NSW Recreational

Saltwater
Fishing Guide

www.dpi.nsw.gov.au

9/4/13

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CONTENTS
NSW Recreational Fishing Fee...........................................................................................................6-7

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Where do my fishing fees go?.......................................................................................................8-11

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Recreational Fishing Havens........................................................................................................ 12-13

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Community programs..................................................................................................................... 14-15

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Responsible fishing............................................................................................................................ 16-23

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Converting fish lengths to weights......................................................................................... 24-27

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Fishing safely/Safe boating........................................................................................................... 28-33

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Food safety.............................................................................................................................................. 34-35

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Knots and rigs....................................................................................................................................... 36-39

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Saltwater fishing rules...................................................................................................................... 40-46

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How to measure fin fish and invertebrates................................................................................47

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Fish identification................................................................................................................................ 48-49

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Bag limits, size limits and closed seasons for fish............................................................ 50-59

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Bag and size limits for saltwater invertebrates................................................................. 60-63

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Threatened and protected species.......................................................................................... 64-68

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Conserving our biodiversity......................................................................................................... 69-73

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Tide tables............................................................................................................................................... 74-81

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Local recreational fishing guides......................................................................................................81

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Fisheries officers...........................................................................................................................................83

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Contact details...................................................................................................................................... 84-86

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A diary for your catch records.............................................................................................................87

NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide

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This NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide is produced by
the NSW Department of Primary Industries (NSW DPI) for and
on behalf of the state of New South Wales, LMB 3020 Nowra
NSW 2541. It is funded from the Saltwater Recreational Fishing
with comprehensive, user-friendly information. A freshwater
ISBN 978 1 74256 627 6
General disclaimer
This publication may provide assistance or information but NSW DPI and
appropriate for any particular purpose and therefore disclaims all liability for any
error, loss or other consequences which may arise from relying on any information
in this publication.
This publication is a guide only, it does not replace the Fisheries Management Act
1994
It is a summary of laws and regulations at the time of publication and cannot be
used as a defence in a court of law.
I

Advertising disclaimer
NSW DPI acknowledges contributions made by private enterprise. Acceptance
of these contributions does not, however endorse or imply endorsement by the

NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide

© State of New South Wales through the Department of
Trade and Investment, Regional Infrastructure and Services, 2014
No material matter in this publication may be reproduced, stored in a
retrieval system, or transmitted in any form by electronic or mechanical
means, photocopying or recording without the written
permission of NSW DPI.
Sign up for Newscast – an information bulletin for NSW recreational

www.dpi.nsw.gov.au

you’ll be able to wear one all day without it getting in the way. accidents do happen while boating. WEAR A LIFEJACKET IT NEVER RUINED A DAY ON THE WATER .com.WEAR A LIFEJACKET 9 OUT OF 10 PEOPLE WHO DROWNED WHILE BOATING DIDN’T The reality is. With modern inflatable lifejacket styles. Wearing a lifejacket could save your life. Visit lifejacketwearit.au to see the new generation styles.

au or call 1300 369 365. via website www. bait collecting or when collecting invertebrates using methods such as hand gathering. spear fishing. caravan parks. gov. you are required by law to carry a receipt showing the payment of the NSW Recreational Fishing Fee. How much is the fee? How much is the fee? $7 for 3 days $14 for 1 month $35 for 1 year $85 for 3 years .licence. both fresh and saltwater. This applies when line fishing (rod or hand line). This also applies when in possession of fishing gear in. service stations.NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide NSW Recreational Fishing Fee 6 NSW Recreational Fishing Fee NSW Fishing Fee Receipt ALL FEES ARE USED TO IMPROVE RECREATIONAL FISHING When do I need to pay? When you are fishing in NSW waters. digging. on or adjacent to waters. trapping and prawn netting. many Kmart stores. local shops. Where do I pay the fee? You can pay at many outlets throughout NSW. such as most fishing tackle shops. pumping.nsw.

