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FINAL EDITION

The Baseball Once-Upon-A Times.
FRIDAY, MAY 28, 1971

VOL. 2, No. 54

Yanks Dazed in Detroit Again,
Cough Up Another Late Lead
DETROIT — Good news for the Yankees:
They don’t return to Tiger Stadium until July 6.
It’ll take them at least that long to exorcise
the nightmares.
Thursday night, for the third game in a row,
the Yanks were flummoxed in the final moments of a game they figured to have had won
— done in this time by a two-run rally in the
bottom of the 12th inning which gave the Tigers a 4-3 victory and a three
-game series sweep.
The series shaped up as a
mismatch between the Yankees, riding a 10-game win
streak and whose start to the
season bordered on historic,
Dick McAuliffe
and the Tigers, whose 8-23
getaway saddled them with the worst record in
the big leagues.
The fortunes of both teams began to turn
Tuesday, when Detroit scored six runs in the
bottom of the eighth inning, turning a 4-2 deficit into an 8-4 victory. Wednesday the Tigers
scored twice in the 10th to win 7-6.
Thursday the Bengals again rallied for two
runs in extras, with Dick McAuliffe driving in
one with a double, then scoring the other on a
single by Aurelio Rodriguez.
The 4-3 triumph was Detroit’s fifth in a row.
The Tigers have won 11 of their past 14.
The late-game heroics overshadowed a dandy duel between the starting pitchers. New
York’s Fritz Peterson, who came into the game
5-0, allowed just one run on three hits in six
innings pitched.
The Tigers’ Mickey Lolich was even better,
hurling 10 innings, allowing two runs and striking out nine. Reliever Bill Zepp (2-1) got the
win for Detroit, throwing one shutout inning.
The Yankees’ Gary Jones (0-2) allowed both
12th-inning runs. Roy White belted his 10th
home run to give New York a short-lived lead
in the top of the 12th.
Indians 7, Orioles 5
BALTIMORE — Ken Harrelson, mired in a
season-long slump, homered for the second
consecutive game as the Indians came from
four runs down to beat the Orioles.
Harrelson was hitting .183 with one home
run in 38 games coming into the series that
featured the second- and third-place teams in
the American League East.
The Hawk homered Wednesday to spark a
go-ahead three-run rally that led to a Cleveland

win. His three-run shot in the eighth on Thursday tied the game at 5-5. Chuck Hinton and
Graig Nettles had RBIs in the top of the ninth.
Tribe reliever Vince Colbert (1-1) pitched two
scoreless innings for the win. The Birds’ Dick
Hall (1-4) took the loss.
Red Sox 2, Senators 1
BOSTON — Gary Peters fired a three-hitter
and John Kennedy tagged a two-run homer as
the Red Sox edged the Senators.
Peters (4-6) fanned eight in his eighth complete game, tied for tops in the majors. Kennedy’s homer came off Washington’s tough-luck
starter Dick Bosman (1-5), who held the BoSox
to two runs in seven innings.
The Senators have played a league-high 18
one-run games, losing 10.
Twins 2, Brewers 1
MILWAUKEE — Jim Kaat scattered nine
hits for his fourth straight complete-game win as
the Twins tripped the Brewers.
Kaat (7-2), tied for the major-league lead in
wins, lowered his ERA to 2.74.
Jim Holt’s RBI single in the sixth inning
broke a scoreless tie. An error on the play allowed a second run to score, giving Kaat all the
cushion he would need.
Loser Marty Pattin (5-5) held Minnesota to
two runs (one earned) in seven innings.

