extensive in-house computer-based training have been successful in the region. Further, the critical mass of technical, engineering and scientific personnel generated by Nellis Air Force Base and the Nevada Test Site represents an important contribution to the Las Vegas area’s workforce. In addition to the 11,000 employees at Nellis Air Force Base, which is expected to expand its Department of Defense role over the next two decades, it is estimated that over 12,200 military retirees live in the region. The retired population is growing more rapidly locally than nationally as seniors seek out the region’s climate, low taxes and quality of life. This pool of workers could be beneficial to certain industries. As for growth, approximately 5,000 to 7,000 individuals continue to migrate to Southern Nevada monthly and the Las Vegas regional population is expected to grow at nearly six times the U.S. rate. Strong population growth even during a national economic turndown should continue to provide new employers with a steady flow of job applicants.
Source: Office of Business Development (January 2006)

LABOR

Business Assistance Programs
Tax Increment Financing - is the abatement of a portion of the taxes due resulting from the increased valuation of a property generated from capital investment. Eighteen percent of the new taxes go to affordable housing, and up to 50% of the remainder, or 41%, can be abated. For more information contact the Office of Business Development at: (702) 229-6551 In addition, the state of Nevada offers many business assistance programs designed to encourage the growth and development of private enterprise. Some of the most popular programs are Green Building Abatements, Renewable & Energy Storage Abatements, Nevada Hub Zone Development, Train Employees Now, and Industrial Development Bonds. For more information, contact the Nevada Commission on Economic Development at: www.expand2Nevada.com
Source: Nevada Commission on Economic Development (January 2006)

Employment by Industry
LV MSA Employment by Industry
Construction 11.9% Manufacturing 2.8%

Foreign Trade Zones - Las Vegas is within Foreign Trade Zone #89, providing customs and duty-free storage, assembly or manufacturing of migrated goods.
Source: Nevada Development Authority (January 2006)

INCENTIVE PROGRAMS: BUSINESS LOCATION ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE
Sales & Use Tax Abatement NRS 374.357 A partial sales/use tax abatement on capital equipment purchases. $1,000,000 $500,000 - New Intellectual Property 75 Sales & use Tax Deferral NRS 372.397 A sales /use tax deferral on capital equipment Minimum $100,000 or more capital equipment 10 Personal Property Tax NRS 361.0687 An abatement not to exceed 50% over a maximum of 10 years $50,000,000 (Industrial) $2,000,000 (Other) 75 Modified Business Tax Abatement NRS 363B.120 An abatement of 50 percent for 4 years $1,000,000 Train Employees Now Grant NRS 231.068 A grant of $1000 per trainee with 25% company match No minimum requirement 10

Natural Resources & Mining 0% Government 10.2%

Trade, Transportation & Utilities 17.2%

Incentives & Criteria

Information 1.1% Other Services (Excl Gov) 3.0% Financial Activities 5.7%

Capital Investment Requirement Number of Primary Jobs Created Minimum Hourly Wage

75

$17.34

$13.87 (80% of state average wage)

$17.34

$17.34

$13.87 (80% of state average wage)

Leisure & Hospitality 29.6%

Professional & Business Services 11.8% Educational & Health 6.6%

For more information, contact the state of Nevada Commission on Economic Development at: www.expand2Nevada.com
Source: Nevada Commission on Economic Development (January 2006)

Nevada Commission on Economic Development, 555 E. Washington Ave., Las Vegas, NV 89101, (702) 486-2127

For more information visit: www.nevadaworkforce.com
Source: State of Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (January 2006)

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Fastest Growing Occupations
THE 10 FASTEST GROWING OCCUPATIONS IN LAS VEGAS MSA Occupation
Fitness Trainers & Aerobics Instructors Personal Financial Advisors Coil Winders, Tapers, Finishers
LABOR

Employment Projections
LAS VEGAS MSA OCCUPATIONAL EMPLOYMENT & PROJECTIONS, 2002-2012 Occupation Title
Management Business & Financial Operations Computer & Mathematical Architecture & Engineering Life, Physical & Social Science Community & Social Services Legal Education, Training & Library Arts, Design, Sports, Entertainment & Media Health Care Practitioners & Technical Health Care Support Protective Service Food Preparation & Serving Related Building & Grounds, Cleaning & Maintenance Personal Care & Service Sales & Related Office & Administrative Support Farming, Fishing & Forestry Construction & Extraction Installation, Maintenance & Repair Production Transportation & Material Moving Total, All Occupations

Growth Rate %
6.2 6.1 6.0 5.8 5.8 5.8 5.8 5.7 5.6 5.6

2002 Employment
36,523 21,631 7,112 9,024 3,764 5,245 5,490 28,807 12,630

2004 Employment
40,283 24,102 7,949 9,820 4,100 5,723 6,037 31,679 13,847

2012 Employment
54,863 33,652 11,180 12,918 5,406 7,582 8,159 42,825 18,573

Annual Openings
2,512 1,585 497 592 252 334 330 1,987 856

Percent Change
50.2% 55.6% 57.2% 43.2% 43.6% 44.6% 48.6% 48.7% 47.1%

Avg. Annual Growth Rate (%)
5.0 5.6 5.7 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.9 4.9 4.7
LABOR

Network Systems & Data Communication Analysts Pharmacists Loan Officers Credit Analysts Computer & Information Systems Managers Social & Human Services Assistants Respiratory Therapists
For more information access DETR at: www.nevadaworkforce.com
Source: State of Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (January 2006)

29,600 12,902 22,687 103,043 51,240 60,947 100,907 127,988 228 72,036 33,277 24,766 64,264 834,111

32,685 14,273 24,870 112,957 56,361 67,783 110,731 137,338 251 78,669 36,499 26,752 69,693 912,373

44,641 19,585 33,350 151,477 76,234 94,217 148,888 173,914 339 104,469 49,013 34,504 90,860 1,216,649

2,052 890 1,696 8,889 3,538 4,963 8,282 7,631 17 4,688 2,347 1,562 4,100 59,599

50.8% 51.8% 47.0% 47.0% 48.8% 54.6% 47.5% 35.9% 48.7% 45.0% 47.3% 39.3% 41.4% 45.9%

5.1 5.2 4.7 4.7 4.9 5.5 4.8 3.6 4.9 4.5 4.7 3.9 4.1 4.2

Source: Department of Employment Training and Rehabilitation (January 2006)

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Employment & Labor Force
Labor Force Availability & Employment Statistics – Las Vegas Metropolitan Statistical Area
LABOR FORCE AVAILABILITY & EMPLOYMENT: 1995 - 2005 1000000
Labor Force LABOR Employment

Median Wages by Occupation
Management Median Hourly Wage
Top Executives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$51.74 General & Operations Managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$41.38 Marketing Managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.29 Administrative Services Managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$27.99 Financial Managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$37.18 Construction Managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$37.69 Computer & Information Systems Managers . . . . .$41.24 Waiters/Waitresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8.25 Food Preparation & Serving Related Workers, All Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10.27

Sales
First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Retail Sales Workers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14.25 Retail Salespersons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9.83 Sales Representatives, Services, All Other . . . . . . .$20.00 Securities, Commodities & Financial Services . .$25.60

LABOR

Business & Financial Operations
Purchasing Agents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21.20 Cost Estimators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$26.88 Accountants/Auditors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$24.31 Human Resources, Training & Labor Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21.86

Workers

800000

Office & Administration Support Workers
First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Retail Sales Workers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18.53 Bill & Account Collectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12.96 Bookkeeping, Accounting & Auditing Clerks . . . . .$13.77 Payroll & Timekeeping Clerks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14.24 Customer Service Representatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13.55

600000

Computer & Mathematical Operations 400000
Computer Programmers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$29.56 Computer Software Engineers, Systems Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.40 Computer Support Specialists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14.45 Database Administrators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$29.69 Network Systems & Data Communications Analyst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$26.84

95

96

97

98

99

00

01

02

03

04

05

Administrative
Procurement Clerks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14.46 File Clerks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10.56 Communications Equipment Operators, All Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13.03 Switchboard Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12.44

19

19

19

19

19

20

20

20

20

20

Year
For more information visit: http://detr.state.nv.us
Source: State of Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (January 2006)

20

Architecture & Engineering
Chemical Engineers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$38.31 Civil Engineers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$37.25 Electrical Engineers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$38.28 Environmental Engineers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.25 Industrial Engineers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$34.10 Nuclear Engineers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$59.97

Construction
Brick Masons, Block Masons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$19.95 Carpenters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$19.78 Carpet Installers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18.81 Cement Masons/Concrete Finishers . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20.88 Drywall/Ceiling Tile Installers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$16.58 Electricians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21.09

Unemployment Rate
AVERAGE UNEMPLOYMENT RATES: 1995 - 2005
7
National Average Las Vegas MSA

Legal
Lawyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$45.22 Legal Support Workers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17.68 Paralegals & Legal Assistants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18.63 Law Clerks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21.09 Judges, Magistrate Judges & Magistrates . . . . . . . .$54.66

Mechanics/Machining
Structural Metal Fabricators and Fitters . . . . . . . . .$15.91 Machinists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$16.72 Mobility Heavy Equipment Mechanics, Except Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21.89

6

Rate (%)

Health Care
5
Registered Nurses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$28.60 Nurses Aides, Orderlies & Attendants . . . . . . . . . . . .$11.94 Occupational Therapists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$29.63 Dental Hygienists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$38.50 Physical Therapists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$34.31 Recreational Therapists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13.21 Dental Assistants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$16.67 Medical Assistants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13.02 For a complete list of all Nevada occupations and wages, visit: http://detr.state.nv.us
Source: State of Nevada Department of Employment, Training & Rehabilitation (February 2006)

4

3

Hospitality
Chefs & Head Cooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17.59 Cooks, Fast Food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6.52 Cooks, Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12.19 Bartenders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9.22

98

01

19 95

19 96

19 97

02

03

04 20

99

00

19

20

19

20

20

20

Year
For more information, access: www.nevadaworkforce.com
Source: Dept Employment Training and Rehabilitation January 2006

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20

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Workers’ Compensation
It is mandatory for Nevada employers who have at least one employee to provide workers’ compensation insurance coverage. Nevada excludes some employees due to unique criteria, such as employment related to interstate commerce entities not subject to state law, employment covered by private disability and death benefits plans, employees brought into Nevada on a temporary basis, and casual employment of 20 days or less. Since January 1, 2000, Nevada no longer provides workers’ compensation through a state fund. However, employers may purchase insurance from private carriers licensed by the state or become certified by the Division of Insurance as a self-insured employer. For smaller businesses wanting to be self-insured, there are associations of self-insured employers (generally in the same business) that form these groups. Also, there is a good chance that agents or brokers who handle other lines of insurance can also provide workers’ compensation insurance for self-insured employers. The maximum considered wage for computing disability compensation for fiscal year 2006 has been certified by the Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation’s Employment Security Division to be $693.76 per week. The Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS) 616A.065 defines the average monthly wage as 150% of the state average weekly wage multiplied by 4.33.

Central Access to Major Markets
Situated at the hub of an 11-state western region, Las Vegas is an ideal location for companies seeking costeffective, rapid access to major markets both domestic and international. With a market area of over 50 million people within a 1,000-mile radius, firms can take advantage of Nevada's low taxation and operational costs while capitalizing on the ease of shipping to a multitude of states including California, the world's sixth largest marketplace. McCarran International Airport, the International Air Cargo Center, Foreign Trade Zone # 89, the Union Pacific Railroad and excellent trucking services have played major roles in the success Las Vegas enjoys. Nevada is also home to the West's fastest-growing warehousing and distribution center industry, providing Nevada businesses with unsurpassed access to advanced logistical services.
Source: City of Las Vegas Office of Business Development, State of Nevada Commission on Economic Development (January 2006)

LABOR

LOCATION/ TRANSPORTATION

Airports & Air Cargo
McCarran International Airport: McCarran International Airport is part of the Clark County Airport System, which owns and operates six airports, including five general aviation facilities: North Las Vegas Airport, Henderson Executive Airport, Jean Sport Aviation Center, Overton/Perkins Field and Searchlight Airport. McCarran International Airport has the third longest civilian runway in the United States. The Las Vegas airport is ranked the fifth busiest airport in North America based on passenger counts, serving more than 40 air carriers. With approximately 1,100 flights arriving and departing daily, McCarran International Airport offers direct flights to over 120 U.S. cities. Internationally, Virgin Atlantic has six non-stop flights per week to London, and BMI has three non-stop flights per week to Manchester, England, plus over 20 flights per week to Mexico and Canada.
In 2005, 11 new gates were added to Concourse “D” and Wi-Fi became available in all public areas of the airport (travelers do not need to look for a hot spot). McCarran was the first airport to provide this as a free service for the entire facility. A total of 16 major construction projects, from roadway improvements to a pedestrian bridge are part of the final build-out of McCarran. Plans also include the last wing of the “D” gates expansion and Terminal 3, a new terminal for scheduled carriers. McCarran will ultimately house a total of 117 gates, which will enable the airport to host 53 million passengers annually by 2011. The Clark County Department of Aviation is in the planning stage of developing the Ivanpah Valley Airport to augment available capacity at McCarran. This new airport, situated on a 5,934-acre site about 25 miles south of Las Vegas, will serve international and long-haul scheduled flights, all charter flights, as well as international and domestic air cargo demand. Initial operations are expected to begin in approximately 2017.
Source: Clark County Department of Aviation (January 2006)

$693.76 X 150% X 4.33 = $4505.33
Maximum disability compensation in Nevada is 66-2/3% of the average monthly wage (NRS 616.065 and 616C.475). If earned wages on the date of injury were less than $4,505.97 per month, compensation is 66-2/3% of the actual earned wage.

Maximum Average Monthly Wage
$4,505.97 X 66-2/3 = $3,003.98 $4,505.97 X 8/12 = $3,003.98

Maximum Compensation
Per Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3003.98 Per Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$690.83 Per Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$98.69 14 Day (Usual Payment) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,381.66 NOTE: Nevada law protects employers who provide coverage for their employees at the time of injury from additional damages claimed by their employees as a result of an injury on the job. For additional information visit: http://dirweb.state.nv.us
Source: Nevada Division of Industrial Relations (February 2006)

State of Nevada Department of Business & Industry Division of Industrial Relations 1301 North Green Valley Pkwy., Suite 200 Henderson, Nevada 89014 (702) 486-9000 or 9080

Las Vegas International Air Cargo Center: The International Air Cargo Center at McCarran International Airport has positioned Las Vegas as a major West Coast air-truck distribution center. Complete custom services are available at McCarran. Las Vegas is considered “an inland port of entry,” where efficient services allow foreign goods to quickly clear customs. The Cargo Center is located less than one mile from a major interstate highway and railroad access. The 160-acre site is a first-rate cargo handling area consisting of three buildings totaling more than 170,000 square feet and is capable of handling heavily loaded, long-haul and wide-body aircraft.
Source: Nevada Development Authority, CLV Office of Business Development (January 2006)

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Airports & Air Cargo
Foreign Trade Zone: Foreign Trade Zone #89 in Las Vegas allows firms to bring foreign goods or raw materials for manufacturing and/or assembling into the United States without formal customs entry or payment of customs duties and government excise taxes until products leave the zone. If the final product is exported from the United States, no U.S. Customs duty or excise tax is levied. If the final product is imported into the United States, fees are only due at the time of transfer of the product or its parts, whichever is lower. Because of the relief in tariffs and duties offered by the Foreign Trade Zone and reduced rates in trucking, international businesses have found that it is often less expensive to bring their goods to Las Vegas and then ship to various markets in California and the southwestern United States. Contact: (702) 361-3422.
Merchandise entering a foreign trade zone may be:
LOCATION/ TRANSPORTATION

Airports & Air Cargo
Trucking Services

(continued)

From Nevada cities, truck shipments arrive overnight throughout the West, including the important consumer and port cities of Los Angeles and San Francisco. As a tourist-based community, Las Vegas is a “net-importer” (more freight arrives than leaves), which makes shipping costs to other cities very low.