n An Aboriginal person. The general NSW Recreational Fishing Fee means those who receive direct benefits from the resource are being asked to make a small contribution to its future. n An adult assisting persons under the age of 18 to take fish using a single rod per child or to take prawns using a single dip or scoop net per child. n A person fishing in a private dam with a surface area of two hectares or less.7 How do I obtain a plastic receipt? If you pay for a one year or three year period online.nsw.dpi. Always check whether you need to have paid the fee before going fishing. If unsure whether you need to pay the NSW Recreational Fishing Fee.dpi. Call 02 4424 7499 to obtain a replacement or download a form from our website www. n A letter from the Department of Veterans’ Affairs stating that you receive a disability pension of 70 per cent or higher. health care cards and repatriation health cards do not exempt you from paying the NSW Recreational Fishing Fee. For all other payment methods you will receive a paper receipt. It is the responsibility of fishers to ensure they are acting within the law at all times. Exemptions: n Persons under the age of 18. you will receive a plastic receipt in the post.nsw.00. n A Department of Veterans’ Affairs Gold Treatment Card endorsed “Extreme Disablement Adjustment”.gov. The holder of: n A current Pensioner Concession Card issued by Centrelink.gov. n A current Pensioner Concession Card issued by the Department of Veterans’ Affairs. This information is current at time of printing but fisheries regulations may change. you may find that your skipper or guide holds an exemption certificate which covers you as well. Replacement fee receipt Cost for a replacement fee receipt is $7. Recreational fishers must have these cards in their possession to be exempt.au/fisheries NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Interstate and overseas visitors Recreational fishing licences issued by other states. check our website at www. . at a Touch agent or if you renew your licence using your renewal letter. Please note that seniors cards. All visitors must pay the NSW Recreational Fishing Fee. or an intermediate pension. These exemptions only apply to the primary card holder. over the phone. A fifty per cent concession applies to people who only fish in the tidal waters of the Tweed River and prescribed adjacent beach areas.au/fisheries NSW Recreational Fishing Fee If you go fishing aboard a charter vessel or with a fishing guide. n A Department of Veterans’ Affairs Gold Treatment Card endorsed “Totally and Permanently Incapacitated”. territories or countries are not valid for fishing in NSW waters.

There is a lot more information on the website at www. Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs).Where do my fishing fees go? 8 Where do my fishing fees go? Recreational fishing trusts All funds raised from the NSW Recreational Fishing Fee are placed into recreational fishing trusts – one for saltwater and one for freshwater – and can only be spent on improving recreational fishing.au/fisheries Anyone can apply for funding from the trusts to improve recreational fishing. Did you know that the longest time at liberty for any fish reported to the program was a School Shark? It was tagged in 1994 off Ulladulla and recaptured 19 years later off Victoria! . Examples of some trust funded projects are provided as follows.dpi.nsw. Anglers can now receive email alerts for all FAD related news.gov. Twenty five fish aggregating devices (FADs) are placed in coastal waters each year to attract pelagic fish for recreational fishing. tuna. Sign up on our website. sharks and selected sportfish. Details can be found at the above website. Expert anglers provide advice on how funds in the trusts should be spent. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Game Fish Tagging Program The program provides valuable scientific information on the movement and growth of billfish.

A second recreational fishing reef will be deployed off the Shoalhaven area in 2014 and planning is underway for a third reef off Port Macquarie.  NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide . Artificial reefs More estuarine artificial reefs are being installed to create new habitat and enhance recreational fishing. weighs around 42 tonnes and has been deployed at a depth of 38m. For more information see community programs section pages 14-15. Monitoring of the reefs and angler reports have shown excellent catches around the reef. fishing platforms and other infrastructure. Ensure your local group gets involved! Fishcare Volunteer program This dynamic program involves 300 volunteers across the state providing face to face awareness and advising fishers about the rules and values of sustainable recreational fishing. local councils and community groups to improve recreational fishing facilities including fish cleaning tables. The state’s first offshore artificial reef has been deployed off Sydney. fish measuring stations. It stands 12 metres high.9 Where do my fishing fees go? More facilities for fishers Funding grants are available for fishing clubs.

com.safefishing.com.com. For more information on angel ring locations.au. replanting and protecting river bank vegetation and restoring tidal flows in order to provide good water quality. Get your local school involved – for more information see community programs section pages 14-15. This includes running coastal fishing workshop weeks which enable students to put into practice skills learned during their Get Hooked class lessons.au . A primary school education program is teaching children in schools across NSW about safe.angelrings. check www. Marine stocking DPI is implementing a small-scale marine stocking program in 2014 following completion of a feasibility study. Angel rings (life buoys) continue to be installed by the Australian National Sportfishing Association (NSW Branch) at popular rock fishing locations. email info@safefishing. Ensure your safety and check out www. Habitat Action program A range of actions are being funded to protect and repair important fish habitat. Activities include removing barriers to fish migration. Going rock fishing – fish safely! Rock fishing is popular but can be dangerous.Where do my fishing fees go? 10 NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Get Hooked: It’s Fun to Fish education program. responsible and sustainable fishing.au for some tips to keep safe while rock fishing. Get your free DVDs on fishing safely when: n Rock fishing n Freshwater fishing n Spearfishing Go to the safefishing website or. healthy habitats and fisheries.

