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AMERICAN

JOURNAL OF PHILOLOGY
VOLUME
97, NO. 1

WHOLENO. 385

ON SENECA THE ELDER, SVAS. 5.2
extincta tot ante Xersem milia, tot sub ipso iacent:
nulli nisi qui fugerunt supersunt. quid dicam Salamina? quid Cynaegiron referam et te, Polyzele? et hoc
agitur, an uicerimus?
Muller (1887), Bornecque (1907), Edward (1928), and now
Winterbottom (1974)1 print Otto's uicerimus, a conjecture
suggested, presumably, by a similar passage a few lines before:
quid Salamina, quid Marathona referam? pudet dicere:
dubitamus adhuc an uicerimus. But the MSS here have
uiceris; and this, I believe, is what Seneca wrote. Cynegirus,
brother of Aeschylus, joined in the charge on the Persian fleet
at Marathon and managed to grasp the stern of an enemy ship,
losing both hand and life in the attempt. As for Polyzelus,
Herodotus 6.117 tells how an ordinary hoplite named Epizelus
had a vision of an unearthly warrior during the battle and was,
as a result, struck blind; Pseudo-Plutarch, Paral. min. 305B,
briefly tells the same story, but calls the hoplite Polyzelus.2
The scene imagined in the suasoria is this: deliberant
Athenienses an trophaea Persica tollant, Xerse minante rediturum se nisi tollerentur. The rhetor Arellius Fuscus urges
the Athenians to stand firm: he mentions Salamis, the dead
hero Cynegirus, then turning to Polyzelus3 demands: et hoc
1 In the Loeb Classical
Library; Winterbottom's is the first complete
translation into English of this bizarre and important text.
2
As do all other writers except Aelian, De nat. anim. 7.38.
3 Winterbottom
ignores the vocative: "What of Cynaegiros and
Polyzelos?", thus misconstruing the scene.

AMERICANJOURNAL OF PHILOLOGY 97
- 1976
Copyright
by The Johns Hopkins

1-2 (1976)
University Press

TrQaTr?YOv'.2 WENDELL CLAUSEN agitur.tvqo rxo7XOvOroaEru TeOEa/Eavo.4 KvvE'YEQov WENDELL CLAUSEN HARVARD UNIVERSIITY 4 See also Polemo..(Pointed out to me by G.) . KvvaiyEtQov 44: ra&. Ei. 0roLtoavTre HroAtSqjov Ka2AllaZov MtLArtab. aiaQtoria AaxE?atCuvtoi trvvOdvovrat ? TaitrTat xati riooA. W. Bowersock. that you conquered?' Seneca follows the later rhetorical tradition according to which Cynegirus and Polyzelus/Epizelus were Marathonian generals on an equal footing with Callimachus and Miltiades: PseudoPlutarch ibid. an uiceris? 'Is this in doubt.: 'AOrZvaiot6e roov/aQL/aQtxoOv j:r OovGxaTa(pQov?joavTre evaxLoz tAov1?. rey Yav. 6 o&S.