DISTANCE FROM LAS VEGAS
City
Albuquerque Atlanta Chicago Denver Houston Los Angeles New York Phoenix Portland Reno Salt Lake City San Diego San Francisco Seattle

Miles
586 2,000 1,800 758 1,467 272 2,550 287 996 445 419 336 570 1,180

Kilometers
938 3,200 2,880 1,213 2,347 435 4,080 459 1,594 711 670 538 912 1,888

SEATTLE PORTLAND CHICAGO NEW YORK

Assembled Cleaned Destroyed Displayed Mixed

Manipulated Manufactured Processed Re-Labeled Repackaged

Repaired Salvaged Sampled Stored Tested

RENO SAN FRANCISCO

DENVER SALT LAKE CITY ALBUQUERQUE

LAS VEGAS
LOS ANGELES

LOCATION/ TRANSPORTATION

PHOENIX ATLANTA

SAN DIEGO HOUSTON

Source: Clark County Department of Aviation, Nevada Commission on Economic Development (January 2006)

Ground Transportation Network
Common Carrier Service
More than 50 motor carriers, including several specialized carriers, serve Las Vegas. The area provides a number of warehousing and manufacturing-related support services including specialized contract haulers, full-service public warehousing, U.S. customs service, foreign trade zone and sub zone accommodations, assembly and packaging support. Source: Nevada Commission on Economic Development, Nevada Development Authority (2006)

Union Pacific Railroad
The Union Pacific Railroad is the largest freight railroad serving Las Vegas. Its Class One rail service connects Las Vegas to Los Angeles-Long Beach, Salt Lake City and a multitude of points East. Las Vegas’ central location makes distribution of goods to major markets very competitive.

RAIL DELIVERY TIMES FROM LAS VEGAS Market T.O.F.C* Boxcar Market
Chicago Denver Kansas City Los Angeles *Trailer on Flat Car 3 days 2 days 2 days 1 day 5 days 3 days 5 days 2 days Portland St. Louis Salt Lake City Seattle

T.O.F.C*
2 days 2 days 1 day 2 days

Boxcar
4 days 5 days 2 days 4 days

WESTERN MARKET ANNUAL OUTBOUND SHIPPING COSTS ($000)*
Annual Shipments (1,000 lbs.) 5,580 1,590 4,200 2,310 9,450 5,250 2,610 2,610 4,200 4,200 42,000

Origination
Dallas 12.7 46.8 167.4 127.7 614.3 253.7 251.8 166.1 330.0 419.5 $2,377.2 Denver 223.1 32.2 9.5 78.4 436.1 206.6 148.7 63.1 243.3 253.6 $1,481.6 Las Vegas 308.7 8.9 142.6 5.2 115.7 68.3 136.2 49.7 108.3 239.7 $874.3 Los Angeles 364.3 56.8 193.8 28.3 21.4 88.5 114.3 81.5 72.9 216.7 $874.3 Phoenix 270.5 33.6 173.3 30.0 158.9 11.9 157.8 78.4 143.2 286.9 $1,074.1 Reno 421.2 73.7 200.3 47.0 222.8 211.6 68.5 61.4 41.5 143.0 $1,069.7 Salt Lake City 355.0 44.8 101.7 44.1 295.2 158.0 90.8 5.9 140.1 160.3 $1,040.8 San San Diego Francisco 344.3 58.5 205.6 34.8 51.4 84.3 128.3 89.0 95.4 239.1 $986.4 440.5 78.3 241.6 59.7 164.1 179.0 75.1 87.1 9.5 153.7 $1,048.0

Source: The Boyd Co., Inc., Princeton, NJ

Destination Dallas Rio Rancho Denver Las Vegas Los Angeles Phoenix Portland Salt Lake City San Francisco Seattle TOTAL

Regional Transportation
Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada
The Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada (RTC) provides transportation services within Southern Nevada including approval and funding of major arterial and highway construction, county-wide mass public transit and metropolitan transportation planning. The RTC strives to provide a safe, convenient and effective regional transportation system that enhances both mobility and air quality. The agency’s governing body is comprised of representatives from Boulder City, Henderson, Las Vegas, Mesquite, North Las Vegas and Clark County. Southern Nevada’s annual growth in population and visitor volume continues to place substantial demands on transportation infrastructure. In 2005, vehicles traveled approximately 34 million daily miles in the Las Vegas Valley. During fiscal year 2006-2007, the Streets and Highways division of the RTC is expected to fund more than $877 million in roadway projects from Question 10 funding and gas tax revenue.

Ramp Meters
Ramp Meters were activated in March 2005 on selected freeway on-ramps during scheduled ramp improvement projects. A preliminary study showed a net reduction in total delay of 6.2 vehicle hours. In a second study, the calculation yielded a net reduction of 28 vehicle hours of delay. The Freeway and Arterial System of Transportation (FAST) expects the net benefit to increase as ramp metering is installed at additional freeway on-ramps in the future.

*Annual charges reflect truckload lots of 30,000 lbs using contract over-the-road carriers to market city location. Projected charges based on estimated $2.04 per mile, which includes factors such as labor, fuel maintenance, insurance certificates and operation rights.
Source: The Boyd Co., Inc., Princeton NJ, Las Vegas Perspective 2005

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Regional Transportation
MAX

(continued)

Ground Transportation Network
Citizens Area Transit

(continued)

The Metropolitan Area Express, or MAX, is the first system in the United States to operate the Civis vehicle, offering the latest technology that provides a state-of-the-art, environmentally-friendly transit alternative. The 61-foot vehicles carry approximately 120 passengers. MAX currently showcases 10 aerodynamic vehicles and 20 architecturallydesigned passenger stations along the Las Vegas Boulevard North corridor, connecting the Las Vegas Downtown Transportation Center to Nellis Air Force Base. Following the launch of this innovative service in June 2004, a passenger survey showed approval of MAX – from its vehicle and station designs to speed, convenience and safety – were consistently above 90%. By the time MAX reached its one-year mark in June 2005, ridership on this single line had increased more than 30%, and ridership along North Las Vegas Boulevard had increased more than 10% overall.
LOCATION/ TRANSPORTATION

Though a young member of Southern Nevada’s history, in just 13 years the RTC’s Citizens Area Transit (CAT) bus system has achieved what many older, larger and more experienced systems have taken many years to realize. Ridership, fleet size, and the service area have increased dramatically, while the cost per passenger has consistently dropped, making CAT one of the most efficient and fastest-growing transit systems in the nation. The original CAT bus system consisted of 21 routes, encompassing 312 square miles. Currently, there are 57 transit routes, with approximately 542 square miles of service area. Those routes offer a variety of services including MAX, The Deuce and neighborhood transportation. Ridership has increased at a rate more than double the national average. In 2005, the CAT bus system served more than 55 million passengers with a fleet of 383 vehicles. The system carries approximately 175,000 passengers a day and 47,000 bicycles each month.

Engineers and consultants are currently in the design process for the Boulder Highway Corridor system expansion and are looking at linking the Boulder Highway system with the North Las Vegas Boulevard line at the Downtown Transportation Center. This new line is expected to be completed in 2008 and will provide rapid transit service from Henderson to North Las Vegas.

LOCATION/ TRANSPORTATION

CAT Fixed Route
The RTC continues to upgrade its fleet to keep pace with the demands of the rapidly growing Las Vegas Valley. Early in 2005, 30 articulated coaches arrived to replace many of the older buses and to provide increased capacity and new technology to CAT residential service. In addition, 30 new full-hybrid vehicles will be introduced to the CAT fleet before the end of 2006, combining innovation and style to more efficiently meet the commuting needs of transit users across the region. With new vehicles and an ever-increasing demand for service, the RTC has added new routes to its residential service in developing areas of the Las Vegas Valley.

Robert A. Broadbent Las Vegas Monorail
The Las Vegas Monorail is privately funded and operated, using no tax dollars for its construction or operations. It connects eight major resorts, linking more than 25,000 hotel rooms and about 4.4 million square feet of meeting and convention space, including one of the world’s largest convention centers. The four-mile route stops at the following seven stations: MGM Grand, Bally’s/Paris, Flamingo/Caesars Palace, Harrah’s/Imperial Palace, Las Vegas Convention Center, Las Vegas Hilton and the Sahara. The $650 million transportation system runs along the Las Vegas resort corridor, traveling at a top speed of 50 mph. Up to nine climate-controlled trains consisting of four cars each run on a single rail that rises 20 feet high in most areas. Its highest point reaches 70 feet above the Las Vegas Convention Center. The system is electric and has improved transit along the Strip without impacting air quality. Each year, it will take more than 4.4 million automobile trips off the major roadways and reduce carbon monoxide by 135 tons per year. Passenger stations along the route are designed to provide customers with comfort and convenience while creating a unique identity for the system. Each station includes accessible elevator service, level boarding from platforms to trains, ticket vending machines, security officers for safety and passenger assistance, and shaded waiting areas. Future monorail expansion options include a line from the Strip to the airport, a line servicing the west side of the Strip and a line from the Strip to Fremont Street in downtown Las Vegas near the World Market Center. A main goal is to connect a majority of the hotels and convention facilities to the airport and government centers, making it easier for both visitors and residents of Southern Nevada to access the phenomenal facilities within the resort corridor and city center of Las Vegas.
Source: Las Vegas Monorail Company (February 2006)

Other Major Regional Roadway Projects
The Hoover Dam Bypass
Transit over the Hoover Dam has long been a tedious adventure but the Hoover Dam bypass, which will rectify traffic delays, has finally become a reality as construction on the project is well underway. Both the Arizona Approach and the Nevada Approach have been completed. Construction on the Colorado River Bridge is now underway. Once finished, the new road will have a profound impact on the traffic flow between Arizona, Nevada and Utah, as well as improve U.S. 93, which is a designated North American Free Trade Agrement trade route between Mexico and Canada. The Hoover Dam Bypass Project is a 3.5-mile corridor beginning at approximately milepost 2.2 in Clark County, Nevada and crossing the Colorado River approximately 1,500 feet downstream of the Hoover Dam, then terminating in Mohave County, Arizona on U.S. 93 near milepost 1.7. Construction on the nearly 2,000-foot-long Colorado River Bridge, a composite concrete deck arch, began in early 2005. The completion of the entire Hoover Dam Bypass Project is expected in 2008. Below is a partial list of objectives this project will accomplish: • Minimize the potential for pedestrian-vehicle accidents on the dam crest and on the Nevada and Arizona approaches to the dam. • Remove a major bottleneck to interstate and international commerce and travel in the west by reducing traffic congestion and accidents in this segment of the major commercial route between Phoenix and Las Vegas. • Replace an inadequate highway river crossing with a new crossing that meets current roadway design criteria and improves through-vehicle and truck traffic capacity on U.S. 93 at the dam. • Reduce travel time in the dam vicinity. • Protect Hoover Dam employees, visitors, equipment, power generation capabilities and Colorado River waters, while enhancing visitors’ experience at Hoover Dam.
Source: Central Federal Lands Highway Division of the Federal Highway Administration January (2006)

Double Deck Buses: “The Deuce”
The character of the Strip poses unique transportation issues that require innovative thinking and creative problemsolving. One answer is growing tall instead of long. With that in mind, the Regional Transportation Commission (RTC) purchased 50 double-decker buses for the Las Vegas Strip. On October 27, 2005, the RTC officially launched “The Deuce.” With breathtaking views from the upper deck and plenty of comfortable seats, The Deuce has recruited riders in record numbers. In just its first week of service, The Deuce carried more than 257,000 passengers, and expectations are high for continued success. The Strip transit service has always paid for itself, but The Deuce is expected to generate revenue that will help pay for other residential service, making The Deuce a true community success story.

Regional Fixed Guideway
In addressing our current and future transportation issues, the Reginoal Transportation Commission is proposing a 33-mile Regional Fixed Guideway (RFG) to link the cities of North Las Vegas, Las Vegas and Henderson with the Las Vegas resort corridor. In January 2006, a citizen's review committee recommended moving forward with the proposed rapid transit system using diesel light-rail technology. If approved by the RTC Board of Commissioners, an Environmental Impact Study will begin in late 2006. The RFG could carry its first passengers by 2014.

42

LAS VEGAS COMMUNITY PROFILE

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43

City of Las Vegas Council Ward / Zip Code Map

KYLE CANYON 157 SR

DURANGO

BUFFALO

TENAYA

HUALAPAI

RAINBOW

ELKHORN

JONES

DECATUR

89166

COMMERCE

89130 89124
LONE MOUNTAIN CRAIG

P.R

.R

.

U.

FORT APACHE

ALEXANDER

MARTIN L. KING

US 95

DURANGO

RAINBOW

BUFFALO

DECATUR

CHEYENNE

JONES

ALLEN

CHEYENNE
SB
LAMB NELLIS

DEL WEBB

NLV AIRPORT
ER NT CIVIC CE

D LV

HILLS CENTER

89134
ANA SAZI

SMOKE RANCH
TENAYA

CAREY

SV LA

A EG

PECOS

RAMPART

89128
SUMMERLIN PKWY

EASTERN

89138

WASHINGTON
US 95

89144
CENTER

89106
I-1
VALLEY VIEW RANCHO

WASHINGTON BONANZA STEWART CHARLESTON

5

ANTELOPE

U.P .R.R

89145
CHARLESTON

89107

89101
AS BLV D
.
MARYLAND PKWY.

89110

TOWN

LA S

SR

9 15

VE G

FORT APACHE

89117
DESERT INN

89146

NELLIS

LAMB

SAHARA

TENAYA

89102
5 I-1

89104

HOLLYWOOD

VEGAS

89108

BRUCE

HUALAPAI

SPRING MOUNTAIN

TWAIN FLAMINGO

SANDS

TWAIN FLAMINGO
DISE PARA

89135 89124
DURANGO

TROPICANA
INDUSTRIAL

TROPICANA
O BR

LAMB

US

95

CABANA

RUSSELL
RAINBOW DECATUR BUFFALO

RUSSELL
EASTERN

JONES

PECOS

McCARRAN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

SUNSET

SUNSET

I 215

Ward 1

Ward 2

Ward 3

Ward 4

Ward 5

Ward 6
Source: City of Las Vegas Planning and Development Department (January 2006)

UNTAIN VISTA MO

US 95

89124
MOCCASIN

89143

89131 89165

GRAND TETON

CENTENNIAL

US 95

NORTH LAS VEGAS

I-1

5

CENTENNIAL

89149
ANN

ANN
B AS EG D LV

LONE MOUNTAIN CRAIG

SV LA

89129

LAKE MEAD BLVD

RA NC HO
ALEXANDER

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE

CAREY
LAKE MEAD BLVD

EA D LAKE M

VD BL

OWENS

BO UL DE R Y HW

SAHARA VEGAS VALLEY

89124

89109

DESERT INN

NT BE AD

HENDERSON

Master Planned Communities

Directional Map of Downtown

BONANZA RD.

US 95/I-515
1 Mountain Spa/Silver Stone 2 Spring Mountain Ranch 3 Iron Mountain Ranch

18

5 Elkhorn Ranch 6 Lynbrook 7 Painted Desert 8 Los Prados 9 Lone Mountain West 10 Lone Mountain
MOCCASIN
KYLE CANYON
95 US 95 US

MARTIN L. KING BLVD.

4 Town Center

17

STE WA RT AVE 20 .

1

16

MA IN S T.

19

3 4

2

I -15

15 16 11 13 11 10 9 10

BRI DG ER AVE . 5
8 7 21 6

11 Sun City 12 Desert Shores

HUALAPAI

19 GRAND TETON 21 20
CENTENNIAL

22

2
DURANGO BUFFALO

1
RAINBOW TENAYA JONES

3
DECATUR

13 West Summerlin 14 Summerlin 15 South Shores 16 Peccole Ranch 17 Canyon Gate 18 The Lakes 19 Grand Canyon Village

14

4

5

6

ELKHORN

GA RCE SA VE.

U.P .R.R .

22 12 23

ANN

7
LONE MOUNTAIN CRAIG

20 Cliff’s Edge

8
HO NC RA
US 95 RAINBOW

CHARLESTON

21 Grand Teton Village 22 Kyle Canyon City of Las Vegas Corporate Limits
DECATUR

DURANGO

9 10

ALEXANDER

BUFFALO

JONES

Unincorporated Clark County

CHEYENNE

HILLS CENTER

11
ANAS AZI

DEL WEBB

12 15
TENAYA

SMOKE RANCH
LAKE MEAD BLVD
VEGAS

CAREY

RAMPART

14
ER

EASTERN

13

OWENS
5 I-1

WYOMING AVE.