11 Where do my fishing fees go? Fisheries Officers Trust funded field officers are based in many regions throughout NSW to maximise compliance with fishing rules and provide advisory services to recreational fishers.nsw. Want to apply for funding? More information and the application package can be found on the website at www. n Angler catch programs.gov.dpi. n Biology and behaviour of popular recreational species.au/fisheries.Essential recreational research Activities include: n Recreational fishing surveys.au/fisheries or phone (02) 6691 9681.nsw.dpi. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide . Want to find out more information? Check our website www.gov.

River and Beach (to 500 metres from mean high water level) Yowaka River . Commercial Sea Mullet hauling is allowed within the Recreational Fishing Haven – adjacent to Shaws Bay below the Missingham Bridge – from 1 April to 31 July each year. near Yamba 4) Entrance of Saltwater Inlet – a 300 metre stretch of river on the eastern side of North Arm. Commercial trapping and eel trapping is permitted in the river and Emigrant Creek upstream from the Burns Point Ferry. Locations and areas Tweed River Downstream from Boyds Bay Bridge and from south of Rocky Point east to Fingal Road. Endless Summer Canal Estate. Oxley Cove) Richmond River Downstream from a line drawn east across the Richmond River from the south eastern corner of portion 21 which is the river end of Emigrant Point Lane beside the flood gate. just outside Yamba 3) Oyster Channel Bridge – waters adjacent to Oyster Channel Road Bridge. Crystal Waters Canal. were created along the NSW coast to provide better angling opportunities for recreational fishers. Wommin Lake.Recreational Fishing Havens 12 Recreational Fishing Havens Thirty Recreational Fishing Havens. Seagulls Canal. Blue Water Canals. Money raised from the NSW Recreational Fishing Fee enabled a $20 million buyout to create the havens.e. The havens also promote tourism and create employment in the local areas. near Iluka Camden Haven River Downstream from Dunbogan Bridge and North Haven Bridge (including Gogleys Lagoon) Manning River Downstream from Ghinni Ghinni and Berady Creek (including Scotts Creek) Botany Bay Back Lake (Back Lagoon) Bega River Bellinger River (including Kalang River) Bermagui River Lake Brunderee Burrill Lake Lake Conjola Dalmeny Lake (also known as Mummaga Lake) Deep Creek Hastings River Little Lake (also known as Little Tilba Lake and Hoyers Lake) Lake Macquarie Meroo Lake Narrawallee Inlet Nelson Lake (Nelson Lagoon) Nullica River Pambula River St Georges Basin Lake Tabourie Tomaga River Tuross Lake (including Tuross River and Borang Lake) Towamba River (also known as Kiah River) Wonboyn Lake. Commercial netting is not permitted from Tatham Bridge upstream to ‘Norco Weir’ at Casino NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Clarence River 1) Middle Wall – a 2 kilometre stretch at the Clarence River mouth near Yamba (commercial hauling during the mullet travelling season – April to August – will still be permitted in this area) 2) Romiaka Bridge . Tweed West Canals. between Arris Island and Saltwater Inlet. Wommin Lagoon and six canal estates beyond that area are also recreational fishing only (i. areas largely free of commercial fishing.waters adjacent to the Romiaka Channel Road Bridge.

Nullica River Towamba River (or Kiah River) Wonboyn Lake.nsw. Lake Brunderee Little Lake (or Little Tilba Lake and Hoyers Lake). St Georges Basin for Flathead. including canal estates. and the Hastings River at Port Macquarie for Bream. Bega River Back Lake. the lower parts of the Tweed River for Mulloway. Kingfish and Tailor. River and Beach South Coast Wide choice of lakes and estuaries. Tailor and Mulloway. Bermagui River Nelson Lake. Recreational Fishing Havens Recreational Fishing Havens in NSW Tweed River 4sq km from the mouth of the Tweed River to Boyds Bay bridge and from Rocky Point east to Fingal Road. Richmond River around Ballina for Whiting and Luderick. .gov. and a spot at the entrance of Saltwater Inlet. Leatherjackets and Blue swimmer crabs. Sydney Botany Bay Dalmeny (or Mummaga Lake) Tuross Lake/Tuross River. Lake Conjola Narrawallee Inlet. Meroo Lake Sydney Try Botany Bay.13 Refer to the website www. Richmond River 8sq km from the mouth of the Richmond River to Emigrant Creek.dpi. Bermagui and Bega Rivers are renowned for Bass. Bream and Whiting. Pambula River Yowaka River. Bellinger/Kalang Rivers Deep Creek Clarence River Four locations within the river – a 2km stretch at middle wall. Hastings River Camden Haven River Down from Dunbogan and North Haven bridges including Gogleys Lagoon. Tuross Lake for Flathead. including Scotts Creek. around Romiaka bridge and Oyster Channel bridge. Luderick. Bream and Tailor. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Tomaga River St Georges Basin. It’s a top spot for Bream.au/fisheries for local area maps. Burrill Lake Lake Tabourie. Central Coast or Newcastle Check out Lake Macquarie for Flathead. Trevally and Tailor. Lake Macquarie Manning River Downstream from Ghinni Ghinni and Berady Creek. North Coast Plenty of good fishing.