MILWAUKEE — The Milwaukee Brewers
made a bid for Alex Johnson, the California
Angels temperamental outfielder, the Milwaukee Sentinel learned Wednesday. However, the
asking price was too high.
“We’d like to have Johnson,” Frank Lane,
the Brewers’ operational chief, admitted. “Dave
Bristol (Milwaukee manager) had him at Cincinnati when he managed the Reds in 1969 and
he feels we can handle him.
“Bristol said all Johnson needed at Cincinnati
was somebody to befriend him and he got Tommy Helms and Pete Rose to fill that role.”
Lane then cracked: “Now all I have to do is
find a way of getting Helms and Rose.”
SPOKANE — Tom Lasorda, manager of the
Spokane Indians, has been suspended for tonight’s Pacific Coast League game against Eugene as a result of a shoving incident with umpire Paul Runge in a game Tuesday night
against Salt Lake City.
The one-game suspension was announced by
PCL president Bill McKechnie Thursday night
in a meeting with Lasorda, Runge’s umpiring
crew, and members of the press.

TEN CENTS

Major League Standings
A.L. EAST
New York
Baltimore
Cleveland
Washington
Boston
Detroit

W
31
26
23
20
19
18

L
11
15
19
25
24
26

PCT.
.738
.634
.548
.444
.442
.409

GB
--4½
8
12½
12½
14

N.L. EAST
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
New York
St. Louis
Chicago
Montreal

W
28
25
23
22
21
17

L
16
17
18
23
24
20

PCT.
.636
.595
.561
.489
.467
.459

GB
--2



A.L. WEST
Oakland
California
Milwaukee
Minnesota
Chicago
Kansas City

W
31
22
18
20
16
14

L
16
24
22
25
23
28

PCT.
.660
.478
.450
.444
.410
.333

GB
--8½

10
11
14½

N.L. WEST
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Cincinnati
Houston
Atlanta
San Diego

W
28
23
21
21
20
15

L
18
23
24
24
26
31

PCT.
.609
.500
.467
.467
.435
.326

GB
--5


8
13

Thursday’s American League Results

Thursday’s National League Results
Pittsburgh 4, Cincinnati 0
St. Louis 12, Chicago 0
Montreal 8, Atlanta 2
Los Angeles 1, San Francisco 0
(Only games scheduled)

Cleveland 7, Baltimore 5
Detroit 4, New York 3 (12 innings)
Boston 2, Washington 1
Minnesota 2, Milwaukee 1
(Only games scheduled)

Today’s Probable Starting Pitchers

Today’s Probable Starting Pitchers
All times local

All times local

Oakland (Blue 7-1) at Boston (Siebert 4-4), 7:30
p.m.
Kansas City (Wright 0-3) at Washington (McLain 16), 7:30 p.m.
California (Messersmith 4-3) at New York (Kekich
4-1), 8 p.m.
Baltimore (McNally 5-1) at Minnesota (Perry 3-6),
8 p.m.
Detroit (Cain 1-0) at Milwaukee (Parsons 3-2), 8
p.m.
Cleveland (McDowell 4-6) at Chicago (Johnson 35), 8 p.m.

Chicago (Pappas 4-3) at Pittsburgh (Walker 6-2),
8:05 p.m.
Houston (Wilson 5-2) at Cincinnati (Gullett 1-4),
8:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Nash 0-4) at St. Louis (Cleveland 5-4), 8
p.m.
New York (Seaver 6-4) at San Diego (Arlin 5-4),
7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia (Short 3-5) at Los Angeles (Downing 4
-5), 8 p.m.
Montreal (Renko 1-3) at San Francisco (Stone 4-2),
8 p.m.

Pirates, Ellis Toy With Misfiring Big Red Machine
PITTSBURGH — Sparky Anderson had better hope the Big Red Machine is still under warranty.
The hard-hitting Reds, who led the National
League in batting average, home runs and slugging percentage en route to the 1970 pennant,
are suddenly sputtering like a rusty clunker.
They succumbed quietly to the Pirates’ Dock
Ellis on Thursday night, losing 4-0. In the Reds’
past four games, all losses, they have scored one
run. The offensive juggernaut that was blanked
just once last year has been shut out five times in
the first 45 games of 1971.
Ellis (7-2) made it look easy, holding Cincinnati to five singles and striking out a season high
nine batters.
Roberto Clemente broke a scoreless tie with
his third home run, a solo shot in the bottom of
the third off Reds starter and loser Jim Merritt (2
-3). Bob Robertson drove in a second run in the
frame.
Merritt, a 20-game winner in 1970, lasted just

