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How to use the Atlas

The Atlas has two map sections


The Main Section shows the location of Russias intact forest landscapes. The Thematic Section
shows their tree species composition in two different ways. The legend is placed at the beginning
of each set of maps.
If you are looking for an area near a town or village
Go to the Index on page 153 and find the alphabetical list of settlements by English name. The
Cyrillic name is also given along with the map page number and coordinates (latitude and
longitude) where it can be found. Capitals of regions and districts (raiony) are listed along with
many other settlements, but only in the vicinity of intact forest landscapes. The reader should
not expect to see a city like Moscow listed. Villages that are insufficiently known or very small
are not listed and appear on the map only as nameless dots.
If you are looking for an administrative region
Go to the Index on page 185 and find the list of administrative regions. The numbers refer to the
map on the inside back cover. Having found the region on this map, the reader will know which
index map to use to search further.
If you are looking for the big picture
Go to the overview map on page 35. This map shows all of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes,
along with the borders and Roman numerals of the five index maps.
If you are looking for a certain part of Russia
Find the appropriate index map. These show the borders of the detailed maps for different parts
of the country.
Page I ................... European Russia westwards of the Ural Mountains
Page II ................. Western Siberia eastwards of the Ural Mountains up to the Enisey River
Page III ............... Eastern Siberia eastwards of the Enisey River up to Lake Baikal,
including all regions surrounding the lake
Page IV ............... The Russian Far East the Pacific coast of Russia
and westwards up to the vicinity of the Lake Baikal
Page V ................. The Kamchatka Peninsula and the Kuril Islands
Each detailed map has an ID number that consists of two letters (e.g., ES for the Eastern Siberia
index map) and a page number within that index map Arabic numerals for the finer scale
maps (1:1.5 million) and letters for other maps (1:3 million). The ID numbers of neighboring maps
are given on each detailed map.
If you are interested in the tree species composition of the remaining
Intact Forest Landscapes
The Thematic Map Section has two series of maps, each with its own legend. The first one
(page 139) shows the tree species composition of the intact forest landscapes according to the
Forests of the USSR map of 1990. This classification derives from a map of the Russian Forest
Service, and is not an original work of Global Forest Watch. The second one (page 147) shows an
attempt by Global Forest Watch to classify the composition of apparent areas of closed forest
within the intact forest landscapes of Siberia and the Russian Far East.

Atlas
of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Dmitry Aksenov, Dmitry Dobrynin, Maxim Dubinin, Alexey Egorov, Alexander Isaev,
Mikhail Karpachevskiy, Lars Laestadius, Petr Potapov, Andrey Purekhovskiy,
Svetlana Turubanova and Alexey Yaroshenko

Contributing authors:
Yekaterina Belozerova, Tatiana Braslavskaya, Alexander Dobrynin, Sergey Dylyuk,
Yelena Esipova, Olga Gershenzon, Alexander Kitov, Konstantin Kobyakov, Evgeny Kozin,
Igor Karyakin, Yelena Kirichok, Ruslan Kiselev, Evgeny Krasilnikov, Sergey Krasnopeev,
Yekaterina Kuznetsova, Andrey Laletin, Nikolay Lashchinsky Jr., Anatoliy Lebedev,
Anton Makarov, Valentina Neshataeva, Dmitry Pamfilov, Fedor Pleshikov, Alexey Pazhenkov,
Vsevolod Rozenberg , Bella Russo, Natalia Rybakova, Anatoly Sapozhnikov, Vladimir Skvortsov,
Olga Smirnova, Anton Sonyushkin, Nikolay Shchenin, Dmitry Vatrasov, Konstantin Yakovlev,
Tatyana Yanitskaya, Vladimir Yaborov, Alexander Yumakaev

Moscow 2002

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes


Dmitry Aksenov, Dmitry Dobrynin, Maxim Dubinin, Alexey Egorov, Alexander Isaev, ikhail Karpachevskiy,
Lars Laestadius, Petr Potapov, Andrey Purekhovskiy, Svetlana Turubanova and Alexey Yaroshenko
The following people contributed to the preparation of materials for this book:
Organization of field verification and ground data processing and contributing information for
thematic interpretation of the degree of disturbance of particular areas:
Tatiana Braslavskaya (Moscow), Alexander Dobrynin (Vladivostok), Alexander Kitov (Irkutsk),
Konstantin Kobyakov (Apatity, Murmansk Oblast), Evgeny Kozin (Vladivostok), Igor Karyakin
(Perm), Sergey Krasnopeev (Vladivostok), Nikolay Lashchinsky Jr. (Novosibirsk),
Valentina Neshataeva (Saint Petersburg), Alexey Pazhenkov (Samara), Vsevolod Rozenberg
(Vladivostok), Fedor Pleshikov (Krasnoyarsk), Anatoly Sapozhnikov (Vladivostok),
Vladimir Skvortsov (Moscow), Olga Smirnova (Moscow), Konstantin Yakovlev (Krasnoyarsk),
Vladimir Yaborov (Blagoveshchensk), Alexander Yumakaev (Barnaul).
Selection of satellite imagery, geoCreferencing and processing:
Olga Gershenzon, Yekaterina Belozerova, Evgeny Krasilnikov, Yekaterina Kuznetsova,
Anton Sonyushkin, Dmitry Pamfilov (Moscow).
Regional coordination of field verification and ground data collection:
Andrey Laletin (Krasnoyarsk), Anatoliy Lebedev (Vladivostok), Alexander Yumakaev (Barnaul).
Development of software for the ground data database; data entry:
Sergey Dylyuk, Nikolay Shchenin (Moscow).
Preparation of topographic and thematic maps:
Yelena Esipova, Yelena Kirichok, Ruslan Kiselev, Bella Russo, Natalia Rybakova,
Dmitry Vatrasov (Moscow).
Borders of federally protected areas:
Ruslan Kiselev, Tatyana Yanitskaya (Moscow).
Reception, selection, primary processing and geoCreferencing of satellite images from the scanners
MSUCE and MSUCSK of the Russian satellite ResursCO series was performed by the R&D Center
ScanEx. On the basis of these images, ScanEx identified vegetation communities associated with
large blocks of intact closed forest.
Map design and general layout:
Dmitry Aksenov, Ilya Belov.
The English text was scrutinized by Eric Glick.
Cover photos by Andrey Purekhovskiy Main front cover photo: BroadCleave forests in montane
Bashkiria; In shortcuts (down from the top): XXXXX Back cover photo:

The work on identification of Russia's intact forest landscapes was supported, in its entirety or in part,
by the home furnishing company IKEA, the World Resources Institute, the Swedish International
Development and Cooperation Agency (SIDA), the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation,
and the Turner Foundation.
The work benefited from software donated by Environmental Systems Research Institute Inc. and ERDAS Inc.

ISBN 1C56973C515C8
2

Biodiversity Conservation Center, 2002


Greenpeace Russia, 2002
International SocioCEcological Union, 2002
World Resources Institute, 2002
Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Table of Contents
How to Use the Atlas ............................................................................................................................................................................................. Cover, 2nd
Acknowledgements ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4
The Atlas in Brief .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5
Text Section
Preface ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 9
Introduction, Purpose, Definitions and Criteria ................................................................................................................................ 10
Method for delineation of intact forest landscapes, Accuracy ............................................................................................... 16
Preliminary identification of large intact forestCdominated areas
and classification of their tree composition ............................................................................................................................................ 22
Results and Conclusions, Next steps ............................................................................................................................................................ 23
References ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 27
List of Reviewers .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 28
Annex 1. Data on intact forest landscapes at the level of administrative regions .................................................. 29
Annex 2. Data on forest area at the level of administrative region .................................................................................... 31
Main Map Section: Intact Forest Landscapes
Legend .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 34
Overview Map (1:30,000,000) ............................................................................................................................................................................. 35
Index Maps (1:12,000,000) .................................................................................................................................................................................... 36
Detailed maps
European Russia ERC01 to ERC19 (1:1,500,000) ................................................................................................................... 41
Western Siberia WSC01 to WSC24 (1:1,500,000), WSCA (1:3,000,000) ............................................................... 59
Eastern Siberia ESC01 to ESC26 (1:1,500,000), ESCA to ESCC (1:3,000,000) .................................................. 84
The Russian Far East FEC01 to FEC16 (1:1,500,000), FECA to FECC (1:3,000,000) .................................113
Kamchatka Peninsula & Kuril Islands KKC01 to KKC07 (1:1,500,000) .........................................................132
Thematic Map Section: Tree Species Composition of Intact Forest Landscapes
Tree Species Composition (according to the Forests of the USSR Map, 1990)
Legend ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 140
Overview Map (1:30,000,000) ...........................................................................................................................................................141
European Russia (1:12,000,00) .........................................................................................................................................................142
Western Siberia (1:12,000,00) ...........................................................................................................................................................143
Eastern Siberia (1:12,000,00) ............................................................................................................................................................ 144
The Russian Far East (1:12,000,00) .............................................................................................................................................. 145
Kamchatka Peninsula & Kuril Islands (1:12,000,00) ....................................................................................................146
Closed Forest Tree Species Composition (apparent areas in Siberia and the Russian Far East)
Legend ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 148
Overview Map (1:30,000,000) ...........................................................................................................................................................149
Western Siberia (1:12,000,00) ...........................................................................................................................................................150
Eastern Siberia (1:12,000,00) ............................................................................................................................................................ 151
The Russian Far East (1:12,000,00) .............................................................................................................................................. 152
Index of settlement names ...............................................................................................................................................................................................153
Index of administrative regions of Russia .......................................................................................................................................................... 185
Administrative regions of Russia ............................................................................................................................................................................... 186
Map of administrative regions of Russia .............................................................................................................................................. Cover, 3rd
Participanting organizations ......................................................................................................................................................................... Cover, 4th

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
The authors would like to thank A. N. Arbachakov (Mezhdurechensk, Kemerovo Oblast), I. A. Artemov
(Novosibirsk), A. S. Batalova , S. A. Babkina (KomsomolskCnaCAmure, Khabarovsk Kray), S. V. Bakka (Nizhny
Novgorod), A. K. Blagovidov (Moscow), O. A. Chernyagina (PetropavlovskCKamchatskiy), M. M. Cherosov
(Yakutsk), G. V. Devyatkin (Abakan, Republic of Khakassia), A. V. Dubynin (Novosibirsk), D. V. Ershov
(Khabarovsk), D. F. Efremov (Khabarovsk), L. M. Faleychik (Chita), I. K. Gavrilov (Krasnoyarsk),
V. Ye. Gershenzon (Moscow), S. Glukhov (Khabarovsk), V. V. Gorobeiko (Birobidzhan), A. Yu. Grigoriev
(Moscow), S. A. Khokhryakov (Lazo, Primorskiy Kray), V. Kirichenko (PetropavlovskCKamchatskiy),
N. N. Kolobaev (Fevralsk, Amur Oblast ), D. B. Koltsov (Moscow), A. Yu. Korolyuk (Novosibirsk), M. L. Kreyndlin
(Moscow), A. N. Kulikov (Khabarovsk), V. A. Kulikov (Khabarovsk), V. A. Kuznetsov (Irkutsk), G. A. Lazarev
(PetropavlovskCKamchatskiy), D.V. Lisitsyn (YuzhnoCSakhalinsk), I. Makhatkov (Novosibirsk), O. F. Malykh
(Chita), Yu. I. Manko (Vladivostok), Yu. Marin (Sverdlovk Oblast), Nikita S. Mergelov (Moscow), A. S. Morozov
(Moscow), A. A. Murzin (Vladivostok), D. I. Nazimova (Krasnoyarsk), V. Yu. Neshataev (Saint Petersburg),
Yu. N. Neshataev (Saint Petersburg), V. G. Onipchenko (Moscow), I. N. Pospelov (Moscow), R. Pukalov
(Moscow), A. S. Rautian (Moscow), Yu. F. Rozhkov (Olekminsk, Republic of Sakha (Yakutiya)),
A. V. Rudomakha (Maykop), V. V. Samsonova (Yakutsk), V. A. Shamshin (PetropavlovskCKamchatskiy),
S. Shapkhaev (UlanCUde), P. Shlesinger (Washingtown, D.C., USA), V. I. Shurduk (Yakutsk), E. Yu. Sidorov
(Blagoveshchensk), Yu. F. Sidorov (Blagoveshchensk), D. Yu. Smirnov (Apatity, Murmansk Oblast),
N. A. Sobolev (Moscow), V. A. Stakheev (Shushenskoe, Krasnoyarsk Kray), V. B. Stepanitskiy (Moscow),
S. I. Titova (Blagoveshchensk), F. D. Torbinskiy (Tura, Evenk Autonomous District), E. Ts. Tsydenov (UlanC
Ude), S. A. Tsyplenkov (Moscow), A. N. Ugarov (Moscow), I. Z. Vladimirskaya (Moscow), V. I. Vlasenko
(Krasnoyarsk), A. V. Volkov (Moscow), I. V. Zaitseva (Apatity, Murmansk Oblast), V. P. Zakharov (Moscow),
A. V. Zimenko (Moscow), I. G. Zinovieva (Chita) and all the participants of the ground verification expeditions
for their invaluable help.
Aster satellite images were donated by the EROS Data Center of the United States Geological Survey (USGS)
within the Earth Observation System Program of the United States National Aeronautics and Space Agency.
The Landsat satellite images used in this work were donated, in part, by the Research and Development
Center ScanEx, the NonCCommercial Partnership Transparent World, the Global Land Cover Facility at the
University of Maryland, the Woods Hole Research Center, the Pacific Institute of Geography of the Russian
Academy of Sciences, the Wildlife Conservation Society, Sergey Krasnopeev, Vadim Kirichenko, Vladimir
Kuznetsov, Andrey Murzin, Igor Pospelov, and the Kamchatka League of Independent Experts. The authors
wish to thank them all for their invaluable help. The completion of this work would have been impossible
without these images.
Materials on federal protected nature areas were kindly provided by the Unit of Protected Nature Areas at
the Environmental Protection and Ecological Safety Department of the Ministry of Natural Resources of the
Russian Federation; by the Unit of Game Management at the Game Resources Conservation and Development
Department of the Ministry of Agriculture of the Russian Federation, and by Dmitry Ochagov, Maxim Sinitsyn,
Nicolay Sobolev and others. The authors gratefully acknowledge their contribution to the project.

The work on identification of Russias intact forest landscapes was supported, in its entirety or in part, by the
home furnishing company IKEA, the World Resources Institute, the Swedish International Development and
Cooperation Agency (SIDA), the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Turner Foundation.
The work benefited from software donated by Environmental Systems Research Institute Inc. and ERDAS Inc.

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

The Atlas in Brief


Results
The romantic notion of the Russian forest as an unbroken band of boundless wilderness is a myth. In
reality, the taiga consists of fragments of wilderness, separated by areas affected either directly or indirectC
ly by modern land use.
Industrial forest harvesting and the fires that follow logging, agricultural use and road construction are
the main causes of fragmentation and transformation in European Russia and the southern parts of Siberia
and the Russian Far East. In Western Siberia and the northern parts of Eastern Siberia and the Far East the
extraction of mineral resources (including prospecting and construction of transportation infrastructure) and
the massive humanCinduced fires that accompany these activities have also caused fragmentation.
Approximately 289 million hectares (26 percent of the forest zone) remain as large, intact forest landC
scapes in Russia. Approximately 5 percent of the intact forest landscapes are in areas with special protection
at the federal level.
Eastern Siberia is the part of Russia that is least affected by modern land use, with 39 percent of the forest
zone still intact, followed by the Russian Far East (30 percent intact) and Western Siberia (25 percent intact).
European Russia is the most affected (9 percent intact).
Almost half of all intact forest landscapes are found located in five administrative regions in Siberia: the
Republic of Sakha (Yakutiya), the Evenk Autonomous District, Krasnoyarsk Kray, the KhantyCMansi AuC
tonomous District, and Irkutsk Oblast. Seven regions have more than 50 percent of their area in intact forest
landscapes: Nenets Autonomous District (100 percent), Koryak Autonomous District (88 percent), (KamchatC
ka Oblast (85 percent), the Republic of Altay (63 percent), YamaloCNenets Autonomous District (62 percent),
Evenk Autonomous District (61 percent), and the Republic of Tuva (57 percent). 98 percent of the total area of
intact forest landscapes is in the 29 regions that have at least 10 percent of the area in that category. Intact
forest landscapes are completely missing from 49 of 89 administrative regions.
The forest zone of Russia is made up of 6 ecoregions according to the global classification by WWF. In half
of these, more than 90 percent of the area is affected by modern land use, while only one (montane grasslands)
has retained more than half of the area in intact condition. Most of the intact forest landscapes areas are in
sparsely wooded and mountainous parts of Russia. More than 80 percent of the intact forest landscapes fall in
one ecoregion: boreal forests/taigas.
Most administrative and ecological regions of Russia lack a representative or sufficiently large system of
protected areas within the remaining intact forest landscapes. Approximately 5 percent of the intact forest
landscapes (14.4 million hectares) have special protection in various forms: zapovedniks (strict scientific naC
ture reserves), national parks, federal zakazniks (sanctuaries and wildlife refugees), and federal nature monC
uments. More than half of protected areas (3.6 percent) are in reserves.

Conclusions
Intact forest landscapes are becoming a rarity in many parts of Russia, or have disappeared completely.
Such is the case in most parts of European Russia and Western Siberia, and in the southern parts of Eastern
Siberia as well as the Russian Far East. Remaining intact forest is broken into fragments, too small to sustain
the full array of components and functions characteristic of a natural forest landscape. Important conservaC
tion values remain but were outside the scope of this study.
Without decisive action within the next few years, intact forest landscapes may disappear within whole
ecological regions and even vegetation zones. The situation is most serious concerning temperate broadCleaved
and mixed coniferCbroadCleafed forests. Such forests are practically extinct in European Russia. The same
fate may befall the forests in the area surrounding the mountain range of SikhoteCAlin, which are Russias
richest in terms of biodiversity.
Decisions about the conservation and use of the remaining intact forest landscapes must reflect a complex
range of ecological, social, and economical factors. The forest industry in these areas should observe precauC
tionary measures and make it a priority to preserve large and representative areas of wild nature. This is
especially important and urgent in European Russia and the Southern parts of Siberia and the Russian Far
East. A reasonable strategy for these areas would be to set aside remaining intact forest landscapes for a
limited time period, to allow optimal decisionCmaking for future conservation and landCuse.

The Atlas in Brief

Next steps
The work needs to be refined in some areas, based on more precise criteria and information. The fire
regime classification should be improved and high resolution satellite images (such as Landsat ETM+) used
for the entire territory, supported by adequate ground verification. Conservation values within intact forest
landscapes should be mapped and described illustrated so that wellCinformed and balanced decisions can be
made without delay about conservation and use. Conservation values must also be mapped outside of the
intact forest landscapes, i.e. in the production landscape. Mapping must become more detailed and incorpoC
rate the kvartal grid of Russian forestry. A retrospective study would add knowledge on the global carbon
cycle and form a reference for monitoring future changes. Areas considered as immediate priority for refined
mapping of conservation values include the Ural Mountains and Southern taiga belt in European Russia (the
Leningrad, Vologda, Kostroma, Kirov and Perm Oblasts), the AltayCSayan area in Western Siberia, the AnC
garaCEnisey and Baikal Lake areas in Eastern Siberia, and the SikhoteCAlin Range in the Russian Far East.

Purpose
This atlas presents an inventory of intact forest landscapes (i.e. the remaining large, unbroken areas of
pristine nature within the forest zone of Russia). This endeavor was carried out by a group of Russian nonC
governmental conservation and scientific organizations between 1999 and 2002 as part of the Global Forest
Watch initiative.
The purpose of the atlas is to provide an accurate picture of remaining intact forest landscapes in Russia,
and the boundaries of federally protected areas, to allow decisions about these landscapes to become better
informed and more balanced.
In particular, the results are crucial to implementation of Article 4 (On Environmental Protection) of the
Law of the Russian Federation, which states that priority objects for conservation are natural ecosystems,
natural landscapes and natural associations, unaffected by anthropogenic influences (unofficial translation).
The atlas will also support the forest industrys effort to exercise precaution in sourcing wood from specific,
ecologically sensitive areas.

Definitions and criteria


An intact forest landscape is a landscape in the forest zone that is whole and natural, undivided by infraC
structure and almost entirely unaffected by human activities. It is large enough to support viable populations
of large predatory vertebrates and keep most of the territory free of edge effects (minimum 50 thousand
hectares). It may, and typically does, contain a mosaic of ecosystems (i.e. it is more than a forest). It has a
natural fire regime.

Method
A threeCstep procedure was used to exclude nonCintact areas and delineate remaining intact landscapes:
Areas around human settlements and infrastructure were excluded along with residual fragments smallC
er than 50,000 ha, based on a 1:500,000 scale topographic map of Russia.
Further exclusion of nonCintact areas and residual fragments smaller than 50,000 ha, based on medium
resolution satellite images (a countryCwide mosaic of Resurs MSUCSK with 150 m resolution from the sumC
mer and winter seasons, and Landsat ETM+ Quicklooks with 300 m resolution). Most agricultural areas and
clearcuts of various ages were excluded at this stage.
Further exclusion of nonCintact areas and residual fragments smaller than 50,000 ha, followed by fine
tuning of boundaries, based on highCresolution satellite images (Landsat ETM+ with a resolution of 30 meters,
ASTER with a resolution of 15 meters, and Resurs MSUCE with a resolution of 35 meters.
Satellite images from 1999 to 2001 were used and reflect the status of the landscape at the middle of year
2000. All satellite images were geoCreferenced onto the 1:500,000 or finer scale topographical map. Forest
inventory maps at various scales at the level of leskhoz (local office of the state forest management agency),
other thematic maps and field data on the degree of disturbance were used at all stages of the analysis. In
total, approximately 9000 Landsat ETM+ Quicklooks, 5000 ASTER, 200 Resurs MSUCE, 800 Resurs MSUCSK
and 350 Landsat ETM+ scenes were used.

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Picture 1. An Intact Forest Landscape, as the concept is used in this Atlas, is a large natural mosaic of untouched
ecosystems located in the forest zone of Russia.
Inside an intact forest landscape the maps use dark colors to show land cover.
forest areas.
nonCforest areas including bogs and treeCless mountains.

Outside an intact forest area the maps use light colors.


forest.
nonCforest.

The picture shows two different cases one with mountains (top) and one with bogs (bottom) of how the
landscape is analyzed in a satellite image and represented on the map.

The Atlas in Brief

Accuracy
The maps of European Russia are most accurate (highCresolution images and extensive ground verificaC
tion 173 sites). There is an intermediate level of accuracy in the Caucasus, south of the Ural area, Siberia and
the Russian Far East (highCresolution images but insufficient ground verification). The least amount of accuC
racy is in the central and northern parts of Siberia (medium and partly highCresolution images, rare ground
verification 235 sites total for two last categories). The intact area is likely to have been overestimated where
only mediumCresolution images were used or ground data were unsufficient..

Review
The draft atlas was presented in 2002 at review meetings in Krasnoyarsk (at the Sukachev Forest ReC
search Institute), in Khabarovsk (at the Far Eastern Forest Research Institute), and in Moscow (at the InterC
national Forest Institute). Russian and international scientists and Russian government agencies were invited
to submit written review statements.

Global Forest Watch


Global Forest Watch is an international forest monitoring network, consisting of
environmental and research organizations in more than 10 countries. The goal of
GFW is to improve the conservation and use of the worlds forests by providing
highCquality information C accurate, timely, relevant and balanced C to
decisionmakers in industry and government, and to the general public. No
advocacy work is allowed under the GFW name, and all reports must undergo
rigorous scientific review. GFW was formally launched in 2000 at the initiative
of the World Resources Institute.

Global Forest Watch Russia


Global Forest Watch (GFW) Russia is an informal, countryCwide network of civil
society and research organizations from all corners of Russia. The goal of GFW
Russia is to provide decisionmakers and the general public with accurate,
accessible and practically useful information in the interest of improving the
conservation and use of Russias forest landscapes. GFW Russia was founded in
1999 in Krasnoyarsk. The first report, called The Intact Forest Landscapes of
Northern European Russia, was published in 2001. The Atlas of Russias Forest
Landscapes is the second report of GFW Russia. Both are available in Russian
and English editions. Future activities of GFW Russia will include continued
mapping of the conservation values of Russian taiga, both within and outside of
the remaining intact forest landscapes.

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Preface
Intactness, i.e. the absence of human disturbance, is a quality of a natural landscape that cannot be artifiC
cially restored. Large intact forest landscapes (also called frontier forests) are quickly becoming a rarity in
most parts of the world (Bryant, Nielsen, and Tangley, 1997). Perhaps surprisingly, the extent and boundaries
of these areas are poorly known. Myths still abound, such as the widespread romantic notion of the northern
taiga forest and the tropical rainforest as virtually endless wilderness areas, intact, unbroken, unpopulated.
Identifying and describing remaining intact forest landscapes is a difficult but urgent task. It is urgent,
because industrial land use is expanding rapidly. It is difficult, because these landscapes are large, inaccessiC
ble and poorly known. The work must be sufficiently rapid, accurate, and detailed to allow timely and wellC
informed decisions about their protection and use.
This atlas is the worlds first rigorous attempt at mapping intact forest landscapes to affect decision makC
ing. Produced in Russia as part of the Global Forest Watch initiative, it is a pioneer work in many ways. And,
as with all pioneer efforts, it has had many problems to overcome. A suitable method had to be designed.
People had to be trained to carry out analysis and field work. Satellite images and ancillary information had to
be acquired, analyzed, and eventually archived in a broadly accessible way. Finally, the result had to be preC
sented in an informative and user friendly way. Deficiencies no doubt remain. The atlas should not be seen as
the last word on this topic, but as the first. It is our hope that the forestry and conservation communities will
contribute the necessary resources to refine this work and expand it to mapping of other values that warrant
special precaution in forest management.
The emergence of an atlas of this kind in Russia should not come as a surprise. Russia has an older tradiC
tion than most countries in forest science, mapping, and remote sensing. Russia has also retained the largest
amount of intact forest landscapes in the world. What might be surprising is that the atlas is the result of a
countryCwide nonCgovernmental initiative. In that sense, too, it is a pioneer work.
We are convinced that this atlas will address several at least two important needs: the need of the public
to know the ecological condition of Russias forest lands, and the need of the decision maker to have accurate,
relevant and accessible information at hand.
It is with great pleasure that we recommend this atlas to the reader.

Alexander S. Isaev
Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences
Director
International Forest Institute
Moscow

Preface

Anthony C. Janetos
Senior Vice President
World Resources Institute
Washington, DC

Introduction
Russia, it is often said, is a country dominated by wild forest, virtually limitless, largely unpopulated, and
still unaffected by human development. Even nature conservation experts often espouse this opinion, assessC
ing the extent of absolutely wild areas at 2/3 of the forest zone of Russia. Some regions in Siberia and the
Russian Far East are even said to be 90 percent wild, or more.
No systematic study that assesses the degree to which the forest zone (or any other zone) of Russia is still
intact in a natural state has ever been completed. All verdicts on the remaining amount of wild nature in
Russia are based solely on purported expert opinion.
Moreover, the areas of intact wilderness that still remain (including forest wilderness) tend to be regarded
as a virtually unlimited reserve of exploitable resources.
This work is the first attempt at mapping the large, unbroken wilderness areas that still exist in the forest
zone of Russia. The term intact forest landscapes refers to large mosaics of ecosystems in the forest zone, still
in their natural state, minimally affected by human activity, and unbroken by infrastructure.