au for dates and locations. Help take a kid fishing NSW DPI fishing workshops are run by fisheries education officers with assistance from Fishcare Volunteers. Assist at your local school The NSW DPI Get Hooked It’s Fun to Fish program encourages children to take an active role in the management of their waterways and fish stocks. Volunteers also assist on the water in dedicated Fishcare boats.000 anglers between the ages of 8-14 years learn the basics of fishing. If you want your child to attend a workshop.000 contacts. assisting in research programs and advisory displays at trade shows and field days. participating in around 400 events per year and making over 40.000 kids from around . habitat rehabilitation. They teach hands-on fishing techniques such as casting. The program continues to grow with over 300 volunteers across NSW. check out www. rigging. threatened species and aquatic habitat. Volunteers provide assistance in activities such as children’s fishing workshops. the importance of protecting our fishing resources. and safe handling of fish at a local fishing spot. and some fishing club members. volunteers assist around 7. Each year. Aimed at primary school students. As a volunteer you will be helping to create better awareness among anglers and the wider community about sustainable recreational fishing.nsw. angler education.NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Community programs 14 Community programs Your fishing fee supporting community programs The NSW DPI Fishcare Volunteer Program is funded by the NSW Government through the recreational fishing trust. Fishing workshops also teach young children about good fishing practices.dpi.gov. each year around 6.

au/fisheries or email fishcare@dpi.au 15 Community programs 100 schools are introduced to saltwater and freshwater fishing.nsw.gov.gov.dpi. please visit www. To volunteer you will need to be available on some weekdays between 9am-3pm. Fishcare Volunteers have no enforcement powers. the significance of aquatic life and life-cycles.Who can become a volunteer? If you are over 18 years of age and can assist around one day per month. Conditions apply. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide .nsw. and the importance of sustaining quality fish habitat while practising safe and responsible fishing behaviours. Fishcare Volunteers are a valuable resource for teachers. especially in the fishing workshop component of the program. you can apply to become a volunteer. If you would like more information about these programs or would like to apply to become a Fishcare Volunteer. catch and release skills.

au/fisheries n n n n n n as simple as using a cable tie to reduce the opening size at the front of the trap. The entrance is still big enough for all size crabs to enter. Release all others using best practice catch and release techniques. n If you retain your catch. A “witches hat” – the float keeps the netting material off the bottom and the inverted mesh operates as an entanglement net. consider moving to a different location to reduce potential discard mortality.nsw. Please be extra vigilant.gov. n U  se environmentally friendly fishing tackle such as lead-alternative sinkers. n Be considerate of others and keep noise to a NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Reduce wildlife injuries Birds. n Only catch sufficient fish for your immediate needs. To reduce injuries: n Avoid using unattended lines and check your crab traps and nets regularly. biodegradable line and non-stainless hooks where possible. Collect and dispose of any discarded fishing line. This can be A cable tie being used to reduce the size of the entrance of a crab trap. Reducing set time for any fishing gear reduces the chances of harm to accidentally caught aquatic animals. If you are fishing deep water. The following guidelines can be applied whether you take fish for the table or release your fish. especially in residential areas. Avoid using stainless steel hooks. Remember all fish. To reduce the probability of entangling non-target animals.dpi. Don’t leave anything behind. check traps and nets regularly and consider moving gear further downstream. n If using a crab trap with a flexible opening. Avoid bird feeding and nesting areas. Even plastic bags can prove fatal when sea turtles mistake them for natural jellyfish prey. n Dispose of all litter and fish waste responsibly. turtles. To avoid wastage always chill your catch immediately with ice.Responsible fishing 16 Responsible fishing NSW DPI promotes responsible fishing practices. minimum. dispatch all fish and invertebrates swiftly and humanely. Ensure any additional fish caught have the best chance of survival once released. An example of a hoop or lift net – the ring and net lay on the bottom when set and crabs feeding on the bait are caught when the net is lifted. platypus and other aquatic animals can be accidentally injured by discarded fishing tackle and unattended fishing gear such as crab traps and nets. An entrance of a crab trap which has been reduced in size. For more information visit www. are important to the ecosystem. Cut discarded fishing line into small pieces to avoid entanglement in case birds and other animals scavenge rubbish bins. other gear or rubbish. . witches hats can easily be converted to a lift net by removing the float from above the mesh and re-attaching the float line with several lengths of lines directly to the ring. including scavengers. n Act responsibly when you have reached your bag limit and you remain at the fishing grounds. install a barrier to help exclude turtles from entering the trap. n Using crab traps and nets when fishing towards an estuary’s headwaters has a higher risk of interacting with platypus.

