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25/6/10 17:54 A6/P6 Te Rawhiti Whanau news letter. Editor this time Helen Harte.

The Te Rawhiti Newsletter

Pipiwharauroa The Herald of Spring

Volume 1 Issue 10, June 2010

The Matariki issue


Matariki is the name of the Pleiades stars. When they appear the
planting season began. They signal the new year; the change from
winter to summer; the winter solistice-around June 21.

He Tohu Aroha
June, 2010

Naini Hiriwanu Hepi nee Rewha

The life of a great woman!!


Tena Koutou Katoa,

My name is Naini Hiriwanu Heremaia I am the oldest daughter of

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Mavis Meteria Heremaia nee Hepi and James Toretore Heremaia. My


mother is the third oldest daughter of the late Kara Teina Hepi and
Naini Hiriwanu Hepi nee Rewha.

So for those of you that haven’t figured out the obvious I am named
after my grandmother which I find in itself a true honour.

Earlier today I was approached to write a piece for Pipiwharauroa on


my late grandmother and for once in my life I am truly speechless
the only obstacle is where to start?? I can only write about my
grandmother from my own perspective and hope that I am able to
capture the very essence of her life without hurting or insulting
anyone close to me and her.

Born in 1927 on February 16th her first name was taken from Nanny
Witi Davis mother Naini and her middle and last names were her
fathers. The daughter of Ene Paaka and Hiriwanu Matutaira Rewha.
She was born a happy healthy able seeing child in Te Rawhiti Hauai
Bay in a one room shack. She attended the local school house in
Kaingahoa where Maori was not to be spoken so instead of being
called by her given Maori name Naini her teacher named her Nancy
which was normal in those days. I recall her saying her cousins use
to tease her “Nancy pancy tickle your fancy” or “Nancy Harry”.

At the age of 14 she had a school accident where an ink quill


stabbed her in the left eye and the eye was later removed. She
lived a normal life with her disability because Te Paea (Nanny ma)
had no eyes and her father was also blind her accident wasn’t
looked upon as an obstacle or even considered a disability. She was
treated just like everyone else. She never actually went completely
blind until around 80 years old. She could fish as good as any able
seeing person she could get kina and pipi as good if not better than
anyone and her skill at opening an oyster was awesome. She
learned to knit and weave kete which she later in her life became
well known for in the whanau.

At around the age of 21 years old she met and married Kara Teina
Hepi and together they had seven girls, Polly, Te Aroha, Mavis,
Elaine, Bebe, Dianne and Queenie and three boys, Kud, Francis and
Boxa. She also mentioned having stillborn twins hence the two
generations of twins in our family. Thru the years the pressure on
her good eye took its toll and it eventually went blind. She lived her
life like any other person if not to the fullest she was also well
known for her humour. I remember she spoke about walking home
blind drunk singing and stumbling home from Kaingahoa and Te
tawa, my initial reaction was utter shock then pure laughter the
thought of a half blind old lady stumbling home drunk and in the
dark seemed so hilarious and it was the way she told it.

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Her life with Kara was not all roses like we’d all like to think. They
had their ups and downs they both liked to drink and she even
smoked cigarettes until she was about 50 years old they attended
church service every Sunday at the Te Rawhiti Marae. They kept a
well knit family and taught their family all the necessities in life on
how to survive and gather food in the big wide world and especially
to remember to be there for each other no matter what.

They tried their luck and moved to Auckland for a few years with the
hope of making more money and a better life for their children until
her mother Ene became sick and went to Auckland to ask Kara and
Naini to move home to look after her. Nana did not want to move
home she had made her life in Auckland and loved every moment
but like the abiding wife she followed her husband because he
respected his mother in-law and loved his wife so much he felt the
need to honour his mother in-laws wishes and returned to Te
Rawhiti.

Kara did many things in and for the community of Te Rawhiti and
Whangaruru, where he came from he was especially well known for
his hospitality so he always made sure the table was always set,
the cupboards were full and ready for visitors and nana was always
willing to get the tea ready if people should stop in. She supported
him in everything he did.

In her late 70’s she was diagnosed with dementia she spent a lot of
the time being passed around to family at first she was home sick
but she came to realise that her children and mokos were busy
working to make a living it was easier to go to them rather than
them go to her because it was unsafe for her to live in Rawhiti by
herself and she got to spend time with most if not all of her children
their partners and also her moko.