SUMMERLIN PKWY

WASHINGTON
US 95
VALLEY VIEW RANCHO

WASHINGTON BONANZA STEWART

OAKEY BLVD.

TOWN CENT

LAS VEG AS BLV D.

9 15 SR

RAINBOW

16
FORT APACHE

CHARLESTON

LAS U VEG .P.R.R. AS BLV D MARYLAND PK WY .

17 18

HUALAPAI

SAHARA

ST. LOUIS AVE.

DESERT INN

Source: City of Las Vegas Planning and Development Department (January 2006)

I-1 5

SAHARA AVE.

Source: City of Las Vegas Planning and Development Department (March 2005)

LAS VEGAS CATALYST FOR SUCCESS

SEV ENT HS T.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 City Hall Campus Neonopolis Fremont Street Experience Third Street Pedestrian Connector Lewis Avenue Corridor Federal Building /U.S. Courthouse Historic Fifth Street School Re-Use Intown Office Building Future South Extension of Third Street Connector Regional Justice Center & Extension Clark Co. Detention Center & Extension Arts Factory Clark County Government Center Las Vegas Premium Outlets World Market Center (Phase 1) World Market Center (Phase 2) Redevelopment of former Union-Pacific Site Internal Revenue Service Union Park Historic Downtown Post Office Alan Bible Federal Building L’Octaine Mixed-Use Commercial / Residential Soho Lofts Mixed-Use Commercial / Residential Casino Center East Fremont Office Core Downtown South Arts District Northern Strip Monorail Stations Cultural Corridor

Y W RH DE UL BO

Existing Land Use
Industrial 1% Parks / Open Space 7% Public / Semi-Public 5% Golf Course 3% Multi-Family 7% Transportation, Communications and Utilities 1% Single Family 33% Vacant 36%

City of Las Vegas Estimated Property Values
CITY OF LAS VEGAS ESTIMATED PROPERTY VALUES
(Amounts estimated in thousands)

Commercial 7%

$40,000,000 $35,000,000 $30,000,000 $25,000,000 $20,000,000 $15,000,000 $10,000,000 $5,000,000 $0
Commercial Residential Other Total

95

96

97

98

99

00

01

02

03

04 20

LAND USE

Future Land Use
Industrial 2% Public 15% Commercial 13% Mixed Use 6% Resource Conservation 11% Single Family 45% Multi-Family 8%

19

19

19

19

19

20

20

20

20

20

05

LAND USE
Source: City of Las Vegas Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (June 30, 2005)

City of Las Vegas Assessed Value of Real Property
CITY OF LAS VEGAS ASSESSED VALUE OF REAL PROPERTY
(Amounts expressed in thousands)

$15,000,000 $12,000,000 $9,000,000 $6,000,000 $3,000,000 $0
96 97 98 00 02 95 99 01 03 04 20 19 19 19 20 20 19 19 20 20 20 05

Source: City of Las Vegas Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (June 30, 2005)

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Population Trends
LAS VEGAS POPULATION TRENDS
600,000 500,000 400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 0

Population Change & Income by Zip Code
ZIP Codes in the west and northwest areas continue to experience the bulk of the city's population growth. During 2005, more than 90% of the city's population growth occurred west of Decatur Boulevard. In the 2000 Census, the city of Las Vegas had a median household income of $44,069. The Median Household Income by ZIP Code table below displays the diversity of Las Vegas' neighborhoods.

POPULATION CHANGE & INCOME BY ZIP CODE
Zip Code
89101 89102 89104 89106 89107 89108 89109 89110 89117 89128 89129 89130 89131 89134 89138 89143 89144 89145 89146 89149 89166 CLV Total

July 1, 2004 Population Estimate
48,274 28,386 18,132 29,342 36,426 67,137 43,009 38,240 38,447 42,421 29,069 28,750 26,897 6,951 10,533 19,400 26,683 8,134 11,488 2,105 559,824

July 1, 2005 Population Estimate
47,696 28,518 18,168 30,375 36,882 67,846 2 43,505 38,331 38,833 43,316 28,589 33,050 26,697 9,700 11,677 19,604 26,501 8,278 16,031 2,375 575,973

Population Change
(578) 132 36 1,033 456 709 2 496 91 386 895 (480) 4,300 (200) 2,749 1,144 204 (182) 144 4,543 270 16,149

Median Household Income
$20,815 $32,483 $33,170 $19,525 $38,075 $41,884 $27,429 $39,976 $59,572 $51,555 $60,755 $61,980 $68,621 $60,854 NA $58,918 $68,823 $50,096 $41,083 $80,641 NA $44,069

02

97

98

19

19 96

19

20

20

03

04 20

95

99

00

01

POPULATION

20

20

19

19

20

05

POPULATION

Historical Housing Counts & Population Estimates
HISTORIC POPULATION

2020 2010 2000 1990 1980 1970 1960 1950 0 164,674 125,787 64,405 24.624 258,295 478,630 645,000

750,000

Population Comparison
POPULATION COMPARISON Entity
Boulder City Henderson Las Vegas Mesquite North Las Vegas Unincorporated Clark County Total Clark County

July 1, 2004 July 1, 2005
15,058 229,984 549,571 15,881 164,971 739,872 1,715,337 15,203 241,134 569,838 16,423 180,219 773,563 1,796,380

Percent Change
1.0% 4.8% 3.7% 3.4% 9.2% 4.6% 4.7%

Population Growth
145 11,150 20,267 542 15,248 33,691 81,043

Percent Share of Growth
0.2% 13.8% 25.0% 0.7% 18.8% 41.6%

100000 200000 300000 400000 500000 600000 700000 800000

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51

Demographic Summary
In 2000, the median age for Las Vegas residents was 34.5 compared to 34.4 for Clark County residents overall. As expected, the city aged more rapidly than the county during the 1990s primarily due to the development of the agerestricted community (55 years and over), Sun City. AGE
75 to 84 years 3.6% 65 to 74 years 7.1% 60 to 64 years 4.2% 55 to 59 years 5.0% 45 to 54 years 12.5% 25 to 44 years 32.0% 85 years and older 0.8% Under 5 years 7.7% 5 to 17 years 18.2% 18 to 20 years 3.6% 21 to 24 years 5.2% Source: U.S. Census (2000) Female 49.2% 235,357 Male 50.8% 243,077

Cost of Living
The Relative Cost of Living Index for Las Vegas climbed to 114.8 in 2005 from 113.3 in 2004. Utility costs jumped from 96.9 in 2004 to 123.7 in 2005, a 21.9% increase. Even with this jump, California’s 144.1 is still well above Las Vegas 114.8 score. Compared with the top 10 states from which new Southern Nevada residents come, Las Vegas still remains 11% less expensive. Note: The Cost of Living Index measures relative price levels for consumer goods and services in participating areas. The average for all participating places equals 100, and each participant's index is read as a percentage of this average. Miscellaneous goods and services include such items as fast food, toiletries, and beer and wine.

GENDER

COST OF LIVING INDEX City
Las Vegas, NV Oakland, CA Denver, CO Boise, ID Portland, OR Salt Lake City, UT Seattle, WA Cheyenne, WY

Composite
114.8 148.8 99.6 95.2 112.7 92.8 115.8 103.6

Grocery Items Housing Utilities
98.3 143.6 106.7 91.9 120.0 107.0 108.0 104.8 135.9 218.4 101.9 86.2 111.7 83.5 133.1 112.4 123.7 85.4 96.7 92.6 125.6 93.2 110.8 112.6

Transportation
109.3 124.2 94.0 102.8 107.7 94.0 109.7 94.7

Health Misc. Goods Care & Services
106.4 118.1 106.0 101.6 111.6 98.7 122.6 98.1 103.2 121.1 96.6 102.0 108.5 94.1 106.6 96.2

Source: U.S. Census (2000)

RACE AND NATIONAL ORIGIN
POPULATION White 58.0% Hispanic 23.6% Other 0.1% More than one race 2.5% Pacific Islander 0.4% Asian 4.7% American Indian 0.5% Black 10.1%
Source: U.S. Census (2000)

Source: American Chamber of Commerce Researchers Association (ACCRA), 3rd Quarter 2005

If you are considering moving to Las Vegas there are several sites on the Internet that can calculate the cost of moving. They can compare living costs between Las Vegas and your hometown and tell you how much you will need to make in wages in Las Vegas to maintain your current lifestyle.

QUALITY OF LIFE

Metro Housing Facts
2005 METRO LAS VEGAS HOUSING FACTS

INCOME

Item
Median Price of New Homes Median Price of Resale New Home Sales* New Home Permits Homes Sold in 2004 New Home Median Price (excluding condos) Existing Home Median Price

2004 Price
$290, 287 $250,000 29,248 32,879 64,168 $290,287 $250,000

2005 Price
$309,990 w/Apartment Conversions $345,130 w/o Apartment Conversions $285,000 30,750 (38,517**) 31,010 58,522 $345,130 $285,000 Average Sq. Ft Detached: 2,223

Percent Change
30.7% 14.0% 15.9% -5.7% -8.8% 18.9% 14% Average Lot Size: 4,500 Sq. Ft.

Household Median Family Median Per Capita 0

$44,069 $50,465 $22,060
10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 60000

Average Price Per Sq. Ft. Detached: $175.28

*The 2005 new homes sales’ figure includes more than 7,700 apartment-to-condo conversion sales. ** Includes apartment conversions
Source: U.S. Census (2000)

For more information visit: www.snhba.com
Source: Southern Nevada Home Builders Association (January 2006)

Source for all: Department of Planning and Development (February 2006)

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53

Master Planned Communities
MASTER PLANNED COMMUNITIES Communities
Silver Stone Ranch Spring Mountain Ranch Iron Mountain Ranch Elkhorn Springs Lynbrook Painted Desert Los Prados Lone Mountain West Lone Mountain Sun City Desert Shores Summerlin West Summerlin South Shores Peccole Ranch Canyon Gate The Lakes Grand Canyon Village Cliffs Edge Town Center Kyle Canyon Grand Teton Village
QUALITY OF LIFE

Health Care
SOUTHERN NEVADA FULL-SERVICE HOSPITALS Population Est. July 1, 2005
2,747 5,293 4,956 6,726 3,674 3,356 3,842 4,016 6,398 13,290 8,015 9,682 41,070 4,332 11,882 2,254 16,910 2,375 7,471 994

(continued)

Proposed/ Actual Units
1,890 1,629 1,886 2,386 1,195 1,615 1,647 2,170 3,348 7,756 3,322 22,500 16,549 1,626 5,295 1,001 7,239 860 10,000 7,400 8,755 635

Projected Population
5,500 B/O 5,500 B/O B/O B/O B/O 4,500 9,000 B/O B/O 60,000 B/O B/O B/O B/O B/O 2,710 31,000 17,244 29,000 1,950

Acres
635.50 351.05 698.09 497.42 263.70 459.52 508.46 626.85 698.09 2,475.45 680.75 8,682.35 4,932.80 323.87 1,418.28 352.77 1,283.44 106.23 1,192.71 2,668.85 1,099.00 79.48

Facility
Boulder City Hospital 901 Adams Blvd., Boulder City, NV (702) 293-4111 Desert Springs Hospital 2075 E. Flamingo Rd., Las Vegas, NV (702) 733-8800 Mike O'Callahan Federal Hospital (VA) 4700 Las Vegas Blvd., N. Las Vegas, NV (702) 653-2260 MountainView Hospital 3100 N. Tenaya Way, Las Vegas, NV (702) 255-5000 North Vista Hospital 1409 E. Lake Mead Blvd., N. Las Vegas, NV (702) 649-7711 Southern Hills Hospital 300 W. Sunset Rd., Las Vegas, NV (702) 880-2100 Spring Valley Hospital 5400 Rainbow Blvd., Las Vegas, NV (702) 853-3000 St. Rose Dominican Hospital - Rose De Lima Campus 102 E. Lake Mead Dr., Henderson NV (702) 616-5000 St. Rose Dominican Hospital - Siena Campus 3001 St. Rose Pkwy., Henderson, NV (702) 616-5000 Summerlin Hospital Medical Center 657 Town Center Dr., Las Vegas, NV (702) 233-7000 Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center 3186 S. Maryland Pkwy., Las Vegas, NV (702) 731-8000 University Medical Center 1800 W. Charleston Blvd., Las Vegas, NV (702) 383-2000 Valley Hospital Medical Center 620 Shadow Ln., Las Vegas, NV (702) 388-4000
Source: Individual Entities (February 2006)

Patient Beds
67

Surgical Suites
2

Sq. Ft.
58,000

286

8

451,000

94

6

374,000

235

10

322,087

185

6

142,357

139

9

279,000

210

7

300,000

B/O - Built Out

138

6

220,000

QUALITY OF LIFE

Health Care
Medical service and health insurance continue to rank among Las Vegas’ fastest growing industries. Because of the high population growth, there is a corresponding need for more nurses, physicians and other health care professionals. The highlight for the medical community in 2005 was the opening of The Nevada Cancer Institute. This facility is dedicated to state-of-the-art research and implementation of groundbreaking methods of prevention, detection and treatment of cancer. Currently, the valley is served by over 32 hospitals, specialty hospitals and surgical centers and eight hospices. Collectively, there are over 3,600 hospital beds and over 5.5 million square feet of hospital space in the Las Vegas Valley.

214

8

328,078

274

9

284,628

701

24

864,000

588

23

570,000

409

12

311,030

54

LAS VEGAS COMMUNITY PROFILE

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55

Health Care
Facility

(continued)

Education
Post-Secondary Education
Specialty
Child psychiatry

SPECIALTY HOSPITALS Patient Beds
58

Sq. Ft.
58,000

QUALITY OF LIFE

Desert Willow Treatment Center 6171 W. Charleston Blvd., Las Vegas, NV (702) 486-8900 Harmon Medical & Rehab. Hospital 2170 E. Harmon Ave., Las Vegas, NV (702) 794-0100 HEALTHSOUTH Rehab. Hospital 1250 S. Valley View Blvd., Las Vegas (702) 877-8898 HEALTHSOUTH Rehab.Hospital 2500 N. Tenaya Way, Las Vegas, NV (702) 562-2021 HEALTHSOUTH Rehab. Hospital 10301 Jeffrey St., Henderson, NV (702) 939-9400 Horizon Specialty Hospital 640 Desert Ln., Las Vegas, NV (702) 382-3155 Kindred Hospital - Desert Springs Hosp. 2075 E. Flamingo Rd, Fifth Floor Las Vegas, NV (702) 866-2000 Kindred Hospital - Flamingo 2250 E. Flamingo Rd., Las Vegas, NV (702) 784-4300 Kindred Hospital - Sahara 5110 W. Sahara Ave., Las Vegas, NV (702) 871-1418 Montevista Hospital 5900 W. Rochelle, Las Vegas, NV (702) 364-1111 So. NV Adult Mental Health Services 6161 W. Charleston Blvd., Las Vegas, NV (702) 486-6000 Spring Mountain Treatment Center 7000 W. Spring Mountain Rd. Las Vegas, NV (702) 873-2400
Source: Individual Entities (February 2006)

The University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), the Community College of Southern Nevada (CCSN) and Nevada State College (NSC) are part of the University and Community College System of Nevada. The combined enrollment is over 60,000 students each year. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching classifies UNLV as a Doctoral/Research University – Intensive, furthering the university’s goal of becoming a leading research institution. All of the universities and colleges listed below have locations in the Las Vegas Valley.

