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SINGLE SUBJECT CREDENTIAL PROGRAM

EDSC LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE Revised 7.28


For directions on how to complete this form, see EDSC Lesson Plan Directions and Scoring Guide in the SSCP Handbook at
www.sscphandbook.org.

Name

CWID

Fabian Botero
Class Title
Physical Science

Subject Area

892494519
Lesson Title
Egg Drop

Physics
Unit Title
Motion and
Gravity

Grade Levels
8

Total Minutes
5 days / periods
(55 minutes
each)

CLASS DESCRIPTION (including specific special needs and language proficiencies)


The class (6th period) has 35 students total, 18 of which are designated as English Learners, and 2 students with
required in-class accommodations for either IEP or 504 plans. Of the 18 English Learners, 17 are Bridging, require
minimal direct assistance from the teacher, and are self-sufficient with social scaffolding from seating arrangement.
One of the English Learners, named Rogelio and seated toward the rear of the class on the left-hand side facing the
teacher, is of Expanding proficiency with a CELDT score of 3 and requires as-needed direct assistance with
understanding assignment directions and implicit language modeling during discussions. Mikayla, who sits front and
center, has a 504 plan for Anxiety and ADHD which allows her to chew gum in class, obtain preferential seating (as per
her seating chart placement), and requires extended time during assignments and tests as-needed. Zachary, who sits
in the center-back row to the left-hand side, has an IEP for ADHD and processing deficiencies in general attention and
phonological memory, requires preferential seating, clarification of unknown words/terms/phrases on assignments and
tests as-needed, as well as periodic checking for understanding of directions.
STANDARDS,OBJECTIVES, &ACCOMDOATIONS
Integrated ELD
CCSS Math, CCSS ELA & Literacy History/Social
Content Objective(s)
strategies for
Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, NGSS,
(cognitive, psychomotor,
developing knowledge
and Content Standards
affective)
in the content area (Part
I ELD)
Students have their prior
Students will demonstrate
knowledge assessed and
HS.PS2-3
understanding of how forces
utilized at the beginning of
counteract each other by
class. Scaffolding is done
Apply scientific and engineering ideas to design,
designing, building, testing,
throughout the lesson and
evaluate, and refine a device that minimizes the force
and revising a dampening
the bulk of the class
of a macroscopic object during a collision.
module to protect a fragile
focuses on modeling and
object from impact forces.
refining a model.
Tier II(General Academic) Vocabulary
Tier III (Domain Specific) Vocabulary
CREATE DESIGN, COLLABORATE, PRELIMINARY,
MEASURE, DISTANCE, MASS, FORCES, THEORY,
OBSERVATION, IMPACT, MODULE
MODULE, GRAVITY, MOTION
Designated ELD
Disciplinary Language
Strategies for
English Language Development Standards (ELD)
Objective(s)
developing knowledge
of disciplinary English
(ELD Parts 1 & 2)
ELD.PI.9.1.Ex: Contribute to class, group, and partner
Students will be able to
Students will engage in
discussions, sustaining conversations on a variety of
communicate concepts and
Extended Language
age and grade-appropriate academic topics by
ideas related to design,
Interaction through the use
following turn-taking rules, asking and answering
collaborative work, and teamof small group discussion
relevant, on-topic questions, affirming others,
building exercises as well as
and collaboration as well as
providing additional, relevant information, and
share observations of natural
class discussion and
paraphrasing key ideas.
phenomena in English using
explanation in English.
their own words.
These forms of language
ELD.PI.9.3.Ex: Negotiate with or persuade others in
interaction will focus on the
conversations using a growing number of learned
usage of grade-appropriate
phrases and open responses to express and defend
Academic English and
nuanced opinions.
exchange of ideas
concerning the
ELD.PI.9.11.Ex: Justify opinions and positions or
development of a model to
persuade others by making connections between ideas
engage with natural
and articulating relevant textual evidence or
phenomena, listening to,
background knowledge.
and sharing observations.
The events of the lesson
occur in a planned and
sequenced manner in
which objectives are clearly

delineated and presented


throughout the duration of
the class for students to
see on the board. Where
videos are used, pausing is
also used to pace the
information in a manner
that is conducive for
struggling conceptualizers
and English Learners.
Additional Student Accommodations (Behavioral, Cognitive, & Physical)
Specific Needs
Specific Accommodations
Mikayla - Student is allowed to chew gum as she wishes to
relieve anxiety, remain seated in preferred arrangement
(See seating chart), and take extended time to complete
Mikayla - Anxiety, ADHD
assignments.
Zachary - ADHD, Processing Deficiencies (General
Attention, Phonological Memory)