In May of this year she was sadly diagnosed with lung cancer it was
a shock to all the family but we as a family pulled together
and realised time was of the escence and we needed to
take too many photos and laugh with her as much as we
could. Tell her we loved her spend those precious
moments with her in the place she loved the most Hauai
Bay Te Rawhiti. The family organised to spend Queens
Birthday with her and celebrate her life but Nana sadly
passed away on Tuesday 01 June 2010.

I think back now at the reality of our situation and now know that we
had a life time to spend with nana and learn everything
about her in one weekend was impossible if we couldn’t
enjoy her in the 83 years she was alive then why start now
when she spent her whole lifetime doing all the wonderful
things she did and touched the hearts of the many people

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she knew.

As a descendant of this great woman I write about I have come to


realise nothing was an obstacle for her she was a very strong
independent woman with an awesome outlook on life and a great
sense of humour. She definitely showed us how to live every
moment like it was our last. To her grandchildren as well as her
children she was not blind. She was a nana, a mother, an aunty, a
grand aunty as well as a sister she could not see any bad in any
person, she accepted everyone with open arms, an open mind as
well as an open home. Her doors were never locked just like her
heart.
A death in the family leaves a void that cannot be filled. No one can
ever take the place of this individual in the world. We should not try
to comfort the family by saying that "it was his time anyway", or,
"he was suffering". These may be words of comfort later. However,
there must be time to mourn the fact that things will never be the
same. One minute he was here and now he is gone. The human
mind must be allowed to sit with this reality. Mourning is a
necessary part of the human experience. If it is ignored, a general
feeling of sadness may pervade the whole family.

For more information about Naini Hiriwanu Hepi can be


found in the
RUSSELL MUSEUM ORAL HISTORY ARCHIVES NH# 08
02.06.94 and THE WALNUT TREE

March, 2010 Lady Raiha Edmonds Mahuta, buried


at Karetu.
April, 2010 Moses Witehira's father-in-law, Leon
Uren, lay at our marae.
Susan Bristowe Hepi, lay at Ngatiwai,
taken to Mokau
Reo Turner - lay one night at Kaimarama,
then taken to Otiria for burial.

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The Centenary of our Wharehui. When is it whanau? Does anyone


remember or have evidence?

1910? This date is one we have in our Marae records but not in minutes.
There are no minutes dealing with this.
1918? This date was in the “Tides of History “book which took the
information from the Northland Age which reports the date for the opening
of the whare for the Roll of Honour. But World War I finished in 1919. Had
our men already returned? Or was the celebration in preparation for their
return? And the Roll of Honour prepared for them? That’s not usual
tikanga.
The Monument was completed in 1948.

LAWYER: What was the first thing your husband said to


you that morning?
WITNESS: He said, 'Where am I, Kathy?'
LAWYER: And why did that upset you?
WITNESS: My name is Susan!

He Whakaputanga Hearings for WAI Claim


1040.

What Hearings?

The Waitangi tribunal has set aside four weeks to hear Ngapuhi hapu and
the Crown deliver submissions about He Whakaputanga o nga Rangatira o
Niu Tireni (the Declaration of Independence of Nu Tireni) and Te Tiriti o
Waitangi.

The initial hearing is scheduled for four weeks, May 10-14 was followed by
June 10-14, August 9-13 and October 11-15. Each day's sitting will begin at
9 a.m. and conclude at 5pm. Radio Tautoko broadcast them everyday.

The first two weeks of the hearing included speakers who set out the
parameters of the Ngapuhi nui tonu case, with opening statements from

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Titewhai Harawira and Sir Graham Latimer, followed by key speakers


Erima Henare, Rima Edwards, Hirini Henare, Pat Hohepa, Hone Sadler and
Ben Te Haara. We will put some of the full transcripts on
www.terawhitimarae.maori.nz . They contain our Ngapuhi world view and
beliefs. They are taonga.

What’s WAI 1040 about?

Ngapuhi Nui Tonu is claiming that the chiefs signed Te Tiriti as an


equal nation, as one sovereignty to another, in a gesture of
partnership and friendliness. They did not sign it to give away
their authority and sovereignty to foreigners. The Crown says the
opposite: that the chiefs gave up everything to the Crown

In the early 1800’s, the hapu chiefs called together Te Whakaminenga’,


the Confederation of hapu Chiefs’ to plan their strategy to cope with the
increasing numbers of visitors to their lands.