Sub-acute care Nursing care Respiratory care Brain injury Pulmonary program Stroke program Brain injury Pulmonary program Stroke program Brain injury Pulmonary program Stroke program Respiratory care Rehabilitation Complex medical care Long-term acute care Ventilator weaning Low-level rehabilitation Long-term acute care Ventilator weaning Low-level rehabilitation Long-term acute care Ventilator weaning Low-level rehabilitation Psychiatric care Chemical dependency Suicide prevention Adult psychiatric care Mental health counseling Adult psychiatric Adolescent psychiatric Adolescent residential treatment

118

Unk

79

67,000

POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION University/College Programs
Arts, Business, Education, Law, Engineering, Health Services, Hotel Administration, Sciences M.D./PhD and M.D. Arts, Business, Health Services, Information Technology, Sciences, Education Business, Nursing, Education, Environmental Science Fashion, Design, Media, Culinary Arts Church Ministries Business, Technology Aviation, Aerospace Health Care/Life Sciences Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Info Technologies Associate of Arts Accounting, Medical Assistant, Business Administration Culinary Arts Arts, Business, Sciences Business Education, Business Business Administration, Education Education Osteopathic Medicine, Nursing, Physician Asst Business, Criminal Justice, Education, Human Services, Technology Business, Pharmacy

Contact Information
www.unlv.edu (702) 895-3011 www.unr.edu/med (702) 671-2240 www.ccsn.nevada.edu (702) 650-2276 www.nsc.nevada.edu (702) 992-2000 www.ailv.artinstitutes.edu (702) 369-9944 www.bethany.edu/APPL/degrees.htm (702) 838-2929 www.devry.edu (702) 933-9700 www.erau.edu (702) 643-0762 www.hightechinstitute.edu/ locations/state/NV (702) 385-6700 www.itt-tech.edu (702) 558-5404 www.heritagecollege.com (702) 644-1234 www.lasvegas-college.com (702) 567-1920 www.vegasculinary.com (702) 365-7690 www.nu.edu (702) 531-7800 (702) 386-2612 www.nova.edu (702) 942-3450 www.regis.edu (702) 990-0375 www.sierranevada.edu (702) 434-6599 www.tu.edu (702) 777-8687 www.phoenix.edu/lasvegas (702) 638-7279 www.usn.edu (702) 990-4433

70

50,567

University of Nevada, Las Vegas University of Nevada School of Medicine Community College of Southern Nevada Nevada State College

60

58,000

61

Unk

40

Unk

Art Institute of Las Vegas Bethany College of Las Vegas

92

133,000

DeVry University Embry–Riddle Aeronautical University High Tech Institute

52

57,289

QUALITY OF LIFE

80

47,872 ITT Technical Institute

50

Unk

Heritage College Las Vegas College Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts National University Nevada Institute of Business Nova Southeastern University

82

Unk

ON THE HORIZON FACILITIES Facility
Centennial Hills Hospital 6900 North Durango Dr. Las Vegas, NV Rawson-Neal Psychiatric Hospital 1650 Community College Dr. Las Vegas, NV St. Rose Dominican Hospital - San Martin Hospital Warm Springs & Durango Blvd. Las Vegas, NV (702) 492-8000
Source: Individual Entities (February 2006)

Regis University

Beds
171

Opening Date
2007

Sq. Ft.
354,000

Sierra Nevada College Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine University of Phoenix University of Southern Nevada

190

June, 2006

Unk

111

Summer, 2006

Unk

Source: Individual Entities (January 2006)

56

LAS VEGAS COMMUNITY PROFILE

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57

Education

(continued)

Climate
Las Vegas is located in a desert valley in southern Nevada. Mountains surrounding the valley extend 2,000 to 10,000 feet above the valley floor. Summers display classic southwestern desert characteristics, with daily high temperatures typically exceeding 100 degrees and lows in the high 70s during the pre-dawn hours. The summer heat is tempered by the extremely low relative humidity, though Pacific storms occasionally produce rainfall. Winter days are usually crisp, pleasant and sunny. Afternoon temperatures average near 60 degrees and skies are mostly clear. The spring and fall seasons are generally considered ideal. Although rather sharp temperature changes can occur during these months, outdoor activities are seldom hampered.

One of the beneficial features of the Nevada University and Community College System is its visionary approach to developing specific employee training programs for individual industries and companies. For example, the Management Assistance Partnership (MAP) provides technical, business and workforce assistance to manufacturing, construction, mining companies and associated industries. The program opens new doors for the Nevada industrial community, while expanding its scope and revitalizing its capabilities. From 2002 through 2004, MAP generated more than $328 million in positive industrial economic impact for the state of Nevada. There is also a multitude of government initiatives aimed at job training. Nevada’s Train Employees Now program assists companies with quickly training workers in the specialized skills a company requires. The Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation’s employment service programs provide job placement and training opportunities that assist businesses in meeting their employment needs, as well as job seekers in returning to work through the state’s workforce investment system, Nevada JobConnect. Available services for businesses include labor market information, recruitment assistance, Foreign Labor Certification, tax credit certification, training incentives and job fairs that help expand employer recruiting efforts. Job seeker services include job referral, career guidance and skill enhancement training. The state of Nevada offers a variety of programs to help make college affordable. The Millennium Scholarship Program awards up to $10,000 to eligible seniors who wish to remain in state. The Nevada Prepaid Tuition Program, the Upromise College Fund 529 Plan, and USAA College Savings are all designed to assist parents in saving for their children’s education.
Source: Office of Business Development (January 2006)

CLIMATE
Days with Sunshine Average High/Low in January Average High/Low in July Annual Precipitation 310 Days 57.1 / 36.8 F 104.1 / 78.2 F 4.49 Inches

Source: National Weather Service ( January, 2006)

Elementary and Secondary Education
The Clark County School District is the fifth largest school district in the country. At the start of the 2005/2006 school year, 291,486 students were enrolled in the district’s 317 public schools. Edison Schools, a private manager of public schools, operates seven of these schools. The average per pupil expenditure rate is $5,805. The student/teacher ratio varies depending on grade level:
QUALITY OF LIFE

Recreation
The Las Vegas Lifestyle
Living in Las Vegas offers the excitement and sophistication of urban areas, or peaceful hometown living in one of the surrounding rural communities. Spectacular mountains, the Lake Mead Recreation Area, lush valleys and desert scenery form a perfect backdrop for world-class outdoor recreational opportunities.

Grade Level
Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 Grades 4 & 5

Student / Teacher Ratio
18:1 17:1 20:1 28:1

QUALITY OF LIFE

The district also includes 17 magnet schools emphasizing aerospace and aviation, communications, fine and performing arts, languages, law and leadership professions, tourism and travel, math and science, and technology. In addition, there are over 50 private and parochial schools operating in the Las Vegas area.
Source: Clark County District (January 2006)

Family Attractions
Las Vegas is the entertainment capital of the world for adults and children alike. There is plenty to choose from, with circus acts, amusement parks and roller coasters, aquariums, wild animal habitats, art museums, pyrotechnic displays and outdoor shows, many of which are free. And when the weather gets hot, head to Mt. Charleston, about 50 minutes from downtown. Many archeological, heritage and historical museums in the valley focus on the 12,000-year history of human settlement in Nevada. You can immerse your family in the history and culture of Native American tribes like the Anasazi and Paiute or follow the story of the Mormon farmers who settled in Moapa Valley. Catering especially to children are the Lied Discovery Children’s Museum, the Las Vegas Natural History Museum and the Southern Nevada Zoological-Botanical Park. Just a few hours away in Southern California are Disneyland, Sea World, the San Diego Zoo, Legoland and Universal Studios.

Outdoor Activities
With ideal weather and scores of activities to choose from, valley residents like to get outdoors and enjoy the sunshine. Las Vegas' centralized location makes it an ideal stepping off point for visiting Southern Utah (Bryce Canyon and Zion National Park), Arizona (Lake Havasu and Grand Canyon) and Southern California (Death Valley and the Pacific Ocean), most of which are within a four-hour drive. With over three million acres of public land surrounding the city and nearly 90 miles of recreation and transportation trails, many outdoor activities are available close to home. These include a mix of golfing, skiing, fishing, hunting, hiking, camping, biking and swimming.

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Recreation

(continued)

Community Affairs
Introduction
Activities
Beach, boat rental, lounge, picnicking, restaurant Visitor’s center, tours, restaurant Boating, diving, ferry service, hot springs, jet skiing, rafting, SCUBA diving, water skiing Biking, camping, hiking, picnic, skiing, snowboarding Beach, boat rental, store Biking, hiking, rock climbing, running, scenic drive Camping, hiking, mountain biking

OUTDOOR ACTIVITES Attraction
Boulder Beach & Marina Hoover Dam Lake Mead Recreational Area

Driving Time
30 minutes 40 minutes 20 minutes

Where are you going on your next vacation? The Bahamas? Mexico? Hawaii? Disney World? Las Vegas? Now more than ever, Las Vegas enjoys a seat along side the most popular vacation spots in the world. This year alone the bustling metropolis will attract more than 44 million visitors to its desert locale. However, mega-resorts and reasonably-priced hotel rooms alone cannot maintain the city’s reputation of being a premiere tourist destination. It takes the constant support and dedication of local government to do that. The support of government is central to maintaining a strong economy and contemporary image. Today’s Las Vegas designers say that putting people into the spirit to have fun and enticing them through the front door begins with visual appeal from the street. The residents of Las Vegas also believe that the visual appeal of their neighborhoods and a quality of life second to none are pivotal when it comes to maintaining a strong tourist industry. This quality of life they speak of includes safe neighborhoods, excellent transportation and roads, flood control construction and maintenance, first-rate fire services, and outstanding municipal and government services. The infrastructure of any city provides the foundation from which it endeavors to provide efficient and cost-effective services. The fiscal year 2005 city of Las Vegas budget is an $880 million expenditure plan that encompasses a wide range of municipal services. The following pages will look in detail at some of these services and improved infrastructure. We believe the information found in this section is a testament to the city’s commitment to the citizens of Las Vegas.
Source: City of Las Vegas Office of Business Development (February 2006)

Mt. Charleston & Toiyabe National Forest Overton Beach & Marina Red Rock Canyon Valley of Fire State Park

50 minutes 60 minutes 20 minutes 40 minutes

Source: Office of Business Development (February 2006)

The first 10 miles of the River Mountains Loop Trail opened in 2005. When completed, the trail will form a 35-mile long continuous paved path for hikers, bicyclists and horseback riders. It is designed to link up to a multiple-use trail system and will eventually connect Boulder City and Henderson and allow access to Lake Mead National Recreation Area, as well as offer connections to Boulder Dam, Clark County Wetlands and metropolitan Las Vegas via other trail networks.
QUALITY OF LIFE

The Las Vegas area boasts over 800 holes of golf spread out over 34 public and semi-private courses and 10 private courses. In addition, you can lob, volley and practice your overhand smash to your heart's content on one of the many Las Vegas public, private and hotel courts (open to non-guests for a fee). Many of the 60 public parks in the city also have well-maintained, lighted basketball and tennis courts available on a first-come, first-served basis. Adventurous athletes can find a slew of activities available in the valley, such as sky diving; motocross; race car driving; indoor and outdoor paintball fields; Laser Tag arenas; and skate parks for skateboarders, in-line skaters and bikers. There are also several ice rinks for ice-skating and hockey.
COMMUNITY AFFAIRS

Spectator Sports
Sports aficionados will enjoy watching the Las Vegas 51s, an AAA affiliate of the Los Angeles Dodgers; the Las Vegas Wranglers, an expansion team for the East Coast Hockey League; and NBA exhibition games. In fact, the 2007 NBA All-Star Game will be held in Las Vegas. The city is also home to one of the nation's fastest racing tracks, the Las Vegas Motor Speedway, where top contenders compete every March in the NASCAR Nextel Cup Series, the UAW DaimlerChrysler 400. For college sports fans, UNLV offers Division I sports, pitting their Rebels against other schools in the Mountain West Conference.

Shopping
From the convenience of the traditional mall to the bargains at the factory outlets to upscale boutiques and specialty shops, Las Vegas has it all. Clothing, shoes, jewelry, art, antiques, electronics, furniture, collectibles, memorabilia, and of course, western wear, abound for your purchasing pleasure. Las Vegas Premium Outlets is the newest mall in the city, featuring name brand designs such as Armani, Coach, Dolce & Gabbana, Guess, Lacoste, Kenneth Cole, Polo Ralph Lauren, St. John and Theory at affordable prices.

Arts
Whether its performing arts, visual arts or humanities – Las Vegas has it all. With over 25 museums, 65 galleries and 25 performing arts centers, the valley abounds with rich cultural opportunities for you and your family to share. Whether you are interested in dance, theatre, art or music, or if you enjoy exploring arts from other countries, you will find an abundance of organizations dedicated to showcasing their skills in Las Vegas.
Source: Office of Business Development (February 2006)

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Public Safety - Fire & Rescue
The 648 employees of Las Vegas Fire & Rescue are tasked with protecting one of the most recognizable cities in the world. The department provides services in the following area:

Las Vegas Fire Stations
City of Las Vegas Fire Stations
MOCCASIN

Legend
Existing Fire Stations Major Freeways Streets City Limits 1.5 Mile Response Area
Future Fire Station 1.5 Mile Response Area

• • • • • •

Fire Suppression, Prevention, Inspection and Educational services. Emergency Medical Ambulance and Rescue Services Fire Investigation & Bomb Squad Services Fire Protection Engineering & Planning Hazardous Materials Response Emergency Management

E

KYL

EC

O ANY

N

I

GRAND TETON

DURANGO

H
HUALAPAI ELKHORN

L
RAINBOW

Fire Suppression, Prevention, Inspection & Emergency Medical Services. Las Vegas Fire & Rescue operates 19 fire engines, six ladder trucks, 17 ambulances, a technical rescue team, water tanker, air/light unit, mobile command post and a hazardous materials team placed at 16 fire stations strategically located throughout the city. Fire Prevention staff conduct inspections at construction sites and at current businesses to ensure that fire & life safety codes are adhered to. The Fire Protection Engineering & Planning sections work with planners and architects to review plans for new construction or existing upgrade/modification to ensure these plans meet fire & safety codes. Further, the department operates the only public safety bomb squad in Southern Nevada as well as a fully equipped hazardous materials team ready to handle any emergency including acts of terrorism.
The Office of Public Information & Education provides instruction in fire and life safety and disaster preparedness to local schools, civic groups and churches. Courses are also available for businesses on the operation of fire extinguishers and evacuations of buildings. Several national award-winning programs (most for free) are available including The Citizens Fire Academy, Community Emergency Response Training, Hotel Employee Life-safety Program, Automatic External Defibrillator training and the University of Nevada-Las Vegas Disaster Preparedness & Emergency Response course, to list some. Call 702-383-2888 for more information. Emergency Medical Services. The department operates 17 licensed advance life support ambulances and all 19 fire engines are also paramedic rated, providing 36 paramedic units to the city. Further, the department operates a Technical Rescue Team, which is equipped with the latest in rescue and extrication equipment. All firefighters are either certified emergency medical technicians or certified paramedics.
COMMUNITY AFFAIRS

TC
CENTENNIAL

BUFFALO

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41

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D
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LONE MOUNTAIN

J
DURANGO
RAINBOW

9
CRAIG
ALEXANDER

DECATUR

SIMMONS

BUFFALO

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CHEYENNE

42

CHEYENNE

HILLS CENTER

46KE LA 47
N W ER T O NT CE

DEL WEB

MEAD

SMOKE RANCH

43

VEGAS CAREY

VEGAS

5TH

CAREY

LAKE MEAD

LAKE MEAD

RAMPART

7

U.P .R. LA R. SV EG AS MARYLAND

SUMMERLIN

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6
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EASTERN

44 2

M
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OWENS

OWENS

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VALLEY VIEW

1 4

8

WASHINGTON BONANZA

STEWART
CHARLESTON

CHARLESTON

MAIN

10

LAMB

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LAMB

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NELLIS

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45

MARTIN L. KING

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ANN LONE MOUNTAIN

FORT APACHE

LOSEE

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Emergency Management. A full-time Emergency Management Coordinator assigned to the department operates the city’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC). City and public safety officials use the EOC in the event of a large-scale emergency or disaster to ensure the incident is handled in an expedient and coordinated manner. I.S.O. Class One Rating and CFAI Accredited Agency: The Insurance Services Office (I.S.O.) rates the city of Las Vegas as CLASS ONE, the very best rating a city can obtain. The rating is used to set insurance premiums by many insurance companies across the United States t oset insurance premiums. Las Vegas residents enjoy savings on premiums as a result of the Class One rating. The department is also an Internationally Accredited Agency of the Commission on Fire Accreditation International. Less than ten fire departments worldwide have been able to hold both a Class One Rating and a CFAI accreditation.

SAHARA

SAHARA

HUALAPAI

SPRING MOUNTAIN DESERT INN

COMMUNITY AFFAIRS

FLAMINGO

DESERT INN
SANDS TWAIN TWAIN

F O G N I M A L

Station 47 opening November, 2006. Temporary Station 47 in operation March 2006.