Purpose
The purpose of the atlas is to give an accurate picture of the current status of remaining intact forest landC
scapes in Russia, and of the boundaries of federally protected areas, using a mapping scale that is relevant to
practical land management (approximately 1:1 million). Such information is relevant for at least two reasons:
To eliminate the uncertainty and myths about the extent to which the forest has been affected by huC
man influence and to record the location of remaining large intact areas.
To improve decisions about the conservation and sustainable use of the forest landscape. Classical forC
est inventory information does not, by itself, provide a sufficiently multiCfaceted decision base. ComC
plementary information regarding conservation values is therefore needed.
In particular, the results are crucial to implementation of Article 4 of the Law of the Russian Federation
On Environmental Protection, which states, priority objects for conservation are natural ecosystems, natural
landscapes and natural associations, unaffected by anthropogenic influences (unofficial translation).
The atlas will support the forest industrys effort to exercise precaution in sourcing of wood from specific,
ecologically sensitive areas.

Definitions and Criteria


For the purposes of this atlas, an intact forest landscape is an area with the following characteristics: (i) It
is situated within the forest zone; (ii) It is large enough (see below); (iii) It contains a contiguous mosaic of
natural ecosystems which may or may not be of different types; (iv) It is not broken or fragmented by infraC
structure; (v) It does not display signs of significant transformation caused by human activity; and (vi) it has
a natural fire regime.
The following set of criteria was used to identify and delineate intact forest landscapes.

1. Smallest viable area of an intact forest landscape


The size of an intact forest landscape is considerably important for its viability and quality. If fragments
are too small, they do not allow all essential components of the intact landscape to be conserved in their pure,
natural state. For vital populations of large predatory vertebrates to coexist with the full range of natural
ecological functions in a boreal landscape (including fires), for example, considerable space is required upC
wards of tens of thousands of hectares, sometimes as much as hundreds of thousands of hectares. Nor do small
fragments provide sufficient protection against edge effects, i.e. the influence from transformed areas outside
the boundary of the intact forest landscape.
The following size criteria were used in this study:
Smallest area: 50,000 hectares (123,500 acres)
Smallest width: 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) (i.e. the diameter of the largest circle that can be fit inside the
contours of an area)
These minimum dimensions are sufficient to sustain vital populations of most large and mediumCsize predC
ator species (Sokolov, et al., 1997). They coincide with the recommendations from a number of Russian enviC
ronmental organizations specified in the document Principles for ecologically responsible trade with Russian
wood (Biodiversity Conservation Center, et al., February 14, 2002).
10

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

2. Significant kinds of disturbance.


There is a notion that the world still contains areas that have never been exposed to human influence. In
reality this is not true. Each and every place on Earth has at some time in history been exposed to human
influence, either directly or indirectly. Any meaningful definition of intactness must reflect this fact. Intact
forest landscapes are not wild in a strict, absolute sense they are only the most well preserved specimens of
wild nature that remain in the forest zone. Delineation of these landscapes involves drawing a line between
more or less disturbed areas between areas having been subject to significant, as opposed to nonCsignifC
icant or background, human influence. The latter should show no signs of significant transformation by
human activity nor should it have been subject to industrial land use for the last six decades. In this study, all
ancient types of human activity were considered as background influence and were treated as a factor in the
evolution of todays forest landscapes. The following more recent analogous activities were also classified as
background influence:
Shifting cultivation, hunting, fishing, picking of mushrooms and berries, and fires caused by humans
engaged in these activities;
Grazing of domestic and semiCdomestic animals;
Harvest of hayfields and floodplains of small rivers, haymaking;
Selective logging of trees for local, nonCindustrial needs, and high grading for stone Pine (Pinus sibirica
and P. koraiensis) and other species in mixed stands;
Activities occurring such a long time ago that their influence is more akin to an evolutionary force than
a disturbance (see next section).
The effects of air pollution and climate change could not be properly assessed at this time. They were
therefore treated as background influences.

3. Minimum time since disturbance.


Human activity has shaped the forests for millennia. People have been one of the predominant causes of
forest fires since the very beginning of colonization. In some cases it is impossible to tell to what extent a
structural feature in the forest landscape is the result of natural processes and to what extent it is the result of
human influence, such as reindeer grazing or fires ignited on purpose [???]. It is therefore reasonable to conC
sider only recent human activities as disturbances along with any activities of ancient times that have radicalC
ly shifted the balance between natural and anthropogenic influences on the forest.
The beginning of the 1930s marked the beginning of significant disturbances. Earlier human disturbance
has not been considered significant with regard to the natural dynamics of the forest landscape. This time was
chosen due to some radical changes in the 1930s that had very significant consequences for the forest landC
scape:
The GULAG system was established, and an effort was initiated to colonize remote areas in the North
and Far East, on the brink of the tundra;
There was a rapid increase in the export of forest products;
A large number of pulp mills and other consumers of lowCquality wood (railway sleepers, mining timC
ber) were established or reconstructed. This led to rapid growth in the demand for small dimension and
low quality wood, and a shift in logging practices towards clear cutting;
Slash and burn agriculture was abolished, agriculture was collectivized; the area of agricultural lands
was initially expanded but later followed by a process of abandoning small and remote villages;
There was a sharp increase in the intensity of mineral surveying and extraction that extended to reC
mote areas.
In this study all disturbances that were concluded prior to 1930 and whose impact is not evident were
considered of no consequence for the identification of intact forest landscapes.

4. Forest fires.
Forest fires, if ignited by lightning, are a natural part of the dynamics of boreal forest landscapes. EviC
dence of naturally occurring fires is available for practically all parts of Russia. Nevertheless, humans are the
cause of most forest fires in Russia. The exact proportion of anthropogenic fires is not known. The official
statistics contain a fires of undetermined cause category. Moreover, the classification of fires as caused by
lightning is often rather dubious. V.A. Ivanov writes in his review of forest fires that as a rule, the analysis
of the link between lightning and forest fire is based on visual inspection. Within the next few days after a
thunderstorm all fires are classified as caused by lighting, without consideration of possible anthropogenic

Definitions and Criteria

11

causes. (Ivanov, 1985). It is likely that the portion of fires caused by lightning is overestimated. As shown by
Ivanov, the currently used method does not produce consistently correct information on the cause of fires.
Even though the amount of spontaneous fires is likely to be exaggerated, most authors point to the overC
whelming dominance of anthropogenic fires (Noga, Tikhonov, 1979; Zakharov, 1977; Sofronov, Vakurov, 1981;
Odintsov, 1995; Sergienko, 1996, 1999; Furyaev, 1996, etc.). The average proportion of anthropogenic fires is
estimated to be 80C90 percent for Russia as a whole. The proportion of spontaneous fires is higher only in areas
with a pronounced continental climate, such as the area around the Irtysh River and in Evenkia and Yakutia
in northern Siberia, where it has been estimated that 33C67 percent of fires are spontaneous, depending on the
time period (Noga, Tikhonov, 1979; Ivanov, 1985). However, the occurrence of fires is connected with populaC
tion density and land use even in these areas (Valendik, Ivanova, 1996).
The published statistical evidence shows that spontaneous fires may dominate in number only in unC
usual years and in remote regions. Land use is one of the main causes of forest fires. A considerable amount
of fires were probably caused by people even in the distant past. Causes range from slash and burn agriculC

2
1

Picture 2. Proximity to infrastructure affects the fire regime. The satellite image shows a ground fire burning in an
old fire scar, which is adjacent to infrastructure (1). Similar old fire scars are visible nearby (2).

12

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

ture, hunting, reindeer herding, and later logging, mining, charcoal production, and transportation (PonoC
marenko, et al, 1996).
The influence of a fire on a forest ecosystem does not depend on its origin, everything else being equal. It is
not possible to deem by the characteristics of the fire scar if the fire was anthropogenic or natural. An individC
ual fire caused by a tossed burning match or a hunters fire is fully analogous with a fire caused by a lightning
strike at the same spot. Single fires, regardless of their origin, that are not associated with the modern intenC
sification in land use, can therefore reasonably be treated as a component in the natural dynamics of the forest
landscape and a factor in its historical formation.
The situation is different, however, for an entire forest landscape. Here it is the fire regime that is important,
especially the frequency and typical site location of individual fires. These factors are associated with characterC
istics of the fire regime, such as fire intensity, pattern of distribution, and type (ground or crown fire).
A fire regime at equilibrium (more or less) over a long period of time will produce a pronounced structure
in the boreal landscape. There will be areas shaped by frequent fires, but also fire refuges spots, which for
various reasons escape fires for long periods (such as wet sites along rivers and creeks). Together, such areas
form a mosaic that influences the biological diversity and the sustainability of the landscape as a whole.
The increase in fire frequency caused by modern land use affect the fire mosaic of the landscape. The area
of forest in an early succession stage will increase, fire refuges will decrease in numbers and may even disapC
pear, the water balance will change along with the soil permafrost horizon, and the intensity of erosion, etc.
Although the effect of individual fires does not depend on their origin, the combined effect on the landC
scape of all anthropogenic and natural fires is very different from that of a natural fire regime. The increase in
fire frequency (or frequency of ignitions) caused by modern, intensive land use has caused abrupt changes in
the affected landscapes. These changes are the result of significant human disturbance.
A typical case is the abundance of fire in areas where oil, gas or gold is extracted, where geological surveying
is conducted, and along transportation corridors. Intensified land use and expansion of infrastructure increase
the fire activity in a landscape. The postCfire succession of burned areas may also be affected. If a fire scar,
whether from a natural or anthropogenic fire, reaches a road or other piece of infrastructure, the regeneration
on this site is likely to develop differently than it would without that influence. The probability of nonCnatural
disturbance is greater, such as another fire, the introduction of nonCindigenous (to the site) species, etc.

Definitions and Criteria

13

In this study, fire scars were identified directly in the satellite images. The cause of a fire scar could not be
determined, however. A decision rule therefore had to be constructed, so that the fire regime associated with
each fire scar could be classified in a consistent way as either natural or anthropogenic (the latter were
considered disturbed landscape). The following rule was created:
All areas in which fire scars or fire mosaics (including areas with young forest vegetation) occur directly
adjacent to a source of disturbance such as infrastructure or some other conduit of human activity were
assumed to have an anthropogenic fire regime. They were therefore classified as disturbed landscape, even
though some of these fires most likely were of natural origin. Such sources of disturbance include settlements,
roads, clear cuts, industrial facilities, and rivers wider than 60 meters.
Areas of otherwise intact forest landscapes, in which fire scars or fire mosaics do not reach any of the sources
of disturbance mentioned above, were considered as having a natural fire regime. They were therefore classiC
fied as intact (even though many of these fires probably were caused by careless hunters, tourists, etc.).
The authors are aware of the artificial nature of this classification of fire regimes. A consistent rule was
needed, however, and this necessitated a pragmatic approach. All radical options were less attractive. ExcludC
ing all fire scars from intact forest landscapes was problematic. Fires are a natural element in the dynamics of
a boreal forest landscape, and many typical forest landscapes owe their appearance to past fires. On the other
hand, it would also be a mistake to include all fires in intact forest landscapes. There are gigantic areas of fireC
affected landscapes around current sites of development activities that differ fundamentally from the strucC
ture of an intact landscape. A schematic decision rule had to be used because there is no credible method for
separating natural and human induced forest fires.

Picture 3. Examples of forest fires classified as intact and non0intact. The green line indicates the boundary of an
intact forest landscape. The fire scars in the upper part of the image (indicated by box) are classified as human
disturbance as they are adjacent to roads and other infrastructure visible in the image.

14

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

5. The northern boundary of intact forest landscapes.


The northern edge of the forest can be very diffuse in northern Russia. Moving north, the trees get succesC
sively smaller and sparser. Thus, a genuine intact forest landscape often changes gradually into an equally
intact tundra landscape. Drawing the northern boundary of a forest landscape is a delicate task under such
circumstances. The outcome depends totally on the forest definition used and does not reflect any change in
the degree of intactness.
The boundary of soCcalled high dense forests given on topographical maps (and also indicated in this
Atlas) was deemed not suitable to represent the northern boundary of closed forests (further referred to as
the northern forest boundary). While it corresponds to the internationally agreed definition of forest (tree
crown cover (or equivalent stocking level) of more than 20 percent, mature tree height more than 5 m (FAO,
2002)), an analysis of medium resolution satellite images suggests that the topographical maps for these areas
are partly out of date and include significant areas of southern tundra shrubs that re classified as forest.
The northern forest boundary in European Russia and Western Siberia was drawn based on medium resoluC
tion winter images, using data from model sites with known characteristics. A tree covered area needed to exC
ceed 20 percent canopy density and be more than 20 kilometers (12.4 miles) wide to qualify. More narrow strips
of forest, (e.g., along river valleys) were thus considered part of the treeless tundra zone (and consequently not
considered intact forest landscape) along with treeCcovered areas of lesser canopy density. Directly adjacent
treeless areas of other kinds, such as alpine areas and bogs, were also excluded from the forest zone.
This method allows for the separation of forest tundra from forest in flat watersheds. It is not directly
suitable for the rest of the country, however, because the lack of model sites and dramatic variation in illumiC
nation and snow depth, caused by the mountainous topography, make it difficult to interpret satellite images.
A landscape approach was therefore used in Eastern Siberia and the Russian Far East. Proposed by ZvoC
rykin and Paramuzin (1956), it takes into account a whole complex of abiotic factors (e.g., occurrence of perC
mafrost) that influence the composition and structure of forest ecosystems. Here, the boundary of the forest
zone was drawn along the boundary of closed high forests (i.e., typically consisting of trees with more or less
straight, main trunks). Besides satellite images and topographical maps, a number of thematic maps (climatic,
hydrological, geological, vegetation and soil, along with the percent treeCcover map by the University of MaryC
land (DeFries, et al., 2000)) were used. In some regions, a high degree of transformation by land use has resultC
ed in a significant shift of the forest boundary to the south (e.g., in the vicinity of Salekhard and the Viluy
reservoir, and the area between the Lena and Viluy rivers).
The natural fragments of forest that exist north of this line were not assessed for intactness due to insufC
ficient information. These areas boundaries are shown on the final map as a separate category without any
division into classes of intactness, in the same way as they appear on the 1:500,000 topographic map.

6. The southern boundary of intact forest landscapes.


In the vast majority of cases, the intact forest landscapes identified in this study have a distinct southern
edge of a clearly anthropogenic character. Often it is formed either by infrastructure or by agricultural land.
Some areas in southern Siberia and the Caucasus Mountains are an exception to this rule. Here, moving south,
the forest gradually changes into forest steppe or treeless steppe, or in some cases into treeless alpine areas,
without any noticeable change in intactness. No boundary was drawn in these cases. Instead, all contiguous
intact areas were unified into one landscape all the way to the southern boundary of the Russian Federation.
The identification of intact landscapes outside the forest zone of Russia is a special task, which requires indiC
vidual approach and additional research.

7. Intact forest landscapes that go beyond the boundary of the Russian Federation.
Some intact forest landscapes continue beyond Russian borders into neighboring countries. Such landC
scapes were delineated if their total area exceeded 50,000 hectares (123,500 acres), regardless of the political
boundary. The part located in Russia may thus be smaller than 50,000 hectares.

Definitions and Criteria

15

Method for delineation of intact forest landscapes


A threeCstep procedure was used to exclude nonCintact areas and delineate remaining intact landscapes:
1. Exclusion of areas around human settlements and infrastructure and residual fragments of landscape
smaller than 50,000 ha, based on the 1:500,000 scale topographic map of Russia, and of residual fragC
ments smaller than 50,000 ha. The result was a candidate set of landscape fragments without roads.
2. Further exclusion of nonCintact areas and residual fragments of landscape smaller than 50,000 ha, based
on medium resolution satellite images (a countryCwide mosaic of Resurs MSUCSK with 150 m resoluC
tion from the summer and winter seasons, and Landsat ETM+ Quicklooks with 300 m resolution. Most
of the old and recent agricultural areas and clear cuts were excluded at this stage.
3. Further exclusion of nonCintact areas and residual fragments of landscape smaller than 50,000 ha folC
lowed by fine tuning of boundaries, based on highCresolution satellite images (Landsat ETM+ with a
resolution of 30 meters), ASTER with a resolution of 15 meters, and Resurs MSUCE with a resolution of
35 meters).
Satellite images taken between 1999 and 2001 were used, reflecting for the most part the status of the
landscape around mid 2000). All satellite images were geoCreferenced onto topographical maps of 1:500,000 or
finer scale.
Additional information, such as forest inventory maps at the level of leskhoz (local office of the state forest
management agency) and other thematic maps, were used at all stages of the analysis. Verification was done
through a number of field expeditions, mostly in European Russia, and by using highCresolution images for
spot checking the interpretation of mediumCresolution images.

Picture 4. A step0wise approach was used to eliminate disturbed areas and identify remaining intact forest
landscapes.
area outside the area of investigation (excluded due to insufficient information).
area eliminated in step 1 of the analysis, using topographical maps to exclude areas influenced by
infrastructure and area fragments smaller than 50,000 hectares
area eliminated in step 2, using medium resolution satellite images to identify agricultural lands,
clearcuts and urban areas.
area eliminated in step 3, using high resolution images to eliminate additional disturbances and draw
precise boundaries.
the remaining area of intact forest landscapes.
16

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

This approach was adopted because of information constraints associated with both cost and availability.
The stepCwise approach made it possible to exclude large areas from further analysis on the basis of readily
available and affordable information. This led to significant savings in working time and data cost.
The most important elements of each step of the analysis are described below. A more detailed description
is given in the book The Last Intact Forest Landscapes of Northern European Russia (Yaroshenko, et al., 2001).

Step 1. Reduction of the initial candidate area (the total area of the forest zone) by
elimination of areas in the vicinity (i.e. within buffer zones) of infrastructure as well as
landscape fragments smaller than 50,000 hectares
The main source of information at this stage was topographical maps at the scale of 1:500,000.
The quality of these maps can be rather low. Therefore, only major elements of infrastructure (i.e. that
could, within reason, be assumed to be reliably depicted on a general map) were taken into account. A list of
such elements and the width of their maximum zone of disturbance (buffer zone) is provided in Table 1.
Occasionally, these maps show elements of infrastructure that do not exist on the ground or which are incorC
rectly classified. Such errors were corrected at subsequent stages of analysis with the aid of satellite images.
The goal at this first stage was to reduce the initial candidate areas under examination (the forest zone of
Russia) by excluding obviously disturbed areas from further analysis. Major elements of infrastructure were
excluded at this stage, together with a buffer zone surrounding them. Remaining landscape fragments were
also excluded if their size was smaller than the minimum viable size for an intact forest landscape, i.e. 50,000
hectares (123,500 acres).
The first stage of the analysis produced a map of landscapes without roads greater than 50,000 hectares in
size (Picture 4). Smaller roads and other linear objects, such as geological survey lines, forest roads, and winter
roads, were not taken into account at this stage.
Table 1. Types of infrastructure considered in the analysis of landscape fragments undivided by constantly
functioning roads and settlements, and the width of their assumed area of disturbance on each side of the object.
Type of infrastructure:
Settlements
Big cities (over 100 thousand inhabitants)
Cities (50&100 thousand inhabitants)
Small cities (less than 50 thousand inhabitants) and towns
Villages
Summer houses and gardens settlements
Separate houses, buildings and facilities
Regular places for temporary cabins
Churches, monasteries etc.
Industrial and military objects
Power plants, power stations, service points for power lines and pipelines
Storages, tanks etc
Military bases and objects
Sea and river ports
Radio and TV centers, TV&towers
Meteorological stations
Railway stations
Sedimentation pools
Airports, airfields
Mining and drilling
Open mines and quarries
Pit mines
Mines
Mining dumps, mining waste piles, reservoirs with waste water
Facilities on oil and gas fields
Wells
Open salt mines

Method for delineation of intact forest landscapes

Width of buffer zone


on each side of the object (meters):
10,000
5,000
1,000
500
500
500
500
500
1,000
500
1,000
1,000
1,000
500
1,000
1,000
1,000
500
500
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
500

17

Pipe lines, power lines


Oil and gas pipelines
Power lines higher than 14 meters

1,000
500
Automobile roads

Highways
Improved hard surface roads
Hard surface roads
Improved earth roads
Country earth roads

1,000
1,000
1,000
500
500
Railroads

Railroads
Narrow&gauge railroads
Local railways

1,000
500
500

Navigable rivers, lakes, canals, reservoirs, seas and oceans


Canals
Parts of rivers wider than 300 meters
Reservoirs
Lakes larger than 75 square kilometers
Seas and oceans

1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000

Step 2. Reduction of the remaining candidate area (roadless landscapes greater than
50,000 hectares) by elimination of areas with larger surface disturbances, visible in
satellite images with a resolution of 1503300 meters
The main source of information at this stage was satellite images from two different sources: summer and
winter images from Resurs MSUCSK (resolution 150 meters, 800 scenes), and Landsat ETM+ Quicklooks (resC
olution approximately 300 meters, 9000 scenes).
The goal at this second stage was to further reduce the candidate area (the map of roadless areas produced
in Step 1 by excluding large areas disturbed by contemporary landCuse practices that could be positively
identified in images of medium resolution, including typically large agricultural fields, clear cuts, and quarC
ries (see Table 2). Burned areas adjacent to infrastructure were also excluded (see the section on forest fires
above).
The individual disturbed areas that were excluded at this stage varied in size between 30C50 hectares (74C
124 acres) and 150C200 hectares (370C494 acres), approximately. Smaller disturbed areas and other areas not
positively identifiable in these images were not taken into account at this stage (i.e. were retained until the
next stage).
The disturbed areas were removed from the roadless landscapes. Remaining landscape fragments were
then excluded if their size was less than 50,000 hectares, or their width less than 10 kilometers (6 miles).
HighCresolution satellite imagery was not available at this stage for a considerable part of the studied
landscape (the northern parts of Siberia and the Russian Far East). The analysis of these areas therefore had
to be concluded at this stage (accuracy zone 3).
The result of the second stage of the analysis was a map of candidate intact forest landscapes.

Step 3. Reduction of the remaining area (candidate intact forest landscapes) by


elimination of smaller linear and surface disturbances, visible in satellite images of high
resolution (15335 meters)
Satellite images from three different sources were used at this stage of the analysis: Landsat ETM+ (350
scenes), ASTER (5000 scenes), and Resurs MSUCE (200 scenes). In addition, images from SPOTCHVR (15 scenes)
were used for a small part of the Murmansk region. Summer images were mainly used, but in their absence
images from the winter, spring and fall seasons were also used.
In the third and final stage of the analysis, the remaining set of candidate intact landscapes was reduced
further by elimination of areas with surface disturbances that were either too small or too unclear to have
been eliminated at earlier stages (see table 2). Elongated, less than 2Ckilometer wide, parts of intact forest
landscapes were eliminated. Areas with smaller linear disturbances were also eliminated, along with remainC
ing landscape fragments, which did not meet the requirements for minimum size or width.
18

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Table 2. Additional types of human disturbance, detectable in medium and high resolution images.
None of these disturbances are allowed in intact forest landscapes (step 2 and step 3 in the analysis)
Reclaimed areas
Arable and hay fields, including agricultural fields abandoned 2530 years ago (in the zone of dry steppes)
Zones of intensive geological prospecting using geophysical methods
Areas with evident signs of overgrazing by domesticated and semidomesticated animals
(wild reindeer, sheep, cattle, horses and yaks)
Fire scars next to areas that are or have been subject to exploration and mining of mineral resources
(oil, gas, coal, diamonds, bauxites, gold, platinum, polymetallic ores, chemical raw materials)
Areas within the zone of permafrost where high population density has caused woody vegetation to disappear
Public roads and service roads that are used as public roads (connecting settlements and/or public roads)
Areas suffered from mass outbreaks of pest
Human disturbances in the vicinity of navigable rivers (at least 60 m wide) and rivers suitable for river driving

Individual disturbed areas that were eliminated at this stage varied in size between 1C2 hectares (2.5C4.9
acres) and 10C20 hectares (25C49 acres), depending on the kind and age of the disturbance. The highCresoluC
tion images also made it possible to verify or correct the location of most linear elements of infrastructure.
The result of this last phase of the analysis was a selection of internally unCfragmented forest landscapes
without detectable signs of significant disturbance, larger than the minimum dimensions of 50,000 in size and
10 km in minimum width. The final map of intact forest landscapes was drawn based on the results of phase 3
with the exception of the areas for which satellite images of high resolution were not available (accuracy zone 3).

Picture 5. Availability of high resolution satellite images for continued analysis of candidate areas remaining
after step 2 (i.e., after the analysis with medium resolution images).
candidate areas covered by high resolution images.
candidate areas covered by medium resolution images only (and therefore not further analyzed in step 3).
area outside the area of investigation.
Method for delineation of intact forest landscapes

19

Forest inventory information was used to support the interpretation of the high resolution images in step
3 (and were also used to some extent in step 2). Most of this information was in the form of generalized maps of
leskhozes (local offices of the state forest management agency) at scales typically between 1:150,000 and
1:300,000. More detailed maps do exist in many cases but were not available to the study for reasons of price
and limited public access. Even the less detailed maps were not available for some areas due to constraints in
public access in combination with the physical dispersal of these maps (there is no central library with mateC
rials for the whole country).

Picture 6. Availability of official forest inventory information for continued analysis of candidate areas remaining
after step 2 (i.e., after the analysis with medium resolution images).
generalized official forest inventory information used to support interpretation of satellite imagery.
official forest inventory data not used (due to lack of availability).

Accuracy
The maps accuracy varies for different parts of Russia, largely depending on the amount and quality of
available information. Field expeditions were organized as part of this mapping project to verify the accuracy
of the result. External researchers kindly shared data that was used for the same purpose.
In European Russia (accuracy zone 1, Picture 7), high resolution images (15C30 meters) were used along
with information from ground observations from a large number of sites (173 inventoried key areas).
In the Caucasus and the southern parts of the Ural area, Siberia, and the Russian Far East (accuracy
zone 2), work was done mostly based on high resolution images, but without a smaller number of ground. It is
possible in this zone that individual areas may have been incorrectly classified, making an intact area out of a
nonCintact, or vice versa. Information from a total of 235 sites was used to verify the map within accuracy
zones 2 and 3 together.
In the remaining regions (the central and northern parts of Siberia and the Russian Far East, accuracy
zone 3) the work was mostly based on mediumCresolution images (150C300 meters) and ground observations
were rare. Instead, high resolution images were used to verify the interpretation of selected areas. Additional
analysis, using ground observations and highCresolution images, is recommended before any management
decisions are made concerning these areas.
In the naturally highly fragmented tundra forests in the northernmost regions of Siberia and the Russian
Far East (accuracy zone 4), the available information (lowCresolution images) was not sufficiently accurate to
20

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

assess the degree of human transformation of the landscape. Forests at the northern tree limit are extremely
vulnerable to any disturbances, even those that are only indirectly related to humans. It would not be correct
to assume that they are totally undisturbed, despite their remote location. These forests are shown as forested
areas outside of the studied territory, and their boundaries are given in accordance with the Russian topoC
graphical maps of the Main Department of Geodesy and Mapping at 1:500,000 scale, most of which reflect the
state of the area in the 1970 and 1980s.
The analysis is more likely to overestimate the remaining intact area than to underestimate it. This is
inherent in the very approach of the study, which assumes land to be intact unless signs of disturbance can be
detected. Signs of disturbance are much more likely to have been missed than to have been mistakenly found
where none exist, although this possibility can not be ignored. A sparse larch forest without needles in rocky
terrain can be difficult to distinguish from fire scar. Ancillary information was used to decrease the risk of
such mistakes, but a few may have occurred. The more likely mistake, however, is that signs of disturbance
were not seen, particularly in those areas where highCresolution images were not available. Some types of
intensive disturbance cannot be detected in such images.

