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INTERCONNECTIONS CHART

Sydney Menne
Directions: Find 2 connections between the Center for Disease Controls health priority areas and your health fair topic.
Describe how your health fair topic relates to all the health priority areas (two facts for each category).
YOU MUST CITE YOUR SOURCEBE SPECIFIC (Author, web site address, journal, magazine, etc)

Use the bullets underneath each priority area as subtopics - if you are having difficulty connecting to the
Main Priority Area.
CDC Health Priority Area
How is the listed health priority area
connected to your topic? Cite your source
Tobacco use

The cigarette is a major source of air pollution.


Secondhand smoke (air pollution) causes more
than 41,000 deaths per year
A cigarette typically emits between 7 and 23
mg of PM 2.5 when it is smoked, depending on
the manner of smoking and the brand
Source: "Tobacco Smoke." The Cigarette Is a Major
Source of Pollution | Tobacco Smoke. N.p., n.d. Web. 31
Dec. 2016.

Nicotine
Smoking
Chew, snuff
Cigarette

"Health Effects of Secondhand Smoke." American Lung


Association. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 Dec. 2016.
Alcohol and other drug use
Drinking
Alcoholism
Drug addiction
All illegal drugs
All medication

Behaviors that contribute to unintentional


injuries and violence
Car accidents
Reckless behavior
Homicide/murder
Self-harm behaviors
Gang violence/bullying

The production and disposal of these drugs has


a negative impact on the overall health and
sustainability of the surrounding environment
Outdoor cannabis (cannabis is a drug)
cultivation operators contaminate watersheds,
divert natural water courses, cause wildfire
hazards, clear cut native plants and vegetation,
and discard non-biodegradable materials which
all is bad for the environment, and wildfires
especially are cause air pollution
Source: "The Connection Between Drug Abuse and the
Environment." Blue and Green Tomorrow. N.p., 09 Feb.
2016. Web. 31 Dec. 2016.

"The Connection Between Drug Abuse and the


Environment." Blue and Green Tomorrow. N.p., 09 Feb.
2016. Web. 31 Dec. 2016.
Violent crimes (including homicide, forcible
rape, assault, and battery) rose 2.2 percent in
areas dealing with local air pollution
temporarily increased by environmental
conditions
In Chicago, air pollution could be pushing up
crime. Neighborhood assaults increase when
gas and particles blow in from the interstates, a
new study finds.
Source: Wallheimer, Brian. "Does Air Pollution Lead to
Violent Crime?" Does Air Pollution Lead to Violent
Crime | The University of Chicago Booth School of
Business. Capital Ideas, n.d. Web. 31 Dec. 2016.
Bliss, Laura. "Air Pollution in Chicago May Be
Affecting Violent Crime." CityLab. N.p., 22 Dec. 2015.
Web. 31 Dec. 2016.

Unhealthy dietary behaviors


High fat/cholesterol diets
High sodium
Eating disorders
Over eating/Binge eating

Inadequate physical activity


Sedentary
Inactive
Lack of exercise (exercise)
Physical activity

Sexual behaviors that may result in HIV


infection, other sexually transmitted diseases, and
unintended pregnancies
HIV/AIDS
STIs/STDs
Premature birth
Birth defects

A healthy diet can protect people from the


effects of air pollution, so eating unhealthy food
along with being in a place with a high PM2.5
particle concentration can be especially bad
Over the past few decades, there has been an
increase in the demand for crops and livestock
from the agricultural industry. This growth in
agricultural production has resulted in an
increase in contaminants polluting soil and
waterways. If theres polluted food, its not as
healthy and fresh.
Source: Bird, Julia. "Can a Healthy Diet Protect Us from
Air Pollution?" Talking Nutrition. DSM, n.d. Web. 31
Dec. 2016.

"Water Contamination." Centers for Disease Control and


Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
11 Oct. 2016. Web. 31 Dec. 2016.
Study found that during exercise, low
concentrations of pollutants caused lung
damage similar to that caused by high
concentrations in people not working out
Athletes typically take in 10 to 20 times as
much air, and thus pollutants, with every breath
as sedentary people do (said by Dr. Kenneth
Rundell). Still say people should not stop
exercising outdoors, people should just keep
distance from exhaust-spewing cars and check
air-quality forecasts before going outside.
Source: Reynolds, Gretchen. "Exercising Outdoors:
How Does Pollution Affect Athletes?" Active.
International Herald Tribune, n.d. Web. 31 Dec. 2016.
Reynolds, Gretchen. "Exercising Outdoors: How Does
Pollution Affect Athletes?" Active. International Herald
Tribune, n.d. Web. 31 Dec. 2016.
Breathing traffic pollution in early pregnancy is
linked to a higher risk for certain serious birth
defects (according to new research from the
Stanford University School of Medicine)
Prolonged exposure to polluted air, water, or
food causes birth defects
Source: Digitale, Erin. "Air Pollutants Linked to Higher
Risk of Birth Defects, Researchers Find." News Center.
Stanford Medicine, 28 Mar. 2013. Web. 31 Dec. 2016.
Larson, Christina. "Air Pollution, Birth Defects, and the
Risk in China (and Beyond)."Bloomberg.com.
Bloomberg, 28 Mar. 2013. Web. 31 Dec. 2016.