Las Vegas Fire & Rescue - Important Phone Numbers
IMPORTANT PHONE NUMBERS - LAS VEGAS FIRE & RESCUE Department
EMERGENCY Fire Headquarters Fire Prevention Division Fire Protection Engineering Public Information & Education TDD Las Vegas (emergency) Emergency Info (recorded) Web Site: www.lasvegasfire.org

Phone
9-1-1 (702) 383-2888 (702) 229-0366 (702) 229-5397 (702) 229-0145 (702) 384-4044 (702) 38ALERT (702) 382-5378

Department
Urgent – Non Emergency Fire Chief’s Officer New Construction Inspections Emergency Management Complaint Hotline TDD Las Vegas (non-emergency)

Phone
3-1-1 (702) 229-0323 (702) 229-2071 (702) 229-0313 (702) 229-0340 (702) 386-9108

e-Mail: fire-rescue@LasVegasNevada.Gov

Emergency Information: www.lvalert.com

Source: Las Vegas Fire & Rescue (February 2006)

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Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department
DEPARTMENT OVERVIEW January 2006 On July 1, 1973 the Clark County Sheriff's Office and the Las Vegas Police Department merged to become the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (LVMPD) headed by an elected sheriff. LVMPD, is one of the few police departments in the nation with an elected sheriff as its head who in turn appoints the undersheriff, assistant sheriffs and deputy chiefs. As such, he commands "police officers" and not "deputy sheriffs." The sheriff serves as chief executive officer for the department, the undersheriff is second in command, and the two assigned assistant sheriffs are responsible for the administration of several groups of divisions within the department, while the deputy chief is responsible for division administration. Captains, lieutenants, sergeants and police officers — in that order—are ranked based on civil service performance and testing. As for budget, both the city of Las Vegas and Clark County fund the department jointly based on a percentage for each determined by a formula consisting of number of calls for service, population and other factors. Also, both the city and county are required to provide office space throughout the valley for the department; however, the sheriff and much of his staff are located at City Hall. The total jurisdiction for the LVMPD consists of 7,560 square miles. In 1973, the city and county’s population under the LVMPD’s jurisdiction was listed at 270,406; by February 2006 it had grown to 1,747,025. The Las Vegas Valley is one of the fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the country with over 6,000 people moving to the valley each month. Police officers patrolling the valley (approximately 400 square miles) are assigned to seven area commands, and there is an eighth station, located at McCarran International Airport, which services the airport only. The commands are strategically located throughout the city to provide better policing to the area’s neighborhoods. Citizens can request information, file crime reports, report accidents, and talk to the police officers who serve their area from any of their respective centers, which are listed below:

Department of Public Works
City of Las Vegas Department of Public Works
The Public Works Department plans, designs, constructs, operates and maintains public-use facilities, the roadway and traffic network, and wastewater and storm water management systems. It also regulates private development. City of Las Vegas infrastructure projects focus on the need to construct roads, flood conveyance systems, traffic signals, sanitary sewer systems, parks, municipal buildings and more. Supporting development remains a high priority in Las Vegas, as is evidenced by more than $778.3 million in public projects. These multi-year projects, which are in the planning, design or construction stages, include $75 million for new city facilities, $248 million in road and flood control improvements, $349 million for park and leisure projects, $22.6 million for environmental division improvements, $32.6 million for transportation improvements, $26.8 million for general public works projects, and $24.3 million for sanitary sewer improvements. Public Works comprises 19% of the total budget citywide and 4% of the city’s General Fund budget. Public Works initiatives in 2006 include completion of the $7.2 million Anasazi Drive Overpass at Summerlin Parkway, the $10.2 million Ann Road Detention Basin in Centennial Hills, the $3.6 million Discovery Drive roadway in downtown Las Vegas, the $4.7 million Tenaya Way improvement project between the 215 Beltway and Elkhorn Road, and the $7.9 million Mirabelli Community Center.

Prior Year Accomplishments
More than $102.4 million was spent on public projects in 2005. A combination of roadwork, sewer system and storm drainage projects, paving and other infrastructure improvements, including new traffic signals and a new park, were completed during the year. As part of the city’s particulate matter PM-10 program, several dirt roads were paved at a cost of approximately $58.1 million. A total of 16 Las Vegas intersections received new traffic signals. Crews installed some 895 new traffic and street signs, and 859 new streetlights. The Public Works Department completed a new $41 million park and regional tennis facility located on 110 acres on the north side of Summerlin Parkway, a new fire station at 633 North Mojave Road, and renovations to the historic downtown post office and at the Fifth Street School. The Environmental Division of Public Works is responsible for the safe treatment of wastewater from the city’s three facilities. Since 1989, more than $200 million has been spent to improve and expand wastewater treatment processes. An average of 70 million gallons of wastewater is treated daily. Collectively, these facilities can treat up to 91 million gallons per day, to serve the community’s needs for many years to come. Due to the region’s history of flash flooding, flood control is an important issue. Since 1987, more than $216.8 million has been spent on regional flood control facilities. Today, 13 detention basins and 286 miles of local drainage facilities are in place and the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Community Rating System (CRS) rates the city of Las Vegas as a Class Six community. This means that 20% of insurance holders in Las Vegas save money on flood insurance premiums as a result of the city’s CRS rating. In 2005, the Public Works Department achieved accreditation by the American Public Works Association, making it the only 23rd public works department in the nation and the first city in Nevada to earn this prestigious status.
Source: Department of Public Works (March 2006)

COMMUNITY AFFAIRS

Northwest: Southeast: Northeast: Southwest:

9850 W. Cheyenne Ave. 3675 E. Harmon Ave. 831 N. Mojave Rd. 5925 Spring Mountain Rd.

South Central: 4860 Las Vegas Blvd. South Downtown: 621 N. 9th St. Bolden: 1851 Stella Lake St.

COMMUNITY AFFAIRS

Further, the department handles calls for police services in the unincorporated portions of Clark County as well. Resident officers patrol the areas outside of the Las Vegas Valley. These officers may actually live in the outlying areas to which they are assigned, some of which are as far as 85 miles south and 60 miles north of downtown Las Vegas. The department also maintains a complete and comprehensive Forensics Laboratory that includes fingerprint identification, an automated fingerprint system, ballistics, handwriting analysis, and extensive analytical capabilities including DNA testing. These capabilities are available to all Southern Nevada law enforcement agencies. The department’s Communications Bureau operates out of a new state-of-the-art building that was constructed in 1999/2000 through a medium-term financing issue. The center also serves as the public safety answering point for the LVMPD. It boasts a computer-assisted dispatch system that is tied to mobile communication terminals in patrol vehicles. It also has an enhanced 9-1-1 system, which includes resident telephone address files on dwellers within the LVMPD jurisdiction that are shared with the city of North Las Vegas on an as-needed basis. A unique functional aspect of the LVMPD is its autonomy in terms of personnel processes. The department independently recruits for new hires through promotion and allocation processes subject only to budgetary constraints and the approval of the Fiscal Affairs Committee and Civil Service Boards. As of January 1, 2006, there were 4,289 authorized, full-time positions within the LVMPD. Some 689 of these positions are assigned to the Detention Services Division; 70 are assigned to the airport, 2,100 are commissioned officers and 1,180 are civilian personnel. Both the airport and detention officers are funded entirely by the county and are not a part of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department’s budget. Civilian staff, which makes up about one-third of the department, handles crime scene analysis, communications, records, information systems and finance. Currently the department is staffed at 1.8 officers per 1,000 citizens, but this number is expected to increase in the future.

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Department of Field Operations
More than 400 Field Operations Department employees are responsible to deliver customer service excellence within the community by managing and maintaining the integrity and cleanliness of the public infrastructure and city-owned and leased facilities, ensuring safe passage on Las Vegas’ heavily traveled roads and byways, and providing safe access to buildings, parks, and other city operated facilities and property. Field Operations personnel operate and maintain the city’s sanitary sewer system and flood control/drainage facilities, and provide safe ridership for city public transit system users. During emergencies, Field Operations crews are first responders who monitor road conditions and flood control systems during heavy storms and lend support to other emergency response agencies throughout Las Vegas. As a public service, the department provides sand at two convenient locations for residents to fill sandbags in advance of potential floods. Major Field Operations Department initiatives for fiscal year 2006 include: • Drafting a new sidewalk maintenance section for the Municipal Code to ensure compliance with new state laws, analyzing costs to construct sidewalks where there are none. • Developing an expanded Bus Circulator System to better serve citizens and tourists in the downtown corridor. • Taking an even more pro-active approach to energy conservation by closely monitoring all utility usage, and making adjustments to increase efficiency when appropriate. Prior Year Accomplishments (2005) • Maintained more than 119 miles of streets to include 222,000 square feet of permanent pavement patching, 520,000 pounds of rubber asphalt crack sealant, and 2,350,000 square yards of pavement surface treatments valued at $2.8 million. • Constructed over 23,000 linear feet of curb and gutter concrete drainage repairs, 16,000 linear feet of sidewalk, 7,000 linear feet of driveway and 37 individual valley gutters values at $2.3 million. • Completed construction of Centennial Plaza in downtown Las Vegas. • Built the city’s first trail project in the northwest Centennial Hills area. • Constructed a pedestrian bridge to improve student safety to and from Eileen Conners Elementary School. • Installed an automated security gate in the Sun City Summerlin Community to provide direct access for emergency crews and significantly shorten response times for fire and medical responses. • Completed significant modifications and upgrades at the Darling Tennis Center complex in Summerlin for the first Tennis Channel Open tennis tournament. • Parks Division crews maintained over 980 park acres, nearly 205 acres of city facilities, 300 acres of medians/roadways and 85 acres belonging to the Clark County School District. Through staff efforts, the National Arbor Day Foundation named the city of Las Vegas a “Tree City USA” for the 13th year. • The Facilities Management Division completed over 140 improvement projects including a major renovation at the Metropolitan Police Department Traffic Safety Bureau, and negotiated a $1 million cellular tower/land lease agreement with Nextel, Cingular and Mountain Union Telecom. • In 2005 the Fleet Services Division: • Increased the total number of hybrid vehicles to 19. • Expanded the use of biodiesel fuel (B20) to virtually the entire fleet of diesel-powered vehicles. • Negotiated a two-year contract with Honda Motor Company of America to use two Honda FCX fuel cell vehicles, making Las Vegas the first city in the world to have them in an arid desert climate. • Negotiated a contract with Collier Technologies to convert seven city-owned trucks to hydrogen/compressed natural gas blend, funded through a subcontract with the Department of Energy.
Source: Department of Field Operations (February 2006)

Department of Human Resources
The Department of Human Resources plays a critical role in the municipal services the city provides to the citizens of Las Vegas. They are responsible for the effective administration and operation of employee and organizational services, personnel services, safety and liability and insurance services, workers’ compensation, workers’ benefits, and employee recruitment and staffing needs, no small measure to say the least. The Department also serves as the hub of activity for the city’s employment recruitment and staffing needs. The city of Las Vegas has more than 400 different classified job titles and approximately 2,800 employees who work in various locations throughout the city. Most jobs are considered classified (or union positions) and fall under the city’s civil service system, which means selections for employment are made through use of a competitive examination process. To find out which jobs are currently open for recruitment at the city you may: 1. Visit our Human Resources Department on the 2nd floor at City Hall. 2. Call our Jobs Hotline at 229-6346. 3. Log on to www.lasvegasnevada.gov. Click “on Apply for", navigate to Jobs, and then click on the job opening of interest to you. You may access a paper employment application by clicking on the Employment Application link. Or, you may apply on line by clicking the Online Employment Center link, to create an employment profile and completing the online employment application. The Department of Human Resources recently upgraded its online application process. The online application gives the applicant the ability to apply for an open position with the city in a secured setting via the Internet. The online application can be used for any recruitment except for those that limit the number of applicants. If recruitment is limited, the applicant must come to Human Resources to receive a numbered application in person. Applicants will also have the ability to submit interest cards for certain positions which have been difficult to recruit for in the past. For those jobs in which interest cards are accepted, applicants will be notified via their email address of record that the recruitment is currently open for applications. When applying for a job, applicants may also submit a resume in addition to the required employment application; however, resumes alone are not accepted. To determine if you are qualified for a particular job opening, carefully review the qualification requirements for that position listed on each job announcement in the Minimum Qualifications section of the announcement. Applicants filing for positions with the city can receive veteran’s preference points by attaching a DD214 showing character of service along with their application. The applicant must have served in the military during a conflict or war and attain a passing score of 70% or above on their examination in order to receive an additional 5% on their final score. In addition to job opportunities, the city’s website also contains helpful hints on how to prepare for oral or written examinations. Click on the Success Tips link to take advantage of the valuable test taking tips that are offered. The city of Las Vegas offers a comprehensive benefits package for all regular, full-time employees that is equal in value to approximately one third of their salary. Part-time employees are eligible for certain benefits on a pro-rated basis. These include medical, dental, vision insurance, employer-paid contributions to the Public Employee’s Retirement System, tuition reimbursement, life insurance, deferred compensation, flexible benefits program, and holiday, sick, and annual leave. Other than the upgraded online application system, major initiatives for FY 2006 include the adoption of the revisions to the Civil Service Board rules and regulations, which govern the recruitment and hiring process for all classified positions, and the development of new methods of providing customer service to citizens and city departments, and participation in the second annual Las Vegas Citizen’s Leadership Academy. The Academy is a seven-week series of interactive workshops and facility tours for 25 selected residents within the community. Participation in the academy provides an excellent opportunity for residents to gain an in-depth look at the roles and responsibilities of local government. For further information on the Human Resources Department, please call (702) 229-6315. Source: Human Resources Department (February 2006)

COMMUNITY AFFAIRS

COMMUNITY AFFAIRS

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Department of Information Technologies
Emerging Strategies & Innovations for Information Technologies
The perspective of Information Technologies (IT) has changed significantly over the last 10 years. The city of Las Vegas recognized the importance of integrating technology into the strategic fiber of the business planning process early on. Graduating from utility status in the “back room,” IT has become essential to the process as the city defines its responsibilities and priorities to its constituents. Recent IT initiatives have resulted in streamlined processes and increased access to traditional and innovative services for both internal clients and the community at large.

Department of Leisure Services
What do you do with your free time if you don’t enjoy visiting casinos? The Department of Leisure Services invites you to look “Beyond the Neon” and discover the wealth of multigenerational programming available at your nearest city of Las Vegas community, cultural or senior center; community school; swimming pool; park, ball field or fitness complex. The department offers, through its ever-expanding facilities and programs, a host of opportunities, from sports to concerts, to fill your leisure hours. It is particularly proud that it has received full accreditation from the Commission for Accreditation of Park and Recreation Agencies, confirming that it meets the operational standards established by the National Park and Recreation Association. Through seven community centers, 10 community schools, one year-round and five seasonal swimming pools, the Recreation Division has activities for young and old alike. Arts and crafts, dance, gymnastics, martial arts, music and educational classes are among the programs the Recreation Division provides, along with youth and adult sports leagues, after-school Safekey, and summer, holiday and track break children’s camps. The Cultural Affairs Division offers concerts, stage productions, dances, art exhibitions, community festivals, and a wide-ranging variety of classes in four cultural centers. Outdoor programs take place in its large amphitheatre and park locations throughout the city. The division also is involved in downtown redevelopment, including the conversion of the historic post office into a cultural facility. The city’s growing senior population is certainly not overlooked. The Senior Citizen Programs Division operates seven senior centers, where residents, age 50 and older, can find classes, workshops, sports opportunities and social clubs that cater to the interests of the mature person. Free legal advice also is available to those over 60 years old through the Senior Citizens Law Project that now is conveniently located in the new Downtown Senior Services Center at 310 South Ninth Street. The program services provided out of this facility are a result of a partnership between the departments of Leisure Services and Neighborhood Services. Inclusionary programming is an important element that is addressed by the Adaptive Recreation and Sports Division. From wheelchair sports to services for those suffering from traumatic head injuries, the division provides programs that serve people with and without disabilities. The Amanda & Stacy Darling Memorial Tennis Center opened in 2005 at 7901 West Washington Avenue. In addition to operating a municipal sports office and two multipurpose sports complexes, the division coordinates Corporate Challenge, an Olympic-style competition involving nearly 15,000 participants. Corporate Challenge is the single largest amateur athletic event of its kind in the state. The department is continuously looking at ways to improve services for the Valley’s ethnically and socially diverse residents. Programs may be added, modified or eliminated based upon the needs and desires of the department’s patrons. Facilities have been constructed and/or remodeled in both the rapidly expanding suburban areas and the inner city. A new mile-long, 130-acre park opened on Buffalo Drive at Washington Avenue in 2005. The new Mirabelli Community Center opened in February 2006. For more information about the Department of Leisure Services and all of the opportunities it provides, call (702) 229-6297.
Source: Department of Leisure Services (February 2006)

Emergence of “Real Time Government.” Traditionally, government adjusts to changing conditions through
predictable timetables; i.e. budget, legislative mandates and elections. The city of Las Vegas has elected to operate in “real time” to respond quickly to fluctuations in the economy, growth and social conditions. More specifically, this is evidenced in the city’s ability to be open for business 24/7 utilizing telephone, Internet and wireless systems. We also post many of our transactions as they happen, rather than wait for off-hours batch processing. An example of this is our direct communications with the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) on parking citations, allowing the DMV to update their records nearly as soon as a transaction is processed at City Hall.

