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THE

ULTIMATE
GUIDE TO
BECOME A
UX DESIGNER
Resume by Aprianil Sesti Rangga UX Designer wanna be.

Contents
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................. 4
UX DESIGNER (USER EXPERIENCE DESIGNER) .............................................................................. 4
UI DESIGNER (USER INTERFACE DESIGNER) ................................................................................. 5
VISUAL DESIGNER (GRAPHIC DESIGNER) ....................................................................................... 7
INTERACTION DESIGNER (MOTION DESIGNER) ............................................................................ 8
UX RESEARCHER (USER RESEARCHER) ......................................................................................... 10
FRONT-END DEVELOPER (UI DEVELOPER) . ............................................................................... 10
PRODUCT DESIGNER .......................................................................................................................... 11
UX BOOKS.................................................................................................................................................... 12
Fundamentals ......................................................................................................................................... 12
Usability .................................................................................................................................................. 13
Process .................................................................................................................................................... 14
Information Architecture ........................................................................................................................ 15
Interaction Design ................................................................................................................................... 15
Psychology .............................................................................................................................................. 17
Documentation ....................................................................................................................................... 17
Must Read UX BOOKS ............................................................................................................................. 18
More Resource About UX Books ......................................................................................................... 20
UX TOOLS .................................................................................................................................................... 21
A/B or Split Testing ................................................................................................................................. 21
Accessibility Testing ................................................................................................................................ 21
Design Prototyping.................................................................................................................................. 22
Evaluating Design .................................................................................................................................... 23
Evaluating Information Architecture ...................................................................................................... 23
Heatmaps, Mouse-tracking or Synthetic Eye-tracking ........................................................................... 24
In-application annotation & user tutorials ............................................................................................. 24
Live Chat with Users................................................................................................................................ 24
Mobile App Testing Tools ....................................................................................................................... 25
Presentations .......................................................................................................................................... 25
Process Aids ............................................................................................................................................ 25
Remote Research .................................................................................................................................... 25
Research Notetaking ............................................................................................................................... 25

Screen Capture........................................................................................................................................ 26
Sketching & Visual Thinking .................................................................................................................... 26
Surveying Users ....................................................................................................................................... 26
Usability Testing ...................................................................................................................................... 27
Web Analytics ......................................................................................................................................... 27
Wireframing & Diagramming .................................................................................................................. 28
More Resource Design Tools .............................................................................................................. 28
UX Design Blog and Resource to Follow ............................................................................................... 29
1. Strategy ............................................................................................................................................. 30
2. UI / Interfaces ................................................................................................................................... 30
3. UX ....................................................................................................................................................... 31
4. Process & Methods.......................................................................................................................... 32
5. Deliverables & Documentation ....................................................................................................... 32
6. Tools & Software .............................................................................................................................. 33
7. Psychology ........................................................................................................................................ 33
8. Trends ................................................................................................................................................ 34
9. Design Patterns ................................................................................................................................ 34
10. Book Reviews. ................................................................................................................................ 35
UX DESIGN COURSES................................................................................................................................... 36
Other UX Design resources: .................................................................................................................... 36
Source : HOW TO BECOME A UX DESIGNER ............................................................................................... 38

INTRODUCTION
Design is a rather broad and vague term. When someone says "I'm a designer," it is not immediately clear
what they actually do day to day. There are a number of different responsibilities encompassed by the
umbrella term designer.

Design-related roles exist in a range of areas from industrial design (cars, furniture) to print (magazines,
other publications) to tech (websites, mobile apps). With the relatively recent influx of tech companies
focused on creating interfaces for screens, many new design roles have emerged. Job titles like UX or UI
designer are confusing to the uninitiated and unfamiliar even to designers who come from other industries.

A given design problem has no single right


answer.
Let's attempt to distill what each of these titles really mean within the context of the tech industry.

UX DESIGNER (USER EXPERIENCE DESIGNER)


UX designers are primarily concerned with how the product feels. A given design problem has no single
right answer. UX designers explore many different approaches to solving a specific user problem. The broad
responsibility of a UX designer is to ensure that the product logically flows from one step to the next. One
way that a UX designer might do this is by conducting in-person user tests to observe one's behavior. By
identifying verbal and non-verbal stumbling blocks, they refine and iterate to create the "best" user
experience. An example project is creating a delightful onboarding flow for a new user.
"Define interaction models, user task flows, and UI specifications. Communicate scenarios,
end-to-end experiences, interaction models, and screen designs to stakeholders. Work with
our creative director and visual designers to incorporate the visual identity of Twitter into
features. Develop and maintain design wireframes, mockups, and specifications as needed."