Picture 7. Accuracy zones of the analysis.


the highest level of accuracy (zone 1). HighCresolution satellite images were mostly available,
along with good ground information.
medium level of accuracy (zone 2). HighCresolution images were mostly available,
but the ground information was good only for some areas.
Low level of accuracy (zone 3). Fragmented coverage of high resolution images,
ground information insufficient or fragmented.
area outside the area of investigation.

Accuracy

21

Picture 8. Sites of ground observation used to verify the accuracy of map.


Orange dots indicate sites of ground observations. These include sites inspected by Global Forest Watch Russia field
expeditions, as well as sites for which data were contributed by external researchers. Other colors: same as in picture 4.

Preliminary identification of large intact forest3dominated


areas and classification of their tree composition
In a special study for Global Forest Watch, R&D Center ScanEx has tested a method for identification of
large blocks of intact, forestCdominated area. In the process of this study, the tree composition of these forests
was classified according to the criteria used in the map Vegetation of the USSR, edited by B. V. Sochava (1957).
These criteria were selected because they have been used to develop other systems for countryCwide classifiC
cation of vegetation and have been found well suited for this purpose.
The purpose of the study was to test a method for direct identification of large intact forestCdominated
areas. (landscape mosaics with a minimum of 50 percent in forest). The approach was to first identify a set of
typical intact forests of different composition and then use an automatic algorithm to search for identical
forests across the landscape. MediumCresolution imagery was used. The result shows that this approach is
sensitive to small differences in forest composition and to the quality of the satellite images used. Primarily
closed forests tend to be identified.
The study has produced a map that shows the location and tree species composition of large blocks of apparC
ently closed forest that fitted the search criteria (i.e. the legend of the map). This map is shown in the thematic
section of this Atlas, beginning on page XXX. A more technical description of the work is given below.
MediumCresolution satellite images from the Russian satellites ResursCOC3 and ResursCOC4 from differC
ent seasons were used. The images were geometrically transformed with the ScanEx Transformer software,
then arranged into a mosaic with 6Cdegree zones in the GaussCKruger projection. The images were brought
into a uniform resolution of 150x150 meters, and geoCreferenced to the 1:1 million scale topographical map.
The thematical analysis was conducted in the ScanEx NeRis software, using the Kohonen algorithm for
selfCorganizing maps. Blocks of closed forest assumed to be typical of intact forest were selected and used for
training of the neural nets employed by this software. The quality and characteristics of the representation of
these forests in medium resolution imagery was assessed with highCresolution Resurs MSUCE images (35C45
meter resolution). The trained neural nets were used to perform a multiCchannel spectral analysis and the
resulting layer was then analyzed for contextual features.
The classification of textural and contextual characteristics resulted in an 8Cbit raster layer. Based on
expert decision, a color coding table was designed and used to vectorize the result. The vector layers were then
overlayed with the original imagery and with fragments of high resolution imagery for visual control.
22

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Results
The Russian forest is no longer a boundless belt of unbroken wilderness. It is better described as a belt of
intact fragments that are separated from each other by areas affected either by land use or its side effect.
Exceptions to this pattern exist, primarily in Kamchatka in the northern part of the Russian Far East and in
the mountainous areas of Altay and Tuva in Southern Siberia.
In European Russia, the southern parts of Siberia, and the Russian Far East, the main causes of fragmentaC
tion and disturbance are industrial forest harvesting and the fires that follow logging, agricultural use and road
construction. In Western Siberia, the northern parts of Eastern Siberia and the Far East, the major causes of
fragmentation and disturbance are extraction of mineral resources (including prospecting and construction of
transportation infrastructure) and the massive humanCinduced fires, which accompany these activities.
Approximately 289 million hectares of large, intact forest landscapes remain in Russia (see table 3). This is
26 percent of the forest zone of Russia (not counting tundra and forest tundra. Around 75 percent of the area
of intact forest landscapes are in forest land, a category that includes both wooded and regenerating areas
(e.g. after a fire or other natural catastrophe). The remaining 25 percent are made up of nonCforest natural
ecosystems (bogs, tundra and mountainous grasslands). Approximately 14 million hectares (5 percent) of the
intact forest landscapes are in areas with special protection at the federal level.

Table 3. Areas of different land categories in Russia, million hectares.


Land category

Russia

Area of Russia

1,707.5

Area of investigation
the forest zone of Russia
Forest land within the area of investigation

1,118.4
876.9

Intact forest landscapes


Intact forests within intact forest landscapes

288.5
216.4

Intact forest landscapes with special


protection within zapovedniks, national parks,
federal zakazniks and nature monuments

14.4

European
Russia
383.2

Western
Siberia
290.5

Eastern
Siberia
722.6

Russian
Far East
311.3

345.9
198.4

234.1
160.5

397.3
375.5

141.1
142.5

31.8
24.0

58.4
36.7

153.9
125.9

44.4
29.8

Source
of information
Russian Encyclopedic
Dictionary (2001)
This study
This study and the
topographical map
of Russia, 1:500,000
This study
This study and the
topographical map
of Russia, 1:500,000
This study

Large areas of the forest landscape (i.e. the mosaic of forest and nonCforest ecosystems) of Russia have
been substantially affected by modern land use (see table 4 and figure 1). The least affected part is Eastern
Siberia, where 39 percent of the forest zone remains in intact forest landscapes, followed by the Russian Far
East (32 percent intact) and Western Siberia (25 percent intact). European Russia is by far the most transC
formed part (9 percent intact). Of Russia as a whole, about 26 percent of the forest zone remain in intact forest
landscapes.
The picture is slightly different if only the forest area of the landscape is considered. The forest area
within remaining intact forest landscapes was compared to the total forest area within the territory of invesC
tigation. The land cover classification of the 1:500,000 scale topographical map of Russia was used in both
cases. Eastern Siberia has the greatest portion of forest in intact landscapes, with 34 percent, followed by
Western Siberia (23 percent), the Russian Far East (21 percent), and European Russia (12 percent). About 25
percent of the forest area of Russia as a whole fall within intact forest landscapes.
Table 4. Portion of the landscape that remains in intact forest landscapes and in intact forest, percent.
Russia
Portion of the entire forest zone
(all ecosystems) that remains in intact forest landscapes
Portion of the forest within the forest zone
that remains in intact forest landscapes

Results

European
Russia

Western
Siberia

Eastern
Siberia

Far East

26%

9%

25%

39%

31%

25%

12%

23%

34%

21%

23

Figure 1. Total area within the forest zone and within intact forest landscapes
for different parts of Russia, million hectares.

Russia has 6 ecoregions according to the global classification proposed by Olsson, et al (2001). These fall
mostly within the forest zone (the other two ecoregions, tundra, and desert and xeric shrublands, lie mostly
outside the forest zone). Three of these have had more than 90 percent of their area affected by modern land
use, while only one (montane grasslands) has retained more than half of the area in intact condition. More than
80 percent of the intact forest landscapes fall in one ecoregion: boreal forests/taiga.
The remaining intact forest landscapes are highly concentrated among a few large administrative regions.
Five regions, all in Siberia, contain almost half of the intact forest landscapes in Russia: the Republic of Sakha
(Yakutiya), the Evenk Autonomous District, Krasnoyarsk Kray, the KhantyCMansi Autonomous District, and
Irkutsk Oblast. In Eastern Siberia the five regions with the most intact forest landscapes make up 85 percent
of the total area. The corresponding number is 90 percent for European Russia and Western Siberia, and as

Figure 2. Area of ecoregions, according to the global classification proposed by Olsson, et al (2001),
within the forest zone of Russia and the area of the intact forest landscapes contained within them.
24

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Figure 3. The five administrative regions in each macro0region of Russia that have the largest areas
of intact forest landscapes. The land0cover type distribution within each of these is also shown.

much as 98 percent in the Russian Far East (see figure 3). Seven regions have more than 50 percent of their
area in intact forest landscapes: Nenets Autonomous District (100 percent), Koryak Autonomous District (88
percent), (Kamchatka Oblast (85 percent), the Republic of Altay (63 percent), YamaloCNenets Autonomous
District (62 percent), Evenk Autonomous District (61 percent), and the Republic of Tuva (57 percent). 98 perC
cent of the total area of intact forest landscapes is in the 29 regions that have at least 10 percent of the area in
that category. Intact forest landscapes are completely missing from 49 of 89 administrative regions.
Most of the intact forest landscapes areas are in sparsely wooded and mountainous parts of Russia. The
following administrative regions have a comparatively high proportion of intact forest landscapes:
European Russia: the Republic of Komi, Murmansk Oblast.
Northern Siberia: the YamalCNenets, KhantyCMansi and Evenki autonomous districts.
Southern Siberia: the republics of Burytiya, Tuva and Khakasiya, Altay Krai, Krasnoyarsk Krai and
Chita Oblast.
The Russian Far East: Kamchatka Oblast, the Koryak Autonomous District.
Most administrative and ecological regions of Russia lack a representative or sufficiently large system of
protected areas within the remaining intact forest landscapes. Only 5.0 percent of all intact forest landscapes
(14.4 million hectares) currently have special protection in various forms: zapovedniks (strict scientific nature
reserves), national parks, federal zakazniks (sanctuaries and wildlife refugees), and nature monuments. More
than half of protected areas (3.6 percent) are in reserves.
Results

25

Conclusions
These findings refute the myth that ancient or virgin forests still dominate Russia. Such forests now domC
inate only the northern parts of Eastern Siberia and the Russian Far East, and even here, human influence,
especially as a cause of forest fires, has become the leading factor affecting vegetation dynamics. In most
parts of European Russia and Western Siberia, and the southern parts of Eastern Siberia and the Russian Far
East, the forest vegetation has been fundamentally transformed by human activity. No large intact landC
scapes remain in many of these western and southern areas, while the intact forests that remain are broken
up into fragments, too small to sustain the full array of components and functions characteristic of a natural
forest landscape.
Without decisive action within the next few years, intact forest landscapes may disappear within whole
ecological regions and even vegetation zones.
This picture raises serious concerns. The most biodiversityCrich and productive forest landscapes of southern
Siberia, the Russian Far East, and of European Russia are also the most transformed. These areas are steadily
diminishing due to continued extensive development of natural resources. The situation is most serious
concerning temperate broadCleaved and mixed coniferCbroadCleafed forests. Such forests are practically exC
tinct in European Russia. The same fate may befall the forests in the area surrounding the mountain range of
SikhoteCAlin, which contain the richest biodiversity in Russia. Intact landscapes remain, but only in the most
inaccessible mountainous locations. Almost all of the unique, farCeastern broadCleaved and mixed coniferC
broadCleafed forests have been affected by industrial logging during the last decade.
Decisions about the conservation and use of the remaining intact forest landscapes must no doubt reflect
a complex range of ecological, social, and economical factors. At this stage it is reasonable to suggest only that
forestry practices observe all possible precautionary measures and make it a concrete goal to preserve suffiC
ciently large and representative reference areas of wild nature. This is especially important and urgent in
European Russia and the Southern parts of Siberia and the Russian Far East, where intact forest landscapes
are particularly rare and threatened. A reasonable strategy for these areas would be to set aside remaining
intact forest landscapes for a limited time, to allow optimal decisionCmaking regarding future conservation
and landCuse.

Next steps
This atlas represents the first attempt to map the extent and boundaries of intact forest landscapes across
a continentalCsize country. The goal has been to produce maps that are accurate and detailed enough to inC
form decisions concerning practical conservation and management. Such a big undertaking would surely have
benefited from additional time and resources. Thus it would be desirable to both refine and extend the work.
An obvious way to refine the work would be to use better information. This would create two important
advantages: additional accuracy in the classification and delineation of areas with conservation and other
values, and greater usefulness to practical land management.
Access to highCresolution satellite images for the whole territory would increase the accuracy, as would
access to more ancillary information and additional ground verification. In the north of Russia, lack of informaC
tion prevented classification of large forest areas as well as the tundra. More information was available in the
South, but here the needs are much greater, due to the greater biodiversity values and smaller remaining intact
areas, as well as the faster rate of change caused by intensified land use, both legal and illegal. The need for
accurate and frequent monitoring is significant in the South, and poses great (and costly) information needs.
Another way to refine the work would be to elaborate the criteria used to separate intact and nonCintact
areas. A particularly difficult problem was posed by the classification of fire regimes. In this study, all fires
occurring in the vicinity of infrastructure and big rivers (wider than 60 meters) were considered anthropoC
genic. The associated fire scars and mosaics, including those with regenerating young forests, were therefore
classified as nonCintact. This schematic approach has obvious weaknesses. No better alternative was availC
able, however, given the need for a decision rule that can be consistently applied across Russia. It is hoped that
future research will produce a more reliable and accurate algorithm.
A third approach to refinement would be to map additional characteristics of the forest landscape. The
Atlas does not distinguish any differences in conservation value within intact forest landscapes. This does not
mean that such differences do not exist, only that it was beyond the scope of this work to study them. A study
of this kind is urgent, as optimal decisions concerning the conservation and use of these landscapes require
such information.
There is also an urgent need to expand the mapping to areas outside of the large intact forest landscapes.
It must be emphasized that there are important conservation values outside of the intact forest landscapes
that are not captured by this Atlas. Intactness is only one of many such values. There is currently an almost
26

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

total lack of conservation value maps that are detailed enough to function as onCtheCground decision support
tools to practical land management. The mapping scale needs to be 1:500,000 or even 1:200,000. All forest
values need to be placed within the network of quadrants (kvartals) which is used for forest inventory and
management purposes in Russia. Such information is needed by many users, including government authoriC
ties, the forest industry, and environmental protection groups. Unfortunately, they do not produce it.
Priority areas for refined mapping of conservation values include the Ural Mountains and the Southern
taiga belt of European Russia (Leningrad, Vologda, Kostroma, Kirov and Perm Oblasts), the AltayCSayany
area in Western Siberia, the AngaraCEnisey and Baikal Lake areas in Eastern Siberia, and the SikhoteCAlin
Range in the Russian Far East.
From a scientific point of view, a highly desirable extension of the work would be a retrospective analysis of
the landscape. Access to old satellite images would be of tremendous value and would make it possible to analyze
the rate of transformation of different parts of the landscape. Besides the obvious ecological interest, such a
study would advance the knowledge of the role that the Russian forest plays in the global carbon budget.
The partners within the Global Forest Watch initiative would welcome any support that would make it
possible to continue and expand the work as outlined above.

References
Biodiversity Conservation Center, et al. Principles for ecologically responsible trade with Russian wood.
http://www.forest.ru/eng/sustainable_forestry/vision/guide.html. Viewed on 22 March, 2002.
Bryant, D., Nielsen, D., Tangley, L. The last frontier forests. World Resources Institute; Washington, DC: 1997.
DeFries, R. Hansen, M., Townshend, J.R.G., Janetos, A.C., and Loveland, T.R., 2000, A new global 1Ckm data set
of percent tree cover derived from remote sensing. Global Change Biology, 6, 247C254.
FAO, 2002. Forest Resources Assessment homepage. http://www.fao.org/forestry/fo/fra/. Viewed on 22
March, 2002.
Federal Forest Service. Lesnoy Fond Rossii (po dannym gosudarstvennogo ucheta lesnogo fonda po sostoya7
niyu na 1 yanvarya 1998 g. [Russian Forest Fund (According to the State Forest Account as for 1st January
1998).] Moscow: VNIITsLesresurs, 1999. In Russian.
Furyaev V.V., Rol pozharov v protsesse lesoobrazovaniya. [The Role of Fires in the Process of Forest FormaC
tion]. Novosibirsk, 1996. In Russian.
Garsia, M. G (ed.). Karta Lesa SSSR. [Forests of the USSR Map], Scale 1:2,500,000, Forest Cartography
Department of AllCUnion State Planning Research Institute Sojuzgiprolezhoz. Moscow: GUGK, 1990.
In Russian.
Ivanov V.A. Lesnye pozhary i ikh posledstviya. [Forest fires and their consequences.]. Krasnoyarsk, 1985,
pp. 38C46. In Russian.
Noga L.G., Tikhonov V.V. O vozniknovenii lesnykh pozharov ot groz. [On the occurrence of forest fires from
lightning.] Lesnoe khozyaistvo, 1979, no. 6, pp. 58C59. In Russian.
Odintsov D.I. Okhrana lesov ot ognya zadacha obshchaya. [Forest protection against fire as a common task.]
Lesnoe khozyaistvo, 1995, no. 2, pp. 28C31. In Russian.
Olsson, D., et al. Terrestrial ecoregions of the world: a new map of life on Earth. Bioscience 51, No. 11, pp. 1C5.
Ponomarenko Ye.V., et al. Zemelnaya reforma v Rossii: negativnye posledstviya i vozmozhnosti dlya ustoichi7
vogo razvitiya. [Land reform in Russia: negative consequences and opportunities for sustainable developC
ment]. Moscow, 1996. In Russian.
Russian Encyclopedic Dictionary. Moscow: Bolsh. Ross. Entsykl., 2001. In Russian.
Sergienko V.N. Sokhranim li nashi lesa? [Will we be able to preserve our forest?] Lesnoe khozyaistvo, 1996,
no. 3, pp. 5C6. In Russian.
Sergienko V.N. Borba s lesnymi pozharami: problemy I zadachi. [Fight against forest fires: problems and tasks.]
Lesnoe khozyaistvo, 1999, no. 4, pp. 47C51. In Russian.
Sochava, B. V. (ed.). Karta Rastitelnost SSSR [Vegetation of the USSR Map], Moscow: GUGK, 1957. In Russian.
Sofronov M.A., Vakurov A.D. Ogon v lesu. [Fire in the forest.] Novosibirsk: Nauka, 1981. In Russian.

References

27

Sokolov V.Ye., et al. Ekologiya zapovednykh territoriy Rossii. [Ecology of Protected Areas of Russia], Moscow:
Severtsev Institute of Problems of Ecology and Evolution, 1997. In Russian.
Valendik E.N., Ivanova G.A. Ekstremalnye pozharoopasnye sezony v borealnykh lesakh Sredney Sibiri. [Seasons
with extreme fire danger in boreal forests of Middle Siberia.] Lesovedenie, 1996, no. 4, pp. 12C19. In Russian.
Yaroshenko A., Potapov P., Turubanova S. The last intact forest landscapes of northern European Russia. GreenC
peace Russia and Gobal Forest Watch: Moscow, 2001.
Zakharov A.N. and Stolyrchuk A.V. Pozhary ot groz v lesakh Tyumenskoy oblasti. [Fires caused by thunderC
storms in forest of Tyumen Oblast.] Lesnoe khozyaistvo, 1977, no. 7, pp. 74C75. In Russian.
Zvorykin K.V. and Paramuzin Yu.P. Fisiko7geograficheskoe rayonirovanie Severa I Vostoka SSSR. [PhysicoC
geographical Regionalization of Northern and Eastern USSR.] Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR. Geogr. Series, 1956, no. 5.

List of Reviewers
Frank Ahern. TerreVista Earth Imaging, Cormac, Ontario, USA
Per Angelstam. Associate Professor, Dept. of Conservation biology, Swedish University of
Agricultural Sciences.
Igor Artemov. Central Siberian Botanical Garden, Novosibirsk, Russia
Dirk Bryant. Program Director, World Resources Institute, Washington, D.C., USA
Andrey Gromtsev. Senior Scientist, Karelian Forest Institute, Petrozavodsk, Russia
Anthony Janetos. Senior Vice President for Program, World Resources Institute, Washington, DC, USA
Nels Johnson. The Nature Conservancy, USA
Eric Kasischke. Associate Professor, Department of Geography, University of Maryland, USA
Vladimir Krespov. Director General of the Western Siberian State Forest Inventory Enterprise,
Novosibirsk, Russia
Andrey Murzin. Pacific Institute of Geography (TIGIS), Vladivostok, Russia
Nikolay Sobolev. Leader of the Initative on Creation of a Regional Protected Areas System, Russian GEF
Biodiversity Project. Member of the Council of Europe Expert Committee for creation of a PanCEuropean
Ecological Network. Moscow. Russia
Ralph Ridder. Technical Director, World Resources Institute, Washington, D.C., USA
Alexander Sheingauz. Professor. Head of Department for Sector Economic, Institute for Economic
Research, Khabarovsk, Russia
Svetlana Shlotgauer. Professor, Head of the Vegetation Ecology Department, Institute for Water and
Ecological Problems, Khabarovsk, Russia
Wynet Smith. Senior Associate, World Resources Institute, Washington, D.C., USA
Thomas Stone. Sr. Research Associate, Woods Hole Research Center, Maryland, USA
Olli Turunen. LuontoCLiitto (Finnish Nature League), Finland.
Dmitry Vladyshevskiy. Professor, Krasnoyarsk State University, Krasnoyarsk, Russia

28

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Annex 1. Data on intact forest landscapes at the level of


administrative regions (subjects of the Russian Federation)
Regions name

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Astrakhan Oblast
Belgorod Oblast
Bryansk Oblast
Ivanovo Oblast
Kaliningrad Oblast
Kaluga Oblast
Kirov Oblast
Komi&Permyak
Autonomous District
Kostroma Oblast
Krasnodar Kray
Kursk Oblast
Leningrad Oblast
Lipetsk Oblast
Moscow Oblast
Murmansk Oblast
Nenets Autonomous District
Nizhniy Novgorod Oblast
Novgorod Oblast
Orel Oblast
Penza Oblast
Perm Oblast
Pskov Oblast
Republic of Adygea
Republic of Bashkortostan
Republic of Chuvashia
Republic of Dagestan
Republic of
Kabardino&Balkaria
Republic of Kalmykia
(Khalmg Tangch)
Republic of
Karachay&Cherkessia
Republic of Karelia
Republic of Komi
Republic of Mari&El
Republic of Mordvinia
Republic of
North Ossetia (Alania)
Republic of Tatarstan
Republic of Udmurtia
Republics of Ingushetia
and Chechnia (Chechnya) *
Rostov Oblast
Ryazan Oblast

Total area
within the
region

Total area within territory of study


(the forest zone of Russia)

Total area

Total area

Intact Area
(Intact
forest
landscapes)

Intact
portion of
total area

Thousand
ha

Thousand
ha

41,070
4,410
2,710
3,490
2,390
1,510
2,990
12,080

30,484
4,410
2,710
3,490
2,390
1,510
2,990
12,080

3,290
6,010
7,600
2,980
8,590
2,410
4,700
14,490
17,670
7,480
5,530
2,470
4,320
12,770
5,530
760
14,360
1,830
5,030

3,290
6,010
7,600
2,980
8,590
2,410
4,700
9,046
1,134
7,480
5,530
2,470
4,320
12,770
5,530
760
14,360
1,830
5,030

1,250

1,250

7,590

7,590

1,410
17,240
41,590
2,320
2,620

1,410
17,240
36,908
2,320
2,620

503
864
13,599

35.70
5.00
36.80

800
6,800
4,210

800
6,800
4,210

135

16.90

1,930
10,080
3,960

1,930
10,080
3,960

Thousand
Percent
ha
European Russia
9,482
31.10

21

0.20

314

4.10

3,821
1,134

42.20
100.00

43

0.80

892
39
101
415

7.00
0.70
13.30
2.90

338

27.00

Forest area within the territory of study


(according to the
1:500,000 topographical map)
Total forest
area

Forest area
within intact
forest
landscapes

Intact
portion
of total
area

Thousand
ha

Thousand
ha

Percent

29,217
46
246
1,302
1,597
238
1,684
9,867

7,477

25.60

21

0.20

235

13.40

1,990
741

30.30
73.70

0.10

803
9
75
414

7.60
0.30
21.00
6.10

33

15.80

521
14,880
35,752
1,569
829

165
678
11,322

31.70
4.60
31.70

220
1,260
2,536

13

5.90

3,282
5,692
1,748
237
6,916
172
2,792
6,574
1,006
4,852
5,031
161
1,057
10,508
3,597
357
6,792
702
552
209
9

477
195
1,131

* The borders are not marked.