Interdependence is a Driving Force. It is now commonly agreed that government programs cannot operate independent of each other. The need to leverage commonalities and structures in each department that support business strategies has become obvious. An example of this principal can be seen in the standardization and interlinking of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and an internal services portal throughout the entire Las Vegas valley. This is an enormous benefit to local businesses and agencies that use the many services provided through GIS and this Internet site. Just take a look at www.mynevada.gov
The city is also a leader in implementing an Enterprise Resource Plan (ERP), supporting continuously updated information through integrated systems such as financials, purchasing, human resources/payroll, payables, leisure programming, courts, land development, public works assets, and customer relationship management. The city has experienced improved efficiencies and is now able to provide expanded services.

Service Needs are Growing. As the city of Las Vegas experiences growth in the information age, the IT department
COMMUNITY AFFAIRS

will see a greater demand for services. Within the last 12 months, the department has experienced a 10% increase in service requests, expanded the network to 20 new facilities and added 20 new servers to its server farm.

COMMUNITY AFFAIRS

Service delivery methods are changing and expanding. Prior to 1995, the prevalent method of delivering business information was through mainframe terminals, with citizen access provided by over-the-counter interaction with city departments and agencies. Since that time, we have added local and remote desktop data services, intranet and Internet services, interactive voice response (IVR), fax-back capability, mobile networking services and wireless networking. New technologies and applications will greatly enhance our use of IVR’s and the Internet as information delivery systems. These solutions are becoming more inexpensive, easier to administer, and more reliable than ever before. Consequently, our citizens and staff will have increased access to the information they need and will be able to transact with the city without visiting City Hall.
For further information contact the city of Las Vegas Information Technologies Department at (702) 229-6291. Source: Information Technology Department (February 2005

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Neighborhood Services Department
Neighborhood Services is in the forefront of proactive community programs. We give residents a voice to define issues, take a stake in their solution, and tap government resources to achieve results and create a stronger community.

Overview of Redevelopment Area
City of Las Vegas Redevelopment Agency
Redevelopment is a planned, concerted effort by local government, the private sector, and the community to encourage new investment in older areas of the city through large-scale, infill development and incentives to enhance older business districts and neighborhoods. In 1985, the Nevada Legislature allowed for the establishment of the Redevelopment Agency, empowering it to carry out the redevelopment objectives as outlined in the Redevelopment Plan. In 1999, a change in Nevada law allowed for the extension of the Las Vegas Redevelopment Agency through 2031. The Redevelopment Area currently encompasses 3,079 acres, but plans are underway to expand the boundaries to allow assistance in other areas in need of revitalization. The current boundaries consists of the Downtown Las Vegas Centennial Plan area and other commercial districts including Owens Avenue, Martin Luther King Boulevard, and portions of North Decatur Boulevard and Eastern Avenue corridors. The Redevelopment Agency is comprised of several key participants: • The mayor and the six members of the Las Vegas City Council form the Redevelopment Agency’s Board. They have the responsibility for setting and implementing downtown redevelopment strategy. • The city manager serves as the executive director and provides policy direction, recommends specific projects to the board for its consideration, and provides general oversight of all agency activities. • The director of the office of business development is responsible for carrying out the day-today tasks of the agency and ensures the policy directives of the agency board and executive director are executed. The agency’s future development efforts will focus on aggressive and upbeat marketing of downtown Las Vegas, maintaining a proactive posture of seeking redevelopment opportunities, providing heightened customer service to developers and owners, and investigating new forms of economic stimuli, such as tax increment financing. This effort will greatly enhance the economic vitality of the expanded redevelopment plan area through new construction and substantial new private reinvestment over the remaining life of the agency. Participation in the downtown redevelopment process requires interested parties to demonstrate the following: • How their project complements the redevelopment strategy • Possession of both the financial resources and management experience to construct, rehabilitate, or reconstruct a project and ensure its successful operation after completion • Explain the need for the agency’s assistance, and show the benefit of the completed project to downtown Las Vegas. An application is available upon request from the Redevelopment Agency’s Office specifying those items, which must be provided before a project is formally reviewed. Regarding funding, while the agency has participated financially on certain projects, it is not designed to function as a primary source of funds or as a management consultant. When a financing gap occurs and the developer can demonstrate that no other means of financing the project is available, the agency may participate financially. Financial participation takes the form of using Tax Increment Financing funds for the project. The agency has the discretion regarding how funds will be used. Eligible public improvement activities include sidewalks, streets, streetlights, signage, landscaping and underground utilities. Some redevelopment projects require the assimilation of land. The agency has the ability to acquire property through purchase or eminent domain, a last resort when all other efforts to negotiate a reasonable settlement have been exhausted. The agency will only become involved in acquiring property after the developer has certified that they have made a good faith effort to purchase the property. For more information on the Redevelopment Agency, please write to the Office of Business Development, 400 Stewart Avenue, Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 or call us at (702) 229-6100.

AFFORDABLE HOUSING
Affordable housing is an important priority for Las Vegas. Federal funds are allocated by Neighborhood Services to preserve and develop affordable housing. Home Investment Partnerships, Low Income Housing Trust Funds and 18 Percent Redevelopment Set-asides are allocated and overseen by Neighborhood Services to fund the improvement, preservation or development of affordable housing. Private Activity Bonds provide low-interest loans to developers of affordable multi-family units, through either new construction or the acquisition/rehabilitation of existing units.

NEIGHBORHOOD PRESERVATION THROUGH COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS
Part of the city vision is that all residents enjoy their neighborhood and feel safe. Community Development Block Grants are a Federal Housing and Urban Development entitlement that go towards revitalizing deteriorating neighborhoods and expanding economic opportunities for people with low to moderate income, and can be used for public service programs or capital projects such as senior centers, community centers, sports fields, sidewalks and streetlights. Neighborhood Organizing - Neighborhood Planners work with residents to organize neighborhoods and develop Neighborhood Action Plans that chart a strategy to build stronger community relationships, tap resources and address their community’s needs. Neighborhood Partners Fund Grants of up to $5,000 are available to fund community enhancement projects for organized neighborhoods that bring matching volunteer labor, donated supplies or cash. Clean and Safe Neighborhoods - A Neighborhood Response Hotline is available to report code enforcement issues or graffiti, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Within 48 hours a Code Enforcement Officer or the Rapid Response Team will be dispatched to investigate or address the issue. Call 229-6615 or go online at www.lasvegasnevada.gov under the submit a complaint menu.

YOUTH AND SENIOR INITIATIVES
Our youth are our future. Neighborhood Services offers programs and grants to cultivate knowledge and leadership skills in our youth. Youth groups affiliated with neighborhood associations can apply for up to $1,000 in Youth Neighborhood Association Partnership Program (YNAPP) grants to make community improvements. They are responsible for matching the grant with volunteer labor, donated materials, or cash. Matching grants of up to $8,000 are available to encourage parents and school staff to partner in defining and addressing the needs of their school through the School Parents As Learning Support (SPALS) Program. The program is aimed at low-income areas. A Senior Citizens Advisory Board, Senior Nutrition Center and the Downtown Senior Services Center, located at 9th and Bridger are part of Neighborhood Services’ multi-faceted approach to meet our commitment to ensure that seniors have a fulfilling quality of life.

COMMUNITY AFFAIRS

REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

COMMUNITY SERVICES
To address homelessness, Neighborhood Services participates in The Southern Nevada Regional Planning Coalition Committee on Homelessness that is implementing a proactive, strategic, regional approach that integrates and maximizes resources to address homelessness. EVOLVE has an outstanding success record for assisting ex-offenders to re-enter society as productive citizens, through housing assistance, training, job placement, counseling and other needed support. Preventing reincarceration saves substantial money for imprisonment costs, reduces crime, adds talent to a tight workforce and generates tax dollars. A Chronic Inebriate Program is underway to assist with substance abuse treatment, housing and employment for repeat offenders who surface in the criminal justice system. The pilot program is aimed at ending the desperate cycle of chronic inebriation, incarceration and debilitation. Neighborhood Services provides a foundation of services that citizens rely upon, while proactively developing innovative programs to meet the expanding, complex needs of our growing and evolving city.
Source: Neighborhood Services Department (February 2006)

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Recent Redevelopment Projects
The Redevelopment Area has experienced unbelievable growth and development over the past five years. Downtown Las Vegas is well on its way to turning a faded city core of aging casinos and motels into a vibrant urban village brimming with everything from coffee houses and art galleries to new homes and night clubs. Now signs of urban renewal are surfacing all over downtown. In 2005, 11 major development projects were completed in the downtown area, 15 are under construction and more than 50 high-rise residential projects totaling over 19,200 units are proposed, approved or under construction.

Recent Redevelopment Projects
Regional Justice Center

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World Market Center – Design Center Debuts in Las Vegas
Just north of the Las Vegas Premium Outlets at the southwest corner of downtown is the World Market Center furniture mart, a gargantuan campus of showrooms expected to generate thousands of jobs and possibly transfer the title of “furniture capital of the world” from High Point, North Carolina, to downtown Las Vegas. The July 2005 grand opening left more than 62,000 industry professionals, home furnishing buyers and more than 1,000 exhibitors amazed and excited. Regional Power, International Appeal World Market Center is a dynamic new showcase for the home and hospitality contract furnishings industries in the heart of a vibrant, world-class city – Las Vegas. All segments of the industry will be under one roof in a state-of-theart facility. Once completed, one campus will span millions of square feet of furniture, decorative accessories, rugs, lighting, home office, bedding, floral and more – as well as a design center open year-round to the trade. This integrated approach provides a tremendous benefit for buyers and a powerful selling opportunity for our exhibitors. At 12 million square feet, World Market Center will be the largest, most comprehensive home furnishings showroom and convention complex in the West. Phase One (Building A) of World Market Center, Las Vegas, is a 1.3 million square-foot complex featuring 230 permanent show rooms with two floors open year-round. Eventually, eight phases will comprise 12-million square feet at a cost of $2 billion. Building A is fully leased. Building B, which is 1.6 million square feet, will open in the spring of 2007. Building C, which is 2.0 million square feet, is leasing ahead of schedule. The city of Las Vegas has adapted to a changing demographic and recreated itself with a signature style. What better place to introduce the new World Market Design Center. And only Las Vegas can deliver a first-class infrastructure for a facility of this kind. Known as the “Convention Capital of the World,” Las Vegas offers more amenities sought by buyers and exhibitors than any other destination in the world.
REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

Located at 200 Lewis Ave., the Regional Justice Center, the newest addition to the Las Vegas skyline, was opened in 2005. It houses all area supreme, district, justice and municipal courts under one roof. The 717,000-square-foot, 17-story facility is being lauded not only for its functionality but also for its beauty. A large share of the funding for the $185-million facility came from bond initiatives and a quarter came from administrative assessments on misdemeanor offenders in justice and municipal courts. It is estimated that more than 5,000 people per day will access the facility. The opening of the facility has already boosted the need for shops and other amenities in the area, adding to the revitalization of the downtown core.

The Las Vegas Premium Outlets
The Las Vegas Premium Outlets mall, with open-air courtyards and food courts, features shops by Armani, Coach, Dolce & Gabbana, Guess, Lacoste, Kenneth Cole, Polo Ralph Lauren, St. John and Theory. It is projected to add another 109,370 square feet and a three-story parking structure in the near future.

A Taste of Manhattan
Las Vegas has gone crazy for condos. The increasing demand for housing and cost of land in the Las Vegas Valley is driving developers to build vertically. Many of the loft-style condominiums have chosen to take root in and around Las Vegas’ downtown, an area that has seen unprecedented revitalization due to a blossoming art scene and the opening of such commercial hubs as the World Market Center. The development of this lifestyle in a decidedly unStrip like area of the city is perfect timing for the college-educated professionals who are used to city living. This demographic shift is bringing a desire for the arts and for new architecture. Downtown is the key to Las Vegas having a true urban environment where one can walk out the front door and go to work or a restaurant or the dry cleaner. It is an integral part of the valley’s future. The city of perpetual makeover is adding upscale urban life with high-rise condominium towers under construction and a promise of scores more underway. Las Vegas is poised to evolve into a city dotted with neighborhoods that bustle with street life, nightclubs, art galleries, restaurants and even groceries stores. The condo towers that are under construction or projected to open in the downtown this year are:

CONDO TOWERS UNDER CONSTRUCTION Project Allure Location 200 W. Sahara Ave. Price $400K - $3.6 Million $300K - $1.8 Million $380K - $3.2 Million Stories Units 41 23 23 428 168 120 Value $210 Million $82 Million $72 Million Delivery 4Q 2007 1Q 2007 1Q 2006
REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

Union Park
Nearby the World Market Center is Union Park. The Smith Performing Arts Center, the Keep Memory Alive Lou Ruvo Alzheimer’s Institute, Class A office space, retail and condos are slated for the 61-acre parcel that is called “the future of Southern Nevada.” Planners envision Union Park becoming an epicenter of commerce, medicine and culture, surrounded by a revitalized downtown featuring walkable neighborhoods, shops and restaurants weaving around highrise residential towers.

Newport Lofts 200 Hoover Ave. SoHo Lofts 900 Las Vegas Blvd.

Streamline Condos. Will replace the vacant Golden Motel at Las Vegas Boulevard and Fremont Street, which was

The Internal Revenue Service Building
The Internal Revenue Service building, a 90,000 square foot, $17-million chrome-and-glass facility opened in the Union Park District in 2005 adding to the Class A office scene in downtown Las Vegas.

demolished recently to make way for this $125 million, 26-story condo tower. It will consist of 251 luxury units and ground floor retail.

L’Octaine Apartments. An upscale, 51-unit complex featuring studios, one- and two-bedroom units and lofts. It

Southern Nevada Water Authority Building
The Southern Nevada Water Authority building, which is an $87-million, 15-story facility, is under construction and scheduled for completion in 2007. It will be one of the largest office structures downtown and like the IRS facility next-door will house hundreds of employees and draw many visitors each day, people likely to also patronize downtown eateries and shops.

opened in the summer of 2005, with 4,000 square feet of ground-floor retail space facing Las Vegas Boulevard.

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Recent Redevelopment Projects

(continued)

Recent Redevelopment Projects
18b – The Las Vegas Arts District

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Sandhurst Las Vegas, Tower One. Will be the tallest building downtown when it is completed in September 2006.
The massive $245 million project, which will have 409 units priced from $300,000 to $2 million-plus, is a 31-story tower with 35,000 square feet of commercial space on the lower floors.