The Confederation was a traditional gathering of a formal decision making


body, usually called when significant events required mass action of the
hapu together.

In this case, the event was the increasing numbers of the Europeans and
the effect they were having on their lives. The Confederation sent chiefs
overseas to gather information and bring their information back to help
their strategising.

Maori declared their own nation of Aotearoa when they flew ‘Te Kara’, the
flag, on their ship. When King William IV approved the flag the chiefs took
this mean that he confirmed their nationhood.

They signed their independence as a nation with a constitution, ‘Te


Whakaputanga o Nga Rangatira o Nu Tireni’, ‘The Declaration of
Independence of Nu Tireni’ in 1835-1839.

Therefore, when they signed Te Tiriti in 1840, they were not giving away
their sovereignty. They were signing as an equal nation as a sign of
partnership.

They believed Hobson’s words when he said that we were one people.

The Crown believes that the chiefs were giving their sovereignty to the
Queen and that the Tiriti cancelled the Whakaputanga. This is the main
point of argument of the Wai Claim 1040. Ngapuhi Nui Tonu disagrees with
the Crown.

In Kaumatua Nuki Aldridge’s (Whangaroa) words, “ E ai nga korero a


nga tupuna matua what it [signing Te Tiriti] would have meant to the
rangatira at the time was that we would be one people under the Maori
kaupapa, we would live together under the Maori umbrella.

History does not say that, so I pose this question to the NZ Crown and all
its institutions: If say, a Maori chief signed a treaty with England
and he shook the hand of the Queen of England, and said, ”We

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are now one people”, would the Queen then give England away?”

Manuka Henare, Ngati Haua, Te Aupouri, of the Auckland University


Business school said: ” I take the view that the very nature of mana and
the nature of a rangatira was such that they would not agree en
masse to give away all their chiefly powers and authority-in
essence their mana rangatira-to the Queen of England.

Finally, based on the historical evidence, I pose this fundamental


economic question for the Tribunal’s consideration: How did the Te Tai
Tokerau economy of the early nineteenth century change from
being the breadbasket of the then Nu Tireni economy to being the
basketcase of the New Zealand economy in 2010?”

Hone Sadler, said that the Ngapuhi world view underpinned the actions
of the tupuna involved in the events of 1835-40 and beyond. They clearly
understood the contents of Whakaputanga and they had had a
relationship with pakeha for at least 20 years.

Ngapuhi were literate and knowledgeable. They knew te Tiriti legitimatised


pakeha people living here. And Maori tolerated settlers but Pakeha had to
look after their own. Maori had their own system of government.

Pakeha needed Maori protection. By 1840 there were about 2000 settlers
and about 100,000 Maori.

Maori wanted to retain the benefits they had seen. They were willing to
share access to those benefits.

Erima Henare, Ngati Hine,

Our Tupuna took a calculated risk in signing Te Tiriti o Waitangi. They


believed
the words that were conveyed to them, and trusted the people that
explained its
meaning. They believed what they were told and they signed it on the
basis of
that understanding.

The Tribunal, are here today because we, as the descendents of


signatories of
Te Tiriti, believe that the promises made to our tupuna have not been
honoured.
Their trust and honour have been betrayed. The Crown have lied and
manipulated the meaning of Te Tiriti to the extent that has eroded its very
meaning.

The Rangatira gathered at Waitangi to consider Te Tiriti, were proven


battle hardened veterans. The role of Rangatira entitled you to respect.
You were not entitled to surrender the Rangatiratanga of the people.

Had the Rangatira gathered at Waitangi been told that they should
surrender their Mana to the foreigners, ‘all hell would have broken loose’
and the foreigners would have been ejected or annihilated.

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In 1939 when Britain declared war on Germany Ngapuhi leaders promptly


convened at Waiomio and declared war on Hitler, even before the New
Zealand
Government did so. That is how they saw their obligation to the Crown
under
Te Tiriti. At the same time, those very same rangatira (and my father was
amongst them) were co-operating with other tribes in support of a petition
to the
Privy Council to require the Crown to honour Te Tiriti.

Honour Te Tiriti. Those words are on many of the gravestones at


Tapakuna cemetery at Motatau. That remains our plea. That is why we
appear before you today.

Sir Graham Latimer and Titewhai Harawira

When we look back at those chiefs who signed Te Tiriti o Waitangi, we


cannot help
but feel immensely proud at the honour and integrity with which they
acted. They
signed believing the Crown would honour its word, and our tupuna, they
fully
honoured their word.