-Experience Designer job description at Twitter

Deliverables: Wireframes of screens, storyboards, sitemap


Tools of the trade: Photoshop, Sketch, Illustrator, Fireworks, InVision
You might hear them say this in the wild: "We should show users the 'Thank You' page
once they have finished signing up."
UI DESIGNER (USER INTERFACE DESIGNER)
Unlike UX designers who are concerned with the overall feel of the product, user interface designers are
particular about how the product is laid out. They are in charge of designing each screen or page with which
a user interacts and ensuring that the UI visually communicates the path that a UX designer has laid out.
For example, a UI designer creating an analytics dashboard might front load the most important content at
the top, or decide whether a slider or a control knob makes the most intuitive sense to adjust a graph. UI
designers are also typically responsible for creating a cohesive style guide and ensuring that a consistent

design language is applied across the product. Maintaining consistency in visual elements and defining
behavior such as how to display error or warning states fall under the purview of a UI designer.

"Concept and implement the visual language of Airbnb.com. Create and advance site-wide
style guides." - UI Designer job description at Airbnb

The boundary between UI and UX designers is fairly blurred and it is not uncommon for companies to opt
to combine these roles.

Tools of the trade: Photoshop, Sketch, Illustrator, Fireworks


You might hear them say this in the wild: "The login and sign up links should be moved

to the top right corner.

VISUAL DESIGNER (GRAPHIC DESIGNER)


A visual designer is the one who pushes pixels. If you ask a non-designer what a designer does, this is
probably what comes to mind first. Visual designers are not concerned with how screens link to each
other, nor how someone interacts with the product. Instead, their focus is on crafting beautiful icons,
controls, and visual elements and making use of suitable typography. Visual designers sweat the small
details that others overlook and frequently operate at the 4X to 8X zoom level in Photoshop.

Visual designers sweat the small details that


others overlook.
"Produce high-quality visual designsfrom concept to execution, including those for
desktop, web, and mobile devices at a variety of resolutions (icons, graphics, and marketing
materials). Create and iterate on assets that reflect a brand, enforce a language, and inject
beauty and life into a product."

-Visual Designer job description at Google

It is also fairly common for UI designers to pull double duty and create the final pixel perfect assets. Some
companies choose not to have a separate visual designer role.

Tools of the trade: Photoshop, Sketch


You might hear them say this in the wild: "The kerning is off and the button should be 1
pixel to the left!"

INTERACTION DESIGNER (MOTION DESIGNER)


Remember the subtle bouncing animation when you pull to refresh in the Mail app on your iPhone? That's
the work of a motion designer. Unlike visual designers who usually deal with static assets, motion designers
create animation inside an app. They deal with what the interface does after a user touches it. For example,
they decide how a menu should slide in, what transition effects to use, and how a button should fan out.
When done well, motion becomes an integral part of the interface by providing visual clues as to how to
use the product.

"Proficiency in graphic design, motion graphics, digital art, a sensitivity to typography and
color, a general awareness of materials/textures, and a practical grasp of animation.
Knowledge of iOS, OS X, Photoshop and Illustrator as well as familiarity with Director (or
equivalent), Quartz Composer (or equivalent), 3D computer modeling, motion graphics are
required." -Interaction Designer job description at Apple

Tools of the trade: AfterEffects, Core Composer, Flash, Origami


You might hear them say this in the wild: "The menu should ease-in from the left in

800ms."

UX RESEARCHER (USER RESEARCHER)

A UX researcher is the champion of a user's


needs.
A UX researcher is the champion of a user's needs. The goal of a researcher is to answer the twin questions
of "Who are our users?" and "What do our users want?" Typically, this role entails interviewing users,
researching market data, and gathering findings. Design is a process of constant iteration. Researchers may
assist with this process by conducting A/B tests to tease out which design option best satisfies user needs.
UX researchers are typically mainstays at large companies, where the access to a plethora of data gives
them ample opportunity to draw statistically significant conclusions.
"Work closely with product teams to identify research topics. Design studies that address
both user behavior and attitudes. Conduct research using a wide variety of qualitative
methods and a subset of quantitative methods, such as surveys." -UX Researcher job

description at Facebook
UX designers also occasionally carry out the role of UX researchers.

Deliverables: User personas, A/B test results, Investigative user studies & interviews
Tools of the trade: Mic, Paper, Docs
You might hear them say this in the wild: "From our research, a typical user..."
FRONT-END DEVELOPER (UI DEVELOPER)
Front-end developers are responsible for creating a functional implementation of a product's interface.
Usually, a UI designer hands off a static mockup to the front-end developer who then translates it into a
working, interactive experience. Front-end developers are also responsible for coding the visual
interactions that the motion designer comes up with.