Annex 1. Data on intact forest landscapes at the level of administrative regions

29

Samara Oblast
Saratov Oblast
Smolensk Oblast
Stavropol Kray
Tambov Oblast
Tula Oblast
Tver Oblast
Ulyanovsk Oblast
Vladimir Oblast
Volgograd Oblast
Vologda Oblast
Voronezh Oblast
Yaroslavl Oblast
Total European Russia
Altay Kray
Chelyabinsk Oblast
Kemerovo Oblast
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Kurgan Oblast
Novosibirsk Oblast
Omsk Oblast
Orenburg Oblast
Republic of Altay
Sverdlovsk Oblast
Tomsk Oblast
Tyumen Oblast
Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District
Total Western Siberia
Aga&Buryat
Autonomous District
Chita Oblast
Evenk Autonomous District
Irkutsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray
Republic of Buryatia
Republic of Khakassia
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Republic of Tuva (Tyva)
Taymyr Autonomous District
Ust&Orda Buryat
Autonomous District
Total Eastern Siberia
Amur Oblast
Chukchi (Chukotka)
Autonomous District
Kamchatka Oblast
Khabarovsk Kray
Koryak Autonomous District
Magadan Oblast
Primorskiy Kray
Sakhalin Oblast
Yevreyskaya (Jewish)
Autonomous Region
Total Russian Far East
Total Russia
30

5,360
10,020
4,980
6,650
3,430
2,570
8,410
3,730
2,900
11,410
14,570
5,240
3,640
383,180

5,360
10,020
4,980
6,650
3,430
2,570
8,410
3,730
2,900
11,410
14,570
5,240
3,640
345,880

16,910
8,790
9,550

16,910
8,790
9,550

52,310
7,100
17,820
13,970
12,400
9,260
19,480
31,690
16,180

52,740
7,100
17,820
13,970
12,400
9,260
19,480
31,690
16,180

75,030
290,490

18,469
234,145

1,900
41,250
76,760
74,560
71,000
35,130
6,190
310,320
17,050
86,210

1,900
41,250
45,176
74,560
68,053
35,130
6,190
105,158
17,050
86,210

2,230
722,600

2,230
397,266

36,370

36,370

73,770
17,080
78,860
30,150
46,140
16,590
8,710

73,770
16,599
59,530
2,196
46,140
16,590
8,710

3,600
311,270
1,707,540

3,600
141,113
1,118,404

103

31,804
Western Siberia
359

0.70

9.20
2.10

736
563
2,419
100
386
349
7,048
1,176
2,598
398
13,750
481
2,549
198,366
4,819
3,128
6,851

24

0.20

24,006

12.10

218

4.50

1,290

18.80

13,812

29.10

920
369

14.80
5.10

2,799
538
5,897
1,179

52.90
2.90
20.50
9.70

1418

14.80

22,619

42.90

2,429
934

13.60
6.70

5,837
906
9,271
3,262

63.00
4.70
29.30
20.20

47,451
2,772
6,234
7,202
498
5,290
18,506
28,814
12,216

11,385
58,420
Eastern Siberia

61.60
25.00

16,712
160,493

9,646
36,668

57.70
22.80

11,958
27,616
22,388
24,555
15,155
1,582
40,882
9,740

29.00
61.10
30.00
36.10
43.10
25.60
38.90
57.10

735
34,673
45,162
71,705
63,416
29,595
3,830
101,231
10,849
13,005

8,690
25,803
17,148
22,033
8,535
1,157
35,756
6,778

25.10
57.10
23.90
34.70
28.80
30.20
35.30
62.50

153,876
Russian Far East
6,611

38.70

1,321
375,522

125,900

33.50

18.20

30,915

5,106

16.50

14,163
17,800
1,933

85.30
29.90
88.00

6,515
13,709
1,019

69.10
26.90
76.40

2,902
905

17.50
10.40

6,443
9,434
51,046
1,333
21,568
13,799
6,107

2,844
494

20.60
8.10

101
44,415
288,515

2.80
31.50
25.80

1,900
142,545
876,926

101
29,788
216,362

5.30
20.90
24.70

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Annex 2. Data on forest area at the level of


administrative region (subject of the Russian Federation)
Name of region

Total area of region

Thousand
ha
European Russia
Arkhangelsk Oblast
41,070
Astrakhan Oblast
4,410
Belgorod Oblast
2,710
Bryansk Oblast
3,490
Ivanovo Oblast
2,390
Kaliningrad Oblast
1,510
Kaluga Oblast
2,990
Kirov Oblast
12,080
Komi&Permyak Autonomous District
3,290
Kostroma Oblast
6,010
Krasnodar Kray
7,600
Kursk Oblast
2,980
Leningrad Oblast
8,590***
Lipetsk Oblast
2,410
Moscow Oblast
4,700****
Murmansk Oblast
14,490
Nenets Autonomous District
17,670
Nizhniy Novgorod Oblast
7,480
Novgorod Oblast
5,530
Orel Oblast
2,470
Penza Oblast
4,320
Perm Oblast
12,770
Pskov Oblast
5,530
Republic of Adygea
760
Republic of Bashkortostan
14,360
Republic of Chuvashia
1,830
Republic of Dagestan
5,030
Republic of Kabardino&Balkaria
1,250
Republic of Kalmykia (Khalmg Tangch)
7,590
Republic of Karachay&Cherkessia
1,410
Republic of Karelia
17,240
Republic of Komi
41,590
Republic of Mari&El
2,320
Republic of Mordvinia
2,620
Republic of North Ossetia (Alania)
800
Republic of Tatarstan
6,800
Republic of Udmurtia
4,210
Republics of Ingushetia and Chechnia (Chechnya)*****
1,930
Rostov Oblast
10,080
Ryazan Oblast
3,960
Samara Oblast
5,360
Saratov Oblast
10,020
Smolensk Oblast
4,980
Stavropol Kray
6,650
Tambov Oblast
3,430
Annex 2. Data on forest area at the level of administrative region

Forest area
according to
the State Forest
Account as for
January 1 1998
(Federal Forest
Service, 1999)*

Forest area
according to the
1:500,000
topographical
map**

Thousand
ha

Thousand
ha

22,086
24
228
1,128
977
292
1,328
7,552
2,626
4,426
1,337
230
4,772
191
1,913
5,253
191
3,619
3,485
190
918
8,479
2,108
246
5,406
568
367
155
5
408
9,390
29,750
1,288
690
171
1,131
1,926
346
197
1,002
647
534
2,047
69
349

29,273
46
246
1,302
1,597
238
1,684
9,867
3,282
5,692
1,748
237
6,916
172
2,792
7,090
1,661
4,852
5,031
161
1,057
10,508
3,597
357
6,792
702
552
209
9
521
14,880
36,763
1,569
829
220
1,260
2,536
477
195
1,131
736
563
2,419
100
386
31

Tula Oblast
Tver Oblast
Ulyanovsk Oblast
Vladimir Oblast
Volgograd Oblast
Vologda Oblast
Voronezh Oblast
Yaroslavl Oblast
Total European Russia
Altay Kray
Chelyabinsk Oblast
Kemerovo Oblast
Khanty&Mansi Autonomous District
Kurgan Oblast
Novosibirsk Oblast
Omsk Oblast
Orenburg Oblast
Republic of Altay
Sverdlovsk Oblast
Tomsk Oblast
Tyumen Oblast
Yamalo&Nenets Autonomous District
Total Western Siberia
Aga&Buryat Autonomous District
Chita Oblast
Evenk Autonomous District
Irkutsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray
Republic of Buryatia
Republic of Khakassia
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Republic of Tuva (Tyva)
Taymyr Autonomous District
Ust&Orda Buryat Autonomous District
Total Eastern Siberia
Amur Oblast
Chukchi (Chukotka) Autonomous District
Kamchatka Oblast
Khabarovsk Kray
Koryak Autonomous District
Magadan Oblast
Primorskiy Kray
Sakhalin Oblast
Yevreyskaya (Jewish) Autonomous Region
Total Russian Far East
Total Russia

2,570
8,410
3,730
2,900
11,410
14,570
5,240
3,640
383,180
Western Siberia
16,910
8,790
9,550
52,310
7,100
17,820
13,970
12,400
9,260
19,480
31,690
16,180
75,030
290,490
Eastern Siberia
1,900
41,250
76,760
74,560
71,000
35,130
6,190
310,320
17,050
86,210
2,230
722,600
Russian Far East
36,370
73,770
17,080
78,860
30,150
46,140
16,590
8,710
3,600
311,270
1,707,540

346
4,518
978
1,467
399
10,019
415
1,637
149,824

349
7,048
1,176
2,598
398
13,750
481
2,549
200,604

3,499
2,503
5,589
27,800
1,589
4,611
4,471
444
3,836
12,998
18,651
6,497
15,376
107,864

4,819
3,128
6,851
47,651
2,772
6,234
7,202
498
5,290
18,506
28,814
12,216
29,657
173,638

625
25,379
45,816
56,812
51,590
18,978
2,945
122,293
7,855
1,858
1,085
335,236

735
34,673
72,764
71,705
66,083
29,595
3,830
209,106
10,849
13,005
1,321
513,666

20,903
1,804
6,133
46,995
2,541
8,353
12,294
5,282
1,629
105,934
698,858

30,915
6,443
9,525
60,616
3,925
21,568
13,799
6,107
1,900
154,798
1,042,706

* Area covered by forest (does not includes sparse and unstocked forests). Forests dominated by minor forestCforming species (e.g.,
elfin birch and willow woods and creeping stone pine (Pinus pumila) and alder) were excluded based on data on them for lands
managed by the Federal Forest Service as of 1998; some forests outside the State Forest Fund (e.g., found on the Lands of State
Reserve) can be missed (see data for Nenets Autonomous District).
** Category of high dense forests.
*** Includes the area of the city of Saint Petersburg.
**** Includes the area of the city of Moscow.
***** The borders are not marked.

32

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Main Map Section:


Intact Forest Landscapes

blank page

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District of settlement
Region names
Page ID
Index

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Many small settlements are marked, but not named, on the maps. These settlements are not listed here.

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

A
Abakan

Ust&abakanskiy

Republic of Khakassia

WS&21;
ES&13
ES&06

Aban

Abanskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

Abaza
Abez

Tashtypskiy
Inta

Republic of Khakassia
Republic of Komi

WS&21
ER&06;
WS&01

Achinsk

Achinskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

21

5343'

9126'

33

5640'

9604'

150

5237'
6631'

9005'
6146'

WS&17;
ES&05
ER&15

5615'

9028'

4326'

3955'

ER&06;
WS&01
WS&07

6635'

5917'

6137'

7505'

ES&14
FE&C

5515'
5846'

9454'
13414'

Adler

Sochi

Krasnodar Kray

Adzvavom

Inta

Republic of Komi

Agan

Nizhnevartovskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

Aginskoe
Aim

Sayanskiy
Ayano&mayskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Khabarovsk Kray

Ak&Dovurak
Akhiny

&

Barun&khemchikskiy Republic of Tuva (Tyva)


Ekhirit&bulagatskiy Ust&Orda Buryat
Autonomous District

WS&24
ES&16

5110'
5315'

9035'
10458'

Aksenovo&
Zilovskoe
Aksha

&

Chernyshevskiy

Chita Oblast

ES&19

5304'

11730'

Akshinskiy

Chita Oblast

ES&26

5016'

11317'

Aktash
Alagir

Ulaganskiy
Alagirskiy

Republic of Altay
Republic of North Ossetia
(Alania)

WS&23
ER&16

5019'
4302'

8737'
4413'

Alakit
Alakurtti

Mirninskiy
Kandalaksha

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Murmansk Oblast

ES&C
ER&01

6606'
6658'

11032'
3020'

Alapaevsk
Aldan

Alapaevsk
Aldanskiy

Sverdlovsk Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

WS&11
FE&B

5750'
5836'

6140'
12523'

Aldoma
Aleksandrovsk

Ayano&mayskiy
Aleksandrovsk

Khabarovsk Kray
Perm Oblast

FE&05
ER&13

5648'
5909'

13826'
5734'

Aleksandrovskoe Aleksandrovskiy
Aleksandrovsk& & Aleksandrovsk&
Sakhalinskiy

sakhalinskiy

Tomsk Oblast
Sakhalin Oblast

WS&07
FE&10

6025'
5054'

7751'
14209'

Alekseevsk
Aleysk

Kirenskiy
Aleyskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Altay Kray

ES&09
WS&22

5750'
5229'

10820'
8246'

Allakh&Yun
Almazny

&

Oymyakonskiy
Mirninskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&C
ES&C;
FE&A

6107'
6226'

13801'
11419'

Altay

Kondinskiy

WS&05

6020'

6857'

Altayskiy

Altayskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Altay Kray

WS&22

5157'

8520'

Alygdzher
Alzamay

Nizhneudinskiy
Nizhneudinskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

ES&14
ES&15

5337'
5533'

9813'
9839'

Amazar

Mogochinskiy

Chita Oblast

5351'

12052'

Ambarny

Loukhskiy

Republic of Karelia

ES&20;
FE&01
ER&07

6554'

3343'

Index of settlement names

153

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Amga

Amginskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&B

6053'

13158'

Amgu
Amursk

Terneyskiy
Amurskiy

Primorskiy Kray
Khabarovsk Kray

FE&16
FE&09

4549'
5013'

13740'
13653'

Amurzet
Andryushino

Oktyabrskiy
Garinskiy

Yevreyskaya Autonomous Region FE&11


Sverdlovsk Oblast
WS&11

4741'
5913'

13105'
6300'

Angarsk
Angutikha

Angarsk
Turukhanskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ES&24
WS&A;
ES&A

5232'
6607'

10355'
8714'

Aniva
Anosovo

Anivskiy
Ust&udinskiy

Sakhalin Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

FE&14
ES&16

4642'
5438'

14231'
10314'

Antykan
Anzhero&
Sudzhensk

&

Tuguro&chumikanskiy Khabarovsk Kray


Yaya
Kemerovo Oblast

FE&04
WS&16

5452'
5604'

13510'
8600'

Apacha
Apatity

Ust&bolsheretskiy
Apatity

Kamchatka Oblast
Murmansk Oblast

KK&03
ER&01

5255'
6733'

15708'
3323'

Apsheronsk
Arkhangelsk

Apsheronskiy
Primorskiy

Krasnodar Kray
Arkhangelsk Oblast

ER&15
ER&09

4427'
6433'

3943'
4032'

Arkhara
Armavir

Tambovskiy
Armavir

Amur Oblast
Krasnodar Kray

FE&11
ER&15

4925'
4459'

13004'
4107'

Aromashevo
Arsenev

Aromashevskiy
Arsenev

Tyumen Oblast
Primorskiy Kray

WS&12
FE&15

5651'
4409'

6838'
13316'

Arshan
Artemovsk

Tunkinskiy
Kuraginskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ES&23
WS&21;
ES&13

5154'
5421'

10226'
9325'

Artemovskiy
Artemovskiy

Artemovskiy
Bodaybinskiy

Sverdlovsk Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

WS&11
ES&10;
FE&A

5720'
5812'

6153'
11438'

Aryktakh
Asbest

Kobyayskiy
Asbest

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Sverdlovsk Oblast

FE&B
WS&11

6334'
5700'

12514'
6127'

Asha
Ashlyk

Ashinskiy
Vagayskiy

Chelyabinsk Oblast
Tyumen Oblast

ER&14
WS&12

5500'
5731'

5713'
6840'

Asino
Askiz

Asinovskiy
Askizskiy

Tomsk Oblast
Republic of Khakassia

WS&16
WS&21

5659'
5308'

8607'
9024'

Atagay
Atamanovka

Nizhneudinskiy
Chitinskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Chita Oblast

ES&15
ES&26

5506'
5156'

9922'
11338'

Atlasovo
Ayan

Milkovskiy
Ayano&mayskiy

Kamchatka Oblast
Khabarovsk Kray

KK&02
FE&05

5536'
5627'

15938'
13810'

Ayan
Aykhal

Katangskiy
Mirninskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ES&08
ES&C

5930'
6556'

10645'
11129'

Aypolovo
Azovy

Kargasokskiy
Shuryshkarskiy

Tomsk Oblast
Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

WS&14
WS&02

5843'
6453'

7636'
6502'

Babaevo

Babaevskiy

Vologda Oblast

ER&18

5923'

3556'

Babushkin
Baevo

Kabanskiy
Baevskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Altay Kray

ES&24
WS&18

5142'
5316'

10550'
8046'

Bagdarin
Bakal

Bauntovskiy
Satkinskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Chelyabinsk Oblast

ES&18
ER&14

5426'
5456'

11335'
5848'

Bakchar
Bakhta

Bakcharskiy
Turukhanskiy

Tomsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&15
WS&09;
ES&01

5701'
6228'

8205'
8900'

154

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Baladek

Tuguro&chumikanskiy Khabarovsk Kray

FE&04

5341'

13303'

Balagansk
Balakhta

Balaganskiy
Balakhtinskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ES&16
WS&21;
ES&13

5400'
5523'

10303'
9136'

Balgazyn
Balykcha

Tandinskiy
Ulaganskiy

Republic of Tuva (Tyva)


Republic of Altay

ES&21
WS&23

5100'
5117'

9510'
8742'

Barabinsk
Barguzin

Barabinskiy
Barguzinskiy

Novosibirsk Oblast
Republic of Buryatia

WS&18
ES&17

5520'
5336'

7820'
10937'

Barnaul
Barylas

Barnaul
Namskiy

Altay Kray
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

WS&19
FE&B

5321'
6259'

8343'
12932'

Barzas
Batamay

Kemerovskiy
Namskiy

Kemerovo Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

WS&19
FE&B

5543'
6331'

8618'
12925'

Baturino
Bayanday

Asinovskiy
Bayandaevskiy

Tomsk Oblast
Ust&Orda Buryat
Autonomous District

WS&16
ES&16

5745'
5303'

8510'
10530'

Bayangol
Baykal

Zakamenskiy
Slyudyanskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Irkutsk Oblast

ES&24
ES&24

5042'
5152'

10328'
10447'

Baykalovo
Baykalovsk

Tobolskiy
Ust&eniseyskiy

Tyumen Oblast
Taymyr Autonomous District

WS&12
WS&A

5746'
7042'

6739'
8337'

Baykalsk
Baykalskoe

Slyudyanskiy
Severo&baykalskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Republic of Buryatia

ES&24
ES&17

5130'
5521'

10407'
10911'

Bay&Khaak
Baykit

&

Tandinskiy
Baykitskiy

Republic of Tuva (Tyva)


Evenk Autonomous District

ES&21
ES&02

5109'
6141'

9428'
9623'

Baymak
Belkachi

Baymakskiy
Aldanskiy

Republic of Bashkortostan
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ER&14
FE&B

5235'
5911'

5818'
13152'

Belogorsk
Belokurikha

Tisulskiy
Smolenskiy

Kemerovo Oblast
Altay Kray

WS&20
WS&22

5501'
5159'

8829'
8500'

Belomorsk
Belorechensk

Belomorskiy
Belorechenskiy

Republic of Karelia
Krasnodar Kray

ER&07
ER&15

6432'
4445'

3445'
3952'

Beloretsk
Belovo

Beloretskiy
Belovo

Republic of Bashkortostan
Kemerovo Oblast

ER&14
WS&20

5358'
5425'

5824'
8618'

Beloyarsk
Beloyarskiy

Pervomayskiy
Beloyarskiy

Altay Kray
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

WS&19
WS&02

5327'
6342'

8353'
6625'

Belozersk
Belushe

Belozerskiy
Vologda Oblast
Nenets
Nenets Autonomous District
Autonomous District

ER&18
ER&04

6001'
6653'

3747'
4737'

Bely Yar
Berdigestyakh

Verkhneketskiy
Gorny

Tomsk Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

WS&16
FE&B

5826'
6205'

8503'
12641'

Berdsk
Bereznik

Berdsk
Vinogradovskiy

Novosibirsk Oblast
Arkhangelsk Oblast

WS&19
ER&09

5445'
6250'

8305'
4244'

Berezniki
Berezovka

Berezniki
Parabelskiy

Perm Oblast
Tomsk Oblast

ER&13
WS&15

5924'
5921'

5648'
8249'

Berezovka
Berezovo

Pechora
Berezovskiy

Republic of Komi
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

ER&05
WS&02

6500'
6356'

5634'
6501'

Berezovskiy
Berezovy

Berezovskiy
Solnechny

Kemerovo Oblast
Khabarovsk Kray

WS&19
FE&08

5535'
5140'

8612'
13540'

Berkakit
Beslan

Neryungri
Beslan

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Republic of North Ossetia
(Alania)

FE&02
ER&16

5634'
4311'

12445'
4432'

Bestyakh
Biaza

Khangalasskiy
Severny

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Novosibirsk Oblast

FE&B
WS&15

6122'
5635'

12851'
7818'

Index of settlement names

155

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Bichura

Bichurskiy

Republic of Buryatia

ES&25

5035'

10735'

Bikin
Bira

Bikinskiy
Obluchenskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Yevreyskaya
Autonomous Region

FE&12
FE&11

4648'
4859'

13415'
13227'

Birikchul
Birobidzhan

Askizskiy
Birobidzhanskiy

Republic of Khakassia
Yevreyskaya
Autonomous Region

WS&21
FE&12

5321'
4847'

8953'
13254'

Birofeld

Birobidzhanskiy

FE&11

4825'

13248'

Biryusinsk

Tayshetskiy

Yevreyskaya
Autonomous Region
Irkutsk Oblast

ES&14

5557'

9748'

Biysk
Blagodarny

Biyskiy
Blagodarnenskiy

Altay Kray
Stavropol Kray

WS&19
ER&16

5232'
4506'

8510'
4325'

Blagoevo

Blagoveshchensk

Udorskiy
Blagoveshchenskiy

Republic of Komi
Republic of Bashkortostan

ER&10
ER&14

6325'
5502'

4756'
5558'

Bodaybo
Bogorodskoe

Bodaybinskiy
Ulchskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Khabarovsk Kray

ES&10
FE&10

5750'
5222'

11411'
14026'

Bogotol
Boguchany

Bogotolskiy
Boguchanskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&17
ES&06

5610'
5822'

8935'
9728'

Bol.Irba

Kuraginskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&21;
ES&13
FE&B

5404'

9256'

Bol.Nimnyr

Aldanskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

5802'

12528'

Bolchary

Kondinskiy

WS&12

5948'

6848'

Bolen

Solnechny

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Khabarovsk Kray

FE&08

5133'

13552'

Bolon
Bolotnoe

Amurskiy
Bolotninskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Novosibirsk Oblast

FE&12
WS&19

4954'
5539'

13608'
8422'

Bolshaya Bicha
Bolshaya Murta

Ust&ishimskiy
Bolshemurtinskiy

Omsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&13
ES&05

5752'
5653'

7037'
9309'

Bolshaya Tava
Bolsheretsk

Ust&ishimskiy
Ust&bolsheretskiy

Omsk Oblast
Kamchatka Oblast

WS&13
KK&03

5729'
5226'

7112'
15621'

Bolshie Uki
Bolshoe
Sorokino

Bolsheukovskiy
Sorokinskiy

Omsk Oblast
Tyumen Oblast

WS&13
WS&13

5656'
5638'

7237'
6949'

Bolshoy Patom
Bolshoy Uluy

Bodaybinskiy
Bolsheuluyskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

FE&A
WS&17;
ES&05

6004'
5638'

11654'
9034'

Bolshye Khatymi Neryungri


Bolugur

Amginskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&B
FE&B

5722'
6036'

12453'
13128'

Bomnak
Borisovo&
Sudskoe

&

Zeyskiy
Babaevskiy

Amur Oblast
Vologda Oblast

FE&03
ER&18

5442'
5954'

12851'
3601'

Borodino
Borogontsy

Rybinskiy
Ust&aldanskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ES&14
FE&B

5552'
6241'

9457'
13109'

Borovlyanka
Borovoy

Troitskiy
Kalevalskiy
natsionalny

Altay Kray
Republic of Karelia

WS&19
ER&07

5237'
6436'

8427'
3214'

Borovoy
Borovy

Verkhnekamskiy
Ukhta

Kirov Oblast
Republic of Komi

ER&19
ER&11

5958'
6313'

5141'
5253'

Boshnyakovo
Bratsk

Uglegorskiy
Bratskiy

Sakhalin Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

FE&14
ES&15

4939'
5610'

14210'
10135'

Brindakit
Bryanka

Oymyakonskiy
Severo&eniseyskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Krasnoyarsk Kray

FE&C
ES&06

6004'
5906'

13741'
9327'

Budennovsk

Budennovskiy

Stavropol Kray

ER&16

4447'

4409'

156

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Bugrino

Nenets
Nenets Autonomous District
Autonomous District

ER&04

6847'

4917'

Bukachacha
Bur

Chernyshevskiy
Katangskiy

Chita Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

ES&19
ES&08

5258'
5849'

11655'
10659'

Buren&Khem
Burevestnik

&

Kaa&khemskiy
Kurilskiy

Republic of Tuva (Tyva)


Sakhalin Oblast

ES&21
KK&07

5139'
4455'

9500'
14737'

Buribay
Burla

Khaybullinskiy
Burlinskiy

Republic of Bashkortostan
Altay Kray

ER&14
WS&18

5157'
5320'

5810'
7819'

Burmantovo

Ivdel

Sverdlovsk Oblast

6117'

6028'

Bursol

Nemetskiy
natsionalny

Altay Kray

ER&12;
WS&04
WS&18

5309'

7827'

Burukan
Buyukly

Tuguro&chumikanskiy Khabarovsk Kray


Smirnykhovskiy
Sakhalin Oblast

FE&08
FE&14

5303'
4932'

13600'
14251'

Bykov
Bystry Istok

Dolinskiy
Bystroistokskiy

Sakhalin Oblast
Altay Kray

FE&14
WS&22

4720'
5222'

14233'
8422'

Chadan

Dzun&khemchikskiy

Republic of Tuva (Tyva)

WS&24

5117'

9134'

Chagda
Chagoda

Aldanskiy
Chagodoshchenskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Vologda Oblast

FE&B
ER&18

5845'
5910'

13036'
3519'

Chara

Kalarskiy

Chita Oblast

5654'

11815'

Charyshskoe

Charyshskiy

Altay Kray

ES&11;
FE&A
WS&22

5124'

8333'

Chegdomyn
Chekhov

Verkhnebureinskiy
Kholmskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Sakhalin Oblast

FE&08
FE&14

5107'
4726'

13259'
14159'

Chekunda
Chemal

Verkhnebureinskiy
Chemalskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Republic of Altay

FE&07
WS&23

5053'
5124'

13220'
8600'

Chemdalsk
Cherdyn

Tungussko&chunskiy Evenk Autonomous District


Cherdynskiy
Perm Oblast

ES&08
ER&13

5937'
6023'

10319'
5628'

Cheremkhovo
Cheremushki

Cheremkhovskiy
Beyskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Republic of Khakassia

ES&16
WS&21;
ES&13

5308'
5251'

10303'
9124'

Cherepanovo
Cherepovets

Cherepanovskiy
Cherepovetskiy

Novosibirsk Oblast
Vologda Oblast

WS&19
ER&18

5413'
5907'

8322'
3754'

Cherevkovo
Cherkekh

Krasnoborskiy
Tattinskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ER&09
FE&C

6147'
6211'

4515'
13313'

Cherkessk

Prikubanskiy

ER&15

4413'

4203'

Chermoz

Ilinskiy

Republic of
Karachay&Cherkessia
Perm Oblast

ER&13

5847'

5608'

Chernogorsk

Ust&abakanskiy

Republic of Khakassia

5350'

9119'

Chernyshevsk

Chernyshevskiy

Chita Oblast

WS&21;
ES&13
ES&19

5231'

11700'

Chernyshevskiy
Chervyanka

Mirninskiy
Chunskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Irkutsk Oblast

ES&C
ES&07

6301'
5739'

11228'
9933'

Chibit
Chibizhek

Ulaganskiy
Kuraginskiy

Republic of Altay
Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&23
WS&21;
ES&13

5019'
5424'

8731'
9336'

Chikhachevo
Chikoy

Bezhanitskiy
Kyakhtinskiy

Pskov Oblast
Republic of Buryatia

ER&17
ES&25

5717'
5015'

2954'
10654'

Chindat
Chingiz

Tyukhtetskiy
Ordynskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Novosibirsk Oblast

WS&17
WS&18

5723'
5407'

8917'
8137'

Index of settlement names

157

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Chirinda

Ilimpiyskiy

Chita
Chizha

Chkalovskiy
Chlya
Chopo&Ologo

Region
Evenk Autonomous District

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

ES&B

6732'

10022'

Chitinskiy
Chita Oblast
Nenets
Nenets Autonomous District
Autonomous District

ES&26
ER&03

5202'
6705'

11329'
4423'

Loukhskiy
Nikolaevskiy

Republic of Karelia
Khabarovsk Kray

ER&07
FE&05

6617'
5332'

3324'
14011'

&

Kalarskiy

Chita Oblast

5704'

11849'

Chuguevka

Chuguevskiy

Primorskiy Kray

ES&11;
FE&A
FE&15

4409'

13351'

Chugunash
Chulman

Tashtagolskiy
Neryungri

Kemerovo Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

WS&20
FE&B

5252'
5650'

8746'
12453'

Chulym
Chumakovo

Chulymskiy
Kuybyshevskiy

Novosibirsk Oblast
Novosibirsk Oblast

WS&18
WS&18

5505'
5541'