OTHER MAJOR HIGH-RISE CONDO PROJECTS UNDERWAY Project Name Celo Vista, “aka” Skyview Club Renaissance Location Washington & Veterans Memorial Casino Center & Bonneville Las Vegas Blvd. & 4th Street Bonneville @ Grand Central Parkway 3200 S. Rancho Dr. 3rd & Bonneville 4th & Clark SWC Gass & 3rd St. Wall Street & Western Number & Type of Units 414 Units Mixed-Use 912 Unit Residential & Commercial 319 Unit MixUse Towers 1 Million Sq. ft. of Hotel, Office, & Condos 1445 Units 355 Units Mixed-Use 450 Units 425 Units 3,012 Units Residential & Commercial Building Height in Feet 312 ft. 750 ft. Number of Stories 28 Stories 60 Stories Project Value $144.4 Million $560 Million $159.5 Million $385 Million $722.5 Million $177.5 Million $175 Million $212.5 Million $1,506 Billion

The Las Vegas Arts District is located in the area south of downtown Las Vegas, roughly bound by Commerce Street, Hoover Avenue, 4th Street, Las Vegas Boulevard (at Charleston) and Colorado Avenue. Its new name, 18b the Las Vegas Arts District, is a reference to the original 18 blocks that were designated as an arts neighborhood in 2003. 18b is home to the city’s most eclectic mix of live-in artists, galleries, funky stores and creative cuisine. Its cultural diversity is celebrated each month with “First Friday,” an ongoing and ever-growing arts, entertainment and social block party. First Fridays bring over 6,000 people downtown on the first Friday of each month for an evening filled with gallery receptions, music, food and conviviality. The Las Vegas Arts District, long the center of creativity for historic downtown Las Vegas has set the stage for citizens to live and work among a wealth of artistic shops and boutiques. The new Soho Lofts, located in the arts district, is the first high-rise condominium development downtown. This project has met with success – in fact, the units are already sold out and the property is projected to open in the first quarter of 2006. The development plan the Las Vegas Arts District Development Corporation prepared seeks to shape an arts district that will become an engine of economic growth in the downtown area.
Source: Las Vegas Review Journal, CLV Planning and Development and CLV Office of Business Development (February 2006)

Flatiron Grand Central Parkway Center Grandview Towers juhl, “aka” City Mark Simayof Stan Hi Wall Street Towers

582 ft. 450 ft.

50 Stories 16, 24, 32 Stories 20 Stories 15 Stories 42 Stories 65 Stories Pending

274 ft. Pending Pending 760 ft. 950 ft.

Redevelopment Agency Assistance Programs
Redevelopment Agency Assistance Programs
There are a variety of tools to encourage and assist in the redevelopment of property. Each tool provides some form of aid to the developer such as the reduction of development financing or operating costs. Below are several assistance programs offered by the city of Las Vegas Redevelopment Agency as incentives to spur development and assist developers interested in redevelopment projects.

Tax Increment Financing
Tax Increment Financing (TIF) is a mechanism to capture the future tax benefits of real estate improvements to pay the present cost of these improvements. This is accomplished by freezing property taxes at a base year and all tax revenue up to the base year assessment continues to go to the taxing jurisdiction (city, county, school district); however the incremental tax revenue collected from rising property values is allocated to the TIF district through the governing agency. Public participation, especially the provision of incentives, is generally based on the “but for” test - the project would not happen “but for” the use of incentives to finance the project. TIF can be used to fund private development in strategic areas and finance infrastructure, property acquisition, relocation assistance and façade improvements. Public investment is reimbursed by future incremental tax revenue. There are many characteristics and variations of TIF, as shown in the following table. TIF is typically administered by a city or county department or a non-profit redevelopment agency. Sometimes the redevelopment agencies are governed by the city council. In others, they are governed by a private or combined public/private-sector board of commissioners. Some of these variations are also outlined in the table.
REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

Other Downtown Development
REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

Fifth Street School. A historic school at the corner of Las Vegas Boulevard and Clark Avenue will be converted into a cultural center, including the North American hub for the International Network of Cities of Asylum for dissident writers seeking harbor from repressive governments. The Block. A few blocks east on Third Street at Ogden you’ll find a Las Vegas edition of the famous western bar “Hogs and Heifers,” as well as an upscale steak and seafood restaurant, “Triple George,” and other venues such as “Sidebar” and “Celebrity.”

The Downtown Entertainment District
In the entertainment capital of the world, the downtown Las Vegas’ entertainment district will focus on intimate club venues that are absent from the Strip. The Fremont East Entertainment District runs a block each side of Fremont Street from Las Vegas Boulevard to Eighth Street. The goals of the district are to attract a pedestrian-friendly collection of jazz and blues clubs and other entertainment venues to the area extending the success of the Fremont Street Experience. The city has made it easy to build, too, with the issuance of special non-gaming Tavern Limited Licenses available at a third of the cost of similar licenses. Separation and height restrictions have also been eased to lay the groundwork for a wider array of entertainment options for residents and visitors. This will help rehabilitate our old commercial center into a vibrant, eclectic entertainment district like Bourbon Street in New Orleans or the Gaslamp District in San Diego - and without any public subsidy. On the horizon is a $6-million dollar streetscape upgrade planned of the district, which will extend the sidewalk one traffic lane each way and provide new façades for the buildings in the area.

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Redevelopment Agency Assistance Programs
TIF CHARACTERISTICS & VARIATIONS Governing Agencies
- City Council - City Economic Development Dept. - Planning Department - Redevelopment Agency - TIF Commission

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Redevelopment Agency Assistance Programs
Program Eligibility Requirements
• Property must be located in the Downtown Entertainment Overlay District • Applicant must: o Have a tavern limited business o Have filed a business license application with the city of Las Vegas o Possess a primary retail use compatible with tavern-limited functions

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Types of Areas Improved Using TIF
- Blighted areas - Non- blighted areas - Development districts - Single site

Types of TIF Area Limitations
- Some projects have none - As a percentage of city’s total land area - As a percentage of city’s total tax base - As a set acreage figure

Taxing Jurisdictions
- School district - Municipalities - Counties - Special districts

Commercial Visual Improvement Program (CVIP)
The CVIP is intended to assist in the improvement of commercial or industrial properties within the city of Las Vegas Redevelopment Area by offering a rebate of any qualified improvement costs, to a maximum of $50,000. The primary objectives of the program are to encourage commercial and industrial property owners and long-term tenants to reinvest in and renovate their properties. Improvements to building facades, permanent landscaping, parking facilities and other external improvements are eligible for assistance.

Tax Increment Can Be Applied To
- Real property - Personal property - Retail sales

Periods TIF is in Effect
- Open-ended - Set period (e.g. 25 years to repay bonds, 30 years for project area) - As soon as project has been completed and bonds have been repaid

Various Financing Methods
- General obligation bonds – Full faith and credit of municipality - Tax allocation revenue bonds – Credit of project - Annual expenditure – No bonds - Use increment revenue to finance improvements - Developer pays – Developer provides improvement and is reimbursed with tax relief

Eligible Development Activities
- Land assembly - Relocation - Demolition - Site preparation - Land cost mark-down - Street repair / construction - Sidewalks, curbs, and gutters - Utilities - Planning, engineering, etc. - Debt Service

Program Benefits
• Participants are eligible to receive up to a $50,000 maximum cash rebate of pre-approved improvement costs • Each participant must provide two-to-one (2:1) matching funds for each dollar the RDA contributes to their project • Targeted Commercial Corridors: Businesses located in the Eastern Avenue, Martin Luther King Boulevard, and Main Street corridors only need to contribute a dollar-for-dollar (1:1) matching funds to any RDA funds. • Funds are used to upgrade building facades, permanent landscaping, parking facilities and other external improvements • The program is intended to improve the aesthetic nature of properties and to assist in bringing properties up to current building and property code standards • Property must be located in the Redevelopment Area

Tax Increment Can Be Applied To
- Industrial - Office - Residential - Retail - Hotel

Program Eligibility Requirements

Visual Improvement Programs
The city of Las Vegas Redevelopment Agency sponsors two Visual Improvement Programs (VIPs) to encourage rehabilitation of downtown commercial buildings, enhance the physical appearance of the area, and improve the overall economic viability of downtown: the Commercial VIP and the Entertainment VIP.
REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

Since the program’s inception, the agency has approved 13 businesses leveraging over $2,154,000 dollars in private investment. Future plans for the program include extending the boundaries into the arts district, which is located in the area south of downtown Las Vegas, roughly bound by Commerce Street, Hoover Avenue, 4th Street, Las Vegas Boulevard (at Charleston) and Colorado Avenue. Details for the Entertainment Visual Improvement Program and the Commercial Visual Improvement Program are provided below.

Entertainment Visual Improvement Program (EVIP)
The EVIP is intended to assist in the improvement of commercial properties within the Downtown Entertainment Overlay District Area by offering a rebate of any qualified improvement costs to a maximum of $50,000. The primary objective of the program is to make a lasting visual improvement to the properties within the entertainment district. Improvements to building facades, permanent landscaping, parking facilities and other external improvements are eligible for assistance.

• All commercial, industrial and mixed-use properties located in the Redevelopment Project Area and/or a Targeted Commercial Corridor (Eastern Avenue, Martin Luther King Boulevard, and Main Street). • Applicant must demonstrate site control for the project, either through a deed of trust or long-term lease • Property must be free of all mechanic liens at time of application • Applicant must not have had a bankruptcy during the last five years • Applicant must hold a current city of Las Vegas Business License • Property must have proper zoning • Applicant must not owe any past due federal, state or city taxes at time of application • Applicant must not have any past-due bills or debt payable to the city of Las Vegas or the RDA at time of application For more information, contact the city of Las Vegas Redevelopment Agency at (702) 229-6100.
Source: City of Las Vegas Office of Business Development (February 2006)

REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

Program Benefits
• Participants are eligible to receive up to $50,000 maximum cash rebate of pre-approved improvement costs • A 20% bonus up to a maximum of $10,000 is available for projects that add neon and animated signage, substantial in scope, and is clearly visible from the city’s public right-of-way • Redevelopment Agency provides dollar-for-dollar (1:1) matching funds to each dollar participating businesses contribute to upgrade their project • Funds are used to upgrade building facades, permanent landscaping, parking facilities and other external improvements

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Letter From The Executive Director
City of Las Vegas Redevelopment Agency’s Fast Track Program
Welcome to the city of Las Vegas Redevelopment Agency’s (RDA’s) Fast Track Program. The goal of our program is to provide you with a well-organized, understandable and expedient process to get your redevelopment projects underway quickly and without hassle. As executive director of the agency, I am committed to providing the best possible service, not only to our RDA clients, but to all those we serve. We are here to work with you to help you achieve your development goals. We believe the information outlined in the following pages will streamline the approval process and guide you to the right city agency the first time. Future RDA projects will include a mix of housing and offices along with services, shops, parks, educational and cultural amenities. I invite you to share in our vision for unique real estate development opportunities in the downtown core that will serve the residents and visitors alike for generations to come. The agency is authorized by the state to provide the following incentives, and conducts these activities in the course of economically improving the redevelopment area: • • • • • • • Buy, own, manage, sell or lease real property Prepare sites for redevelopment, including demolition Install and construct public improvements and utilities Provide relocation assistance Conserve buildings and sites of historic or architectural significance Dispose of personal property acquired Pledge future new property taxes to issue bonds or offer tax increment financing (partial tax rebate), if no other reasonable method of financing is available

Fast Track Program
City of Las Vegas Redevelopment Agency’s Fast Track Program
The Redevelopment Agency’s Fast Track Program is designed to provide prospective clients with special assistance in getting their project underway. The goal of the program is to provide the client with a seamless and uninterrupted process for project approval. A. Contacting the Office of Business Development/Redevelopment Agency is the first step in the development process. Redevelopment staff will be able to discuss your project and establish a review process that includes: 1. State of Nevada incentives for job creation 2. New ideas for the project and/or Redevelopment Area 3. Help you navigate through the following city services: i. Development Coordination at the Development Services Center 1. Planning & Zoning Required Reviews & Procedures 2. Public Works & Land Development Procedures 3. Fire Department Permits & Procedures 4. Building & Safety Permit Review Procedures 5. Public Utility Coordination and Easements ii. Business Licensing Requirements 1. All General Business Licenses 2. Special Privileged Licenses, Gaming & Liquor Licenses 3. Temporary Event & Special Event Business Licenses B. The Redevelopment Agency’s Fast Track Program is focused on the following target market opportunities: • • • • • • Market Rate Residential Development Class A Offices Medical Research & Development Offices Renovating & Expanding Downtown Casinos Supporting the Downtown Entertainment District & Arts District Supporting Retail & Family Entertainment Venues

Please let me know if I can assist you or provide you with additional information regarding the Redevelopment Agency’s Fast Track Program. Again, I welcome you and encourage you to explore all that our Redevelopment Agency has to offer.

Douglas A. Selby, PhD City Manager / Executive Director, Las Vegas Redevelopment Agency
REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

C. You can help the Fast Track Team by these steps: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Clearly define the scope and nature of your proposed project in a letter format Identify site requirements and the preferred locations suitable for your project Prepare a conceptual site plan, floor plan and building elevations Utilize the Downtown Plans Pre-Review Process to identify issues early Hire a strong design team to assist you with your project Demonstrate the financial and managerial capacity to undertake and successfully complete the project, the need for the agency’s assistance, and the benefit of the completed project to downtown Las Vegas
REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

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Fast Track Program

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Fast Track Program
A Sampling of Existing Fast Track Project Partners:
• Mixed-Use Residential Towers o Soho Lofts o Newport Tower o Stanhi Tower o Streamline Tower o Allure o Club Renaissance o Sandhurst Tower o Cielo Vista o Evolution Condominiums o Juhl o Neon Heights o H.U.E. Lofts o Urban Lofts

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Redevelopment Agency Fast Track Promises
The Redevelopment Agency has always committed itself to providing the best and most reliable service to our customers. Our commitments are based on the following concepts as they apply to the FAST TRACK program:

acilitation: Staff will schedule, coordinate, and facilitate meetings between your design team and the appropriate city staff members to provide a collaborative public/private effort on behalf of your redevelopment project.

F

Accountability: Staff will explain regulatory and procedural timelines to help your
design team identify and understand significant project milestones. The Fast Track team will ensure city staff and your design team are accountable for the progress of your plans.

Speed: Staff will identify potential development issues and provide suggestions on how
your design team can avoid these common pitfalls. “Pre-review” meetings with your design team and city staff are employed to provide an efficient permit review process.

• Commercial Developments o Beauty Bar o Downtown Cocktail Lounge o The Griffin o Hog’s & Heifer’s Saloon, Triple George, Celebrity and Sidebar o Hennessey’s Tavern and Mickie Finnz, o Artistic Iron Works o Douglas Parking o Lewis Street Parking Garage o Downtown Coffee Company o Expertise School of Beauty o Edmond Town Center o Vegas Thai & Chinese Restaurant

Transparency: The RDA strives to make all aspects of the development process
understandable and expedient. Prompt, clear and honest information is provided.

Please contact us to share your experience, complaints or compliments at dbratcher@lasvegasnevada.gov or (702) 229-2201.

ask Driven: The Fast Track Team will monitor and communicate the status of individual components vital to the progression and approval of your project plans. esponsiveness: The Fast Track Team is trained to immediately communicate the status of individual project components such as land use entitlements, conditions of approval, civil improvement plans status, and building plans check comments.

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Redevelopment Area Map
REDEVELOPMENT AREA
SMOKE RANCH RD

R

CAREY AV
REVERE ST

Access: The Fast Track Team will provide direct access to the city staff members who
are enabled to make administrative decisions on the merits post-approval design changes.
VALLEY VIEW BLVD

LAKE MEAD BLVD. SMOKE RANCH RD
SIMMONS ST

MARTIN L KING BLVD

REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

Cost Effective: The utilization of available express reviews can effectively reduce your
permit review time and allow your project to move quickly from design to construction.
MICHAEL WY

VEGAS DR

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Knowledgeable: The Fast Track Team is comprised of knowledgeable staff members
who represent a cross section of the many dedicated city staff members who will collectively help you achieve your goals in a timely and comprehensive manner.