four innings, allowing three runs on nine hits.
Dodgers 1, Giants 0
LOS ANGELES — Don Sutton spun a sixhitter with 10 strikeouts as the Dodgers nipped
the Giants in the rubber match of their threegame series.
Sutton (7-2), who walked three, hit a batter
and had two errors committed behind him, had
just one 1-2-3 inning. He whiffed Willie Mays
with two men on to end the game.
In hurling his second shutout of the season,
Sutton lowered his ERA to an National League
best 1.60.
Giants starter Ron Bryant pitched six strong
innings but fell to 3-2. He allowed the game’s
only run in the bottom of the fifth inning, on
Willie Davis’ two-out triple and Wes Parker’s
RBI single.
Cardinals 12, Cubs 0
ST. LOUIS — Chris Zachary pitched his first
career shutout and added four hits as the Cardinals routed the Cubs.

Major League Leaders

Around Baseball

Brewers Covet Alex,
But Price is Too High

Including final
results of all ball
games

AMERICAN

G

AB

R

H

AVG.

NATIONAL

G

AB

R

H

AVG.

Carew, Min.

40

152

33

59

.388

Aaron, Atl.

43

142

33

54

.380

Murcer, N.Y.

42

162

33

62

.383

Pepitone, Chi.

35

138

20

50

.362

Johnstone, Chi.

35

119

17

45

.378

Johnson, Phi.

41

146

24

50

.342

Epstein, Oak.

42

132

24

48

.364

Sanguillen, Pit.

40

161

20

55

.342

Cater, N.Y.

41

159

17

56

.352

Alou, St.L

43

183

29

62

.339

McMullen, Cal.

45

165

31

57

.345

Beckert, Chi.

44

192

26

65

.339

Mincher, Was.

43

138

24

47

.341

Oliver, Pit.

41

142

17

48

.338

Howard, Was.

45

177

25

60

.339

Jones, N.Y.

40

154

18

52

.338

Tovar, Min.

45

185

29

61

.330

Perez, Cin.

44

172

19

58

.337

Blair, Bal.

37

148

22

48

.324

Bowa, Phi.

42

183

33

61

.333

HR: Smith (Bos.) 13; Powell (Bal.) 12; Nettles
(Cle.) 12; Monday (Oak.) 11; 2 tied with 10.
RBI: Powell (Bal.) 35; White (N.Y.) 35; Monday (Oak.) 34; Smith (Bos.) 34; Bando (Oak.)
33.
Wins: Stottlemyre (N.Y.) 7-1; Blue (Oak.) 7-1;
Kaat (Min.) 7-2; Lockwood (Mil.) 6-1; 2 tied
with 6-2.
Strikeouts: Blue (Oak.) 121; Lolich (Det.) 90;
Coleman (Det.) 66; Blyleven (Min.) 65; Hunter
(Oak.) 62.
ERA: Fingers (Oak.) 1.40; McNally (Bal) 1.87;
Foster (Cle.) 1.98; Blue (Oak.) 2.02; Kline (N.Y.)
2.11.

HR: Stargell (Pit.) 17; Aaron (Atl.) 16;
Robertson (Pit.) 13; May (Cin.) 12; Johnson
(Phi.) 12.
RBI: Aaron (Atl.) 37; Bench (Cin.) 34;
Stargell (Pit.) 33; McCovey (S.F.) 33; Torre
(St.L) 33.
Wins: Blass (Pit.) 7-1; Holtzman (Chi.) 7-2;
Sutton (L.A.) 7-2; Ellis (Pit.) 7-2; Walker (Pit.) 62).
Strikeouts: Seaver (N.Y.) 91; Jenkins (Chi.)
83; Stoneman (Mon.) 66; Holtzman (Chi.) 65;
2 tied with 64.
ERA: Sutton (L.A.) 1.60; Seaver (N.Y.) 1.69;
Holtzman (Chi.) 1.86; Wilson (Hou.) 1.88; Billingham (Hou.) 1.94.