17 Catch and release fish survival results Main factors for reduced survival Australian Bass 92-100 Deep hooking Dusky Flathead 91-96 Poor handling and sub-optimal live well water quality Luderick 99 Poor handling Mulloway 73-81 Deep hooking and poor handling Pearl Perch 91 Deep hooking Sand Whiting 93 Deep hooking Silver Trevally 68-98 Excessive time in poorly designed live wells Snapper 67-92 Deep hooking and poor handling Tailor 92 Deep hooking Yellowfin Bream 72-97 Deep hooking Yellowtail Kingfish 85 Deep hooking NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Per cent survival Responsible fishing Species .

it is important to follow a few simple rules: n Use methods and rigs that reduce deep hooking. n Responsible fishing n NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Maximising fish survival To maximise fish survival when catching and releasing fish. cut the line as close as possible to the fish’s mouth rather than removing the hook.18 R  emove hooks from mouth-hooked fish. aerated system. n Minimise the length of time the fish is out of the water and swiftly unhook. n If the fish is hooked deeply. n Use fish-friendly landing nets with knotless mesh. deep-hooked bream shed hooks within around three weeks. eyes and fins. n U  p to 76 per cent of released line-cut. n If live wells are used. n Try to remove hooks and release fish as quickly as possible. simply cutting the line increases shortterm survival from 12 per cent to more than 85 per cent. The use of needlenosed pliers or hook retrieving devices can greatly reduce time spent unhooking. n A  void knotted landing nets which may damage the fish’s scales. n P  oorly designed live wells reduce fish survival – particularly species such as Silver Trevally where survival dropped from 98 per cent to 63 per cent. n C  ompared to removing swallowed hooks from Bream and Mulloway. Ideally unhook fish while they are still in the water. skin. . n Target fish using artificial lures. ensure they are of sufficient size and maintain good water quality by using a flow through. n Choose non-offset circle hooks when using bait. This is especially important during the summer months when water temperatures are high.

19 Responsible fishing Other practices to help increase survival n Use suitable tackle for the species that you are targeting and minimise the time spent to land the fish. or filing down larger barbs. n Use barbless hooks or hooks with reduced barbs to make hook removal easier and minimise hook damage. n This can be achieved by squeezing barbs down with pliers. Remember many surfaces. can become very hot in the sun. Take care to revive any fish upon release if they appear exhausted (struggling to hold themselves upright and/ or unable to swim away).  smooth. n H  andle fish firmly and carefully. hold the fish upright facing towards the current until it starts to show signs of recovery. If there is any water current. Avoid dropping fish on to the bottom of boats and other hard surfaces. wet surface such as vinyl A covered foam is best to lay fish on if they are removed from the water. n NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide . Do not throw them. n Gently hold or push the fish through the water so that it obtains a good flow of water over its gills. especially metal. n Carefully return fish to the water. n Use wet hands or wet gloves when handling a fish to minimise damage to its skin.

lightly hook the bait so that the point and barb are exposed or “bridle” the bait.Responsible fishing 20 NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide n If you are going to take photos of your fish before release. . eyes or unsupported by the jaw. n Do not hold fish by the gills. flathead and kingfish. n Avoid lifting very large fish from the water. support the fish properly. With their success already proven for many game fish species. n Do not bury your hook (particularly with tough baits). n W  hen using soft baits like peeled prawn or bread it is not so important to expose the hook as fish will crush the bait during the bite and become hooked. the hooks are now used increasingly for many other common recreational species including bream. Circle hooks bring about many benefits for anglers. How to use circle hooks Circle hooks have been shown to increase the survival of angler released fish. but they do require a few minor changes to your normal fishing techniques.

allow the fish time to take the bait into its mouth and then apply slow and steady pressure to set the hook in the mouth area.21 Responsible fishing n D  o not strike at the fish. n Use a de-hooker or needle-nosed pliers to help with unhooking. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide . The fish often hook themselves. n N  on-offset circle hooks are recommended for the best mouth-hooking results.

