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Digital Unit Plan Template

Unit Title: ENERGY SYSTEMS

Name: MARLON E. BENAVENTE

Content Area: CHEMISTRY

Grade Level: 10TH GRADE

CA Content Standard(s)/Common Core Standard(s):

HS-PS3-1.
Create a computational model to calculate the change in the energy of one component in a system when the change in energy of the other
component(s) and energy flows in and out of the system are known. Emphasis is on explaining the meaning of mathematical expressions used in
the model.
HS-PS3-2.
Develop and use models to illustrate that energy at the macroscopic scale can be accounted for as a combination of energy associated with the
motions of particles (objects) and energy associated with the relative position of particles (objects). Examples of phenomena at the macroscopic
scale could include the conversion of kinetic energy to thermal energy, the energy stored due to position of an object above the earth, and the
energy stored between two electrically-charged plates. Examples of models could include diagrams, drawings, descriptions, and computer
simulations.
HS-PS3-3.
Design, build, and refine a device that works within given constraints to convert one form of energy into another form of energy. Emphasis is on
both qualitative and quantitative evaluations of devices. Examples of devices could include Rube Goldberg devices, wind turbines, solar cells,
solar ovens, and generators. Examples of constraints could include use of renewable energy forms and efficiency.
HS-PS3-4.
Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that the transfer of thermal energy when two components of different temperature are
combined within a closed system results in a more uniform energy distribution among the components in the system (second law of
thermodynamics). Emphasis is on analyzing data from student investigations and using mathematical thinking to describe the energy changes
both quantitatively and conceptually. Examples of investigations could include mixing liquids at different initial temperatures or adding objects
at different temperatures to water.
Big Ideas/Unit Goals:

The big ideas come in the form of questions such as: What is energy? Is all energy conserved? Is junk food an efficient form of energy? Are there
forms of energy that are beneficial for the environment? What is the difference between renewable and non-renewable forms of energy?

The unit objectives for the students are:


- Solve mathematical problems involving specific heat and change in enthalpy to quantify changes of state in heating curves.
- Identify measurements of heat in units of Joules (J), calorie (cal), or Btu; keeping dimensional analysis in mind.
- Distinguish the differences between internal energy, heat, and temperature.
- Draw conclusions about the exothermic and endothermic characteristics of real-life context problems.
- Define and discuss the laws of thermodynamics.
- Create a calorimeter by following written instructions, working in groups, and using the materials provided.
- Investigate data of the enthalpy changes in chemical reactions (Neutralization, precipitation, dissolution of sugar) using the calorimeter
built.
- Summarize ideas in discussions and in written form about the best sources of energy when comparing solar, wind, and fossil fuels.
- Create a battery operated motor by following written instructions, working in groups, and using the materials provided.
Unit Summary:

The unit begins the day before the introduction of the lecture where we familiarize ourselves with the vocabulary of thermodynamics. The
lecture delves into math concepts and calculations of thermodynamics after completing both, a short Kahoot survey and a 4 corners vocabulary
chart. The lecture also involves the use of guided notes where we will have the opportunity and space to work of the mentioned math concepts.
The webercise is an activity that encourages curiosity about other stuff to find on the internet that is not a social media website. At the end, we
will put on our engineer hats and build a motor to demonstrate some of the concepts that we learned while on our web quest. After the
webercise, the essay prompt gives us a chance to speak our mind and back up our facts with evidence. The graphic organizer takes us to the final
leg of the unit and it is an aid for the final unit test which is dedicated to calorimetry math problems.
Assessment Plan:

Entry-Level:
Kahoot Survey

Formative:
4 Corners Vocabulary Chart
Quizstar Calculations Quiz
Unit Webercise
Creately Flow Chart
Discussions Throughout

Summative:
Writing About Energy Systems
Calorimetry Problem Math Test

Lesson 1

Student Learning
Objective: Define and
discuss the laws of
thermodynamics.

Acceptable Evidence
(Assessments): Using
correct vocabulary
during discussions.

Lesson Activities: Kahoot Survey, 4 Corners Vocabulary Chart, Discussions, and Interactive
Lecture.

Lesson 2

Student Learning
Objective: Summarize
ideas in discussions and
in written form about
the best sources of
energy when comparing
solar, wind, and fossil
fuels.

Acceptable Evidence: A
letter grade of B of
better on the essay,
Writing About Energy
Systems.

Lesson Activities: Quizstar Calculations Quiz, Creately Flow Chart, Interactive Lecture, and
Guided Notes.

Acceptable Evidence: A
letter grade of B of
better on the calorimetry
problem math test.

Lesson Activities: Webercise

Lesson 3

Student Learning
Objective: Solve
mathematical problems
involving specific heat
and change in enthalpy
to quantify changes of
state in heating curves.
Unit Resources:

PhET Simulation on Energy Changes


Build a Motor Video
Unit Converter/Calculator
Energy Calculator
Useful Websites:

Department of Energy
Energy Sources - DoE
Boundless on Thermodynamics
RSC -Thermite Reaction
Predicting the Big One - SCE