STUDENT ASSESSMENT
Purpose/Focus of
Type
Assessment

EL

PM

Zachary - Student requires preferential seating (See


seating chart), clarification of unknown
words/terms/phrases on assignments and tests asneeded, as well as periodic checking for understanding of
directions.

Implementation

Feedback Strategy

Students are shown the


Egg Drop demonstration
and asked before and
after what they believe
will happen and what
they observed

Immediate feedback and


validation for the student
through classmate
agreement and teacher
writing prior knowledge
and observations on the
board

Progress Monitoring and


Scaffolding opportunities

Construction, testing,
revision, and defense of
student egg drop module
designs

Immediate and ongoing


feedback for the student
as construction and
design efforts are
scaffolded on an asneeded basis and class
discussion provides
communal feedback over
an extended period of
time

Summative Written
Assessment over lesson
principles and ability to
connect concepts and
ideas

Narrative essay
addressing the Central
Question "How can we
counteract the force of
impact?" using the egg
drop module creation
process as well as the
design element rationale
of the final product or a
competing, successful
product

Graded narrative essays


provide the students
written feedback on
conceptual holes and
where the bridging of
concepts if incomplete
with advice going into
future studies

Accessing Prior
Knowledge and
engagement of basic
observational knowledge
and skills

INSTRUCTION
Lesson Introduction/Anticipatory Set
Time
Teacher Does
Engage (Day 1)
1) Teacher writes objectives on the board but does
not write Central Question. Objectives include
"Demonstrations", "Discussion", and "Design".

How Informs Teaching


If students are not able
to draw on prior
knowledge or have
difficulty understanding
what the teacher is
asking, teacher may
utilize somebody else by
asking them to elaborate
on their own experiences
for the struggling student
to draw from
Informs the teacher on
which students are
underperforming on
design and engineering
tasks so that they can be
scaffolded conceptually
by the teacher using
probing and leading
questions as well as
student placement within
groups that can best
facilitate their efforts

Informs the teacher of


who needs design and
engineering scaffolding
and the progress of
English Learners in this
respect

Student Does
Engage (Day 1)
1) Students write down the objectives for the day
and follow-along as the teacher explains the
importance of the day's objectives.

Teacher then leads the students through the


objectives for the day with a brief explanation of the
bullet-points.
2) Teacher demonstrates Egg Drop by covering a
section of the floor with newspaper for easy clean-up
and dropping an unprotected egg. Teacher asks
before and after what the students think will happen
and what the students observed, respectively. The
Students are encouraged to take notes on what they
observe about the demonstration. Teacher writes
observations the students have made about the Egg
Drop, on the board.
3) Teacher shows Bubble Soccer video to the
students and encourages the students to write down
their observations as notes. At the conclusion of the
video, Teacher then asks the students for their
observations and what they saw in the video.
Student observations are then written on the board.
Teacher asks the students what they think the nature
of the project will be about.
4) Teacher hands out project design handout to
student small groups and explains the directive of
the project, wherein students design a module that
will protect an egg from breaking from a 10-foot drop
using materials provided in-class. Students are then
directed to work within their small groups for the rest
of the period to design their modules in anticipation
of construction the following day.
5) Teacher collects student project handouts as an
exit slip.
Lesson Body
Time
Teacher Does
Explore (Day 2)
1) Teacher writes the Central Question "How can we
counteract the force of impact?" on the board as well
as the objectives for the day, including: "Construct
Modules", "Measure Mass", and "Test Modules".
Teacher then leads the students through the
objectives for the day with a brief explanation of the
bullet-points.
2) Teacher passes back project design handouts to
student small groups and makes construction
materials available to the students. The students are
then instructed to work within their groups to build
their design and measure the mass of their module
using the Weigh Scale.
3) Teacher passes out eggs, one per group, to the
student groups for insertion into their modules for
testing. The students are then instructed to follow
the teacher outside, where the teacher then drops
the modules from atop a ladder while the students
record observations.