Zachary (3-0) held Chicago to three hits, all
singles, while striking out three and walking
one.
The Cards amassed 25 hits, tied for tops for
the majors this season. Matty Alou led the parade, tying a career high with five safeties.
Eight of the nine Redbirds in the starting lineup
had multiple hits.
Ferguson Jenkins (6-6) lasted just 4 1/3 innings, allowing eight runs on 14 hits. He is 2-6
with a 4.73 ERA since starting the season 4-0.
Expos 8, Braves 2
MONTREAL — Ernie McAnally tossed a
five-hitter as the Expos trounced the Braves to
complete a 6-1 homestand.
Leadoff hitter Ron Hunt tripled and homered
in support of McAnally (4-3). Ron Fairly also
homered for the Expos.
Hank Aaron and Orlando Cepeda both tagged
round-trippers for Atlanta — career No. 608 for
Aaron, and career No. 350 for Cepeda. Braves
starter Tom Kelley (1-1) took the loss.

Williams Girds For
Return to Fenway
OAKLAND (AP) — “I haven’t been in Fenway Park since the Red Sox fired me,” says
Dick Williams, who is going back to Boston a
winner.
The new manager of the Oakland Athletics
also is returning to Fenway
Park with no bitterness, he
says, calling his 1969 dismissal by Red Sox owner Tom
Yawkey “just one of those
things.”
“All I’m thinking about is
that it will be a great series Dick Williams
with the Red Sox,” Williams said before the
A’s headed East for their first 1971 meeting
with Boston on Friday night.
The 42-year-old Williams could become the
first American League manager since Bucky
Harris to win pennants with two different
teams. He took the Red Sox to the championship in 1967 and has the A’s well in front in the
Western Division this season.
Williams says he can’t compare the 1967
Red Sox with the 1971 A’s because “the Red
Sox team didn’t start its drive until after the All
-Star game.”

WILLIAMS, Page 2

FRIDAY, MAY 28, 1971

Page 2

Sc000 000 000reboard
National League Boxscores

American League Boxscores

Oft-Lackadaisical Johnson
Reinstated to Angels Lineup

Boyer on Braves: Too Much
Pressure, Not Enough Talent
ATLANTA (AP) — “We
don’t have the team, pitching
or morale to win a pennant
here,” Clete Boyer said Thursday night as he arrived from
Montreal with hopes of gaining today his release from the
Atlanta Braves.
“You can’t play baseball
every day under pressure like
it is here,” said Boyer, who
added that his discontent with
the Braves organization had
been building for four years.
“Nobody has any enthusiasm, it’s just all a lot of individual play,” he said.
“I’ve just had all I can
take.”
Boyer requested his release
from the Braves earlier this
week when he and Paul Richards, the club’s vice president,
traded verbal blasts publicly.
Richards summoned the
slick-fielding third baseman
by telegram Thursday in
which he said if Boyer failed
to go by the Braves offices by
noon today “you will be suspended without play indefinitely.”
“I hope to hell I wake up in
time so I don’t get caught in
traffic,” Boyer said. “I plan to
be there at 11:59. I want to
find out if his word is any
good. I don’t trust him.”
The spat erupted when the
New York Post quoted Boyer
as saying there shouldn’t be
any place in baseball for a
man like Richards.
Richards replied, “For such
a lousy player, Boyer does a
lot of talking.”
Richards said Thursday that