8057'
7902'

Chumikan
Chunskiy

Tuguro&chumikanskiy Khabarovsk Kray


Chunskiy
Irkutsk Oblast

FE&04
ES&15

5442'
5605'

13518'
9939'

Chupa
Churapcha

Loukhskiy
Churapchinskiy

Republic of Karelia
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ER&07
FE&C

6616'
6159'

3303'
13225'

Chusovoy
Chuya

Chusovskoy
Mamsko&chuyskiy

Perm Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

ER&13
ES&10

5817'
5915'

5748'
11226'

Daban

Olekminskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&A

6007'

11913'

Dagomys
Dalmatovo

Sochi
Dalmatovskiy

Krasnodar Kray
Kurgan Oblast

ER&15
WS&11

4339'
5615'

3939'
6256'

Dalnegorsk
Dalnerechensk

Dalnegorskiy
Dalnerechenskiy

Primorskiy Kray
Primorskiy Kray

FE&15
FE&15

4433'
4556'

13534'
13343'

Darasun
Darkylakh

Karymskiy
Chita Oblast
Megino&kangalasskiy Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ES&26
FE&B

5138'
6058'

11358'
13021'

Daurskoe

Balakhtinskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

5513'

9158'

Davenda

Mogochinskiy

Chita Oblast

WS&21;
ES&13
ES&20

5333'

11918'

Demyansk
Demyanskoe

Demyanskiy
Uvatskiy

Novgorod Oblast
Tyumen Oblast

ER&17
WS&13

5738'
5936'

3228'
6917'

Denisovka
Dipkun

Usinsk
Tyndinskiy

Republic of Komi
Amur Oblast

ER&05
FE&02

6612'
5507'

5525'
12645'

Divnogorsk
Dno

Berezovskiy
Dnovskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Pskov Oblast

ES&05
ER&17

5556'
5749'

9222'
2958'

Dobryanka
Dolgiy Most

Dobryanskiy
Abanskiy

Perm Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ER&13
ES&06

5827'
5644'

5624'
9648'

Dolgoshchele
Dolinovka

Mezenskiy
Milkovskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Kamchatka Oblast

ER&03
KK&02

6602'
5507'

4328'
15903'

Dolinsk
Dormidontovka

Dolinskiy
Vyazemskiy

Sakhalin Oblast
Khabarovsk Kray

FE&14
FE&12

4719'
4746'

14247'
13455'

Doroninskoe
Dorozhny

Uletovskiy
Lenskiy

Chita Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ES&26
ES&C;
FE&A

5107'
6126'

11208'
11422'

Dovolnoe
Druzhny

Dovolenskiy
Verkhneketskiy

Novosibirsk Oblast
Tomsk Oblast

WS&18
WS&16

5429'
5845'

7939'
8604'

Dubrovka
Dubrovnoe

Belokholunitskiy
Vagayskiy

Kirov Oblast
Tyumen Oblast

ER&19
WS&12

5913'
5757'

5109'
6925'

158

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Dudinka

Dudinka

Taymyr Autonomous District

WS&A;
ES&A

6924'

8610'

Dugda
Duldurga

Zeyskiy
Duldurginskiy

Amur Oblast
Aga&Buryat
Autonomous District

FE&07
ES&26

5321'
5040'

12959'
11334'

Dutovo
Dvinskoy

Vuktyl
Verkhnetoemskiy

Republic of Komi
Arkhangelsk Oblast

ER&12
ER&09

6347'
6209'

5640'
4506'

Dygdal
Dzerzhinskoe

Ust&aldanskiy
Dzerzhinskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Krasnoyarsk Kray

FE&B
ES&06

6318'
5649'

13022'
9514'

Dzhalinda

Dzhebariki&Khaya &

Skovorodinskiy
Tomponskiy

Amur Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&01
FE&C

5329'
6212'

12354'
13551'

Dzhida

Dzhidinskiy

Republic of Buryatia

ES&24

5040'

10610'

Vilyuyskiy
Ust&ilimskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Irkutsk Oblast

FE&B
ES&07

6329'
5722'

12311'
10209'

Ekaterinoslavka Oktyabrskiy
Elban

Amurskiy

Amur Oblast
Khabarovsk Kray

FE&07
FE&09

5022'
5005'

12906'
13630'

Eldikan
Eletskiy

Oymyakonskiy
Vorkuta

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Republic of Komi

FE&C
WS&02

6046'
6702'

13508'
6413'

Elgyay

Suntarskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

6228'

11729'

Elizovo

Elizovskiy

Kamchatka Oblast

ES&C;
FE&A
KK&04

5310'

15822'

Eltsovka
Emetsk

Eltsovskiy
Kholmogorskiy

Altay Kray
Arkhangelsk Oblast

WS&20
ER&09

5314'
6328'

8615'
4146'

Emtsa
Emva

Plesetskiy
Knyazhpogostskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Republic of Komi

ER&08
ER&10

6304'
6236'

4020'
5054'

Eniseysk
Erbogachen

Eniseyskiy
Katangskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Irkutsk Oblast

ES&05
ES&C

5827'
6116'

9209'
10801'

Erema
Ermakovskoe

Katangskiy
Ermakovskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ES&C
WS&21;
ES&13

6021'
5316'

10746'
9223'

Ermilovka
Ermitsa

Tevrizskiy
Ust&tsilemskiy

Omsk Oblast
Republic of Komi

WS&13
ER&05

5738'
6654'

7254'
5219'

Erofey
Pavlovich
Ert

Skovorodinskiy

Amur Oblast

5357'

12157'

Gorny

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ES&20;
FE&01
FE&B

6200'

12546'

Erzin
Essentuki

Erzinskiy
Essentuki

Republic of Tuva (Tyva)


Stavropol Kray

ES&21
ER&16

5015'
4402'

9509'
4251'

Essey
Esso

Ilimpiyskiy
Bystrinskiy

Evenk Autonomous District


Kamchatka Oblast

ES&B
KK&01

6827'
5555'

10211'
15841'

Selemdzhinskiy

Amur Oblast

FE&07

5227'

13052'

Gari

Garinskiy

Sverdlovsk Oblast

WS&11

5924'

6221'

Gay
Georgievsk

Gay
Georgievskiy

Orenburg Oblast
Stavropol Kray

ER&14
ER&16

5128'
4408'

5827'
4327'

E
Ebya
Educhanka

F
Fevralsk

Index of settlement names

159

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Golovnino

Yuzhno&kurilskiy

Sakhalin Oblast

KK&07

4344'

14531'

Goltyavino
Gorki

Boguchanskiy
Shuryshkarskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

ES&07
WS&02

5825'
6503'

9825'
6516'

Gorno&Altaysk
&
Gorno&Chuyskiy &

Mayminskiy
Mamsko&chuyskiy

Republic of Altay
Irkutsk Oblast

WS&23
ES&10

5157'
5738'

8557'
11143'

Gornoslinkino
Gornozavodsk

Uvatskiy
Nevelskiy

Tyumen Oblast
Sakhalin Oblast

WS&12
FE&14

5845'
4633'

6847'
14150'

Gorny
Gorny

Kirovskiy
Solnechny

Primorskiy Kray
Khabarovsk Kray

FE&15
FE&09

4450'
5045'

13357'
13627'

Gorny
Goryachegorsk

Toguchinskiy
Sharypovskiy

Novosibirsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&19
WS&20

5507'
5522'

8354'
8853'

Gremyachinsk
Gremyachinsk

Gremyachinsk
Pribaykalskiy

Perm Oblast
Republic of Buryatia

ER&13
ES&17

5832'
5247'

5750'
10758'

Grossevichi
Gubakha

Sovetsko&gavanskiy
Gubakha

Khabarovsk Kray
Perm Oblast

FE&13
ER&13

4759'
5852'

13931'
5734'

Guga
Gulya

Imeni Poliny Osipenko Khabarovsk Kray


Tungiro&olekminskiy Chita Oblast

FE&09
ES&20;
FE&01

5242'
5440'

13731'
12059'

Gurevsk
Gurskoe

Gurevsk
Komsomolskiy

Kemerovo Oblast
Khabarovsk Kray

WS&19
FE&09

5417'
5018'

8555'
13805'

Gusinoe Ozero
Gusinoozersk

Selenginskiy
Selenginskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Republic of Buryatia

ES&24
ES&24

5106'
5117'

10615'
10631'

Gutay
Gyda

Krasnochikoyskiy
Tazovskiy

Chita Oblast
Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

ES&25
WS&A

4959'
7053'

10811'
7830'

Ichera

Kirenskiy

Irkutsk Oblast

ES&09

5830'

10946'

Ichinskiy
Idel

Sobolevskiy
Segezhskiy

Kamchatka Oblast
Republic of Karelia

KK&03
ER&07

5536'
6407'

15537'
3414'

Idrinskoe

Idrinskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

5422'

9208'

Igarka

Igarka

Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&21;
ES&13
WS&A;
ES&A

6727'

8636'

Igrim

Berezovskiy

WS&05

6311'

6424'

Ika

Katangskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Irkutsk Oblast

ES&08

5918'

10620'

Ikey
Ilanskiy

Tulunskiy
Ilanskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ES&15
ES&06

5411'
5613'

10004'
9603'

Ilbenge
Ilinskiy

Vilyuyskiy
Ilinskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Perm Oblast

FE&B
ER&13

6250'
5833'

12424'
5541'

Ilinskiy
im.Poliny
Osipenko

Tomarinskiy
Sakhalin Oblast
Imeni Poliny Osipenko Khabarovsk Kray

FE&14
FE&08

4759'
5225'

14212'
13628'

Indiga

ER&04

6739'

4903'

Innokentevka

Nenets
Nenets Autonomous District
Autonomous District
Nanayskiy
Khabarovsk Kray

FE&13

4940'

13654'

Innokentevskiy Sovetsko&gavanskiy
Inskoy

Belovskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Kemerovo Oblast

FE&14
WS&20

4836'
5425'

14009'
8625'

Inta

Republic of Komi

ER&06;
WS&01

6602'

6009'

160

Inta

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Inya

Ongudayskiy

Republic of Altay

WS&23

5026'

8638'

Irael
Irbeyskoe

Sosnogorsk
Irbeyskiy

Republic of Komi
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ER&11
ES&14

6424'
5538'

5511'
9527'

Irbit
Irkutsk

Irbitskiy
Irkutsk

Sverdlovsk Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

WS&11
ES&24

5740'
5216'

6302'
10418'

Isa
Ishimbay

Selemdzhinskiy
Ishimbayskiy

Amur Oblast
Republic of Bashkortostan

FE&07
ER&14

5145'
5326'

13102'
5602'

Isinga
Isit

Eravninskiy
Khangalasskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ES&18
FE&B

5254'
6048'

11159'
12519'

Iskateley

ER&05

6740'

5309'

Iskitim

Nenets
Nenets Autonomous District
Autonomous District
Iskitimskiy
Novosibirsk Oblast

WS&19

5438'

8317'

Isyangulovo
Itaka

Zianchurinskiy
Mogochinskiy

Republic of Bashkortostan
Chita Oblast

ER&14
ES&19

5211'
5353'

5634'
11841'

Ivdel
Izhma

Ivdel
Izhemskiy

Sverdlovsk Oblast
Republic of Komi

WS&04
ER&11

6041'
6500'

6025'
5355'

K
Kachikattsy

Khangalasskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&B

6119'

12857'

Kachkanar
Kachug

Kachkanar
Kachugskiy

Sverdlovsk Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

ER&13
ES&16

5841'
5357'

5929'
10552'

Kadzherom
Kalakan

Pechora
Tungokochenskiy

Republic of Komi
Chita Oblast

ER&11
ES&19

6441'
5507'

5555'
11645'

Kalevala

Republic of Karelia

ER&07

6512'

3112'

Irkutsk Oblast

ES&15

5539'

10143'

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Altay Kray

ER&03
WS&18

6553'
5347'

4406'
8119'

Kamennomostskiy Maykopskiy
Kamensk&
&
Kamensk&uralskiy
Uralskiy

Republic of Adygea
Sverdlovsk Oblast

ER&15
WS&11

4417'
5625'

4011'
6155'

Kamyshlov
Kandalaksha

Kamyshlovskiy
Kandalaksha

Sverdlovsk Oblast
Murmansk Oblast

WS&11
ER&01

5650'
6710'

6242'
3225'

Kanevka
Kangalassy

Lovozerskiy
Yakutsk

Murmansk Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ER&02
FE&B

6707'
6220'

3940'
12958'

Kankunskiy
Kansk

Aldanskiy
Kanskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Krasnoyarsk Kray

FE&B
ES&06

5737'
5611'

12601'
9544'

Karabula
Karaftit

Boguchanskiy
Bauntovskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Republic of Buryatia

ES&06
ES&18

5802'
5412'

9723'
11154'

Karam
Karasuk

Kazachinsko&lenskiy Irkutsk Oblast


Karasukskiy
Novosibirsk Oblast

ES&17
WS&18

5508'
5343'

10735'
7802'

Karaul
Karepole

Ust&eniseyskiy
Mezenskiy

Taymyr Autonomous District


Arkhangelsk Oblast

WS&A
ER&03

7004'
6532'

8311'
4341'

Kargala
Kargasok

Orenburgskiy
Kargasokskiy

Orenburg Oblast
Tomsk Oblast

ER&14
WS&15

5153'
5903'

5452'
8051'

Kargat
Karpinsk

Kargat
Karpinsk

Novosibirsk Oblast
Sverdlovsk Oblast

WS&18
WS&04

5512'
5945'

8016'
6000'

Karpogory
Karymkary

Pinezhskiy
Oktyabrskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

ER&09
WS&05

6400'
6201'

4424'
6723'

Katalga

Kargasokskiy

Tomsk Oblast

WS&14

5903'

7642'

Kaltuk

Kalevalskiy
natsionalny
Bratskiy

Kamenka
Kamen&na&Obi

&&

Mezenskiy
Kamenskiy

Index of settlement names

161

Name of
settlement
Katangli

Cyrillic
name

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Noglikskiy

Sakhalin Oblast

FE&10

5142'

14314'

Katav&Ivanovsk &
Katen

Katav&ivanovskiy
Imeni Lazo

Chelyabinsk Oblast
Khabarovsk Kray

ER&14
FE&12

5446'
4723'

5813'
13606'

Kavalerovo
Kayerkaa

Kavalerovskiy
Dudinka

Primorskiy Kray
Taymyr Autonomous District

FE&15
WS&A;
ES&A

4415'
6921'

13503'
8744'

Kazachinskoe
Kazachinskoe

Kazachinskiy
Krasnoyarsk Kray
Kazachinsko&lenskiy Irkutsk Oblast

ES&05
ES&09

5741'
5615'

9316'
10735'

Kazhym
Kekra

Koygorodskiy
Ayano&mayskiy

Republic of Komi
Khabarovsk Kray

ER&19
FE&C

6019'
5745'

5131'
14012'

Kellog
Kem

Turukhanskiy
Kemskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Republic of Karelia

WS&09
ER&07

6229'
6457'

8617'
3434'

Kemerovo
Kempendyay

Kemerovo
Suntarskiy

Kemerovo Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

WS&19
FE&A

5520'
6201'

8605'
11838'

Kenga
Kerchevskiy

Bakcharskiy
Cherdynskiy

Tomsk Oblast
Perm Oblast

WS&15
ER&13

5726'
5956'

8058'
5617'

Kerchomya
Kestenga

Ust&kulomskiy
Loukhskiy

Republic of Komi
Republic of Karelia

ER&11
ER&07

6128'
6553'

5354'
3149'

Ketanda
Kezhma

Okhotskiy
Kezhemskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Krasnoyarsk Kray

FE&C
ES&07

6038'
5858'

14118'
10107'

Khabarikha
Khabarovsk

Ust&tsilemskiy
Khabarovsk

Republic of Komi
Khabarovsk Kray

ER&05
FE&12

6548'
4825'

5220'
13507'

Khabary
Khadyn

Khabarskiy
Piy&khemskiy

Altay Kray
Republic of Tuva (Tyva)

WS&18
ES&21

5337'
5157'

7931'
9337'

Khadyzhensk
Khalyasavey

Apsheronskiy
Purovskiy

Krasnodar Kray
Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

ER&15
WS&07

4425'
6323'

3931'
7820'

Khampa
Khandagayty

Vilyuyskiy
Ovyurskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Republic of Tuva (Tyva)

FE&B
WS&24;
ES&21

6345'
5044'

12253'
9204'

Khandalsk
Khandyga

Abanskiy
Tomponskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ES&06
FE&C

5705'
6239'

9707'
13533'

Khani

Neryungri

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

5655'

11956'

Khanty&
Mansiysk

& Khanty&mansiyskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

ES&11;
FE&A
WS&06

6100'

6900'

Khapcheranga
Khara&Aldan

&

Kyrinskiy
Tattinskiy

Chita Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ES&26
FE&C

4941'
6315'

11222'
13313'

Kharampur

Purovskiy

WS&A

6416'

7806'

Kharbatovo

Kachugskiy

Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District
Irkutsk Oblast

ES&16

5345'

10600'

Kharlovka
Kharp

Severomorsk
Priuralskiy

Murmansk Oblast
Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

ER&02
WS&02

6846'
6647'

3718'
6550'

Khayryuzovo
Kherkuchi

Tigilskiy
Koryak Autonomous District
Imeni Poliny Osipenko Khabarovsk Kray

KK&01
FE&09

5650'
5258'

15701'
13849'

Khilok
Kholm

Khilokskiy
Kholmskiy

Chita Oblast
Novgorod Oblast

ES&25
ER&17

5121'
5708'

11027'
3111'

Kholmogory
Kholmsk

Kholmogorskiy
Kholmskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Sakhalin Oblast

ER&09
FE&14

6413'
4702'

4139'
14202'

Khor
Khordogoy

Imeni Lazo
Suntarskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&12
ES&C;
FE&A

4752'
6236'

13456'
11539'

162

District

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Khorey&Ver

&

Nenets
Nenets Autonomous District
Autonomous District

ER&05

6725'

5803'

Khorinsk
Khorintsy

Khorinskiy
Olekminskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ES&25
FE&A

5209'
6040'

10945'
12128'

Khoshgort

Shuryshkarskiy

WS&02

6529'

6542'

Khovu&Aksy

&

Tandinskiy

Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District
Republic of Tuva (Tyva)

ES&21

5107'

9340'

Khrebtovaya
Khulimsunt

Nizhneilimskiy
Berezovskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

ES&08
WS&04

5642'
6251'

10415'
6139'

Khuzhir
Khuzhir

Okinskiy
Olkhonskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Irkutsk Oblast

ES&15
ES&17

5248'
5311'

9951'
10720'

Kirensk
Kirillov

Kirenskiy
Kirillovskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Vologda Oblast

ES&09
ER&18

5747'
5951'

10806'
3823'

Kirovsk
Kirovskiy

Kirovsk
Kirovskiy

Murmansk Oblast
Primorskiy Kray

ER&01
FE&15

6736'
4505'

3339'
13329'

Kirovskiy
Kirs

Sobolevskiy
Verkhnekamskiy

Kamchatka Oblast
Kirov Oblast

KK&03
ER&19

5413'
5920'

15548'
5214'

Kiselevka
Kiselevsk

Ulchskiy
Kiselevsk

Khabarovsk Kray
Kemerovo Oblast

FE&09
WS&20

5124'
5356'

13858'
8643'

Kislokan
Kislovodsk

Ilimpiyskiy
Kislovodsk

Evenk Autonomous District


Stavropol Kray

ES&B
ER&16

6335'
4354'

10356'
4243'

Kitoy
Kizel

Angarsk
Kizel

Irkutsk Oblast
Perm Oblast

ES&24
ER&13

5235'
5903'

10352'
5738'

Kizhinga
Klimino

Kizhinginskiy
Kezhemskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ES&25
ES&07

5150'
5838'

10954'
9844'

Klyuchevskiy
Klyuchi

Mogochinskiy
Ust&kamchatskiy

Chita Oblast
Kamchatka Oblast

ES&20
KK&02

5332'
5618'

11926'
16050'

Koboldo
Kobyay

Selemdzhinskiy
Kobyayskiy

Amur Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&08
FE&B

5257'
6334'

13243'
12629'

Kochenevo
Kochevaya

Kochenevskiy
Surgutskiy

Novosibirsk Oblast
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

WS&18
WS&06

5501'
6227'

8211'
7307'

Kochki
Kochmes

Kochkovskiy
Inta

Novosibirsk Oblast
Republic of Komi

WS&18
ER&06;
WS&01

5420'
6610'

8029'
6046'

Kodino
Kodinsk

Onezhskiy
Kezhemskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ER&08
ES&07

6342'
5841'

3939'
9910'

Kogalym

Surgutskiy

WS&07

6214'

7431'

Kokuy

Sretenskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Chita Oblast

ES&19

5212'

11732'

Kola
Kolendo

Kolskiy
Okhinskiy

Murmansk Oblast
Sakhalin Oblast

ER&01
FE&06

6852'
5346'

3304'
14247'

Kolpashevo
Kolyvan

Kolpashevskiy
Kolyvanskiy

Tomsk Oblast
Novosibirsk Oblast

WS&16
WS&19

5819'
5518'

8254'
8244'

Kolyvan
Kommunar

Kurinskiy
Shirinskiy

Altay Kray
Republic of Khakassia

WS&22
WS&20

5118'
5419'

8234'
8916'

Komsomolsk
Komsomolskiy

Pervomayskiy
Vorkuta

Tomsk Oblast
Republic of Komi

WS&16
ER&06

5724'
6733'

8601'
6348'

Komsomolsk&
na&Amure
Komsomolsk&
na&Pechore

&
&
&
&

Komsomolskiy

Khabarovsk Kray

FE&09

5033'

13700'

Troitsko&pechorskiy

Republic of Komi

ER&12

6207'

5635'

Index of settlement names

163

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Konda

Ilimpiyskiy

Evenk Autonomous District

ES&B

6545'

10520'

Kondinskoe

Kondinskiy

WS&12

5939'

6724'

Kondon

Solnechny

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Khabarovsk Kray

FE&09

5115'

13634'

Kondratevo
Konevo

Tayshetskiy
Plesetskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Arkhangelsk Oblast

ES&06
ER&08

5721'
6207'

9810'
3919'

Konoshanovo
Kopevo

Zhigalovskiy
Ordzhonikidzevskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Republic of Khakassia

ES&16
WS&20

5521'
5459'

10527'
8948'

Korepino
Korfovskiy

Cherdynskiy
Khabarovsk

Perm Oblast
Khabarovsk Kray

ER&13
FE&12

6103'
4813'

5708'
13503'

Korliki

Nizhnevartovskiy

WS&08

6132'

8224'

Korotchaevo

Purovskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

WS&A

6555'

7812'

Korsakov
Kortkeros

Korsakovskiy
Kortkerosskiy

Sakhalin Oblast
Republic of Komi

FE&14
ER&11

4637'
6148'

14246'
5134'

Koryaki
Kosh&Agach

&

Elizovskiy
Kosh&agachskiy

Kamchatka Oblast
Republic of Altay

KK&04
WS&23

5316'
4959'

15812'
8840'

Koslan
Kostino

Udorskiy
Turukhanskiy

Republic of Komi
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ER&10
WS&A;
ES&A

6327'
6519'

4853'
8759'

Kostomuksha
Kosyu

Kostomuksha
Pechora

Republic of Karelia
Republic of Komi

ER&07
ER&06;
WS&01

6433'
6536'

3033'
5858'

Kovdor
Koyda

Kovdorskiy
Mezenskiy

Murmansk Oblast
Arkhangelsk Oblast

ER&01
ER&03

6734'
6622'

3029'
4232'

Koynas
Kozhevnikovo

Leshukonskiy
Kozhevnikovskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Tomsk Oblast

ER&10
WS&16

6445'
5615'

4738'
8358'

Kozhva

Pechora

Republic of Komi

6506'

5703'

Kozhym

Inta

Republic of Komi

ER&05;
WS&01
ER&06;
WS&01

6544'

5931'

Kozyrevsk
Krasny Yar

Ust&kamchatskiy
Krivosheinskiy

Kamchatka Oblast
Tomsk Oblast

KK&02
WS&16

5602'
5707'

15952'
8431'

Krasnaya Polyana
Krasnogorsk

Sochi
Tomarinskiy

Krasnodar Kray
Sakhalin Oblast

ER&15
FE&14

4341'
4825'

4012'
14205'

Krasnogorskoe
Krasnokamsk

Krasnogorskiy
Krasnokamsk

Altay Kray
Perm Oblast

WS&23
ER&13

5217'
5804'

8610'
5545'

Krasnoleninskiy

Khanty&mansiyskiy

WS&05

6137'

6747'

Krasnoselkup

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

WS&A

6542'

8227'

Krasnoselkupskiy

Krasnoshchekovo
Krasnoshchele

Krasnoshchekovskiy Altay Kray


Lovozerskiy
Murmansk Oblast

WS&22
ER&02

5139'
6720'

8244'
3702'

Krasnoturansk

Krasnoturanskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

5418'

9133'

Krasnoturinsk

Krasnoturinsk

Sverdlovsk Oblast

WS&21;
ES&13
WS&04

5946'

6012'

Krasnousolskiy
Krasnovishersk

Gafuriyskiy
Krasnovisherskiy

Republic of Bashkortostan
Perm Oblast

ER&14
ER&13

5353'
6024'

5628'
5705'

Krasnoyarsk
Krasnozerskoe

Emelyanovskiy
Krasnozerskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Novosibirsk Oblast

ES&05
WS&18

5600'
5359'

9248'
7914'

Krasny Chikoy
Krasny Luch

Krasnochikoyskiy
Bezhanitskiy

Chita Oblast
Pskov Oblast

ES&25
ER&17

5021'
5703'

10845'
3005'

Tomponskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&C

6247'

13430'

Krest&Khaldzhay &

164

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Kresttsy

Krestetskiy

Novgorod Oblast

ER&17

5814'

3231'

Krivosheino
Kropotkin

Krivosheinskiy
Bodaybinskiy

Tomsk Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

WS&16
ES&10;
FE&A

5720'
5830'

8355'
11519'

Krutikha
Krutogorovskiy

Krutikhinskiy
Sobolevskiy

Altay Kray
Kamchatka Oblast

WS&18
KK&03

5357'
5501'

8111'
15535'

Ksenevka
Kuanda

Mogochinskiy
Kalarskiy

Chita Oblast
Chita Oblast

ES&19
ES&11;
FE&A

5333'
5619'

11843'
11605'

Kudu&Kyuel
Kuldur

&

Olekminskiy
Obluchenskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Yevreyskaya
Autonomous Region

FE&A
FE&11

5927'
4912'

12118'
13138'

Kuloy
Kultuk

Pinezhskiy
Slyudyanskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

ER&09
ES&24

6459'
5143'

4330'
10341'

Kumertau
Kuminskiy

Kuyurgazinskiy
Kondinskiy

Republic of Bashkortostan
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

ER&14
WS&12

5245'
5848'

5547'
6558'

Kumora
Kunerma

Severo&baykalskiy
Republic of Buryatia
Kazachinsko&lenskiy Irkutsk Oblast

ES&18
ES&17

5552'
5546'