The Crown, however, have behaved very differently. It acted with deceit
and
dishonour, seeking to suppress us and take what it wanted, even those
things that we had agreed to share.

We don’t want to stand here and argue about which Crown or what
Government. We don’t need to. Every single one of them has been part of
a lie that festers within our history.

He Whakaputanga o te Rangatiratanga – the Declaration of Independence


1835;
Proves our rangatiratanga. We declared it, Britain agreed with it. No-one
ever
challenged it.

Te Tiriti o Waitangi – the Treaty of Waitangi 1840; Affirmed our


rangatiratanga, on the transition to a State, in a joint declaration with the
Crown. It is now part of our informal constitution.

We have had to fight a long and arduous battle to raise the profile of Te
Tiriti o
Waitangi, and have the promises made in Te Tiriti redeemed.

We now want to bring to your attention Te Whakapuakitanga mo nga


iwi Taketake – the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples 2007.

This spells out the minimum requirements for our rangatiratanga. It has
now been
internationally recognised by more than 150 states, including last month,

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New
Zealand.

With each of these covenants: He Whakaputanga, Te Tiriti o Waitangi and


Te
Whakapuakitanga, Ngapuhi was there from the start. We need to
remember this. It is important for our history to do so.

Patuone Hohepa, Professor, Waima.

My presentation will focus on perceptions from the western shores, Te Tai


Tamatane. I will explain Te Hokianga nui a Kupe as a destination and a point
of origin and dispersal.

It was here that Kupe, Nukutawhiti and Ruanui arrived and settled , and it
was from here that the laws of Rahiri have emanated shaping the evolving
identity of the Ngapuhi confederation and its tikanga or substantive laws.

We do not have Waka based Confederations. We do not have Kingitanga or


Arikitanga in its former sense. We do have mana whenua, mana tangata,
mana motuhake.

All hapū of Northland, all iwi are linked to Hokianga, and all Ngāpuhi nui
tonu are linked in several ways to Hokianga. But I will explain that each has
its own integrity.

It is at this point that I will discuss our enduring connections to He


Whakaputanga me Te Tiriti. I wish to emphasize that our people assert a
relationship to Te Tiriti o Waitangi and not The Treaty of Waitangi, which I
dismiss as a fraud.

Te Waiohau Riu Te Haara, Ngati Rangi-Te Haara whanau, Ohaewai; Ngati


Kuta.

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On Heta Te Haara’s headstone at St Michael’s church, is an inscription

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Louisa Malcom Collier, Te Kawau Tuatua, Whangaroa

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Te Whakaputanga o Nu Tireni (From Manuka Henare’s evidence on


website)

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LAWYER: How was your first marriage terminated?


WITNESS: By death.
LAWYER: And by whose death was it terminated?
WITNESS: Take a guess.

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RAKAUMANGAMANGA
Words from Marara Te Tai Hook, written by her mother.
The waiata is sung by Nanny Mere Rewha Willoughby (her version) on the
marae website.
www.terawhitimarae.maori.nz

Ko Rakaumangamanga Rakaumangamanga
Ko te maunga rongonui Is the mountain of renown
E tu mai nei standing here
I te marangai to the east
Ko te herenga kupu The binding word
A nga tupuna of the ancestors
Ko Rakaumangamanga Rakaumangamanga
No Hawaiki e. is from Hawaiki

Ka piki ake au I climb up


Ki runga o te tihi to the summit
O Rakaumangamanga of Rakaumangamanga
Onamata e, of ancient times
Kia matakitaki to watch/gaze
I te au o Morunga at the current of Morunga
Ko te hoenga waka, o (which was) the paddling path
Ngapuhi e. of Ngapuhi

Ko te au o Morunga The current of Morunga


E hora nei spread out (before me)
Takoto whakarunga lying upwards (southward)
Whakararo e, lying downwards (northward)
Ko te tai tuku waka The tide which brought the canoes
O nga tupuna, of our ancestors
No Hawaiki mai (Came) from Hawaiki
Tuku iho e. down (to Aotearoa)

Ka titiro iho au, I look toward


Ki te Taitokerau Taitokerau
Ki Taiamai to Taiamai
Hokianga e and Hokianga
Ko te takotoranga It has been laid down/foundation
To mana e Ngapuhi that your mana Ngapuhi
No Hawaiki mai (Came) from Hawaiki
Tuku iho e down (to Aotearoa)

O maunga whakahi, Your mountains of pride


Kei te tai marangai on the eastern side
Ko Rakaumangamanga, are Rakaumangamanga and
Mana-ia e Manaia
Kei te Taihauauru On the western side
Ko Maungataniwha, is Maungataniwha (Mangamuka)
Ko Whakatere e, is Whakatere (Waima)
Ngapuhi e. (that completes the whare tapu of)
Ngapuhi.