2) Students watch, question, and write-down


observations as the teacher demonstrates the Egg
Drop. Students respond to the teacher before and
after the Egg Drop about their observations and what
they think will happen based on prior knowledge.
Afterward, students write-down as notes what the
teacher writes on the board derived from
observations from their classmates.
3) Students watch the Bubble Soccer video and
write down their observations as notes to be used
during class discussion. Students then respond to the
teacher's probing questions regarding the nature of
the Bubble Soccer video and what can be learned
from it as applied to the Egg Drop. Students also
respond to the teacher on what they believe the
project for the lesson will entail.
4) Students receive the project design handout and
form small groups to design an Egg Drop Module
using in-class materials listed by the teacher.
Students continue working on the Design Phase until
the end of the period.
5) Students submit their design handouts as an exit
slip as they leave class.

Student Does
Explore (Day 2)
1) Students write down the Central Question and
objectives for the day and follow along as teacher
explains the objectives.
2) Students form their groups and accept their
project design handouts. Students then work in their
groups to construct their module designs out of inclass materials provided by the teacher and mass
their modules using the Weigh Scale.
3) Students equip their modules with eggs given by
the teacher and proceed outside for testing.
Students record their observations on how their
module falls and impacts the ground, as well as if
their egg broke or not.
4) Students turn-in their modules after evacuating
the egg and get their observations stamped as they
leave class.
Explain (Day 3)

4) Teacher instructs the students to turn-in their


modules and get their observations stamped upon
exiting the class.

1) Students write down Central Question and


objectives for the day and follow along as the
teacher covers the bullet points.

Explain (Day 3)

2) Students take out their stamped observations


pages and contribute to the discussion on
contributing factors to whether their designs
succeeded or failed. Students write down

1) Teacher writes the Central Question "How can we


counteract the force of impact" as well as the

objectives for the day on the board. The objectives


include: "Discussion", "Video", and "Quickwrite".
Students are then led through an explanation on the
day's objectives.
2) Teacher prompts students to discuss observations
they had had on previous day that would inform
them on why eggs either did or didn't break. Student
observations connecting module structure with
success rate are written on the board and
observations in agreement are tallied.
3) Teacher shows video to students on gravitation
and falling bodies. Students are encouraged to write
notes and observations on the video. Teacher pauses
video at critical points after important assertions are
made so students can have an opportunity to collect
their thoughts and write their notes.
4) Teacher prompts students to discuss mass
measurements and the effect of mass on impact
force and how that may have affected the success of
the design. Teacher writes student observations and
opinions on the board and tallies opinions in
agreement.
5) Teacher instructs the students to perform a
Quickwrite on what they learned about the
relationship between mass, gravitation, and the
design of their egg drop modules. Students are
asked to reflect on how they believe changes to the
design could influence how this relationship would
impact the egg. The Quickwrite is then collected as
an exit slip as students leave the classroom.

observations that their classmates have made that


the teacher writes on the board.
3) Students watch video on gravitation and falling
bodies. Students also take notes and observations on
the video content.
4) Students return to discussion over egg drop
successes and failures but this time directed by
teacher to focus on the impact of mass. Students
write down observations and opinions that their
classmates have made or assert that the teacher
writes on the board.
5) Students perform a Quickwrite short essay on
what they have learned about the relationship
between mass, gravitation, and the design of their
egg drop modules. Students additionally reflect on
what changes could be made to the egg drop module
design to accommodate this new knowledge.
Students submit their completed Quickwrite as an
exit slip upon leaving class.
Elaborate (Day 4)
1) Students write down the Central Question and
objectives for the day as notes and follow along as
teacher leads the class through the importance of
the day's objectives.
2) Students form their small groups and discuss
their answers to the question on the board "What
forces are present in the fall and impact of the egg
drop module?" Students write down their group's
answers in preparation for the class discussion.