Tools of the trade: CSS, HTML, JavaScript


You might hear them say this in the wild: "I'm using a 960px 12-column grid system."
Showoff: Often times front end developers need to share their work with colleagues,
clients or open source world. There are many tools for that, but simplest way is to get
shared hosting and throw HTML files there. Here you can find top 10 web hosting
reviews. Lots of useful information there. Pay attention to inmotion hosting review, as

well as a2 hosting review.


PRODUCT DESIGNER
Product designer is a catch-all term used to describe a designer who is generally involved in the creation of
the look and feel of a product.
The role of a product designer isn't well-defined and differs from one company to the next. A product
designer may do minimal front-end coding, conduct user research, design interfaces, or create visual assets.
From start to finish, a product designer helps identify the initial problem, sets benchmarks to address it,
and then designs, tests, and iterates on different solutions. Some companies that want more fluid
collaboration within the various design roles opt to have this title to encourage the whole design team to
collectively own the user experience, user research, and visual design elements.
Some companies use "UX designer" or simply "designer" as a catch-all term. Reading the job description is
the best way to figure out how the company's design team divides the responsibilities.
"Own all facets of design: interaction, visual, product, prototyping. Create pixel-perfect
mocks and code for new features across web and mobile." -Product Designer job

description at Pinterest
"I AM LOOKING FOR A DESIGNER"
This is the single most common phase I hear from new startups. What they are usually looking for is
someone who can do everything described above. They want someone who can make pretty icons, create
A/B tested landing sites, logically arrange UI elements on screen, and maybe even do some front-end
development. Due to the broad sweeping scope of this role, we usually hear smaller companies asking to
hire a "designer" rather than being specific in their needs.

The boundaries between each of these various design roles are very fluid. Some UX designers are also
expected to do interaction design, and often UI designers are expected to push pixels as well. The best way
to look for the right person is to describe what you expect the designer to do within your company's
process, and choose a title that best represents the primary task of that person.

UX BOOKS
Fundamentals
Title

Author

Link

The Design of
Everyday Things

Don Norman

The Elements of
User Experience:
User-Centered
Design for the Web
and Beyond

Jesse James Garret

The User
Experience Team of
One: A Research
and Design Survival
Guide

Leah Buley

The Encyclopedia of
Human-Computer
Interaction

Mads Soegaard &


Rikke Friis Dam

Interaction Design
Foundation

UI Is
Communication:
How to Design
Intuitive, User
Centered Interfaces
by Focusing on
Effective
Communication

Everett N. McKay

Amazon

Undercover User
Experience Design

Cennydd Bowles &


James Box

Rating

Amazon
13,050 Ratings 1.040 Reviews

Amazon
2,393 Ratings 96 Reviews

Amazon
392 Ratings 38 Reviews

3 Ratings 0 Reviews

25 Ratings 2 Reviews

Amazon
8 Ratings 0 Reviews

Usability
Title

Author

Link

Don't Make Me Think,


Revisited: A Common
Sense Approach to
Web Usability

Steve Krug

Hooked: How to Build


Habit-Forming
Products

Nir Eyal

Rocket Surgery Made


Easy: The Do-ItYourself Guide to
Finding and Fixing
Usability Problems

Steve Krug

Usable Usability:
Simple Steps For
Making Stuff Better

Eric Reiss

Smashing UX Design:
Foundations for
designing online user
experiences

Jesmond Allen and


James Chudley

Amazon

Measuring the User


Experience

Tom Tullis and Bill


Albert

Amazon

Rating

Amazon
13,237 Ratings 1,045 Reviews

Amazon
7,130 Ratings 565 Reviews

Amazon
2,283 Ratings 113 Reviews

Amazon
77 Ratings 10 Reviews

Universal Principles of William Lidwell


Design, Revised and
Updated: 125 Ways to
Enhance Usability,
Influence Perception,
Increase Appeal,
Make Better Design
Decisions, and Teach
through Design

125 Ratings 5 Reviews

327 Ratings 12 Reviews

Amazon
3,511 Ratings 109 Reviews

Process
Title

Author

A Project Guide to UX
Design: For user
experience designers
in the field or in the
making

Russ Unger

Lean UX: Applying


Lean Principles to
Improve User
Experience

Jeff Gothelf

User Story Mapping:


Discover the Whole
Story, Build the Right
Product

Jeff Patton

Sprint: How to Solve


Big Problems and Test
New Ideas in Just Five
Days

Jake Knapp

The UX Book: Process


and Guidelines for
Ensuring a Quality
User Experience

Rex Hartson and


Pardha Pyla

Link

Rating

Amazon
1,126 Ratings 47 Reviews

Amazon
2,195 Ratings 110 Reviews

Amazon
589 Ratings 68 Reviews

Amazon
1,955 Ratings 229 Reviews

Amazon
113 Ratings 6 Reviews

Information Architecture
Title
Information
Architecture for the
World Wide Web

Author
Peter Morville and
Louis Rosenfeld

A Practical Guide to
Information
Architecture (ebook)

Donna Spencer

Card Sorting:
Designing Usable
Categories

Donna Spencer

How to Make Sense


of Any Mess:
Information
Architecture for
Everybody

Abby Covert

Designing Web
Navigation:
Optimizing the User
Experience

James Kalbach

Link

Rating

Amazon
2,355 Ratings 84 Reviews

uxmastery
140 Ratings 14 Reviews

Amazon
206 Ratings 9 Reviews

Amazon
428 Ratings 42 Reviews

Amazon
230 Ratings 4 Reviews

Interaction Design
Title

Author

About Face 3: The


Essentials of
Interaction Design

Alan Cooper

About Face: The


Essentials of
Interaction Design
4th Edition

Alan Cooper

Designing
Interaction

Bill Moggridge

Link

Rating

Amazon
2,115 Ratings 71 Reviews

Amazon
2,116 Ratings 71 Reviews

Amazon
1629 Ratings 37 Reviews

Web Form Design:


Filling in the Blanks

Luke Wroblewski

Amazon
1,448 Ratings 57 Reviews

Designing Social
Christian Crumlish
Interfaces: Principles,
Patterns, and
Practices for
Improving the User
Experience

Amazon

Make It So:
Interaction Design
Lessons from
Science Fiction

Nathan Shedroff and


Christopher Noessel

Amazon

Seductive
Interaction Design:
Creating Playful,
Fun, and Effective
User Experiences

Stephen P. Anderson

Amazon

Interaction Design:
Beyond HumanComputer
Interaction

Jenny Preece, Helen


Sharp and Yvonne
Rogers

Amazon

Emotional Design:
Why We Love (or
Hate) Everyday
Things

Don Norman

Amazon

Microinteractions:
Designing with
Details

Dan Saffer

The Best Interface Is


No Interface: The
Simple Path to
Brilliant Technology

Golden Krishna

3 Ratings 0 Reviews

195 Ratings 19 Reviews

807 Ratings 40 Reviews

536 Ratings 33 Reviews

2,817 Ratings 135 Reviews

Amazon
532 Ratings 45 Reviews

Amazon
276 Ratings 27 Reviews

Psychology
Title

Author

100 Things Every


Designer Needs to
Know About People

Susan Weinschenk

Influence: The
Psychology of
Persuasion

Robert B. Cialdini

Set Phasers on Stun:


And Other True
Tales of Design,
Technology, and
Human Error

S. M. Casey

Link

Rating

Amazon
2,329 Ratings 110 Reviews

Amazon
46,341 Ratings 1,653 Reviews

Amazon
184 Ratings 19 Reviews

Documentation
Title

Author

Link

Communicating the
User Experience: A
Practical Guide for
Creating Useful UX
Documentation

Richard Caddick and


Steve Cable

Amazon

Communicating
Design:
Developing Web
Site
Documentation for
Design and
Planning

Dan M. Brown

The Sketchnote
Handbook: the
illustrated guide to
visual note taking

Mike Rohde

Rating

77 Ratings 3 Reviews

Amazon
871 Ratings 33 Reviews

Amazon
1,299 Ratings 140 Reviews

Must Read UX BOOKS


Title

Author

Link

Category

The Design of
Everyday Things

Don Norman

Amazon

Fundamentals

The Elements of
User Experience:
User-Centered
Design for the Web
and Beyond

Jesse James Garret

Amazon

Fundamentals

Don't Make Me
Think, Revisited: A
Common Sense
Approach to Web
Usability

Steve Krug

Amazon

Usability

Hooked: How to
Build Habit-Forming
Products

Nir Eyal

Amazon

Usability

Universal Principles
of Design, Revised
and Updated: 125
Ways to Enhance
Usability, Influence
Perception, Increase
Appeal, Make Better
Design Decisions,
and Teach through
Design

William Lidwell

Amazon

Usability

A Project Guide to
UX Design: For user
experience
designers in the field
or in the making