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THE MAUNGA REPORT


From our roving reporter, Kuia Marara Hook

5th or 6th January 2010.

Tena koutou katoa,

Am attaching the words to our waiata Rakaumangamanga. These words I


copied from my mother’s handwriting in one of her books. Some of our
whanau have words which differ slightly from mine, but that’s okay, you
learn what you know or what you have been taught and I’ll learn what I
have seen written! The main thing is the meaning of the words and I have
translated it as best I can. I typed and printed out copies of this waiata
and we all sang this after nga mihimihi on the maunga!

Yes, the second verse, Kia piki ake au ki runga o te tihi o


Rakaumangamanga, Let me climb to the summit of the maunga which is
just what we did (except we didn’t “climb”) but standing there gazing out
to the moana, the paddling path of our tuupuna on their waka, we looked
upwards from whence they came, we looked towards the north, to
Taiamai, to Hokianga, to Manaia, to Maungataniwha, to Whakatere, to
Whiria, Panguru, Papata, Ramaroa then back to Rakaumangamanga, te
tahi o nga pou o te whare tapu o Ngapuhi, thus completing the sacred
house of Ngapuhi. It was very moving standing there on the tihi AND the
added bonus of being taken to Motukokako - it was just TOO MUCH, and
was a really emotional experience for me and I expressed it in my tangi-
korero. We all felt the ‘presence’ of our tuupuna on both places and we
must thank those responsible for according us the opportunity of visiting
the two maunga. But, let me start at the beginning.

The idea was first mooted by Blandy, who had a grant from Nga Whenua
Rahui for both hapu to show the pest control project and to show the
community of Te Rawhiti. He asked about taking nga kuia and kaumaatua
to the maunga. I thought about it very deeply and on inquiring how big the
chopper landing pad was, I visualized how we were to do this ceremony. It
was also suggested that a pou whenua in the form of a rock/stone from
Ohututea be placed on the tihi, (the peak) to represent the mauri and
mana of Ngati Kuta and Patukeha. It was going to be such a significant
ceremony that I thought it was worthwhile too, to have the boys perform a
taki (a challenge which does not involve chasing and killing traditionally).
I ran the idea past both Moka and Blandy who agreed to this being done.

Blandy engaged the services of a pilot and the chopper from Te Kaha. We
counted nga kuia and kaumaatua and came up with a figure of 16, 8 from
each hapu. Those who went were: Eddie & Ella Garland, John Martin –
Pona’s son and our Akonga for Rawhiti, Moka & Hine Puru, Robert
Willoughby, Peti Ahitapu, her sister Faith, Joe Bristowe, Keita Inch, Hemi
Rewiri, his daughter Tony, Blandy, Tamaira Hook, Jock Hepi (Aunty Naini’s
moko), Lynette Te Tai and myself and the 2 documentary film girls, Jude
and Mika. I had asked Della to come but she didn’t in the end.

Blandy had asked Moses to be the third warrior, but he had hurt his leg
and was unable to perform, so there were just Tamaira and Jock who

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performed excellently considering the uneven terrain, the small ground


space, and the small tree stumps left in the ground.

Going to Motukokako was an additional last minute arrangement but it all


fitted in very well. Blandy and the pilot had already been to Motukokako
to suss out a landing space somewhere near the top, and Blandy and
Moses were the first ones to be taken to that spot yesterday morning,
armed with chainsaws and axes to cut a track vertically from where they
were dropped off, to the top where they would clear a space for the
chopper to land the rest of us. The chopper was a 3 seater excluding the
pilot. Blandy said it was a bit ‘hairy’ (his own words) and I understood
that the chopper landed in a precarious position, with one ‘foot’ resting on
a rock and the other ??? (don’t know, I wasn’t too keen on hearing the
rest of it!!) They managed to cut a track of sorts to the very top of
Motukokako where they both cleared a space for the chopper to land and
disembark us.

To get back to the maunga.