11112'
10825'

Kungurtug
Kuokunu

Kyzylskiy
Suntarskiy

Republic of Tuva (Tyva)


Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ES&22
ES&C;
FE&A

5035'
6205'

9731'
11613'

Kuragino

Kuraginskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

5353'

9239'

Kurilsk

Kurilskiy

Sakhalin Oblast

WS&21;
ES&13
KK&07

4513'

14752'

Kurort&Baunt
Kurort&Darasun

&
&

Bauntovskiy
Karymskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Chita Oblast

ES&18
ES&26

5507'
5111'

11253'
11342'

Kurumkan
Kurun&Uryakh

&

Kurumkanskiy
Ayano&mayskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Khabarovsk Kray

ES&17
FE&C

5419'
5839'

11019'
13717'

Kurya
Kutana

Troitsko&pechorskiy
Aldanskiy

Republic of Komi
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ER&12
FE&B

6140'
5901'

5714'
13144'

Kutima
Kutulik

Kazachinsko&lenskiy Irkutsk Oblast


Alarskiy
Ust&Orda Buryat
Autonomous District

ES&09
ES&15

5710'
5320'

10813'
10246'

Kuvandyk
Kuybyshev

Kuvandyk
Kuybyshevskiy

Orenburg Oblast
Novosibirsk Oblast

ER&14
WS&18

5128'
5526'

5721'
7818'

Kuytun
Kuyumba

Kuytunskiy
Baykitskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Evenk Autonomous District

ES&15
ES&02

5421'
6057'

10130'
9658'

Kuyus
Kuzmovka

Chemalskiy
Baykitskiy

Republic of Altay
Evenk Autonomous District

WS&23
WS&10;
ES&02

5101'
6219'

8613'
9207'

Kyakhta
Kyker

Kyakhtinskiy
Tungokochenskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Chita Oblast

ES&24
ES&19

5021'
5309'

10626'
11549'

Kylay
Kyra

Ust&aldanskiy
Kyrinskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Chita Oblast

FE&C
ES&26

6313'
4934'

13208'
11157'

Kyren
Kyrta

Tunkinskiy
Vuktyl

Republic of Buryatia
Republic of Komi

ES&23
ER&12;
WS&01

5140'
6403'

10206'
5741'

Kyshtovka
Kysyl&Syr

&

Kyshtovskiy
Vilyuyskiy

Novosibirsk Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

WS&14
FE&B

5633'
6353'

7637'
12246'

Kytlym
Kytyl&Dyura

&

Karpinsk
Khangalasskiy

Sverdlovsk Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ER&13
FE&B

5930'
6057'

5912'
12554'

Kyzyl
Kyzyl&Mazhalyk

Kyzyl
Republic of Tuva (Tyva)
& Barun&khemchikskiy Republic of Tuva (Tyva)

ES&21
WS&24

5142'
5108'

9427'
9034'

Index of settlement names

165

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

L
Labytnangi

Priuralskiy

Langepas

Nizhnevartovskiy

Lapri
Larba

Tyndinskiy
Tyndinskiy

Laryak

Nizhnevartovskiy

Lazarev

Lazarevskoe
Lazo

WS&02

6639'

6623'

WS&07

6115'

7509'

Amur Oblast
Amur Oblast

FE&02
ES&12;
FE&01

5541'
5522'

12454'
12311'

WS&08

6106'

8015'

Nikolaevskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Khabarovsk Kray

FE&10

5212'

14130'

Sochi
Lazovskiy

Krasnodar Kray
Primorskiy Kray

ER&15
FE&15

4355'
4322'

3920'
13354'

Lebediny
Lempino

Aldanskiy
Nefteyuganskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

FE&B
WS&06

5829'
6058'

12529'
7114'

Lendery
Leninskiy

Muezerskiy
Aldanskiy

Republic of Karelia
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ER&07
FE&B

6324'
5834'

3113'
12526'

Leninsk&
Kuznetskiy
Lensk

&

Leninsk&Kuznetskiy

Kemerovo Oblast

WS&19

5439'

8609'

Lenskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ES&C;
FE&A

6043'

11456'

Lenskoe
Leonidovo

Turinskiy
Poronayskiy

Sverdlovsk Oblast
Sakhalin Oblast

WS&11
FE&14

5809'
4917'

6311'
14251'

Leshukonskoe
Lesnoy

Leshukonskiy
Verkhnekamskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Kirov Oblast

ER&09
ER&19

6453'
5946'

4546'
5207'

Lesnoy
Lesogorsk

Yurginskiy
Uglegorskiy

Tyumen Oblast
Sakhalin Oblast

WS&12
FE&14

5655'
4926'

6714'
14207'

Lesosibirsk
Lesozavodsk

Lesosibirsk
Lesozavodskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Primorskiy Kray

ES&05
FE&15

5813'
4528'

9229'
13325'

Lesozavodskiy
Letka

Kandalaksha
Priluzskiy

Murmansk Oblast
Republic of Komi

ER&01
ER&19

6643'
5935'

3249'
4925'

Letnerechenskiy Belomorskiy
Letniy Navolok Primorskiy

Republic of Karelia
Arkhangelsk Oblast

ER&07
ER&08

6416'
6509'

3423'
3702'

Listvyanka
Listvyanskiy

Irkutskiy
Iskitimskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Novosibirsk Oblast

ES&24
WS&19

5151'
5426'

10451'
8330'

Litovko
Lobva

Amurskiy
Novolyalinskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Sverdlovsk Oblast

FE&12
WS&11

4914'
5911'

13510'
6030'

Loknya
Lombovozh

Loknyanskiy
Berezovskiy

Pskov Oblast
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

ER&17
ER&12;
WS&01

5649'
6348'

3009'
6129'

Londoko

Obluchenskiy

FE&11

4901'

13159'

Lopatino

Tomarinskiy

Yevreyskaya
Autonomous Region
Sakhalin Oblast

FE&14

4823'

14214'

Lopcha

Tyndinskiy

Amur Oblast

5544'

12240'

Loukhi

Loukhskiy

Republic of Karelia

ES&12;
FE&01
ER&07

6604'

3301'

Lovozero
Luchegorsk

Lovozerskiy
Pozharskiy

Murmansk Oblast
Primorskiy Kray

ER&02
FE&12

6800'
4626'

3500'
13418'

Lugovatka

Eniseyskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&17;
ES&01

5905'

8905'

166

Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Lugovoy

Kondinskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

WS&12

5943'

6554'

Lugovskiy
Lyantorskiy

Mamsko&chuyskiy
Surgutskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

ES&10
WS&06

5803'
6137'

11252'
7208'

Lysva

Lysvenskiy

Perm Oblast

ER&13

5805'

5748'

Macha
Magdagachi

Olekminskiy
Magdagachinskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Amur Oblast

FE&A
FE&02

5954'
5326'

11734'
12548'

Magistralny
Magnitogorsk

Kazachinsko&lenskiy Irkutsk Oblast


Magnitogorsk
Chelyabinsk Oblast

ES&17
ER&14

5610'
5324'

10726'
5858'

Mago
Makarov

Nikolaevskiy
Makarovskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Sakhalin Oblast

FE&09
FE&14

5315'
4837'

14010'
14246'

Makarovo
Maksimkin Yar

Kirenskiy
Verkhneketskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Tomsk Oblast

ES&09
WS&16

5728'
5840'

10750'
8648'

Maksimovka
Malchikha

Terneyskiy
Kolyvanskiy

Primorskiy Kray
Novosibirsk Oblast

FE&16
WS&19

4605'
5551'

13753'
8233'

Malenga
Malmyzh

Belomorskiy
Nanayskiy

Republic of Karelia
Khabarovsk Kray

ER&08
FE&13

6350'
4951'

3626'
13645'

Malokurilskoe
Maloshuyka

Yuzhno&kurilskiy

Onezhskiy

Sakhalin Oblast
Arkhangelsk Oblast

KK&07
ER&08

4351'
6342'

14649'
3727'

Maly Anzas
Maly Atlym

Tashtypskiy
Oktyabrskiy

Republic of Khakassia
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

WS&21
WS&05

5223'
6213'

8948'
6657'

Malykay
Mama

Nyurbinskiy
Mamsko&chuyskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Irkutsk Oblast

ES&C
ES&10

6330'
5818'

11700'
11254'

Mamakan
Mamontovo

Bodaybinskiy
Nefteyuganskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

ES&10
WS&06

5748'
6045'

11400'
7246'

Manzurka
Marevo

Kachugskiy
Marevskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Novgorod Oblast

ES&16
ER&17

5329'
5718'

10603'
3204'

Margaritovo
Mariinsk

Olginskiy
Mariinsk

Primorskiy Kray
Kemerovo Oblast

FE&15
WS&17

4324'
5612'

13445'
8744'

Markovo
Maslovo

Ust&kutskiy
Ivdel

Irkutsk Oblast
Sverdlovsk Oblast

ES&09
WS&04

5719'
6006'

10703'
6029'

Maslyanino
Maykop

Maslyaninskiy
Maykop

Novosibirsk Oblast
Republic of Adygea

WS&19
ER&15

5420'
4436'

8412'
4006'

Maykor

Yusvinskiy

ER&13

5900'

5553'

Maysk

Kargasokskiy

Komi&Permyak
Autonomous District
Tomsk Oblast

WS&14

5748'

7713'

Mayskiy
Mayskiy

Mayskiy
Mazanovskiy

Republic of Kabardino&Balkaria
Amur Oblast

ER&16
FE&07

4337'
5217'

4404'
12935'

Mayskoe
Mayya

Ust&kamchatskiy
Kamchatka Oblast
Megino&kangalasskiy Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

KK&02
FE&B

5615'
6144'

16003'
13016'

Medvezhegorsk
Meget

Medvezhegorskiy
Angarskiy

Republic of Karelia
Irkutsk Oblast

ER&07
ES&24

6255'
5225'

3427'
10403'

Megion

Nizhnevartovskiy

WS&07

6103'

7607'

Meletsk

Birilyusskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&17;
ES&05

5725'

9013'

Meleuz

Meleuzovskiy

Republic of Bashkortostan

ER&14

5257'

5556'

Index of settlement names

167

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Mendeleevo

Tobolskiy

Tyumen Oblast

WS&12

5817'

6819'

Menza
Messoyakha

Krasnochikoyskiy
Ust&eniseyskiy

Chita Oblast
Taymyr Autonomous District

ES&25
WS&A;
ES&A

4925'
6910'

10851'
8221'

Mezenskiy
Mezhdurechensk

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Kemerovo Oblast

ER&03
WS&20

6550'
5341'

4414'
8803'

Mezhdurechensk
Udorskiy
Mezhdurechenskiy Kondinskiy

Republic of Komi
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

ER&10
WS&12

6313'
5935'

4834'
6552'

Mezhozorny
Mgachi

Verkhneuralskiy
Aleksandrovsk&
sakhalinskiy

Chelyabinsk Oblast
Sakhalin Oblast

ER&14
FE&10

5409'
5102'

5921'
14215'

Mikhaylovka
Mikun

Amginskiy
Udorskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Republic of Komi

FE&C
ER&10

6112'
6221'

13240'
5004'

Milkovo

Milkovskiy
Mineralnye Vody Mineralnye vody

Kamchatka Oblast
Stavropol Kray

KK&04
ER&16

5442'
4412'

15837'
4307'

Minusinsk

Minusinskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

5342'

9141'

Mirny

Mirninskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

WS&21;
ES&13
ES&C;
FE&A

6230'

11358'

Mezen

Mezhdurechensk

Mnogovershinny Nikolaevskiy
Mogdy

Verkhnebureinskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Khabarovsk Kray

FE&05
FE&08

5356'
5036'

13954'
13348'

Mogocha
Mogochin

Mogochinskiy
Molchanovskiy

Chita Oblast
Tomsk Oblast

ES&20
WS&16

5344'
5742'

11945'
8335'

Mogzon
Moklakan

Khilokskiy
Chita Oblast
Tungiro&olekminskiy Chita Oblast

ES&26
ES&19

5144'
5443'

11157'
11852'

Molchanovo
Monchegorsk

Molchanovskiy
Monchegorsk

Tomsk Oblast
Murmansk Oblast

WS&16
ER&01

5734'
6756'

8347'
3255'

Mondy
Mongoy

Tunkinskiy
Bauntovskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Republic of Buryatia

ES&23
ES&18

5140'
5358'

10059'
11349'

Mortka

Kondinskiy

WS&12

5919'

6600'

Moshkovo

Moshkovskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Novosibirsk Oblast

WS&19

5518'

8336'

Motorovo
Motygino

Krutinskiy
Motyginskiy

Omsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&13
ES&06

5631'
5810'

7110'
9442'

Mozdok

Mozdokskiy

ER&16

4344'

4439'

Muezerskiy

Muezerskiy

Republic of North Ossetia


(Alania)
Republic of Karelia

ER&07

6357'

3200'

Mugur&Aksy
Mukhen

&

Mongun&tayginskiy
Imeni Lazo

Republic of Tuva (Tyva)


Khabarovsk Kray

WS&24
FE&12

5022'
4812'

9026'
13606'

Mukhorshibir
Mulda

Mukhorshibirskiy
Vorkuta

Republic of Buryatia
Republic of Komi

ES&25
ER&06

5102'
6728'

10749'
6340'

Mundybash
Murashi

Tashtagolskiy
Murashinskiy

Kemerovo Oblast
Kirov Oblast

WS&20
ER&19

5312'
5923'

8717'
4858'

Murmansk
Murmashi

Kolskiy
Kolskiy

Murmansk Oblast
Murmansk Oblast

ER&01
ER&01

6856'
6849'

3306'
3249'

Murtygit
Mutoray

Tyndinskiy
Amur Oblast
Tungussko&chunskiy Evenk Autonomous District

FE&01
ES&03

5425'
6119'

12351'
10029'

Muzhi

Shuryshkarskiy

WS&02

6524'

6441'

Myldzhino

Kargasokskiy

Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District
Tomsk Oblast

WS&15

5859'

7828'

Myndagay
Myski

Churapchinskiy
Myski

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Kemerovo Oblast

FE&C
WS&20

6138'
5342'

13311'
8747'

168

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

N
Nadezhny
Nadym

Kyrinskiy
Nadymskiy

Chita Oblast
Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

ES&26
WS&03

5001'
6532'

11149'
7232'

Nagorny
Nagorsk

Neryungri
Nagorskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Kirov Oblast

FE&02
ER&19

5556'
5918'

12454'
5047'

Nakanno
Nalchik

Katangskiy
Nalchik

Irkutsk Oblast
ES&C
Republic of Kabardino&Balkaria ER&16

6253'
4329'

10827'
4336'

Namtsy
Napas

Namskiy
Kargasokskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Tomsk Oblast

FE&B
WS&15

6243'
5953'

12939'
8200'

Narasun
Naryan&Mar

&

Akshinskiy
Chita Oblast
Nenets
Nenets Autonomous District
Autonomous District

ES&26
ER&05

5005'
6739'

11258'
5305'

Narym
Naushki

Parabelskiy
Kyakhtinskiy

Tomsk Oblast
Republic of Buryatia

WS&15
ES&24

5856'
5022'

8135'
10605'

Nazarovo

Nazarovskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

5600'

9024'

Nazino

Aleksandrovskiy

Tomsk Oblast

WS&17;
ES&05
WS&08

6008'

7856'

Nazran
Nedokura

Nazranovskiy
Kezhemskiy

Republic of Ingushetia
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ER&16
ES&07

4313'
5836'

4446'
10038'

Nefedova
Neftegorsk

Uvatskiy
Okhinskiy

Tyumen Oblast
Sakhalin Oblast

WS&13
FE&10

5849'
5259'

7233'
14256'

Neftekumsk
Nefteyugansk

Neftekumskiy
Nefteyuganskiy

Stavropol Kray
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

ER&16
WS&06

4445'
6105'

4459'
7235'

Nelkan
Nelma

Ayano&mayskiy
Sovetsko&gavanskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Khabarovsk Kray

FE&C
FE&13

5739'
4739'

13609'
13910'

Nelyaty

Kalarskiy

Chita Oblast

5629'

11541'

Nemuy

Ayano&mayskiy

Khabarovsk Kray

ES&11;
FE&A
FE&04

Nepa
Nerpo

Katangskiy
Bodaybinskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

Neryungri
Nes

Nevelsk
Never

5541'

13615'

ES&09
ES&10;
FE&A

5914'
5728'

10815'
11518'

Neryungri
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Nenets
Nenets Autonomous District
Autonomous District

FE&02
ER&03

5640'
6636'

12439'
4440'

Nevelskiy
Skovorodinskiy

Sakhalin Oblast
Amur Oblast

FE&14
FE&01

4640'
5358'

14152'
12409'

Nevinnomyssk
Nezhdaninskoe

Nevinnomyssk
Tomponskiy

Stavropol Kray
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ER&15
FE&C

4437'
6230'

4155'
13902'

Nidym
Nikel

Ilimpiyskiy
Pechengskiy

Evenk Autonomous District


Murmansk Oblast

ES&B
ER&01

6407'
6923'

9954'
3014'

Nikolaevsk&
na&Amure
Nizh.Kuranakh

&
&
.

Nikolaevskiy

Khabarovsk Kray

FE&10

5308'

14043'

Aldanskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&B

5849'

12531'

Nizh.Odes
Nizh.Poyma

.
.

Sosnogorsk
Nizhneingashskiy

Republic of Komi
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ER&11
ES&06

6337'
5609'

5453'
9712'

Nizh.Zolotitsa
Nizhneangarsk

Primorskiy
Severo&baykalskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Republic of Buryatia

ER&08
ES&17

6541'
5547'

4010'
10934'

Yevreyskaya
Autonomous Region

FE&11

4757'

13239'

Nizhneleninskoe Leninskiy

Index of settlement names

169

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

Nizhneshadrino

District
Eniseyskiy

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&10;
ES&01

5954'

9038'

Nizhne&
tambovskoe
Nizhneudinsk

Komsomolskiy

Khabarovsk Kray

FE&09

5055'

13811'

Nizhneudinskiy

Irkutsk Oblast

ES&15

5454'

9901'

Nizhnevartovsk

Nizhnevartovskiy

WS&07

6056'

7633'

Nizhniy Bestyakh

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Megino&kangalasskiy Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&B

6157'

12954'

Nizhnyaya Omra
Nizhnyaya Salda

Troitsko&pechorskiy
Nizhnyaya salda

Republic of Komi
Sverdlovsk Oblast

ER&11
WS&11

6245'
5804'

5550'
6042'

Nizhnyaya Tavda
Noginsk

Nizhnetavdinskiy
Ilimpiyskiy

Tyumen Oblast
Evenk Autonomous District

WS&12
ES&A

5740'
6428'

6610'
9114'

Nogliki
Nori

Noglikskiy
Nadymskiy

Sakhalin Oblast
Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

FE&10
WS&03

5148'
6609'

14310'
7225'

Norilsk

Dudinka

Taymyr Autonomous District

6918'

8812'

Norsk

Selemdzhinskiy

Amur Oblast

WS&A;
ES&A
FE&07

5220'

12954'

Noshul
Nosok

Priluzskiy
Ust&eniseyskiy

Republic of Komi
Taymyr Autonomous District

ER&19
WS&A

6008'
7010'

4929'
8219'

Nosovaya

ER&05

6814'

5433'

Nov.Chara

Nenets
Nenets Autonomous District
Autonomous District
Kalarskiy
Chita Oblast

ES&11;
FE&A

5648'

11816'

Nov.Igirma
Nov.Uoyan

.
.

Nizhneilimskiy
Severo&baykalskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Republic of Buryatia

ES&08
ES&10

5707'
5608'

10356'
11143'

Novaya Lyalya
Novoagansk

Novolyalinskiy
Nizhnevartovskiy

Sverdlovsk Oblast
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

WS&11
WS&07

5903'
6156'

6036'
7639'

Novoaltaysk
Novobirilyussy

Pervomayskiy
Birilyusskiy

Altay Kray
Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&19
WS&17;
ES&05

5324'
5657'

8355'
9040'

Novobiryusinskiy Tayshetskiy
Novobureyskiy Bureyskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Amur Oblast

ES&06
FE&11

5657'
4947'

9743'
12952'

Novodvinsk

Primorskiy
Novoerudinskiy Severo&eniseyskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ER&09
ES&02

6425'
5947'

4048'
9329'

Novoilinovka
Novokazimovo

Komsomolskiy
Eniseyskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Krasnoyarsk Kray

FE&09
WS&10;
ES&01

5110'
5934'

13836'
9048'

Novokievskiy
Uval
Novokurovka

Mazanovskiy

Amur Oblast

FE&07

5139'

12854'

Khabarovskiy

Khabarovsk Kray

FE&12

4851'

13418'

Novokuznetsk
Novonikolskoe

Novokuznetsk
Aleksandrovskiy

Kemerovo Oblast
Tomsk Oblast

WS&20
WS&15

5344'
5946'

8706'
7913'

Novonukutskiy

ES&15

5342'

10241'

Novopavlovka

Ust&Orda Buryat
Autonomous District
Petrovsk&Zabaykalskiy Chita Oblast

ES&25

5113'

10913'

Novorossiyka
Novorzhev

Mazanovskiy
Novorzhevskiy

Amur Oblast
Pskov Oblast

FE&07
ER&17

5208'
5701'

12927'
2920'

Novoselenginsk
Novoselovo

Selenginskiy
Novoselovskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ES&24
WS&21;
ES&13

5105'
5459'

10637'
9058'

Novosibirsk
Novy Tap

Novosibirsk
Yurginskiy

Novosibirsk Oblast
Tyumen Oblast

WS&19
WS&12

5501'
5702'

8256'
6743'

170

Nukutskiy

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Novy Urgal

Verkhnebureinskiy

Khabarovsk Kray

FE&07

5104'

13234'

Novy Vasyugan
Noyabrsk

Kargasokskiy
Purovskiy

Tomsk Oblast
Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

WS&14
WS&07

5834'
6310'

7629'
7524'

Numto

Beloyarskiy

WS&06

6330'

7121'

Nyagan

Oktyabrskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

WS&05

6209'

6528'

Nyaksimvol

Berezovskiy

6051'

Nadymskiy

ER&12;
WS&04
WS&03

6225'

Nyda

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

6637'

7256'

Nyrob
Nysh

Cherdynskiy
Noglikskiy

Perm Oblast
Sakhalin Oblast

ER&13
FE&10

6043'
5132'

5644'
14245'

Nytva
Nyukhcha

Nytvenskiy
Pinezhskiy

Perm Oblast
Arkhangelsk Oblast

ER&13
ER&10

5756'
6326'

5519'
4631'

Nyurba
Nyuya

Nyurbinskiy
Lenskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&A
ES&C;
FE&A

6317'
6032'

11820'
11613'

Ob

Novosibirskiy

Novosibirsk Oblast

WS&19

5459'

8243'

Obluche

Obluchenskiy

FE&11

4900'

13103'

Obozerskiy

Plesetskiy

Yevreyskaya
Autonomous Region
Arkhangelsk Oblast

ER&08

6327'

4019'

Obyachevo
Ocher

Priluzskiy
Ocherskiy

Republic of Komi
Perm Oblast

ER&19
ER&13

6020'
5753'

4936'
5443'

Ogodzha
Ogorodtakh

Selemdzhinskiy
Ust&aldanskiy

Amur Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&07
FE&B

5245'
6226'

13232'
13007'

Ogoron
Okha

Zeyskiy
Okhinskiy

Amur Oblast
Sakhalin Oblast

FE&03
FE&06

5357'
5334'

12907'
14256'

Okhotskiy
Perevoz
Oksino

Tomponskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&C

6152'

13531'

Nenets
Nenets Autonomous District
Autonomous District

ER&05

6734'

5211'

Oksovskiy
Oktyabrskiy

Plesetskiy
Ust&bolsheretskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Kamchatka Oblast

ER&08
KK&03

6236'
5239'

3955'
15614'

Oktyabrskoe

Oktyabrskiy

WS&05

6227'

6601'

Olekminsk

Olekminskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&A

6022'

12025'

Olenegorsk
Olenitsa

Monchegorsk
Terskiy

Murmansk Oblast
Murmansk Oblast

ER&01
ER&02

6808'
6628'

3316'
3520'

Olga
Oma

Olginskiy
Primorskiy Kray
Nenets
Nenets Autonomous District
Autonomous District

FE&15
ER&04

4344'
6638'

13517'
4629'

Omutinskoe
Onega

Omutinskiy
Onezhskiy

Tyumen Oblast
Arkhangelsk Oblast

WS&12
ER&08

5628'
6354'

6739'
3806'

Onguday
Onguren

Ongudayskiy
Olkhonskiy

Republic of Altay
Irkutsk Oblast

WS&23
ES&17

5044'
5338'

8607'
10735'

Onnes
Onokhoy

Amginskiy
Zaigraevskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Republic of Buryatia

FE&B
ES&25

6028'
5155'

13105'
10804'

Oparino
Ordynskoe

Oparinskiy
Ordynskiy

Kirov Oblast
Novosibirsk Oblast

ER&19
WS&18

5950'
5421'

4817'
8153'

Index of settlement names

171

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Ordzhonikid&
zevskiy

&

Ordzhonikidzevskiy

Republic of Khakassia

WS&20

5446'

8857'

Orenburg
Orlik

Orenburg
Okinskiy

Orenburg Oblast
Republic of Buryatia

ER&14
ES&23

5146'
5231'

5506'
9949'

Orlovka
Orto&Nakhara

&

Kyshtovskiy
Lenskiy

Novosibirsk Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

WS&14
ES&C;
FE&A

5656'
6049'

7619'
11419'

Osharovo
Osinniki

Baykitskiy
Osinniki

Evenk Autonomous District


Kemerovo Oblast

ES&03
WS&20

6022'
5336'

9819'
8719'

Osinovka
Oskino

Bratskiy
Katangskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

ES&07
ES&C

5617'
6048'

10152'
10759'

Ostashkov
Ous

Ostashkovskiy
Ivdel

Tver Oblast
Sverdlovsk Oblast

ER&17
WS&04

5707'
6053'

3307'
6128'

Ozernovskiy

Ust&bolsheretskiy

Kamchatka Oblast

KK&05

5129'

15630'

Palmino
Pamyati 13
Bortsov

13

Taborinskiy
Emelyanovskiy

Sverdlovsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&12
ES&05

5836'
5612'

6457'
9218'

Panovo
Parabel

Kezhemskiy
Parabelskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Tomsk Oblast

ES&07
WS&15

5858'
5842'

10152'
8129'

Paratunka
Parbig

Elizovskiy
Bakcharskiy

Kamchatka Oblast
Tomsk Oblast

KK&04
WS&15

5257'
5713'

15815'
8124'

Partizansk
Partizanskoe

Partizansk
Partizanskiy

Primorskiy Kray
Krasnoyarsk Kray

FE&15
ES&13

4307'
5529'

13307'
9423'

Pashino
Pashnya

Novosibirsk
Vuktyl

Novosibirsk Oblast
Republic of Komi

WS&19
ER&12

5510'
6320'

8259'
5630'