n the stomach protruding from the mouth and n intestines protruding from the anus. It is illegal for an unlicensed boat to be used for charter fishing in NSW. Do not tie up to lease marker posts. Boat wash may wash over oyster crops from lease infrastructure and may pose significant risk of injury to industry workers on the lease. Please ensure that your vessel. it will return to normal when the fish returns to depth. Kidney Stomach More information on these techniques is available under best practice at: www. Returning the fish to capture depth is crucial in maximising the post-release survival of barotrauma-affected fish. The effects and severity of barotrauma injuries increase with depth of capture and susceptibility varies between fish species. n Release your fish quickly with minimal time out of water. Avoid puncturing the stomach if it is protruding from the mouth. Charter boat fishing Charter boat operators providing fishing trips for anglers in NSW estuaries and ocean waters need a licence to operate their business. including the oysters. your vessel’s wash and your fishing tackle does not interfere with any part of an oyster lease.recfishingresearch. baskets and trays may cause serious injury to oyster industry workers so please fish responsibly around oyster leases. Hooks and lures abandoned on oyster sticks. These experienced charter fishing operators usually provide all fishing equipment and are also keen to provide advice and assist with your fishing activities to help you learn more about fishing. This provides the fish with a good chance to return to depth without any treatment n If the fish is displaying barotrauma symptoms and unable to swim down: n Use a release weight to help return the fish to depth n If no other option is available vent the fish to release the expanded gases This technique requires considerable experience to carry out successfully without inadvertently damaging internal organs as the size and location of the swim bladder varies from species to species. .Responsible fishing 22 Swim bladder Heart NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Barotrauma Fish may suffer from barotrauma injuries when they are caught from deep water.org/ category/practices Oyster leases The NSW oyster industry supports valuable regional employment and investment. Make sure the boat has a current NSW DPI charter fishing boat licence and NSW Roads and Maritime Services survey before you board it. n bulging eyes. Physical symptoms of fish suffering from barotrauma can include: n an inflated abdomen. Barotrauma occurs as a result of the expansion of gases in the swim bladder and other organs as the fish are not able to adjust to the rapid decrease in water pressure when they are pulled towards the surface. You will recognise a licensed NSW charter fishing boat by distinctive markings on the boat – the letters CFB followed by a number.

contact 1800 025 520 or visit our website www.dpi. Catch and release mats for recreational fishers A catch and release measuring mat has been designed to help fishers accurately record their The catch and release mats are available for purchase. visit www.gov.dpi.nsw.au/fisheries NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide .gov. The mat includes full colour illustrations of the most popular species of fish and conversion tables so approximate weight can be estimated from length measurement.23 Responsible fishing If you have any concerns contact your local NSW DPI fisheries office or for more information and a list of charter fishing operators.nsw.au/fisheries catch.

4 47 2.6 50 2.3 44 1.3 43 1.0 30 0.1 54 1.7 33 0. Dusky Flathead Australian Bass NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Total length used for both legal length measurements and weight calculation Total length used for both legal length measurements and weight calculation Total Length (cm) Weight (kg) Total Length (cm) Weight (kg) Total Length (cm) Weight (kg) Total Length (cm) Weight (kg) 25 0.6 38 1. Remember: Legal length is the total length measurement of the fish. Measuring length Fork length measurements have been used for Yellowfin Bream.1 105 9.8 29 0. Sand Whiting.2 110 10.6 74 2.3 26 0.4 49 0. sex. season and recent feeding activity.5 36 0.5 70 2.7 28 0.4 42 0.8 52 2.8 41 1.9 39 0.9 45 0.4 66 2. Fork length is measured from the snout to the fork of the tail.2 58 3.1 42 1. dispatch all fish and invertebrates swiftly and humanely.6 49 2.1 40 0.7 50 0.7 51 2.5 32 0.5 27 0.2 41 0.9 46 0.6 40 1. If you retain your catch.2 48 0.0 47 0.6 . Total length is measured from the snout to the tip of the tail.8 95 6. Yellowtail Kingfish.3 56 1.4 45 1.3 59 4.3 62 1.3 60 1. Snapper. Tailor and Australian Salmon in the conversion tables and total length used for Australian Bass.8 37 1.7 85 4.6 76 3.6 78 3.9 34 0.6 37 0.2 31 0.7 44 0.2 35 0.Converting fish lengths to weights 24 Converting fish lengths to weights Fish biologists have calculated length and weight relationships for some popular fish species which can be used to estimate the weight of a fish by measuring its length.5 39 1. Dusky Flathead and Mulloway.4 68 2.1 56 3.9 52 0.5 36 0.5 43 0.7 80 3.4 64 1.9 54 3.8 38 0.8 90 5.8 53 2. Please note that these figures are estimates only and individual fish weight can vary depending on age.4 46 1.4 60 4.9 100 7.3 58 1.0 55 3.1 57 3.5 48 2.5 72 2.