Russ Unger

Amazon

Process

Lean UX: Applying


Lean Principles to

Jeff Gothelf

Amazon

Process

Improve User
Experience

Sprint: How to Solve


Big Problems and
Test New Ideas in
Just Five Days

Jake Knapp

Amazon

Process

Information
Architecture for the
World Wide Web

Peter Morville and


Louis Rosenfeld

Amazon

Information
Architecture

About Face 3: The


Essentials of
Interaction Design

Alan Cooper

Amazon

Interaction Design

Designing
Interaction

Bill Moggridge

Amazon

Interaction Design

Web Form Design:


Filling in the Blanks

Luke Wroblewski

Amazon

Interaction Design

Seductive
Interaction Design:
Creating Playful,
Fun, and Effective
User Experiences

Stephen P. Anderson

Amazon

Interaction Design

Microinteractions:
Designing with
Details

Dan Saffer

Amazon

Interaction Design

The Best Interface Is


No Interface: The
Simple Path to
Brilliant Technology

Golden Krishna

Amazon

Interaction Design

Emotional Design:
Why We Love (or

Don Norman

Amazon

Interaction Design

Hate) Everyday
Things
100 Things Every
Designer Needs to
Know About People

Susan Weinschenk

Amazon

Psychology

More Resource About UX Books

UXpin - Free UX Ebooks


UX Mastery Recommended UX Books
Userbrain 137 FREE ebooks on User Experience, Usability, User Interface Design and more
Useful Usability - The ULTIMATE List of 24 Free eBooks on UX and Interface Design
The learning coach 10 Interaction Design Books
Medium Great Books for Designers to Read in 2016
Medium Best new UX Books from the last 3 years
52 Weeks of UX Free Online Reading
Whitney Hesss Blog - Resource

List

UX TOOLS

A/B or Split Testing

Accessibility Testing

A/B Test Master


BagelHint
Intuition
Maxymiser
Monetate
Myna
Optimizely
Testomato
UsabilityTools
VWO

Accessibility Priority Tool


HTML_CodeSniffer

Design Prototyping

Adobe Brackets
AnteType
AppSketcher
Axure
Balsamiq Mockups
Cogtool
FileSquare
Fireworks
Flinto
Indigo Studio
InVision
iPlotz
iRise
Justinmind
Keynote
Lumzy
Macaw
Marvel
MockFlow
Naview
Notism
Patternry
Pencil
Pidoco
Proto.io
Protoshare
Prototyp
UXPin

Evaluating Design

Evaluating Information Architecture

Accessibility Priority Tool


Capian
Concept Feedback
Feng Gui
Firefly
Five Second Test
Loop11
Mental Notes Cards by Stephen P
Anderson
Navflow
Quince
Specfox
UsabilityHub
UsabilityTools
Usabilla
Userbrain
BagelHint
BoardThing
ConceptCodify
Loop11
Naview
OptimalSort
Plainframe (now integrated with
Optimal Workshop)
SimpleCardSort
Solidify
TreeJack
Usabilitest
UsabilityHub
Userzoom
Websort (now integrated with
Optimal Workshop)
Xsort

Heatmaps, Mouse-tracking or Synthetic


Eye-tracking

In-application annotation & user tutorials

Live Chat with Users

Chalkmark
ClickDensity
Clicktale
CrazyEgg
Decibel Insight
EyesDecide
Eyetracking
Feng Gui
HeatData
Hotjar
Inspectlet
LookTracker
Loop11
MouseStats
Navilytics
Optimal workshop
Ptengine
Speedzine

Tour My App
WalkMe

Comm100 Live Chat


LiveChat
LivePerson
Olark
SnapEngage
Woopra
Zopim

Mobile App Testing Tools

Presentations

Process Aids

Remote Research

Research Notetaking

Adobe Device Central


Android SDK Emulator
Blackberry Simulator
DotMobi Emulator
eggPlant
Google Android Emulator
iPad Peek
iPhoney
Magitest
Modify Headers
MonkeyTalk (previously
FoneMonkey)
Mr Tappy
Opera Mobile Emulator
POP App
W3C mobileOK Checker
Canva

Digital Empathy Map


Reframer
UCDmanager

Ethnio
Feedback Army
Mechanical Turk
Pick Fu
Testapic (French)
TryMyUI
UsabilityHub
UsabilityTools
UsersThink
UserTesting

BugHerd
PearNote
Reframer
Webnotes

Screen Capture

Sketching & Visual Thinking

Surveying Users

Camtasia
Inspectlet
Jing
Magitest
Open Hallway
ScreenFlow
Silverback
Usability Test
UsabilityTools

53 Paper & Pencil


Balsamiq Mockups
Canva
iSketchnote
Livescribe
Pen & Ink
Penultimate
RealtimeBoard
VuPoint Magic Wand scanner