Pavda
Pavlovsk

Novolyalinskiy
Pavlovskiy

Sverdlovsk Oblast
Altay Kray

ER&13
WS&19

5915'
5319'

5929'
8259'

Pechenga
Pechora

Pechengskiy
Pechora

Murmansk Oblast
Republic of Komi

ER&01
ER&06;
WS&01

6933'
6508'

3112'
5713'

Peleduy
Peles

Lenskiy
Gaynskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Komi&Permyak
Autonomous District

ES&10
ER&19

5937'
6037'

11243'
5159'

Peno
Peregrebnoe

Penovskiy
Oktyabrskiy

Tver Oblast
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

ER&17
WS&05

5655'
6258'

3245'
6505'

Peretychikha
Perevoz

Terneyskiy
Bodaybinskiy

Primorskiy Kray
Irkutsk Oblast

FE&13
ES&11;
FE&A

4711'
5900'

13837'
11655'

Perm
Pervomayskoe

Perm
Pervomayskiy

Perm Oblast
Tomsk Oblast

ER&13
WS&16

5800'
5704'

5613'
8614'

Peskovka
Pestovo

Omutninskiy
Pestovskiy

Kirov Oblast
Novgorod Oblast

ER&19
ER&18

5902'
5836'

5221'
3547'

Petropavlovsk&
Kamchatskiy
Petrovsk&
Zabaykalskiy

&

&

Elizovskiy

Kamchatka Oblast

KK&04

5302'

15838'

Petrovsk&Zabaykalskiy Chita Oblast

ES&25

5116'

10850'

Pinega
Pionerskiy

Pinezhskiy
Sovetskiy

ER&09
WS&04

6441'
6111'

4323'
6251'

172

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Pirovskoe

Pirovskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

ES&05

5737'

9216'

Pit&Gorodok
Pitlyar

&

Severo&eniseyskiy
Shuryshkarskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

ES&06
WS&02

5917'
6550'

9350'
6556'

Plastun
Plesetsk

Terneyskiy
Plesetskiy

Primorskiy Kray
Arkhangelsk Oblast

FE&16
ER&08

4444'
6242'

13617'
4017'

Plotnikovo
Podgornoe

Bakcharskiy
Chainskiy

Tomsk Oblast
Tomsk Oblast

WS&16
WS&15

5651'
5747'

8305'
8238'

Podtesovo

Eniseyskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

5835'

9206'

Podvolochnoe

Ust&udinskiy

Irkutsk Oblast

WS&17;
ES&05
ES&16

5512'

10322'

Pogibi
Pokachi

Okhinskiy
Nizhnevartovskiy

Sakhalin Oblast
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

FE&10
WS&07

5213'
6143'

14139'
7522'

Pokanaevka
Pokcha

Nizhneingashskiy
Troitsko&pechorskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Republic of Komi

ES&06
ER&11

5631'
6256'

9739'
5606'

Pokrovsk
Pokrovsk&
Uralskiy

&

Khangalasskiy
Severouralsk

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Sverdlovsk Oblast

FE&B
ER&13;
WS&04

6129'
6009'

12908'
5949'

Poligus
Polunochnoe

Baykitskiy
Ivdel

Evenk Autonomous District


Sverdlovsk Oblast

ES&02
ER&12;
WS&04

6159'
6052'

9441'
6025'

Polyarnye Zori
Pomozdino

Apatity
Ust&kulomskiy

Murmansk Oblast
Republic of Komi

ER&01
ER&11

6722'
6211'

3229'
5410'

Pompeevka

Oktyabrskiy

FE&11

4821'

13048'

Ponomarevka

Kolyvanskiy

Yevreyskaya
Autonomous Region
Novosibirsk Oblast

WS&18

5608'

8222'

Porkhov
Poronaysk

Porkhovskiy
Poronayskiy

Pskov Oblast
Sakhalin Oblast

ER&17
FE&14

5745'
4913'

2933'
14305'

Porosozero
Pospelikha

Suoyarvskiy
Atkarskiy

Republic of Karelia
Altay Kray

ER&07
WS&22

6242'
5158'

3242'
8149'

Potapovo

Dudinka

Taymyr Autonomous District

6840'

8616'

Pozharskoe

Pozharskiy

Primorskiy Kray

WS&A;
ES&A
FE&15

4615'

13404'

Pozheg
Predivinsk

Ust&kulomskiy
Bolshemurtinskiy

Republic of Komi
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ER&11
ES&05

6158'
5703'

5421'
9326'

Preobrazhenka
Priiskovy

Katangskiy
Ordzhonikidzevskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Republic of Khakassia

ES&C
WS&20

6001'
5439'

10805'
8841'

Progress
Prokhladny

Raychikhinsk
Prokhladnenskiy

Amur Oblast
Republic of Kabardino&Balkaria

FE&11
ER&16

4944'
4345'

12940'
4401'

Prokopevsk

Promyshlennaya

Prokopevsk
Promyshlennovskiy

Kemerovo Oblast
Kemerovo Oblast

WS&20
WS&19

5352'
5454'

8643'
8538'

Psebay
Pudino

Mostovskiy
Parabelskiy

Krasnodar Kray
Tomsk Oblast

ER&15
WS&15

4406'
5734'

4048'
7926'

Puksoozero
Pulozero

Plesetskiy
Kolskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Murmansk Oblast

ER&08
ER&01

6235'
6821'

4036'
3320'

Pushchino
Pyalitsa

Milkovskiy
Terskiy

Kamchatka Oblast
Murmansk Oblast

KK&03
ER&02

5410'
6611'

15800'
3930'

Pyalma
Pyatigorsk

Pudozhskiy
Pyatigorsk

Republic of Karelia
Stavropol Kray

ER&08
ER&16

6224'
4402'

3553'
4303'

Pyt&Yakh

&

Nefteyuganskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

WS&06

6044'

7251'

Index of settlement names

173

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

R
Raduzhny

Nizhnevartovskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Primorskiy Kray

WS&07

6206'

7728'

Rakitnoe

Dalnerechenskiy

Rassvet
Ratta

Birilyusskiy
Krasnoselkupskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

FE&15

4535'

13416'

ES&05
WS&A

5659'
6335'

9129'
8351'

Raychikhinsk
Razdolinsk

Raychikhinsk
Motyginskiy

Amur Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

FE&11
ES&06

4947'
5824'

12924'
9436'

Reboly
Rebrikha

Muezerskiy
Rebrikhinskiy

Republic of Karelia
Altay Kray

ER&07
WS&19

6349'
5300'

3048'
8217'

Revda
Rezh

Lovozerskiy
Rezhevskiy

Murmansk Oblast
Sverdlovsk Oblast

ER&02
WS&11

6756'
5722'

3434'
6124'

Rochegda
Romanovka

Vinogradovskiy
Eravninskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Republic of Buryatia

ER&09
ES&18

6240'
5313'

4323'
11247'

Romny
Rovdino

Romnenskiy
Shenkurskiy

Amur Oblast
Arkhangelsk Oblast

FE&07
ER&09

5042'
6140'

12917'
4232'

Ruchi

Mezenskiy
Rudnaya Pristan Dalnegorskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Primorskiy Kray

ER&03
FE&15

6602'
4421'

4113'
13548'

Rudnichny
Rudnogorsk

Verkhnekamskiy
Nizhneilimskiy

Kirov Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

ER&19
ES&08

5936'
5716'

5226'
10344'

Russkinskaya

Surgutskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

WS&06

6209'

7335'

Safonovo
Salavat

Mezenskiy
Sterlitamakskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Republic of Bashkortostan

ER&04
ER&14

6540'
5321'

4741'
5555'

Salekhard

Priuralskiy

WS&02

6632'

6636'

Salym

Nefteyuganskiy

Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

WS&13

6004'

7128'

Samagaltay
Samburg

Tes&khemskiy
Purovskiy

Republic of Tuva (Tyva)


Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

ES&21
WS&A

5036'
6700'

9500'
7814'

Samoded
Samus

Plesetskiy
Tomskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Tomsk Oblast

ER&08
WS&16

6336'
5644'

4030'
8442'

Samza

Sovetskiy

WS&05

6140'

6428'

Sangar

Kobyayskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&B

6356'

12728'

Sanyyakhtakh
Saraktash

Olekminskiy
Saraktashskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Orenburg Oblast

FE&B
ER&14

6035'
5147'

12403'
5621'

Saranpaul

Berezovskiy

ER&12;
WS&01
ES&22

6415'

6056'

Saryg&Sep

&

Kaa&khemskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Republic of Tuva (Tyva)

5129'

9533'

Savinskiy
Sayanogorsk

Plesetskiy
Beyskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Republic of Khakassia

ER&08
WS&21;
ES&13

6256'
5305'

4009'
9124'

Sayansk
Sazonovo

Ziminskiy
Chagodoshchenskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Vologda Oblast

ES&15
ER&18

5406'
5904'

10209'
3514'

Sedanka

Tigilskiy

Koryak Autonomous District

KK&01

5743'

15817'

174

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Sedelnikovo

Sedelnikovskiy

Omsk Oblast

WS&14

5656'

7518'

Sedkyrkesh
Segezha

Syktyvkar
Segezhskiy

Republic of Komi
Republic of Karelia

ER&11
ER&07

6143'
6344'

5057'
3420'

Segyan&Kyuel
Selenduma

&

Kobyayskiy
Selenginskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Republic of Buryatia

FE&B
ES&24

6400'
5054'

13019'
10613'

Selenginsk
Seliyarovo

Kabanskiy
Khanty&mansiyskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

ES&25
WS&06

5201'
6117'

10651'
7019'

Serebryany Bor
Serginskiy

Neryungri

Oktyabrskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

FE&02
WS&05

5640'
6232'

12449'
6538'

Serov
Severnoe

Serov
Severny

Sverdlovsk Oblast
Novosibirsk Oblast

WS&04
WS&18

5936'
5620'

6035'
7821'

Severny

Ivdel

Sverdlovsk Oblast

6058'

6023'

Severny

Vorkuta

Republic of Komi

ER&12;
WS&04
ER&06

6735'

6407'

Severobaykalsk
Severodvinsk

Severo&baykalskiy

Primorskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Arkhangelsk Oblast

ES&17
ER&08

5538'
6434'

10919'
3949'

Severo&
Eniseyskiy
Severo&Kurilsk

&
Severo&eniseyskiy

& Severo&kurilskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

6022'

9302'

Sakhalin Oblast

WS&10;
ES&02
KK&05

5041'

15607'

Severomorsk
Severomuysk

Severomorsk
Severo&baykalskiy

Murmansk Oblast
Republic of Buryatia

ER&02
ES&10

6903'
5610'

3325'
11335'

Severouralsk

Severouralsk

Sverdlovsk Oblast

6010'

5958'

Shadrinsk

Shadrinskiy

Kurgan Oblast

ER&13;
WS&04
WS&11

5605'

6338'

Shagonar

Ulug&khemskiy

Republic of Tuva (Tyva)

Shaim

Kondinskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

Shakhtersk
Shalakuita

Uglegorskiy
Nyandomskiy

Shalinskoe
Sharomy

Shchelyayur
Shchuche

WS&21;
ES&21
WS&04

5132'

9252'

6020'

6409'

Sakhalin Oblast
Arkhangelsk Oblast

FE&14
ER&08

4910'
6213'

14208'
4015'

Manskiy
Milkovskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Kamchatka Oblast

ES&13
KK&03

5543'
5423'

9345'
15812'

Izhemskiy
Priuralskiy

Republic of Komi
Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

ER&05
WS&03

6519'
6715'

5324'
6841'

Shebalino
Shebunino

Shebalinskiy
Nevelskiy

Republic of Altay
Sakhalin Oblast

WS&23
FE&14

5117'
4625'

8541'
14151'

Shedok
Sheksna

Mostovskiy
Sheksninskiy

Krasnodar Kray
Vologda Oblast

ER&15
ER&18

4413'
5912'

4050'
3830'

Shelekhov
Shenkursk

Shelekhovskiy
Shenkurskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Arkhangelsk Oblast

ES&24
ER&09

5212'
6206'

10405'
4254'

Sherkaly

Oktyabrskiy

WS&05

6245'

6528'

ES&08

5628'

10358'

6251'

11733'

Shestakovo

Nizhneilimskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Irkutsk Oblast

Sheya

Suntarskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

Shilega

Pinezhskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast

ES&C;
FE&A
ER&09

6402'

4406'

Shimbilik
Shipunovo

Krasnochikoyskiy
Shipunovskiy

Chita Oblast
Altay Kray

ES&25
WS&22

5033'
5213'

10934'
8215'

Shira
Shitkino

Shirinskiy
Tayshetskiy

Republic of Khakassia
Irkutsk Oblast

WS&20
ES&06

5429'
5622'

8957'
9820'

Index of settlement names

175

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Shoyna

Nenets
Nenets Autonomous District
Autonomous District

ER&03

6752'

4410'

Shumskiy
Shumunda

Nizhneudinskiy
Kyrinskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Chita Oblast

ES&15
ES&26

5449'
4930'

9907'
11117'

Shuryshkary

Shuryshkarskiy

WS&02

6554'

6521'

Shushenskoe

Shushenskiy

Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District
Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&21;
ES&13

5319'

9156'

Shuy
Sibay

Bay&tayginskiy
Baymakskiy

Republic of Tuva (Tyva)


Republic of Bashkortostan

WS&24
ER&14

5052'
5242'

9020'
5839'

Sidorovsk

Krasnoselkupskiy

WS&A

6636'

8217'

Sim

Ashinskiy

Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District
Chelyabinsk Oblast

ER&14

5459'

5741'

Sinda
Sinegorsk

Nanayskiy
Yuzhno&Sakhalinsk

Khabarovsk Kray
Sakhalin Oblast

FE&12
FE&14

4857'
4710'

13617'
14231'

Sinsk
Sivomaskinskiy

Khangalasskiy
Vorkuta

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Republic of Komi

FE&B
ER&06;
WS&02

6108'
6640'

12650'
6234'

Skovorodino
Slavgorod

Skovorodinskiy
Amur Oblast
Nemetskiy natsionalny Altay Kray

FE&01
WS&18

5359'
5259'

12355'
7838'

Slavnoe
Slyudyanka

Kurilskiy
Slyudyanskiy

Sakhalin Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

KK&07
ES&24

4528'
5139'

14836'
10342'

Smidovich

Smidovichskiy

FE&12

4835'

13348'

Smirnykh

Smirnykhovskiy

Yevreyskaya
Autonomous Region
Sakhalin Oblast

FE&10

4944'

14250'

Snezhnogorsk

Dudinka

Taymyr Autonomous District

6806'

8747'

Sobolevo

Sobolevskiy

Kamchatka Oblast

WS&A;
ES&A
KK&03

5417'

15556'

Sochi
Sofiysk

Sochi
Ulchskiy

Krasnodar Kray
Khabarovsk Kray

ER&15
FE&09

4336'
5133'

3943'
13950'

Sofiysk
Sofporog

Verkhnebureinskiy
Loukhskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Republic of Karelia

FE&08
ER&07

5215'
6548'

13359'
3123'

Sogda
Sogdiondon

Verkhnebureinskiy
Mamsko&chuyskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Irkutsk Oblast

FE&07
ES&10

5020'
5741'

13217'
11208'

Sokol
Solikamsk

Ivolginskiy
Solikamskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Perm Oblast

ES&25
ER&13

5147'
5937'

10726'
5646'

Solnechny
Solnechny

Oymyakonskiy
Solnechny

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Khabarovsk Kray

FE&C
FE&09

6018'
5043'

13733'
13638'

Soloneshnoe
Solovevsk

Soloneshenskiy
Tyndinskiy

Altay Kray
Amur Oblast

WS&22
FE&01

5139'
5412'

8418'
12425'

Solton
Soltsy

Soltonskiy
Soletskiy

Altay Kray
Novgorod Oblast

WS&20
ER&17

5250'
5806'

8628'
3018'

Sonskiy
Sorok

Bogradskiy
Okinskiy

Republic of Khakassia
Republic of Buryatia

WS&21
ES&23

5409'
5219'

9013'
10009'

Sorsk
Sosnogorsk

Ust&abakanskiy
Sosnogorsk

Republic of Khakassia
Republic of Komi

WS&21
ER&11

5400'
6335'

9014'
5353'

Sosnovka
Sosnovo&
Ozerskoe

&

Lovozerskiy
Eravninskiy

Murmansk Oblast
Republic of Buryatia

ER&03
ES&18

6630'
5231'

4034'
11132'

Sosva

Berezovskiy

WS&01

6338'

6206'

Sosva

Serovskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Sverdlovsk Oblast

WS&11

5910'

6150'

Sovetskaya
Gavan

Sovetsko&gavanskiy

Khabarovsk Kray

FE&14

4858'

14017'

176

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Sovetskiy

Sovetskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

WS&04

6122'

6332'

Sred.Urgal
Sredniy Kalar

Verkhnebureinskiy
Kalarskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Chita Oblast

FE&08
ES&11

5110'
5551'

13256'
11722'

Sredniy
Vasyugan
Srednyaya
Olekma

Kargasokskiy

Tomsk Oblast

WS&14

5913'

7814'

Tungiro&olekminskiy Chita Oblast

ES&12;
FE&01

5525'

12032'

Sretensk
Staraya Russa

Sretenskiy
Staraya russa

Chita Oblast
Novgorod Oblast

ES&19
ER&17

5214'
5759'

11743'
3121'

Stavropol
Sterlitamak

Stavropol
Sterlitamakskiy

Stavropol Kray
Republic of Bashkortostan

ER&15
ER&14

4502'
5338'

4159'
5556'

Stoyba
Strelka

Selemdzhinskiy
Eniseyskiy

Amur Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

FE&07
ES&05

5247'
5804'

13143'
9301'

Strelka&Chunya
Strezhevoy

&

Tungussko&chunskiy Evenk Autonomous District


Aleksandrovskiy
Tomsk Oblast

ES&04
WS&07

6144'
6044'

10247'
7735'

Suda
Sukhaya

Cherepovetskiy
Kabanskiy

Vologda Oblast
Republic of Buryatia

ER&18
ES&25

5909'
5232'

3733'
10706'

Sukhobuzimskoe
Sukkozero

Sukhobuzimskiy
Muezerskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Republic of Karelia

ES&05
ER&07

5629'
6310'

9316'
3220'

Sumarokovo

Turukhanskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

6139'

8944'

Sumkino

Tobolskiy

Tyumen Oblast

WS&10;
ES&01
WS&12

5806'

6820'

Suntar
Supra

Suntarskiy
Kondinskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

FE&A
WS&05

6209'
6051'

11738'
6453'

Surgut

Surgutskiy

WS&06

6115'

7324'

Surgutikha

Turukhanskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&A;
ES&A

6351'

8719'

Surovo
Susanino

Zhigalovskiy
Ulchskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Khabarovsk Kray

ES&16
FE&09

5536'
5247'

10536'
14005'

Sut&Khol
Suzun

&

Sut&kholskiy
Suzunskiy

Republic of Tuva (Tyva)


Novosibirsk Oblast

WS&24
WS&19

5124'
5346'

9117'
8218'

Svetlaya
Svetlogorsk

Terneyskiy
Turukhanskiy

Primorskiy Kray
Krasnoyarsk Kray

FE&13
WS&A;
ES&A

4632'
6656'

13819'
8821'

Svetly

Bodaybinskiy

Irkutsk Oblast

5826'

11557'

Svetly

Mirninskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ES&10;
FE&A
ES&C

6302'

11324'

Svirsk
Syktyvkar

Cheremkhovskiy
Syktyvkar

Irkutsk Oblast
Republic of Komi

ES&16
ER&10

5304'
6140'

10320'
5049'

Sym

Eniseyskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

6020'

8821'

Synya

Pechora

Republic of Komi

WS&10;
ES&01
ER&06;
WS&01

6522'

5801'

Syrtynya

Berezovskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

WS&01

6322'

6304'

Tabory
Taezhny

Taborinskiy
Boguchanskiy

Sverdlovsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&11
ES&06

5831'
5804'

6433'
9718'

Taezhny

Kanskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

ES&06

5615'

9458'

Index of settlement names

177

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Taezhny

Sovetskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

WS&04

6109'

6241'

Takhta
Takhtamygda

Ulchskiy
Skovorodinskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Amur Oblast

FE&09
FE&01

5307'
5405'

13951'
12335'

Taksimo
Talaya

Muyskiy
Tayshetskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Irkutsk Oblast

ES&10
ES&14

5621'
5535'

11452'
9743'

Taldan
Talmenka

Skovorodinskiy
Talmenskiy

Amur Oblast
Altay Kray

FE&02
WS&19

5341'
5349'

12448'
8333'

Talnakh

Dudinka

Taymyr Autonomous District

6929'

8827'

Tanguy

Bratskiy

Irkutsk Oblast

WS&A;
ES&A
ES&15

5523'

10101'

Tankhoy
Tara

Kabanskiy
Tarskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Omsk Oblast

ES&24
WS&14

5132'
5653'

10507'
7422'

Tarko&Sale

&

Purovskiy

WS&A

6455'

7747'

Taseevo

Taseevskiy

Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ES&06

5712'

9452'

Tashanta
Tashtagol

Kosh&agachskiy
Tashtagol

Republic of Altay
Kemerovo Oblast

WS&24
WS&20

4942'
5246'

8910'
8753'

Tas&Yuryakh

&

Mirninskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

6147'

11301'

Taurova

Surgutskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

ES&C;
FE&A
WS&13

5935'

7317'

Tavda
Tayga

Tavdinskiy
Yashkino

Sverdlovsk Oblast
Kemerovo Oblast

WS&12
WS&19

5802'
5603'

6515'
8536'

Taylakova

Surgutskiy

WS&14

5915'

7358'

Taymba

Baykitskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Evenk Autonomous District

ES&03

6018'

9857'

Tayshet
Taza

Tayshetskiy
Kurumkanskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Republic of Buryatia

ES&14
ES&18

5555'
5452'

9800'
11109'

Tazovskiy

Tazovskiy

WS&A

6728'

7843'

Teberda

Karachaevskiy

Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District
Republic of
Karachay&Cherkessia

ER&15

4327'

4144'

Teeli
Tegda

Bay&tayginskiy
Khorinskiy

Republic of Tuva (Tyva)


Republic of Buryatia

WS&24
ES&25

5100'
5224'

9011'
10855'

Teguldet
Telemba

Teguldetskiy
Eravninskiy

Tomsk Oblast
Republic of Buryatia

WS&17
ES&18

5718'
5244'

8809'
11316'

Terney
Tevriz

Terneyskiy
Tevrizskiy

Primorskiy Kray
Omsk Oblast

FE&16
WS&13

4502'
5730'

13636'
7224'

Teya

Severo&eniseyskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

6022'

9238'

Tigil

Tigilskiy

Koryak Autonomous District

WS&10;
ES&01
KK&01

5745'

15840'

Timiryazevskiy
Tirlyanskiy

Tomskiy
Beloretskiy

Tomsk Oblast
Republic of Bashkortostan

WS&16
ER&14

5629'
5412'

8452'
5834'

Tisul
Tobolsk

Tisulskiy
Tobolskiy

Kemerovo Oblast
Tyumen Oblast

WS&20
WS&12

5545'
5811'

8818'
6815'

Tobseda

ER&04

6835'

5220'

Toguchin

Nenets
Nenets Autonomous District
Autonomous District
Toguchinskiy
Novosibirsk Oblast

WS&19

5514'

8423'

Togurt
Tokko

Kolpashevskiy
Olekminskiy

Tomsk Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

WS&15
FE&A

5822'
5958'

8250'
11950'

Tokma
Tokur

Katangskiy
Selemdzhinskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Amur Oblast

ES&08
FE&08

5815'
5308'

10552'
13254'

178

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Tolka

Krasnoselkupskiy

Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

WS&A

6400'

8202'

Tolka

Krasnoselkupskiy

WS&08

6323'

8006'

Tomari

Tomarinskiy

Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District
Sakhalin Oblast

FE&14

4745'

14204'

Tommot
Tompo

Aldanskiy
Tomponskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&B
FE&C

5857'
6354'

12617'
13551'

Tomsk
Toora&Khem

&

Tomskiy
Todzhinskiy

Tomsk Oblast
Republic of Tuva (Tyva)

WS&16
ES&14

5628'
5228'

8459'
9607'

Topchikha
Topki

Topchikhinskiy
Topki

Altay Kray
Kemerovo Oblast

WS&19
WS&19

5249'
5516'

8307'
8536'

Torgo

Olekminskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

5827'

11932'

Toyoku

Verkhnevilyuyskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ES&11;
FE&A
FE&A

6308'

12055'

Trakt
Troitskoe

Knyazhpogostskiy
Nanayskiy

Republic of Komi
Khabarovsk Kray

ER&11
FE&13

6241'
4926'

5117'
13633'

Troitskoe

Troitsko&Pechorsk &

Troitskiy
Troitsko&pechorskiy

Altay Kray
Republic of Komi

WS&19
ER&11

5258'
6242'

8440'
5610'

Trusovo
Tsentralny

Ust&tsilemskiy
Tisulskiy

Republic of Komi
Kemerovo Oblast

ER&04
WS&20

6527'
5512'

5122'
8738'

Tsingaly

Khanty&mansiyskiy

WS&06

6010'

6941'

Tsipikan

Bauntovskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Republic of Buryatia

ES&18

5454'

11320'

Tsvetnogorsk
Tubinskiy

Bogradskiy
Baymakskiy

Republic of Khakassia
Republic of Bashkortostan

WS&21
ER&14

5414'
5253'

9027'
5813'

Tugulym
Tugur

Tugulymskiy
Sverdlovsk Oblast
Tuguro&chumikanskiy Khabarovsk Kray

WS&11
FE&05

5703'
5346'

6438'
13650'

Tuim
Tulpan

Shirinskiy
Cherdynskiy

Republic of Khakassia
Perm Oblast

WS&20
ER&12

5419'
6122'

8955'
5724'

Tulun
Tungokochen

Tulunskiy
Tungokochenskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Chita Oblast

ES&15
ES&19

5433'
5332'

10035'
11536'

Tungor
Tuobuya

Okhinskiy
Verkhnevilyuyskiy

Sakhalin Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&06
FE&B

5323'
6159'

14257'
12203'

Tupik
Tura

Tungiro&olekminskiy Chita Oblast


Ilimpiyskiy
Evenk Autonomous District

ES&20
ES&B

5425'
6416'

11955'
10013'

Turan
Turinsk

Piy&khemskiy
Turinskiy

Republic of Tuva (Tyva)


Sverdlovsk Oblast

ES&13
WS&11

5208'
5802'

9354'
6341'

Turka
Turochak

Pribaykalskiy
Turochakskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Republic of Altay

ES&17
WS&23

5256'
5215'

10813'
8707'

Turukhansk

Turukhanskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

6547'

8757'

Turuntaevo

Pribaykalskiy

Republic of Buryatia

WS&A;
ES&A
ES&25

5212'

10738'

Tutonchany
Tyagun

Ilimpiyskiy
Zarinskiy

Evenk Autonomous District


Altay Kray

ES&A
WS&19

6413'
5356'