Blandy, Tamaira and Jock were on the first load, then the crew girls and I
went next as I wanted to suss out how the powhiri and the taki were to be
done. Poor Tamaira, as soon as we arrived, his first words were “anyone
gotta smoke?” – not to worry about food, just a smoke!!

I went through the procedure with the both of them, who was going first,
how far they were to go before the laying down of the leaves to be picked
up etc etc.
While we waited for the rest of the whanau to be brought over, we had a
visit from some of the trapper boys who had been flown out with all their
gear and food early that morning before our crew, Fancis, Rob McPherson,
Alvin, Carl, Karena,

He and Jock had cut 2 thin kahikatoa for their taki, Tamaira’s old piupiu
disintegrated so he just did it in his shorts, Jock had acquired a lovely
piupiu, so he looked the part, well, they both looked the part actually.
When the last of the whanau arrived, Blandy gave a quick run-down of the
Motukokako visit, the numbers had to be limited because the landing
space was very small and the pilot had allowed us half an hour on there
while he began coptering the whanau back to The Corner in Kaingahoa.

I gave a run-down of our part of the powhiri, how far the first rakau
whakaara (the first twig) was to be placed and also where the rakau
takoto (the final twig) was to be placed and after it was picked up, Lynette
and I would karanga the whanau forward. Oh, I forgot, on one of the
drop-off trips, Moka had brought the kohatu with him and placed it where
the old trig point had stood, which was near Lynette and I, nga kai
karanga.

Moka was the one who picked up the leaves laid down and as the whanau
moved forward slowly, I did the karanga saying the words, “haere mai e te
whanau ki runga I to tatou maunga rongo nui, te tahi o nga pou o te whare
tapu o Ngapuhi eee”
Now, as Moka moved forward with the others behind him, he placed the
two sprigs of leaves on to the kohatu saying a chant. His words of mihi
were so beautiful, I’m hoping that the film girls captured his mihi on film, if

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contributions of news are welcome. Do send them in.
25/6/10 17:54 A6/P6 Te Rawhiti Whanau news letter. Editor this time Helen Harte. 18

they have, I want to send it out to you all. I do remember he


acknowledged Ngare Raumati, the first ones who lived here those many
years ago only to be nearly wiped out by Ngapuhi. After Moka’s deep
meaningful words, Uncle Eddie said whakamoemiti after which we all sang
“Ko Rakaumangamanga”
The other day I had typed out, printed and handed out copies to those
present of the waiata I have attached today.
Motukokako
The chopper came, picked Blandy, Joe B, Peti, Faith her sister, Mika one of
the doco girls, John Martin, Tamaira and self and took us over to
Motukokako – here again I was overcome with emotion, being physically
present on Motukokako, with the Hole directly below us, having seen it so
many times on postcards, newspapers, from a boat at a distance, from
the air when I was taken for a ride over Whangamumu and out to the Cape
a few months ago, I tell you people it was something else to be there. I
mihi-ed to Blandy, Peti, her sister and Joe B, being the direct uri of those
original shareholders and giving me the honour of sharing this moment
with them.

Well, folks, this is it for now, I wanted to share these two memorable visits
with you all and once again would like to acknowledge those responsible
for making it happen for us.

No reira e te whanau, nga mihi nui ki a koutou katoa,


Me te arohanoa o Ihoa ki runga I a koutou mo tenei Tau Hou.
Arohanui na te kuia nei x x x x

LAWYER: Can you describe the individual?


WITNESS: He was about medium height and had a
beard
LAWYER: Was this a male or a female?
WITNESS: Unless the Circus was in town I'm going with

Matariki

Find out about Matariki. See what’s happening.

http://www.korero.maori.nz/news/matariki/factsandfigures

Dawn Rise
As the year moves from autumn towards its shortest winter day, the
sunrise moves north along the eastern horizon. When the sunrise reaches
Matariki, it turns around and starts moving south again. This effect can be
seen everywhere on the planet and makes the Matariki stars famous world
wide. In Greece, several important temples face straight towards Matariki.
In Japan the world rally car Subaru is named after the Matariki stars.

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contributions of news are welcome. Do send them in.
25/6/10 17:54 A6/P6 Te Rawhiti Whanau news letter. Editor this time Helen Harte. 19

LAWYER: She had three children, right?