4qSurvey
Clicktools
Feedback Lite
Frelay
Kampyle
Polldaddy
Qualaroo (previously Kiss Insights)
SurveyGizmo
Surveymonkey
Survicate
UsabilityHub
UsabilityTools
Uservoice
Userzoom
Webreep
Wufoo

Usability Testing

Web Analytics

BagelHint
FileSquare
Forsee
Intuition
Lookback
Loop11
Magitest
Morae
Optimize
Silverback
Testaisso
Testapic (French)
TryMyUI
UsabilityHub
Usabilla
UserBob
Userfeel
Userlytics
UserTesting
Userzoom
uxline: spanish usability testing
software
Verify
Webnographer
WhatUsersDo
Adobe Marketing Cloud (previously
Omniture)
Clicktale
FoxMetrics Web Analytics Tool
Get Clicky
Google Analytics
Inspectlet
Kiss Metrics
LivePerson
Loop11
Lucky Orange
Mix Panel
Navilytics
Piwik
Quantcast
Userzoom
Woopra

Wireframing & Diagramming

Axure
Balsamiq Mockups
Creately
Devhand
Draw.io
Flair Builder
Fluid UI
Gliffy
Handcraft
Hotgloo
Indigo Studio
Invision
Koolchart
Lucidchart
Marvel
MockFlow
Mockingbird
Mockplus
MOQUPS
NinjaMock
OmniGraffle
Patternry
Photoshop Wireframing Kit
Pidoco
Power Mockup
Proto.io
Protoshare
Sketch 3
Visio
WireframeSketcher
Wirify

More Resource Design Tools

Medium The most promising design tools you should try in 2017
Quora Most Common Design Tools
Quora Answer
Wireframing and prototyping apps You can use pencil and paper to make sketches. However, you
should check out specialized apps like Omnigraffle, UXPin, Invision, Axure, and Moqups.
A/B testing tools Again, this is something that you can purchase through a monthly subscription.
A/B testing involves testing one or two elements on a page in order to see which gets the most
action.
User feedback tools These types of tools allow you to gather more information from users. You
can use general tools such as Survey Monkey or Mechanical Turk for this, as well as specific UX
tools such as Usabilla or UserTesting.

Web analytics tools UX designers should use Google Analytics to understand visitor behavior from
a business perspective (e.g. conversion optimization). KISSmetrics is also another good tool if you
want to better understand which users are converting (and why). We currently use Google
Analytics for aggregated data, then dive deeper into segmented behavior with KISSmetrics.

UX Design Blog and


Resource to Follow
ARTICLE BY CHRIS BANK IN RESOURCES & TOOLS - JULY 17

In this article, Chris Bank of UXPin The UX Design App details some of his favorite
product design blogs on the web, categorized by the type of content they contain.
Talent may be developed, and creativity may still be for the most part inspired, but
thanks to the internet knowledge and advice are free of charge. Some of the
best product design resources are only a click, tap or swipe away. With the brightest
thought leaders in the design arena sharing their expertise, best practices and advice
openly, via a plethora of product design blogs on the web, one has arguably all the
resources necessary to be the next Jony Ive. The following are a sampling of some of
the best UX design blogs that the web has to offer.

1. Strategy

These blogs discuss techniques and guidelines that can be implemented to achieve
design goals or objectives. Articles and post topics range from project management
methodology to ideas on how to improve one's creative process.

Boxes and Arrows: articles about design principles, processes and methods, interfaces and
more.
Nielsen Norman Group: reports and articles regarding groundbreaking research in user
experience.
Usability Geek: covers topics ranging from UX and interfaces to conversion.

2. UI / Interfaces
These blogs feature tips, tricks, and advice on how to build effective user interfaces.
Whether creating UIs for software products, mobile apps, or websites the
information contained in these sites are indispensable.

Usability Post: a site that discusses web design and usability issues.
Boxes and Arrows: blog that publishes useful articles and resources for UI designers.
UXPin Blog: site contains lots of UI resources and tools, such as this responsive web
design cheat sheet, useful sources for design patterns and wireframes guides and a ux
patterns library.
iA: contains articles containing tips on building effective user interfaces.
Smashing Magazine: a leading website for UX information and articles.
Felt Presence: a blog that covers topics regarding UI design and product management.

Inverra: some great resources and articles regarding dashboard design.

3. UX

These blogs focus on the the topic of user experience design for products and services.
Topics range from discussions regarding industry trends in UX to reviews on software
and tools for UX designers.

UX Mag: an online UX publication discussing the latest in design and UX strategy.