Elaborate (Day 4)
1) Teacher writes Central Question "How can we
counteract the force of impact" on the board as well
as the objectives for the day, including: "Forces
Discussion", "Group Work", and "Structural
Discussion". Teacher then leads the students through
the importance of the individual class objectives.
2) Teacher instructs the students to form their small
groups and discuss amongst themselves what forces
are at play in the movement and impact of the egg
drop module. Teacher writes the question on the
board "What forces are present in the fall and impact
of the egg drop module?" for the students to focus
on during the small group discussion.
3) Teacher elicits responses from the class to answer
the question on the board about forces. Teacher
encourages the students to write down the
responses their classmates have, and writes down
student responses on the board with an
accompanying free-fall diagram depicting the egg
drop module as it hits the floor.
4) Teacher instructs the students to form their small
groups again and discuss amongst themselves what
structural features of their module mitigates the
force of impact and How. Teacher writes on the board
the question "How does the design of your module
and what parts of your module soften the force of
impact?" to guide students during their small group
discussion.

3) Students respond in the class discussion by


committing their answers to the class. Students draw
a diagram of their module and write down the
consensus of forces shown on the board derived from
the class responses that the teacher has written
down which govern the movement of the egg drop
module during free-fall, as notes.
4) Students form their small groups again and
discuss their answers to the question "How does the
design of your module and what parts of your
module soften the force of impact?" Students write
down their group's answers in preparation for the
class discussion.
5) Students respond in the class discussion by
committing their answers to the class. Students draw
a diagram of their module and write down the
consensus of forces shown on the board derived from
the class responses that the teacher has written
down which govern how various egg drop module
designs mitigate the force of impact, as notes.
6) Students get their notes stamped by the teacher
for completion as they leave the class for the day.

5) Teacher elicits responses from the class to answer


the question on the board about structural features.
Teacher encourages the students to write down the
responses their classmates have, and writes down
student responses on the board with an
accompanying diagram depicting the egg drop
module as it hits the floor.
6) Teacher stamps student notes for completion as
they exit the class.
Lesson Closure
Time
Teacher Does
Evaluate (Day 5)
1) Teacher writes Central Question "How can we
counteract the force of impact" on the board as well
as objectives for the day, including: "Group
Discussion", "Cross-Talk", and "Reflection". Teacher
then leads the students through the summative
significance of the objectives.
2) Teacher instructs the students to discuss within
their groups the answer to the Central Question
"How can we counteract the force of impact" using
their egg drop module as a reference, and to write
down their conclusions in bullet-point form with an
accompanying diagram of their egg drop module and
the forces involved in free-fall, impact, and impact
mitigation. If a student group's module was
insufficient, they are directed to write-down their
claims on how their module can be improved.
Students are also told to elect someone from their
group to be the group speaker who will take their
group's data and narrative with them during the
Cross-Talk activity.
3) Teacher begins the Cross-Talk activity by
instructing the students to send their elected
speaker to a neighboring group with the information
sheet they have generated to explain how their
module solves or answers the Central Question, and
to explain how their module functions to mitigate the
force of impact. Students are encouraged to write
notes on how neighboring groups' solutions may be
different or similar to theirs.
4) Teacher instructs the students to submit their
collective work for scoring, including diagrams,
notes, observations, and measurements made
during the overarching Egg Drop lesson. The teacher
then passes out a handout with the Central Question
as a narrative essay prompt, and the students are
instructed to individually answer the Central
Question in their own words using either their own
group's egg drop module or another group's module
as an example with accompanying diagrams
showcasing the forces involved in the process.