9347'
8539'

Tyanya

Olekminskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

5902'

11947'

Tymovskoe

Tymovskiy

Sakhalin Oblast

ES&11;
FE&A
FE&10

5050'

14239'

Tymsk
Tynda

Kargasokskiy
Tyndinskiy

Tomsk Oblast
Amur Oblast

WS&15
FE&02

5922'
5509'

8018'
12442'

Tyrma
Tyrnyauz

Verkhnebureinskiy
Elbrusskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Republic of Kabardino&Balkaria

FE&07
ER&16

5002'
4323'

13210'
4255'

Tyukhtet
Tyulgan

Tyukhtetskiy
Tyulganskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Orenburg Oblast

WS&17
ER&14

5631'
5221'

8919'
5611'

Index of settlement names

179

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Tyulkino

Solikamskiy

Perm Oblast

ER&13

5950'

5631'

Tyumen
Tyumentsevo

Tyumenskiy
Tyumentsevskiy

Tyumen Oblast
Altay Kray

WS&12
WS&18

5709'
5319'

6531'
8129'

U
Ubinskoe

Ubinskiy

Novosibirsk Oblast

WS&18

5518'

7941'

Uchaly
Uchami

Uchalinskiy
Ilimpiyskiy

Republic of Bashkortostan
Evenk Autonomous District

ER&14
ES&A

5418'
6348'

5926'
9626'

Udachny
Udskoe

Mirninskiy
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Tuguro&chumikanskiy Khabarovsk Kray

ES&C
FE&04

6624'
5430'

11217'
13424'

Ufa
Uglegorsk

Ufa
Uglegorskiy

Republic of Bashkortostan
Sakhalin Oblast

ER&14
FE&14

5444'
4904'

5559'
14204'

Ugoyan
Ugut

Aldanskiy
Surgutskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

FE&B
WS&07

5915'
6030'

12517'
7401'

Uk
Ukhta

Nizhneudinskiy
Ukhta

Irkutsk Oblast
Republic of Komi

ES&15
ER&11

5504'
6333'

9850'
5343'

Ulan&Ude
Ulety

&

Ivolginskiy
Uletovskiy

Republic of Buryatia
Chita Oblast

ES&25
ES&26

5150'
5121'

10736'
11228'

Ulkan
Ulu

Kazachinsko&lenskiy Irkutsk Oblast


Aldanskiy
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ES&17
FE&B

5553'
6019'

10747'
12725'

Umba
Uporovo

Terskiy
Uporovskiy

Murmansk Oblast
Tyumen Oblast

ER&02
WS&12

6641'
5618'

3420'
6616'

Uray

Kondinskiy

WS&05

6007'

6448'

Urengoy

Purovskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

WS&A

6557'

7822'

Ureysk
Uritskoe

Akshinskiy
Olekminskiy

Chita Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

ES&26
FE&A

5017'
6033'

11312'
12224'

Urusha

Skovorodinskiy

Amur Oblast

5403'

12252'

Usinsk

Usinsk

Republic of Komi

ES&20;
FE&01
ER&05;
WS&01

6600'

5732'

Usogorsk
Usole

Udorskiy
Berezniki

Republic of Komi
Perm Oblast

ER&10
ER&13

6325'
5925'

4842'
5640'

Usole&Sibirskoe
Ust&Barguzin

& Usole&Sibirskoe
&
Barguzinskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Republic of Buryatia

ES&16
ES&17

5245'
5325'

10338'
10901'

Ust&Bolsheretsk
Ust&Ilga

& Ust&bolsheretskiy
&
Zhigalovskiy

Kamchatka Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

KK&03
ES&16

5249'
5500'

15616'
10504'

Ust&Ilimsk
Ust&Ishim

&
&

Ust&ilimskiy
Ust&ishimskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Omsk Oblast

ES&08
WS&13

5800'
5741'

10240'
7110'

Ust&Kada
Ust&Kamchatsk

&
&

Kuytunskiy
Ust&kamchatskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Kamchatka Oblast

ES&15
KK&02

5429'
5613'

10200'
16228'

Ust&Kan
Ust&Karenga

&
&

Sukhobuzimskiy
Tungokochenskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Chita Oblast

ES&05
ES&19

5630'
5426'

9347'
11631'

Ust&Karsk
&
Ust&Khayryuzovo &

Sretenskiy
Tigilskiy

Chita Oblast
Koryak Autonomous District

ES&20
KK&01

5242'
5706'

11848'
15644'

Ust&Koksa
Ust&Kulom

&
&

Ust&koksinskiy
Ust&kulomskiy

Republic of Altay
Republic of Komi

WS&23
ER&11

5016'
6141'

8536'
5341'

Ust&Kut
Ust&Manya

&
&

Ust&kutskiy
Berezovskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

ES&08
ER&12;
WS&04

5646'
6211'

10544'
6021'

180

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Ust&Maya

&

Oymyakonskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&C

6024'

13432'

Ust&Mil
Ust&Nyukzha

&
&

Oymyakonskiy
Tyndinskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Amur Oblast

FE&C
ES&12;
FE&A

5938'
5633'

13305'
12136'

Ust&Ordynskiy

&

Ekhirit&bulagatskiy

ES&16

5248'

10444'

Ust&Padenga

&

Shenkurskiy

Ust&Orda Buryat
Autonomous District
Arkhangelsk Oblast

ER&09

6154'

4238'

Ust&Pit

&

Eniseyskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

5859'

9146'

Ust&Port

&

Ust&eniseyskiy

Taymyr Autonomous District

WS&17;
ES&05
WS&A;
ES&A

6939'

8425'

Ustrem

Berezovskiy

WS&02

6415'

6529'

Ust&Tsilma

&

Ust&tsilemskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Republic of Komi

ER&05

6526'

5209'

Ust&Uda
Ust&Ulagan

&
&

Ust&udinskiy
Ulaganskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Republic of Altay

ES&16
WS&23

5410'
5038'

10301'
8757'

Ust&Urkima

&

Tyndinskiy

Amur Oblast

5518'

12310'

Ust&Usa

&

Usinsk

Republic of Komi

ES&12;
FE&01
ER&05;
WS&01

6559'

5655'

Ust&Vaenga
Ust&Voya

&
&

Vinogradovskiy
Vuktyl

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Republic of Komi

ER&09
ER&12;
WS&01

6300'
6427'

4238'
5740'

Ustyuzhna
Utata

Ustyuzhenskiy
Zakamenskiy

Vologda Oblast
Republic of Buryatia

ER&18
ES&23

5850'
5049'

3627'
10246'

Uvat
Uyar

Uvatskiy
Uyarskiy

Tyumen Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&12
ES&13

5908'
5548'

6852'
9419'

Uzhur

Uzhurskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

WS&20

5519'

8951'

Vagay
Vagay

Omutinskiy
Vagayskiy

Tyumen Oblast
Tyumen Oblast

WS&12
WS&12

5628'
5755'

6718'
6900'

Val
Valentin

Noglikskiy
Lazovskiy

Sakhalin Oblast
Primorskiy Kray

FE&10
FE&15

5220'
4307'

14303'
13417'

Vanavara
Vanino

Tungussko&chunskiy Evenk Autonomous District


Vaninskiy
Khabarovsk Kray

ES&03
FE&14

6020'
4905'

10217'
14015'

Vanzetur

Berezovskiy

WS&02

6332'

6449'

Vanzhilkynak

Kargasokskiy

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District
Tomsk Oblast

WS&09

6023'

8413'

Vasiss
Vayampolka

Tarskiy
Tigilskiy

Omsk Oblast
Koryak Autonomous District

WS&14
KK&01

5721'
5818'

7444'
15923'

Vazhgort
Vekh.Inta

Udorskiy
Inta

Republic of Komi
Republic of Komi

ER&10
ER&06;
WS&01

6400'
6558'

4703'
6019'

Velikaya Kema
Vendinga

Terneyskiy
Udorskiy

Primorskiy Kray
Republic of Komi

FE&16
ER&10

4527'
6326'

13712'
4755'

Vereshchagino

Turukhanskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

6414'

8736'

Verkh.Amga

Aldanskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

WS&A;
ES&A
FE&B

5938'

12706'

Verkh.Avzyan
Verkhneimbatsk

Beloretskiy
Turukhanskiy

Republic of Bashkortostan
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ER&14
WS&09;
ES&A

5331'
6309'

5731'
8758'

Republic of Komi

ER&05

6640'

5658'

Verkhnekolvinsk Usinsk

Index of settlement names

181

Name of
settlement
Verkhnenildina

Cyrillic
name

District

Berezovskiy

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

ER&12;
WS&01

6316'

6130'

Verkhneuralsk

Verkhneusinskoe

Verkhneuralskiy
Ermakovskiy

Chelyabinsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ER&14
WS&21;
ES&13

5352'
5214'

5912'
9301'

Verkhnevilyuysk
Verkhnyaya Salda

Verkhnevilyuyskiy
Verkhnesaldinskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Sverdlovsk Oblast

FE&A
WS&11

6326'
5802'

12017'
6033'

Verkholensk
Verkhoture

Kachugskiy
Verkhoturskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Sverdlovsk Oblast

ES&16
WS&11

5406'
5851'

10534'
6048'

Verkh&Usugli
Verkola

&

Tungokochenskiy
Pinezhskiy

Chita Oblast
Arkhangelsk Oblast

ES&19
ER&09

5241'
6348'

11511'
4508'

Vershino&
Darasunskiy
Viakhtu

&

Tungokochenskiy

Chita Oblast

ES&19

5221'

11533'

Aleksandrovsk&
sakhalinskiy

Sakhalin Oblast

FE&10

5134'

14156'

Vidim
Vikhorevka

Nizhneilimskiy
Bratskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

ES&08
ES&15

5624'
5607'

10307'
10110'

Vikulovo
Vilyuysk

Vikulovskiy
Vilyuyskiy

Tyumen Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

WS&13
FE&B

5649'
6344'

7036'
12136'

Vinzili
Virandozero

Tyumenskiy
Belomorskiy

Tyumen Oblast
Republic of Karelia

WS&12
ER&08

5657'
6400'

6546'
3600'

Vitim
Vitimskiy

Lenskiy
Mamsko&chuyskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Irkutsk Oblast

ES&10
ES&10

5927'
5813'

11233'
11315'

Vladikavkaz

Vladikavkaz

ER&16

4301'

4440'

Vladimirovka

Aleksandrovsk&
sakhalinskiy

Republic of North Ossetia


(Alania)
Sakhalin Oblast

FE&10

5032'

14210'

Volchansk
Volochaevka
2&ya

2&

Karpinsk
Smidovichskiy

Sverdlovsk Oblast
Yevreyskaya
Autonomous Region

WS&04
FE&12

5956'
4834'

6005'
13434'

Vorkuta
Vorogovo

Vorkuta
Turukhanskiy

Republic of Komi
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ER&06
WS&10;
ES&01

6730'
6101'

6401'
8936'

Voskresenskoe
Vostochny

Meleuzovskiy
Makarovskiy

Republic of Bashkortostan
Sakhalin Oblast

ER&14
FE&14

5307'
4816'

5608'
14237'

Vostok
Voyvozh

Poronayskiy
Sosnogorsk

Sakhalin Oblast
Republic of Komi

FE&14
ER&11

4858'
6253'

14254'
5457'

Vozhgora
Vuktyl

Leshukonskiy
Vuktyl

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Republic of Komi

ER&10
ER&12

6433'
6352'

4825'
5718'

Vyazemskiy
Vydrino

Vyazemskiy
Kabanskiy

Khabarovsk Kray
Republic of Buryatia

FE&12
ES&24

4732'
5127'

13445'
10437'

Vyezzhiy Log

Manskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

5458'

9355'

Vysokogorny

Vaninskiy

Khabarovsk Kray

WS&21;
ES&13
FE&09

5005'

13908'

Vzmore

Dolinskiy

Sakhalin Oblast

FE&14

4750'

14231'

Yablonovo
Yagodny

Chitinskiy
Kondinskiy

Chita Oblast
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

ES&26
WS&12

5150'
5944'

11245'
6504'

Yaksha
Yakurim

Troitsko&pechorskiy
Ust&kutskiy

Republic of Komi
Irkutsk Oblast

ER&12
ES&08

6149'
5659'

5649'
10634'

182

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Yakutsk

Yakutsk

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

FE&B

6201'

12943'

Yalutorovsk
Yamarovka

Yalutorovskiy
Krasnochikoyskiy

Tyumen Oblast
Chita Oblast

WS&12
ES&25

5638'
5036'

6617'
11014'

Yarega
Yarensk

Ukhta
Lenskiy

Republic of Komi
Arkhangelsk Oblast

ER&11
ER&10

6325'
6210'

5333'
4906'

Yarkino
Yar&Sale

&

Kezhemskiy
Yamalskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray
Yamalo&Nenets
Autonomous District

ES&07
WS&03

5907'
6651'

9923'
7049'

Yartsevo

Eniseyskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

6014'

9013'

Yashkino

Yashkinskiy

Kemerovo Oblast

WS&10;
ES&01
WS&19

5552'

8525'

Yaya
Yllymakh

Yayskiy
Aldanskiy

Kemerovo Oblast
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

WS&16
FE&B

5612'
5834'

8626'
12640'

Ynakhsy
Yrban

Nyurbinskiy
Todzhinskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Republic of Tuva (Tyva)

FE&A
ES&14

6333'
5243'

11912'
9543'

Ytyk&Kyuel
Yug

&

Tattinskiy
Permskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Perm Oblast

FE&C
ER&13

6221'
5744'

13333'
5609'

Yugorenok
Yugorsk

Oymyakonskiy
Sovetskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

FE&C
WS&04

5945'
6118'

13740'
6318'

Yugydyag
Yuilsk

Ust&kulomskiy
Beloyarskiy

Republic of Komi
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

ER&11
WS&06

6137'
6340'

5456'
6939'

Yukta
Yuma

Ilimpiyskiy
Kemskiy

Evenk Autonomous District


Republic of Karelia

ES&04
ER&07

6322'
6504'

10540'
3315'

Yumurchen
Yurga

Tungokochenskiy
Yurga

Chita Oblast
Kemerovo Oblast

ES&18
WS&19

5336'
5543'

11401'
8453'

Yuroma
Yurovsk

Leshukonskiy
Uvatskiy

Arkhangelsk Oblast
Tyumen Oblast

ER&09
WS&12

6509'
5927'

4534'
6903'

Yurty
Yushkozero

Tayshetskiy
Kalevalskiy
natsionalny

Irkutsk Oblast
Republic of Karelia

ES&14
ER&07

5601'
6446'

9738'
3212'

Yuzhno&
Eniseyskiy
Yuzhno&Kurilsk

&

&

Motyginskiy

Krasnoyarsk Kray

ES&06

5847'

9439'

Sakhalin Oblast

KK&07

4401'

14551'

Yuzhno&
Sakhalinsk

& Yuzhno&Sakhalinsk

Sakhalin Oblast

FE&14

4656'

14243'

ES&15

5315'

10249'

Yuzhno&kurilskiy

Z
Zabituy

Alarskiy

Zakamensk

Zakamenskiy

Ust&Orda Buryat
Autonomous District
Republic of Buryatia

ES&24

5022'

10317'

Zakharkovo
Zalari

Pervomayskiy
Zalarinskiy

Tomsk Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

WS&16
ES&15

5751'
5333'

8621'
10230'

Zanule
Zaozerny

Priluzskiy
Rybinskiy

Republic of Komi
Krasnoyarsk Kray

ER&19
ES&06

6038'
5558'

4924'
9441'

Zapolyarny
Zarinsk

Pechengskiy
Zarinskiy

Murmansk Oblast
Altay Kray

ER&01
WS&19

6925'
5342'

3050'
8457'

Zaterechny
Zavitinsk

Neftekumskiy
Zavitinskiy

Stavropol Kray
Amur Oblast

ER&16
FE&07

4447'
5006'

4512'
12926'

Tyumen Oblast
Tyumen Oblast

WS&12
WS&12

5650'
5630'

6643'
6632'

Zavodopetrovskiy Yalutorovskiy
Zavodoukovsk

Zavodoukovskiy

Index of settlement names

183

Name of
settlement

Cyrillic
name

District

Region

Page ID

Page
Latitude Longitude
number

Zavyalovo

Zavyalovskiy

Altay Kray

WS&18

5250'

8054'

Zdvinsk
Zelenoborsk

Zdvinskiy
Sovetskiy

Novosibirsk Oblast
Khanty&Mansi
Autonomous District

WS&18
WS&05

5442'
6128'

7840'
6402'

Zelenoborskiy
Zelenoe Ozero

Kandalaksha
Tungokochenskiy

Murmansk Oblast
Chita Oblast

ER&01
ES&19

6651'
5340'

3224'
11634'

Zelenokumsk
Zeya

Sovetskiy
Zeyskiy

Stavropol Kray
Amur Oblast

ER&16
FE&02

4424'
5344'

4352'
12715'

Zhatay
Zhelezno&
dorozhny

&

Yakutsk
Ust&ilimskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Irkutsk Oblast

FE&B
ES&08

6209'
5754'

12949'
10246'

Zheleznogorsk&
Ilimskiy
Zheshart

&

Nizhneilimskiy

Irkutsk Oblast

ES&08

5634'

10408'

Udorskiy

Republic of Komi

ER&10

6203'

4932'

Zhigalovo
Zima

Zhigalovskiy
Ziminskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Irkutsk Oblast

ES&16
ES&15

5448'
5354'

10508'
10202'

Zlatoustovsk
Zmeinogorsk

Selemdzhinskiy
Zmeinogorskiy

Amur Oblast
Altay Kray

FE&08
WS&22

5258'
5109'

13335'
8211'

Znamenskoe
Zolotaya Gora

Znamenskiy
Zeyskiy

Omsk Oblast
Amur Oblast

WS&13
FE&02

5707'
5416'

7349'
12637'

Zolotinka
Zulumay

Neryungri
Ziminskiy

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)


Irkutsk Oblast

FE&02
ES&15

5611'
5341'

12450'
10118'

Zvezdny
Zyryanskoe

Ust&kutskiy
Zyryanskiy

Irkutsk Oblast
Tomsk Oblast

ES&08
WS&16

5645'
5649'

10630'
8637'

184

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Index of administrative regions of Russia


(Subjects of the Russian Federation)
The numbers refer to the map at the inside back cover.
Regions without intact forest landscapes
Regions contain at least some intact forest landscapes
Regions outside the area of investigation
Name
AgaBBuryat Autonomous District
Altay Kray
Amur Oblast
Arkhangelsk Oblast
Astrakhan Oblast
Belgorod Oblast
Bryansk Oblast
Chelyabinsk Oblast
Chita Oblast
Chukchi (Chukotka) Autonomous District
Evenk Autonomous District
Irkutsk Oblast
Ivanovo Oblast
Kaliningrad Oblast
Kaluga Oblast
Kamchatka Oblast
Kemerovo Oblast
Khabarovsk Kray
KhantyBMansi Autonomous District
Kirov Oblast
KomiBPermyak Autonomous District
Koryak Autonomous District
Kostroma Oblast
Krasnodar Kray
Krasnoyarsk Kray
Kurgan Oblast
Kursk Oblast
Leningrad Oblast
Lipetsk Oblast
Magadan Oblast
Moscow
Moscow Oblast
Murmansk Oblast
Nenets Autonomous District
Nizhniy Novgorod Oblast
Novgorod Oblast
Novosibirsk Oblast
Omsk Oblast
Orel Oblast
Orenburg Oblast
Penza Oblast
Perm Oblast
Primorskiy Kray
Pskov Oblast
Republic of Adygea
Alphabetical list of administrative regions of Russia

No.
83
75
84
5
60
31
20
68
82
11
46
79
29
14
21
87
74
85
44
40
41
13
30
47
45
69
25
4
33
12
22
23
1
6
37
16
73
71
26
66
52
42
89
15
48

Name
AgaBBuryat Autonomous District
Altay Kray
Amur Oblast
Name
Republic of Altay
Republic of Bashkortostan
Republic of Buryatia
Republic of Chechnia
Republic of Chuvashia
Republic of Dagestan
Republic of Ingushetia
Republic of KabardinoBBalkaria
Republic of Kalmykia (Khalmg Tangch)
Republic of KarachayBCherkessia
Republic of Karelia
Republic of Khakassia
Republic of Komi
Republic of MariBEl
Republic of Mordvinia
Republic of North Ossetia (Alania)
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Republic of Tatarstan
Republic of Tuva (Tyva)
Republic of Udmurtia
Rostov Oblast
Ryazan Oblast
Saint Petersburg
Sakhalin Oblast
Samara Oblast
Saratov Oblast
Smolensk Oblast
Stavropol Kray
Sverdlovsk Oblast
Tambov Oblast
Taymyr Autonomous District
Tomsk Oblast
Tula Oblast
Tver Oblast
Tyumen Oblast
Ulyanovsk Oblast
UstBOrda Buryat Autonomous District
Vladimir Oblast
Volgograd Oblast
Vologda Oblast
Voronezh Oblast
YamaloBNenets Autonomous District
Yaroslavl Oblast
Yevreyskaya (Jewish) Autonomous Region

No.
83
75
84
No.
77
67
81
64
38
65
63
61
59
57
2
76
7
39
36
62
10
55
78
56
49
34
3
86
54
51
18
58
43
35
9
72
27
19
70
53
80
28
50
17
32
8
24
88

185

Administrative regions of Russia (Subjects of the Russian Federation)


The numbers refer to the map on the right.
Regions without intact forest landscapes
Regions contain at least some intact forest landscapes
Regions outside the area of investigation
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45

186

Name
Murmansk Oblast
Republic of Karelia
Saint Petersburg
Leningrad Oblast
Arkhangelsk Oblast
Nenets Autonomous District
Republic of Komi
YamaloBNenets Autonomous District
Taymyr Autonomous District
Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Chukchi (Chukotka) Autonomous District
Magadan Oblast
Koryak Autonomous District
Kaliningrad Oblast
Pskov Oblast
Novgorod Oblast
Vologda Oblast
Smolensk Oblast
Tver Oblast
Bryansk Oblast
Kaluga Oblast
Moscow
Moscow Oblast
Yaroslavl Oblast
Kursk Oblast
Orel Oblast
Tula Oblast
Vladimir Oblast
Ivanovo Oblast
Kostroma Oblast
Belgorod Oblast
Voronezh Oblast
Lipetsk Oblast
Ryazan Oblast
Tambov Oblast
Republic of Mordvinia
Nizhniy Novgorod Oblast
Republic of Chuvashia
Republic of MariBEl
Kirov Oblast
KomiBPermyak Autonomous District
Perm Oblast
Sverdlovsk Oblast
KhantyBMansi Autonomous District
Krasnoyarsk Kray

No.
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89

Name
Evenk Autonomous District
Krasnodar Kray
Republic of Adygea
Rostov Oblast
Volgograd Oblast
Saratov Oblast
Penza Oblast
Ulyanovsk Oblast
Samara Oblast
Republic of Tatarstan
Republic of Udmurtia
Republic of KarachayBCherkessia
Stavropol Kray
Republic of Kalmykia (Khalmg Tangch)
Astrakhan Oblast
Republic of KabardinoBBalkaria
Republic of North Ossetia (Alania)
Republic of Ingushetia
Republic of Chechnia
Republic of Dagestan
Orenburg Oblast
Republic of Bashkortostan
Chelyabinsk Oblast
Kurgan Oblast
Tyumen Oblast
Omsk Oblast
Tomsk Oblast
Novosibirsk Oblast
Kemerovo Oblast
Altay Kray
Republic of Khakassia
Republic of Altay
Republic of Tuva (Tyva)
Irkutsk Oblast
UstBOrda Buryat Autonomous District
Republic of Buryatia
Chita Oblast
AgaBBuryat Autonomous District
Amur Oblast
Khabarovsk Kray
Sakhalin Oblast
Kamchatka Oblast
Yevreyskaya (Jewish) Autonomous Region
Primorskiy Kray

Atlas of Russias Intact Forest Landscapes

Russian Forest Watch, January, 2002

300

Scale: 1 : 30 000 000

300

600

900

Khanty-Mansiysk

Novosibirsk

Omsk

Ekaterinburg

Perm

Syktyvkar

Vorkuta

Murmansk

Arkhangelsk

1200 Kilometers

Nizhny Novgorod

Samara

Astrakhan

Rostov-na-Donu

Kursk

Vologda

Saint Petersburg

Moscow

Smolensk

Kaliningrad

Krasnoyarsk

Norilsk

Irkutsk

Bratsk

Chita

Khabarovsk

Komsomolsk-na-Amure

Vladivostok

Blagoveshchensk

Yakutsk

Magadan

Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk

Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy

Global Forest Watch


10 G Str. NE, Washington, DC 20002 USA
ph. +1-202-7297694 fax: +1-202-7297686
e-mail: gfw@wri.org web: http://www.globalforestwatch.org
Biodiversity Conservation Center
Vavilova str. 41, app.1-2, Moscow 117312 Russia
ph.: +7-095-1245011, -1245022 ph./fax: +7-095-1247178
e-mail: forest@bcc.seu.ru web: http://www.biodiversity.ru
Bureau for Regional Outreach Campaigns (BROC)
Pologaya str. 22, 2nd floor, Vladivostok 690091 Russia
ph.: +7-4232-329797 ph./fax: +7-4232-405132
e-mail: swan1@marine.su
Fund For the 21st Centure Altai
Matrosova str. 120, Barnaul 656052 Russia
ph.: +7-3852-443567
e-mail: katun@ab.ru
Greenpeace Russia
Novaya Bashilovka str. 6, Moscow 125124 Russia
ph.: +7-095-2574116, -2574118, -2574122 fax: +7-095-25710
e-mail: alexy@diala.greenpeace.org web: http://www.greenpeace.ru
International Forest Institute
Profsoyuznaya str. 84/32, Moscow 117910 Russia
ph.: +7-095-3322617, -3322320 fax: +7-095-3322917
e-mail: secretariat@cepl.rcci.ru
International Socio-Ecological Union
Vavilova str. 41, app.3, Moscow 117312 Russia
ph./fax: +7-095-1247934
e-mail: picea@online.ru web: http://www.seu.ru
Krasnoyarsk Regional Environmental Public Movement
"Friends of the Siberian Forests" (FSF)
box 26779, Krasnoyarsk 660036 Russia
ph./fax: +7-3912-498404
e-mail: laletin@online.ru
Research&Development Center ScanEx
Lva Tolstogo str. 22/5, Moscow 119021 Russia
ph/fax: +7-095-2462593
e-mail: info@scanex.ru web: http://www.scanex.ru
Russian NGOs' Forest Club
Vavilova str. 41, app.3, Moscow 117312 Russia
ph./fax: +7-095-1247934
e-mail: forest@ecoline.ru web: http://www.forest.ru
Transparent World
Lva Tolstogo str. 22/5, Moscow 119021 Russia
ph: +7-095-9395640 ph/fax: +7-095-9394284
e-mail: info@transparentworld.ru
web: http://www.transparentworld.ru
World Resources Institute
10 G Str. NE, Washington, DC 20002, USA
ph: +1-202-7297600 fax: +1-202-7297610
web: http://www.wri.org