UX Booth: one of the leading publications for UX topics, held in high regard by the UX
community.
52 Weeks of UX: a UX blog authored by UX designers Joshua Porter and Joshua Brewer.
UXPin Blog: useful articles on how to create effective user experiences.
DesignModo UX: comprehensive site covering the aesthetic, business, and psychological
elements of UX.
Webcredible: UX articles and resources.
Johnny Holland: a popular source of information for a variety of UX topics.
Smashing Magazine: a leading website for UX information and articles.
UX Colombo: a site that strives to promote UX creativity and inspiration with its insightful,
indepth coverage of various UX topics.
UX Myths: a site that dispels some common myths regarding UX design and the industry
atlarge.
Inspire UX: UX design articles and tips.
UXADAY: daily inspiration and directory of useful resources and tools for User Experience
Designers.
Stack Exchange UX: question and answer site for user experience researchers and experts.
UX Matters: a site featuring a bounty of useful UX information and tips.
Foolproof: a popular blog covering UX strategy and design.
Akendi: discusses issues surrounding UX and design.

Innovation M: a design blog that highlights various UX methods.

4. Process & Methods


These sites feature articles covering topics around design methodology. Posts include
discussions and pointers on how to achieve user experience goals and objectives.

Boxes and Arrows: articles about design principles, processes and methods, interfaces and
more.
A List Apart: a blog that discusses UX, web design, web development and web standards.
Usability Post: some great articles discussing usability methods.
Nielsen Norman Group: a site that features Nielsen Norman Group's groundbreaking
research, reporting, and user interface evaluations.
UXPin Blog: articles about design processes such as shifting from lo to hifidelity
prototypes.
Smashing Magazine: a popular site for design related topics and discussions.

5. Deliverables & Documentation


These sites include topics that discuss design deliverables and documentation, with
information on how effectively create items such as wireframes, site maps, flow
diagrams, and prototypes, among others.

UXPin Blog: tools and resources for creating wireframes, mockups, and other prototyping
information, such as this practical look at using wireframes.
Nielsen Norman Group: a site that features Nielsen Norman Group's groundbreaking
research, reporting, and user interface evaluations.
Wireframes: a site featuring tools, tips, and advice regarding wireframing and prototyping.
Inspire UX: some great articles about sketching and wireframing.

6. Tools & Software


Information regarding the latest software, code snippets, and other items essential to
one's design arsenal can be found in these blogs. These resources are indispensable for
staying updated on the latest and greatest design tools.

Boxes and Arrows: articles about design principles, processes and methods, interfaces and
more.
Little Big Details: a provider of daily design inspiration tips.
Creative Bloq: a leading website for UX information and articles.
UXPin Blog: features useful software information and resources, including extensive tips on
using their prototyping and wireframing platform UXPin.

7. Psychology

Why do some user experiences work, while some do not? These sites contain articles
that discuss the psychological underpinnings of an effective UI/UX.

Nielsen Norman Group: a site that features Nielsen Norman Group's groundbreaking research,
reporting, and user interface evaluations.
UXPin Blog: lots of articles discussing the psychology of a good UX, such as this one
covering psychology and design ten best presentations.
Konigi: a blog discussing various topics related to creativity and design.
Little Big Details: a daily dose of design inspiration.
ISkeletor: some great articles related to the psychology of usability.

8. Trends
These blogs cover general movements, though processes, and opinions shared
amongst the design community atlarge.

UXPin Blog: regular updates on UXPins collection of free ebooks discussing mobile and web
design trends, mobile ui design pattern trends, and more.
A List Apart: a blog devoted to discussions around accessibility and email design.
Nielsen Norman Group: a site that features Nielsen Norman Group's groundbreaking research,
reporting, and user interface evaluations.
Joshua Garity: a blog published by Joshua Garity, design psychologist and brand strategist.
52 Weeks of UX: a great site for forward thinking design perspectives.

9. Design Patterns

For design pattern inspiration, look to the following resources:

Boxes and Arrows: articles about design principles, processes and methods, interfaces and
more.
UXPin Blog: tips and advice regarding the latest design patterns, including useful sources for
design patterns and wireframes guides, ux patterns library, and updates on free ebooks such as mobile ui design pattern trends.
Wireframes: a site that discusses wireframing, sketching and design patterns.
MobilePatterns: a site that features design patterns in mobile apps.
Lovely UI: features interesting and unique mobile design patterns.
Pttrns: some great examples of mobile design patterns.

10. Book Reviews


These sites provide expert opinion and reviews on the latest design publications. A
wide range of designrelated materials are reviewed, including howto books, digital
guides, and case studies.