WITNESS: Yes.
LAWYER: How many were boys?
WITNESS: None.
LAWYER: Were there any girls?
WITNESS: Your Honour, I think I need a different
lawyer. Can I get a new lawyer?
____________________________________________
JUDGE GREG DAVIS, NGATI MANU,
SWEARING IN CEREMONY

Tena koutou katoa from the Roving Unpaid Reporter, Marara Te Tai
Hook.

What a wonderful day for Ngatimanu, for Taitokerau, for Ngapuhi, for
Maoridom, to attend the swearing in of one of our own as a Judge. (In the
words of Shane Jones in his congratulatory mihi to Greg, 'it was good for him
to attend a swearing in ceremony than be sworn at'!!). We women
commented on what a lovely change it was to attend something other than a
tangi.

Greg is a direct descendant of Pomare, his parents being Pat and Glennis
Davis who used to own and run the Bonanza tearooms in Kawakawa, (Pat
and I both received our JP citation at the same time). Greg grew up in
Kawakawa, has had a full and varied legal career and experience in same,
and according to all the accolades, he is cut out for the turanga. Greg's
brother is Kelvin Davis Labour MP, and a brother of their father, Pat, is Rome
who married Grace, one of Sir James Henare's daughters.

There were about 25 in the Judges party, plus supporters, who were all given
a taki by Wiremu Wiremu's boys. A marquee was set up outside with
loudspeakers as well as microphones inside the whare. As the Roopu
advanced after the taki, cousin Riu Te Tai and Bubby from Hokianga called
them under the marquee to the steps where Isey Bristowe and Heni Davis
called them to the door and Aunty Violet and I called them inside the whare in
front of nga tuupuna on the wall. It was a bit of a tight squeeze inside but we
managed.

I didn't know any of the Judges' party, but I recognised Judge Coxhead (the
Tribunal Judge) and Andrew Spencer. There wasn't anyone close to me
whom I could ask who was who! Parekura Horomia, Shane Jones, John
Carter, Hone Harawira, Rudie Taylor, Eddie and Ella, were the ones I knew.

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contributions of news are welcome. Do send them in.
25/6/10 17:54 A6/P6 Te Rawhiti Whanau news letter. Editor this time Helen Harte. 20

Our Ben did the karakia, Pae Wynyard, Lou Tana and Arapeta Hamilton were
on the taumata with Sonny George organising the seating, the speakers etc.
The speeches were great, I wish I could quote some of the hard-case sayings,
one just had to be there to appreciate what was being said.

After nga mihimihi, a break for a cup of tea was called, the whare re-set for
the swearing in ceremony and we were able to mix and mingle for a while.

Robert Willoughby was present, Pita Tipene, Dr Manuka Henare, John


Klaricich and wife, ummm ?? who else?? Anyway, after that the Judges filed
in again, sat at the top with their gowns and the Chief Judge Russell Johnston
I think his name is, took over the proceedings from there, Greg was sworn in,
his wife Tania gave a wonderful mihi too - of course you all know don't you
that Tania's mother is Tawera who is Uncle George Hakaraia and Auntie
Maraea's daughter, so that was a double-banger for Ngati Manu, Maraea
having been a Sullivan.

Of course we women accompanied each speaker with waiata, tis lovely to


have a group singing, lots of volume! We then all filed in for dinner which
was served out in true Ngati Manu style, all organised, plenty to eat etc.

OK, that's it folks, I'll retire now, glad that you've got a bit of news of my day's
outing, very enjoyable.

Noho mai ra koutou i roto i te arohanoa o Ihoa o nga Mano,


Same old kuia x x

Subject: Tamariki Ora 2010 - Maori Television, Sunday 27


June, 8pm & Monday 28th June, 8pm

Recommended viewing - so tune in and spread the word. This


is a production focusing on the issue of child abuse. Karen McKenzie who
directed the last Brainwave "First Years Last Forever" DVD; has worked on
the "Tamariki Ora 2010" programme with fellow directors Kathleen Mantel and
Michael Bennett and producer Meg Douglas. There is some input from
Brainwave and an interview with Dr. Bruce Perry.
Carol Hirschfeld is presenting and producing. There are a number of well
known people appearing.

<http://www.maoritelevision.com/Default.aspx?
tabid=558&amp;pid=7631>

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contributions of news are welcome. Do send them in.
25/6/10 17:54 A6/P6 Te Rawhiti Whanau news letter. Editor this time Helen Harte. 21

If you want to edit a newsletter issue please talk to Anya Hook or Marara Hook. Any
contributions of news are welcome. Do send them in.