Student Does

Evaluate (Day 5)
1) Students write down the Central Question and the
objectives for the day as notes, and follow-along as
the teacher elaborates on the importance and
significance of the day's objectives.
2) Students work within their groups to discuss and
address the their answers to the Central Question
using their group's egg drop module as a reference.
Students write-down their conclusions in the form of
bullet-points with an accompanying diagram of their
module and the forces involved. Students then elect
a member of their groups to serve as a designated
speaker who will participate in the Cross-Talk activity.
3) Elected speakers from each student group brings
their information sheet to a neighboring group to
discuss and elaborate on what they have concluded
in addressing the Central Question. Students
listening to elected speakers write down their notes
on what if any differences there exist between what
they have accomplished and what others have
accomplished, as well as similarities.
4) Students submit their work for scoring, including
diagrams, notes, observations, and measurements
made during the overarching Egg Drop lesson.
Students then receive a handout with the Central
Question as an essay prompt and answer the
question using the knowledge they have gained, in
their own words, with an accompanying diagram of
either their group's module or a neighboring group's
module to showcase the forces involved.
5) Students submit their narrative responses for
collection as a summative assessment as they leave
class.

5) Student responses are collected as they leave the


class for scoring as a summative assessment.
Instructional Materials, Equipment, and Multimedia
White board, dry erase markers, in-class construction materials (depending on location and funding), handouts
Co-Teaching Strategies
One teach, one
observe
Supplemental

One teach, one assist


Differentiated
teaching

Station teaching
Team teaching

Parallel teaching
Not applicable

teaching
CO-PLANNINGNOTES

The SIOP Model includes teacher preparation, instructional indicators such as comprehensible input and
the building of background knowledge. It comprises strategies for classroom organization and delivery of
instruction.
Ask yourself:

Teacher Preparation
1. Do I have (and will I post) clearly defined content objectives for students?
2. Do I have a plan to review the objectives at the beginning of the lesson and provide an opportunity for
students to state at the end of the lesson whether the objectives have been met?
3. Are the concepts I plan to teach appropriate for the age and educational background of students,
(students' L1 literacy, second language proficiency, and the reading level of the materials)?
4. Have I planned to incorporate supplementary materials (charts, graphs, pictures, illustrations, realia,
math manipulatives, multimedia, and demonstrations by teacher and other students) to promote
comprehension?
5. Have I planned to adapt content to ELLs needs through use of graphic organizers, outlines, labeling of
pictures, study guides, adapted text, and highlighted text?
6. Have I designed meaningful activities that integrate lesson concepts with language practice
opportunities in listening.speaking, reading, and writing?

Indicators of Instruction:
Building Background
1. Am I linking concepts to students background experience (personal, cultural, or academic)?
2. Am I linking past learning and new concepts?
3. Am I emphasizing key vocabulary and introducing a limited number of new vocabulary items in context?
Comprehensible Input
1. Am I using speech that is appropriate for students' language proficiency?
2. Am I explaining tasksin aclear, step-by-step manner with visuals?
3. Am I using a variety of techniques to make content concepts clear?Am I focusing attention selectively
on the most important information? Am I introducing new learning in context?Am I helping students learn
strategies such as predicting and summarizing?

Strategies
1. Am I explicitly teaching students how to use learning strategies? Am I providing ample opportunities for
students to use learning strategies? Am I encouraging students independence in self-monitoring?

2. Am I consistently using scaffolding techniques throughout the lesson? Do I introduce a new concept
using a lot of scaffolding and decrease support as time goes on?
3. Do I use of a variety of question types, including those that promote higher level thinking skills?

Interaction
Do I provide the following for ELLs:
1. frequent opportunities for interactions about lesson concepts which encourage higher level thinking
skills;
2. grouping which supports language and content objectives. Cooperative groups, buddies, pairs, large
and small groups;
3. ample wait time for responses;
4. opportunities for clarification in native language, if possible?

Application
Does my lessoninclude:
1. hands-on materials or manipulatives for student practice;
2. activities for students to apply content and language knowledge in the classroom;
3. activities that integrate all language skills :listening, speaking, reading and writing?

Lesson Delivery
1. Are my content objectives supported by lesson delivery?
2. Are my language objectives supported by lesson delivery?
3. Are my students engaged 90% to 100% of the period?
4. Is the pacing of the lesson appropriate to students ability level?