7 60 4.3 43 0.8 84 10.1 28 0.3 Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) 40 1.7 35 0.9 1.0 46 2.9 96 15.0 58 3.1 68 5.6 Converting fish lengths to weights Juvenile Snapper Sand Whiting Total length for legal length measurement 34 0.2 38 0.5 49 0.8 100 17.6 33 0.8 52 2.0 NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Fork length for weight calculation .2 1.9 42 1.0 1.4 48 0.5 82 9.2 80 9.9 27 0.1 86 11.7 36 0.4 88 12.5 54 3.8 Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) 37 0.25 Snapper Total length for legal length calculation Adult Snapper Fork length for weight calculation Fork Length (cm) 30 31 32 33 34 Weight (kg) 0.5 74 7.2 56 3.9 Fork Length (cm) 35 36 37 38 39 Weight (kg) 0.2 40 0.4 64 4.5 32 0.3 72 6.4 47 0.7 0.4 44 1.2 50 2.6 48 2.8 90 12.7 76 8.2 41 0.7 0.3 42 0.3 44 0.5 94 14.2 66 5.6 0.5 62 4.1 92 13.1 29 0.4 98 16.1 1.0 78 8.1 70 6.5 50 1.3 Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) 31 0.8 0.9 26 0.2 30 0.4 46 0.2 39 0.3 45 0.8 25 0.

3 68 4.0 64 3.3 34 0.7 60 3.5 72 4.4 36 0.5 56 2.6 58 2.6 125 24.8 86 8.8 78 6.5 30 0.0 80 6.2 90 9.3 140 35.4 92 9.7 62 3.0 65 3.6 105 14.5 52 1.5 78 7.3 155 47.0 160 52.7 72 5.0 Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) 54 2.2 70 4.2 100 12.1 110 17.5 115 19.0 88 8.9 64 3.9 60 2.4 62 3.4 Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) 82 7.9 68 4.6 150 43.5 66 3.0 84 7.0 98 12.9 145 38.5 70 5.0 40 0.0 .6 94 10.8 67 3.4 71 4.26 Converting fish lengths to weights Tailor Total length for legal length measurement Fork length for weight calculation Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) 38 0.9 74 6.8 76 5.0 61 2.0 120 22.2 76 6.7 73 5.0 63 3.1 32 0.8 96 11.0 69 4.7 135 31.6 48 1.8 80 7.2 66 4.0 50 1.1 130 28.4 42 1.2 46 1.8 44 1.7 Yellowtail Kingfish Total length for legal length measurement NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Fork length for weight calculation Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) 74 5.

6 40 1.6 54 3.9 36 1.6 43 1.4 30 0.7 35 1.7 55 4.4 17.3 2.3 12.9 2.8 46 2.4 84 88 92 100 108 112 120 130 140 150 160 6.3 Australian Salmon Converting fish lengths to weights Total length for legal length measurement Mulloway Fork length for legal length measurement Total length used for both legal length measurements and weight calculation Fork length for weight calculation Weight (kg) 0.0 49 2.1 4.6 5.7 45 2.5 53 3.0 48 2.1 NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Fork Length (cm) 30 33 36 40 42 45 48 51 Total Length (cm) .0 41.3 1.4 60 5.9 1.9 57 4.8 41 1.2 59 5.1 28 0.7 34.1 8.5 1.8 27 0.2 1.8 2.5 4.3 3.5 32 0.3 27.9 47 2.9 Weight (kg) Total Length (cm) Weight (kg) 45 48 49 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 1.27 Yellowfin Bream Fork length for weight calculation Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) 25 26 Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) 33 0.1 58 4.8 3.9 4.4 39 1.1 Fork Length (cm) 54 57 60 63 66 69 72 75 Weight (kg) 2.4 0.1 6.5 31 0.5 34 1.4 6.1 37 1.2 38 1.2 1.0 3.4 29 0.7 5.7 44 2.5 3.1 50 3.6 0.8 56 4.3 52 3.5 0.2 7.7 0.2 51 3.6 22.1 42 1.5 1.3 Fork Length (cm) Weight (kg) 0.1 10.9 14.0 1.