Luke W: reviews publications about digital product design by Luke Wroblewski.


The IxD Library: a site that highlights the best books, articles and presentations regarding
interaction design.
UXPin Library: a collection of free UI/UX ebooks containing references to a wide variety of
other UI/UX books.
UX Mastery: a great selection of UI/UX books and publications.
UX Mag: contains ongoing, periodic book reviews on UX and usability topics.

UX DESIGN COURSES

General Assembly They offer a complete program in UX design. You can take a variety
of classes and workshops, as well as attend as a full-time or part-time student.
Lynda All of the courses on this site have an excellent reputation, but you do have to
subscribe if you want to access them. Prices start from around $25 per month.
Udemy A competitor to Lynda, Udemys per-course pricing make this a great
supplement to any designers education. Some introductory courses are even free.
DesignLab A highly focused design program that pairs students with experienced
design mentors. Courses range between four-six weeks and cost roughly $300.
Fundamentals of UX Design A course from Tuts+ Web Design comprised of 16 twohour lessons for a fee of $15.
UX Apprentice Free courses and learning materials for those looking to learn the
basics.
Learnable Again a subscription site which costs $15 pm or $99 per year for access to
all courses. With the premium membership you can also download all eBooks and
videos.

Other UX Design resources:

The Hipper Element A library with 31 daily lessons on the fundamentals of UX design
that has a good reputation.
LukeW Product Director at Google, Luke Wroblewski is one of the top UX experts in
the world. His site summarizes takeaways from conferences, includes plenty of how-to
pieces, and features plenty of solid advice for UX design.
UXMyths Regularly updated list of dozens of common myths with thorough research
disproving each misconception.
A List Apart Meticulously written and edited, A List Apart features some of the most
thought-provoking pieces on designing experiences for the Web. Always worth reading.
Smashing Magazine The online magazine includes plenty of opinion pieces, how-toarticles, and thought pieces on the state (and future) of UX design.
UXPins free eBook Library A collection of 30+ e-books (growing at one a week)
teaches practical UX design principles by analyzing existing live examples. The longer
books range from 50 to 100 pages, while shorter pocket guides span 20-30 pages.
UXPin Blog The blog features tutorials (like prototyping with Photoshop and with
Sketch) along with straightforward articles to get you started.
ZURB Blog The reputable design agencys blog is full of thought-provoking and
practical advice on product design from its staff of designers and the CEO himself.
You can also join plenty of design communities, ranging from visual design sites
like Dribbble to more comprehensive design sites like Designer News,
and r/userexperience. Being part of a community allows you to bounce ideas off others
and makes learning a little less intimidating.

When it comes to learning, start at the beginning and master the basics first. UX is a
broad discipline and you may want to specialize once your career gets underway, but
first focus on executing the fundamentals flawlessly.

If youd like to learn more about UX and UI design techniques and best practices, check out some
of these resources from UXpin free design library.

Web UI Best Practices 7 chapters exploring techniques spanning visual design, interface
design, and UX design.
Interaction Design Best Practices: Words, Visuals, Space 7 chapters explaining the practical
use of affordances, white space, size/distance, visual consistency, cognitive load, and more.
Interaction Design Best Practices: Time & Behavior 6 chapters explaining how to reduce
friction, design for time, create delight through animations, affect user decisions & behavior,
and more.
Guide to Prototyping 100+ pages explaining how and when to use prototyping tools, paper
prototypes, and other popular methods.
Guide to Mockups 80+ pages discussing how to create mockups of all types and fidelities,
along with best practices for Photoshop & Sketch.
Guide to Wireframing 100+ pages explaining the context, tools, techniques, and best practices
for analog and digital wireframing.

Source
After you done with this Guide , you can visit this great resource :

The Next Web - The ultimate guide to becoming a UX designer


Fastcodesign - UI, UX: Who Does What? A Designer's Guide To The Tech Industry
CareerFoundry - The Difference Between UX and UI Design-A Laymans Guide
Awwwards -UX Design Blog and Resources to Follow Religiously
Quora Answer 1
Quora Answer 2
InVisions Blog HOW TO BECOME A GREAT UX DESIGNER WITHOUT A DEGREE
Medium Become A UI/UX Designer From Scratch
InspiringUX - The Resources to Start Learning about UX Design
Whitney Hesss Blog - So you wanna be a user experience designer
The Interaction Design Foundation How to Change Your Career from Graphic Design to UX
Design
Linkedin - How to become a UX/UI designer when you know nothing
UX Mastery How To Get Started in UX Design
UXPin How to Get Started in UX Design ?
Mockplus How to Get Started in UX Design ?

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