any attempt at reconciliation
would be “up to his attitude.
Hell, I have no personal feeling about this. It’ll be strictly
professional as far as I’m concerned.”
Asked if he thought the two
could reach accord, Richards
said, “Frankly, I doubt it.”
Boyer left no doubt.
Asked if there were any
conditions under which he
would agree to remain with the
club, Boyer said, “Yes, one, if
he’d let me take over the ball
club and run it. I think I could.
I think I know baseball.”
Boyer said Richards had
agreed to release him if Boyer
would forfeit his 60 days severance play — an agreement
under which each would swap
checks since baseball law requires the club to make the
payment. Boyer said the
amount was about $10,000. He
said he signed this year for
$45,000.
“I don’t believe I can get my
release for 60 days pay,” Boyer said. “He’s trying to trade
me, but I’d prefer he release
me. If he lets me go on waivers, he’ll get $20,000. I don’t
want him to get anything.”
Meanwhile, the Atlanta
Constitution reported today it
learned from an unimpeachable source that Richards would
grant Boyer his release.
“You know why we lose on
the road?” Boyer said.
“There’s no telephone direct to
the dugout like there is in Atlanta so Richards can tell (field
manager) Luman Harris what
to do.”

OAKLAND (AP) — Alex
Johnson is back in the California Angels’ lineup. How long
he’ll stay there is anybody’s
guess.
The defending American
League batting champion went
to manager Lefty Phillips on
Wednesday and asked for a
reprieve from his third benching sentence this season.
After hearing promises that
Johnson would improve on the
frequently lackadaisical attitude he has displayed, Phillips
put him back in left field.
Just three days earlier Phillips had vowed, “Alex Johnson will never play for me
again.”
What changed?
“Alex said he realized he’s
done things wrong this year,”
said Phillips. “He said he feels
he has not done his share to
help us this year.”
Batting a mediocre .234
going into Wednesday night’s
game and frequently criticized
for not hustling, Johnson went
0-for-5 with two strikeouts in
the Angels’ 5-3 victory over
the Oakland Athletics. His
average fell to .227.
Phillips said Johnson “told
me he’d run out ground balls
and play in the field to the best
of his ability.
“I’m gonna hustle, I’m gonna try,” the manager quoted

Williams
From Page 1

Oakland is in command in
the West largely due to baseball’s hottest pitcher, 21-yearold left-hander Vida Blue, who
is 7-1 and will be going for his
fourth straight victory Friday
night.
“And I understand they’ll
pitch Sonny Siebert,” said Williams. “I’m sure they’ve got a
sellout already.”
Williams ended his playing
career in 1964, with Boston,
and managed the team’s International League farm club at
Toronto the next two seasons.
In 1967, he took over a Boston Red Sox team that had fin-

his player as saying.
But Phillips holds a waitand-see attitude toward his
problem player.
Phillips, however, said he
has some hopes for a better
response this time from Johnson because assurances the last
time were through a third party
but “this time he told me himself.”
Despite the troubles with
Johnson, Phillips declared
“I’m not mad at him. Disappointed, yes. But I know when
you’re losing everything is
magnified.
“He has paid the penalty in
fines and now I’m giving him
the chance to be the player I
thought he was when we traded for him.”
Phillips concluded, “It’s a
challenge to the manager to
bring a man through.”
There is also a challenge to
Johnson’s teammates, who
cheered Phillips’ pronouncement that the outfielder would
not play again.
The manager admitted there
was “mixed emotions” when a
club meeting was told Johnson
was back in the lineup.
But, Phillips added: “The
players realize we need Alex
in the lineup. He said that
when Johnson was up bat
Wednesday night, “They were
pulling for him to get a hit.”
ished ninth, a half-game out
of last place, the year before.
The “Impossible Dream” team
won the pennant on the last
day of the 1967 season.
Attendance in Boston went
up from 811,172 to 1,727,832
in the pennant year and Williams appeared set for a long
term a manager.
But the team dipped to
fourth in 1968 and was third
in 1969. Williams, criticized
by several of his star players,
was fired a week before the
1969 season ended.
He spent last season as a
coach with the Montreal Expos of the National League
and got the A’s job in October.