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The Black Sheep Animal Sanctuary
and Opportunity for Animals
2015-2016 Annual Report
It’s been a busy and exciting year, with many new animal
residents arriving. We have extended the sanctuary
infrastructure, fencing, and buildings.
Our charity shops raise funds for the sanctuary
while providing low-cost quality recycled goods to
the community. We have moved one of our opshop
premises from Kilbirnie to Miramar, while maintaining
our stores in Newtown and Ōtaki.
This has all been possible through the goodwill and
tautoko from the community - we’re humbled by your
support!

Our community links

Our heartfelt gratitude goes to our four live-in
caretakers who collectively spend over 100 hours a
week improving animals’ lives, as well as our 26 animal
sponsors and more than 50 volunteers working in our
opshops.
We also give our profound thanks to Recycle Boutique,
Paper Bag Princess and Hunters & Collectors, who
donate clothing to our opshops, as well as Countdown
Newtown, Kaibosh Food Rescue, Home of Compassion,
BGI and Hope Centre Newtown, who contribute
regular animal food donations.

Animal rights, outreach and
animal care education

We hosted five open days and working bees at the
sanctuary, introducing our supporters to the animals
we care for and demonstrating how they lead lives free
of exploitation. We also held five off-site education and
fundraising stalls, to raise awareness of animal rights in
the wider community.
We shared our knowledge of animal care through
an estimated 80 phone or email conversations with
other animal caregivers, and we distributed over 1000
newsletters and 1000 animal rights leaflets.
Sixteen volunteers received training in animal care
through their work with the sanctuary, and we sold 340
A Taste of Freedom vegan cookbooks, encouraging
animal-friendly eating habits.

Every day, we work to create the world we dream of, through rescuing animals and
educating the community about animal welfare and animal liberation

A huge amount of work goes on behind the scenes, and we would like to acknowledge
the dedication and spirit of everyone involved in making this project possible.
Animal rescue and care
We rescued:

33

17

9
2
1
1

194

new residents

short-term rescue animals

rehomed or rewilded
hedgehogs
pukeko
magpie

We cared for:

2
1
1

pigeons
seagull
kitten

ruru – taken to the Nest for treatment

60
16
15
10
5
2

existing longterm residents
ducks
sheep
geese
pigs
cows

55
15
11
5
3

chooks
goats
rats
cats
miniature horses

dogs

Every animal rescued is a symbol of hope and liberation
Introducing Mabel
Mabel arrived at the end of August 2015 - she
was just one of 25 ex-battery hens who were
used by vet students to practice giving
injections and similar treatments. The
students were allowed to euthanise
the birds they were working
with as a practical exercise, but
almost everyone in the class
wanted their birds to live! A
kind student went out of her
way to save them, and got in
touch with us.
We accepted ten of the
hens into our brood.
They
were
severely
defeathered,
so
we
wrapped them up in cosy
jackets sewn from jerseys,
and sheltered them in a
warm home with lots of
straw. They explored their
new surroundings with
glee. Fairly early on we
noticed that Mabel was very
reluctant to get off the straw,
even though she otherwise
seemed healthy - she was eating
well and looked extremely alert
and aware. Mabel had no obvious
injuries. She could take a few normal
steps but then would slowly collapse on
the ground. Apparently, she was reluctant to

walk because her muscles had atrophied, which is not
too surprising given her previous life at a battery
farm with barely room to move.
So we took Mabel into our house and kept
a very close watch on her, encouraging
her to move toward food and lifting
her to her feet at least once an hour
to exercise her muscles. She was
hilarious to share a space with,
intensely curious about every
sound and activity. She quickly
learnt that the cats posed no
threat or competition when
they were being fed and they
were quite intimidated when
they met such a large fearless
creature in their territory.
With constant encouragement
she began to walk more and
more over a three-day period,
becoming as active and able as
any other hen. She still tries to
sneak inside our house whenever
the door is open. If only hens
could be litter box trained! Mabel
returned to the flock as a happy and
healthy hen, ever happy to adventure
and scratch for worms. She is a loyal
companion to anyone who is digging in the
sanctuary gardens, rushing over to investigate
any freshly dug area!

The Black Sheep Animal Sanctuary and Opportunity for Animals opshops are part of The Animal Protection Society inc.

To find out more about these groups visit www.theblacksheep.org.nz