WASHINGTON A

HO NC RA

BONANZA RD
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BO NA NZA

MARTIN L KING BLVD I 15 GR AN D CENTR AL MA IN P ST

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FAST TRACK TEAM LEADERS City Department Office of Business Development Redevelopment Agency Planning & Development Building & Safety Business Licensing Public Works/Development Coordination Fire Department/Fire Prevention Primary Contact David Bratcher Steve van Gorp Flinn Fagg Ron Labar Jim DiFiore Bart Anderson Jeff Donahue Telephone # (702) 229-2201 (702) 229-6863 (702) 229-4848 (702) 229-6092 (702) 229-6413 (702) 229-2198 (702) 229-0344
CHARLESTON BLVD

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BO NN EVI LLE AV LAS VEG AS BLV D

MA RY LA ND PK WY 15T HS T

EASTERN AV

CHARLESTON BLVD

BURNHAM AVE

FRE MO NT

ST

MAIN ST

OAKEY BLVD

Date of Map 1996

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PAR AD ISE

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Source: City of Las Vegas Planning and Development Department (July 2003)

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Nevada Development Authority
Nevada Development Authority Fostering Business Success in Southern Nevada Introduction
As an active supporter of the city of Las Vegas, the Nevada Development Authority (NDA) is committed to maintaining, influencing and improving economic vitality in Southern Nevada. By working together with the city of Las Vegas, the NDA has gained valuable support and continually collaborates to make notable strides towards diversifying the local economy and connecting to the business community. This inter-agency partnership has been a win–win for the Las Vegas community and continues to serve the needs of businesses wanting to grow or expand in the Las Vegas Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Development Contacts
City of Las Vegas Development Contacts
City of Las Vegas Building and Safety
Development Services Center 731 South Fourth St. Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 (702) 229-6251 www.lasvegasnevada.gov

City of Las Vegas Finance & Business Services (Also Business License & Purchasing)
400 Stewart Ave. Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 (702) 229-6281 www.lasvegasnevada.gov

City of Las Vegas Office of Business Development
400 Stewart Ave. Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 (702) 229-6551 www.lasvegasnevada.gov/obd

Who We Are
The NDA works to attract, retain, and expand the business base to enhance the overall socioeconomic development of Southern Nevada and encompasses local NDA members who have an interest in the growth and stability of the local economy. Along with the help of its members, the NDA is directly responsible for creating and retaining thousands of stable jobs for Southern Nevada residents through recruiting new non-gaming companies to the area and playing an active role in the local expansion of existing businesses. Over the last five years, Southern Nevada realized an economic impact of $6.2 billion from more than 1,000 jobs created through the NDA’s economic development efforts.

City of Las Vegas Planning and Development
731 South 4th St. Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 (702) 229-6301 www.lasvegasnevada.gov

City of Las Vegas Redevelopment Agency
400 Stewart Ave. Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 (702) 229-6551 www.lasvegasnevada.gov

What We Do
As a non-profit agency, the NDA is dedicated to fostering an attractive, business–friendly environment through building key relationships while assisting and targeting new and expanding businesses. The NDA puts business leaders on the right track for success in Southern Nevada and works to diversify and improve the local economy. Involvement in the NDA helps individuals and businesses connect, grow and prosper. Each year, the NDA hosts many networking opportunities including breakfast meetings, business mixers, luncheons and special events. In addition, the NDA helps to keep its members up-to-date on the latest economic development news through quarterly newsletters, an interactive Web site and daily interaction.

Other Development Contacts
Nevada Commission on Economic Development
555 E. Washington Ave. Las Vegas, NV 89101 (702) 486-2700 www.expand2nevada.com The Commission on Economic Development seeks to bring high-wage primary jobs to Nevada by attracting companies, subsidiaries, corporate startups and investment.

U. S. Small Business Administration
400 S. 4th St., Suite 250 Las Vegas, NV 89101 (702) 388-6611 www.sba.gov/nv Provides assistance to small business startups and business expansion. Services include one-on-one counseling, technical assistance, business information center, small business development centers and the Nevada Micro Enterprise Initiative.

City of Las Vegas Housing Authority
340 N. 11th St., Ste. #180 Las Vegas, NV 89101 P.O. Box 1897 Las Vegas, NV 89125 (702) 386-2973 Fax (702) 922-6648/9 Assists businesses with Housing Authority procurements, provides general assistance in business development, technical assistance and other services for emerging and established enterprises, including women, minorities, and disabled veterans.

How We Can Help You
As the area’s leading regional development authority, the NDA provides the necessary resources and assistance for companies interested in doing business in Southern Nevada – free of charge. Companies can save hundreds of hours and thousands of dollars by utilizing NDA’s comprehensive and confidential services. The NDA’s professional expansion relocation specialists provide an extensive list of services to assist businesses in decision making including: • Research & Information Services – Including accurate cost assessments and comparisons • Customized Site Tours – Undeveloped sites, industrial parks and both build-to-suit-lease and build-to-suit-own and existing buildings • Interface with Regulatory Agencies – Licensing, incentives, incorporations, workers’ compensation, employment security, and government • Interface with Professional Services – Including local business leaders and service providers The NDA strives to make each company’s move or relocation to Southern Nevada as easy and efficient as possible. After a business relocates, the NDA continues to provide resources and services. This ongoing relationship not only helps companies make the transition to the area, but also ensure they remain stable and productive members of the business community. The NDA’s economic foresight has helped many businesses realize increased profits and lower liabilities. Working with the NDA is essential for business success. Contact us today, to learn more about doing business in Southern Nevada and how we can help you. Contact Information: Nevada Development Authority 6700 Via Austi Pkwy., Ste. B Las Vegas, Nevada 89119 Phone: 1-888-4NO-Taxes / (702) 791-0000 Fax: (702) 796-6483 Web site: www.nevadadevelopment.org E-mail: info@nevadadevelopment.org

Nevada Development Authority
6700 Via Austi Pkwy., Suite B Las Vegas, NV 89119 (702) 791-0000; (800) 634-6858 Fax (702) 796-6483 www.nevadadevelopment.org The NDA works to attract new businesses to the Las Vegas MSA. Supports existing businesses for expansion in/out state; and provides information to in/out state businesses to help them become operational and diversified. Distributes the “Las Vegas Perspective.”

Black Business Council of Nevada
626 S. Ninth St. Las Vegas, NV 89101 (702) 382-9522 Fax (702) 382-0375 A non-profit business and trade association whose mission is to promote black business and economic development in Nevada.

Nevada Micro Enterprise Initiative
1600 E. Desert Inn Rd., Ste. 210 Las Vegas, NV 89109 (702) 734-3555 Fax (702) 734-3530 Not-for-profit, micro-enterprise, development program partially funded by the U.S. Small Business Administration, providing training, small loans, technical assistance and startup for the socially and economically disadvantaged business enterprises.

NEVADA DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

Community Development Programs Center of Nevada
2009 Alta Dr. Las Vegas, NV 89106 (702) 873-8882 Fax (702) 873-8942 Specializes in Community & Economic Development, small business and mortgage loan packaging, homebuyer counseling and down payment assistance credit counseling.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Nevada Power Company Economic Development
6626 W. Sahara Ave. P.O. Box 98910 Las Vegas, NV 89151 (702) 367-5707 alopez@nevp.com Assists businesses with Nevada Power procurement, provides general assistance in business development, technical assistance and other business services for emerging and established enterprises.

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Development Contacts
Other Development Contacts
Nevada Small Business Development Center
851 E. Tropicana Ave., Bldg. 700 Las Vegas NV 89119 (702) 895-4270 Fax (702 895-4273 Web site: www.nsbdc.org Assists existing and new small businesses to plan growth potential as well as develop and maintain professional management skills through free assistance programs and educational seminars. Partially funded by the U.S. Small Business Administration.

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Development Contacts
Regulatory Agencies

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Southwest Gas Corporation
5241 Spring Mountain Rd. P.O. Box 98510 Las Vegas, NV 89193-8510 (702) 876-7348 Fax (702) 222-1672 Assists businesses with Southwest Gas Corporation procurements, provides general assistance in business development, technical assistance and other business services for emerging and established enterprises owned by minorities, women and disabled veterans.

U.S. Small Business Administration
400 South Fourth St., Ste. 250 Las Vegas, NV 89101 (702) 388-6611 Fax (702) 388-6469 www.sba.gov Provides assistance to small business startups and businesses seeking expansion. Services include one-onone counseling, technical assistance, Business Information Center, Small Business Development Centers and Nevada’s Micro Enterprise Initiative.

Nevada Department of Business & Industry
555 E. Washington Ave., Suite 4900 Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 (702) 486-2750 http://dbi.state.nv.us The department's activities include regulation of business and industrial enterprises; promotion of worker safety, protection and rights; administration of bond programs; and educating and informing the public and business and industry of their legal rights and responsibilities.

Nevada Gaming Control Board
555 E. Washington Ave. Las Vegas, NV 89101 (702) 486-2000 http://gaming.nv.gov State agency responsible for collecting and distributing gaming revenue information. In addition to regulating gaming they publish many booklets regarding gaming regulations, the U.S. gaming industry and the Nevada Gaming Control Act.

Nevada Department of Transportation
1263 S. Stewart St. Carson City, NV 89712 (702) 385-6500 www.nevadadot.com NDOT distributes information on traffic volume for all highways and interstates throughout Nevada.

Nevada Secretary of State
555 E. Washington Ave. Suite 4000 Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 (702) 486-2880 http://sos.state.nv.us The purpose and mission of the secretary is to protect Nevada investors through the licensing of investment professionals, the registration of securities offerings, the enforcement of statutes regarding securities law, and education of the public.

Nevada Department of Taxation
555 E. Washington Ave., Suite 1300 Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 (702) 486-2300 www.tax.state.nv.us The Department of Taxation provides fair, efficient and effective administration of tax programs for the state of Nevada in accordance with applicable statutes, regulations and policies.

Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE)
400 South 4th St., Suite 250 Las Vegas, NV 89101 (702) 388-6104 Fax (702) 388-6469 SCORE is an all-volunteer service organization that provides free business consulting services, including how to start your own business seminars. Non-profit national association sponsored by the U.S. Small Business Administration. Services provided by retired business owners and executives.

State of Nevada Commission on Economic Development
Procurement Outreach Program 555 E. Washington Ave., Ste. 5400 Las Vegas, NV 89101 (702) 486-2716 Fax (702) 486-2701 www.nvoutreachcenter.com The Procurement Outreach Program (POP) is a cooperative effort between the state of Nevada and the Federal Government assisting Nevada businesses with initiating and expanding marketing efforts of their products and services to the Federal Government.

Nevada Division of Industrial Relations
400 West King Street, Suite 400 Carson City, Nevada 89703 (775) 684-7260 http://dirweb.state.nv.us The Division of Industrial Relations promotes and enforces safety in the workplace and workers’ compensation, and training. Should injury occur, the division ensures the timely and appropriate delivery of benefits.

Workforce Development Agencies
Institute for Business & Industry
Community College of Southern Nevada 3200 E. Cheyenne Ave. North Las Vegas, NV 89030 (702) 651-4479 www.ccsn.nevada.edu The Institute for Business and Industry is a partnership program that specializes in occupational training skills. The program helps businesses find skilled labor through training partnerships subsidized by state and federal programs. CONTACT INFORMATION

Management Assistance Partnership (MAP)
2409 Las Verdes, K1B Las Vegas, NV 89102 (702) 651-4360 www.mapnv.com MAP is the industrial extension program of the University and Community College System of Nevada and its partners. Its primary purpose is to work directly with Nevada companies to strengthen their global competitiveness by providing information, decision support and implementation assistance in adopting new, more advanced technologies, techniques and best business practices.

UNLV Professional Development Center
4505 Maryland Pkwy. Box 451019 7Las Vegas, NV 89154 (702) 895-3867 http://edoutreach.unlv.edu The UNLV Professional Development Center and the Division of Educational Outreach provides a variety of professional development courses, workshops, seminars, and conferences for the business community. Many of these courses are included in certificate programs, but some are onetime educational opportunities for the business and professional community in general.

Research Agencies
Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority
3150 Paradise Rd. Las Vegas, NV 89109 (702)892-0711 www.lvcva.com; pr@lvcva.com The Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority (LVCVA) is the official destination marketing organization of Las Vegas and operates the Las Vegas Convention Center and Cashman Center. The LVCVA brings visitors to Las Vegas and Clark County by promoting tourism, conventions, meetings and special events.

McCarran International Airport
P.O. Box 11005 Las Vegas, NV 89111-1005 (702) 261-5100 www.mccarran.com Collects information on airline passengers, average daily fights, load factors and other statistics regarding scheduled, charter and commuter air traffic at Clark County airports.

UNLV Center for Business and Economic Research
4505 S. Maryland Pkwy. Las Vegas, NV 89154-6002 (702) 895-3191 www.unlv.edu/Research_Centers/cber CBER was established to aid businesses and agencies by providing information that encompasses aspects of the business community including private, commercial and residential development, public transportation and communication systems.

Southern Nevada Workforce Investment Board
1127 S. Rancho Dr. Las Vegas, NV 89102 (702) 638-8750 Fax (702) 638–8774 The Workforce Investment Board provides businesses and career seekers with the ability to make one stop to satisfy their workforce needs. The onestop program provides a full array of career development services: labor market information, occupational training providers information, assessment and counseling services, pre-employment interview, job marketing services and career planning.

Nevada Department of Employment, Training & Rehabilitation (DETR)
101 Convention Center Dr., Suite 925 Las Vegas, NV 89109 (702) 486-7923 www.nvdetr.org, Distributes information on Nevada employment statistics such as labor force estimates, wage surveys and employment guides. The “Economic Update,” among many other documents, is published by this agency.

CONTACT INFORMATION

State of Nevada Demographer
(775) 784-6352 www.nsbdc.org/demographer, jhardcas@unr.edu The Nevada State Demographer's office is responsible for conducting annual population estimates for Nevada's counties, cities and towns. The office also estimates population by age, sex, race and Hispanic origin.

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Development Contacts
Chambers of Commerce
Asian Chamber of Commerce
900 Karen Ave., Suite C-215 Las Vegas, NV 89109 www.lvacc.com info@lvacc.com (702) 737-4300

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Las Vegas Chamber of Commerce
3720 Howard Hughes Pkwy. Las Vegas, NV 89109 www.lvchamber.com Info@lvchaamber.com (702) 641-LVCC (5822)

North Las Vegas Chamber
2290 McDaniel St. North Las Vegas, NV 89030 www.northlasvegaschamber.com contact@nlvchamber.com (702) 642-9595

Henderson Chamber of Commerce
590 S. Boulder Hwy. Henderson, NV 89015 www.hendersonchamber.com info@hendersonchamber.com (702) 565-8951

Latin Chamber of Commerce
300 North 13th St. Las Vegas, NV 89101 www.lasvegaslatincc.com lvlchamber@aol.com (702) 385-7367

Urban Chamber
1048 W. Owens Ave. Las Vegas, NV 89106 www.urbanchamberlv.org lvurbanchamber@wizard.com (702) 648-6222

Las Vegas City Hall Contacts
LAS VEGAS CITY HALL CONTACTS Contact
City Hall Animal Control Unit Administrative Services Building Permit Application Information Building and Safety Citizen’s Complaint Hotline City Attorney’s Office City Auditor City Clerk City Council Offices Ward 3: Councilman Gary Reese (Mayor Pro Tem) Ward 4: Councilman Larry Brown Ward 5: Councilman Lawrence Weekly CONTACT INFORMATION Ward 2: Councilman Steve Wolfson Ward 1: Councilwoman Lois Tarkanian Ward 6: Councilman Steven D. Ross City Hall Jail City Manager’s Office (702) 229-6405 (702) 229-6405 (702) 229-6405 (702) 229-6405 (702) 229-6405 (702) 229-6405 (702) 229-6429 (702) 229-6501

Phone
(702) 229-6011 (702) 229-6348 (702) 229-6958 (702) 229-6916 (702) 229-6251 (702) 229-6615 (702) 229-6201 (702) 229-2472 (702) 229-6311

Contact
Communications Services Deputy City Marshal Unit Detention and Enforcement Emergency Management Finance and Business Services Fire and Rescue, Administration Human Resources Information Technologies Leisure Services Mayor Oscar B. Goodman’s Office Municipal Court Neighborhood Services Office Of Business Development Office Of Communications Parking Enforcement Unit Planning & Development Public Defender Public Works

Phone
(702) 229-6501 (702) 229-6444 (702) 229-6617 (702) 229-0313 (702) 229-6321 (702) 383-2888 (702) 229-6315 (702) 229-6291 (702) 229-6297 (702) 229-6241 (702) 382-2938 (702) 229-2330 (702) 229-6551 (702) 229-6501 (702) 229-6431 (702) 229-6301 (702) 229-6486 (702) 229-6276

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