Always let friends or family know where you are going and when you wilI be back.au or www. n Plan an escape route in case you are washed in. Light clothing such as shorts and a spray jacket will let you swim easily If you are washed in. Carry safety gear. one person can stay and help while the other alerts emergency services (dial 000). NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide  only in places you know are safe and n Fish never fish in exposed areas during rough or large seas.com. Jumpers may be heavy and difficult to take off. weather or swell threaten your fishing spot then leave immediately. If someone is washed in. Also nW bring something buoyant that can be easily thrown and held to help you stay afloat. Stay calm. especially rock fishing. Be aware that conditions may change dramatically in a short period of time.  not jump in if someone is washed into n Do the water. n Wear light clothing. n Observe  first. fish later. If there is an angel ring nearby know how to use it. Cleats. n Wear sandals and sandshoes with non slip soles suit different surfaces.safefishing. can be dangerous. Dial 000 to alert emergency services to get help.  ear a life lifejacket. swell and tidal conditions before going fishing. n Inform  others of your plans. Wave conditions can get worse as the tide changes .com. A rock fishing safety DVD is available free of charge from the following websites www. Make sure you are aware of local weather. a float and torches.au. Fish in a group of a least three people and within sight of each other. Listen to weather forecasts or call the weather information line on 1900 937 107.you should know whether the tides are high or low and coming in or going out. swim away from the rocks and look for a safe place to come ashore or stay afloat and wait for help to arrive. by emailing info@safefishing. n Stay  alert.Fishing safely/safe boating 28 Fishing safely Going rock fishing Fishing. Follow these basic safety tips at all times when rock fishing: n Never fish by yourself. Spend some time (at least 30 minutes) watching your intended spot before fishing to get an idea of the conditions over a full swell/wave cycle.  for advice from locals who know the n Ask area. Never ever turn your back on the sea.  appropriate footwear. if you are washed in. . Use your rope or something that floats to rescue the person.rfansw. Carry ropes.au These two images were taken eight minutes apart on a rock platform at Coogee.com. They will always tell you when an area is dangerous. Use the appropriate shoes for the conditions. if the waves.

on or near the surface whilst separated from their vessel for extended periods of time. participants in these activities can be at risk of being hit by a boat whilst on or near the surface. Boat or buoy/float flag As required by maritime regulations. the blue and white ‘Alpha Diver in the Water’ flag should always be displayed from your vessel or from a buoy nearby the boat. n Always handle your speargun as if it is loaded. such as spearfishers. are at risk.  carrying spearguns through n Avoid crowded areas.  propeller strike. one diver down” rule  point your speargun at anyone n Never (including yourself ) for any reason. Divers in the water-keep a proper lookout Spearfishing. To alert other vessels in n Avoid the vicinity that there are divers on the surface ensure your safety vessel clearly displays the international diver-down flag “A” and that all divers in the water are towing a highly visible float with a safety flag attached. It is also strongly recommended that an additional high visibility yellow/green flag is flown under the Alpha flag if divers. Shallow water blackout is a real danger. Alpha flag NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide  load your speargun while out of n Never the water.  spearfish alone and always inform n Never others of your fishing plans. when spearfishers. n Be considerate of other water users.  dive with a buddy in sight of you at n Always all times and practice the “one diver up. However. snorkelers or SCUBA divers are diving from a vessel. Always load and unload your speargun while in the water. Both skippers and divers must maintain personal responsibilities and keep a proper lookout at all times. snorkelling and SCUBA diving are popular activities on the state’s coastal waterways.29 Fishing safely/safe boating Safe spearfishing Spearfishing can be a particularly dangerous form of recreational fishing. A few key safety tips include: n Never hyperventilate. .  spearfishing in popular n Avoid swimming locations.

Never reverse without looking. at least 2m above the water surface. Select neutral if in doubt or before allowing anyone alongside or to board. n Navigate with caution at all times within 200 metres of the shore where divers may be present. Pass well clear on the seaward side. locate all divers first and then progress slowly. all vessels must slow down to less than 10 knots whenever within 60 metres of a person in the water. such as in fog. their vessels or their floats and flags. n Maintain a slow safe speed of less than 10 knots until well clear of any divers. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Know where divers go n Consider areas where divers may be present – headlands. n Maintain awareness of boat traffic around you. Watch out. Boat flags must be at least 1m vertically above the boat‘s superstructure or if flown from a buoy. Remember. n Keep well clear from any flags and floats and watch out for divers in the water. You should also tow a float and flag when diving from the shore. n Use a large brightly coloured float for maximum visibility. Additionally it is also recommended that by adding a high visibility yellow/green second flag & upgrading to a similar high visibility coloured float you will maximise the chance of being seen by passing or approaching boats. When spearfishing and diving n Make sure you tow a float and flag whenever you are operating away from your vessel. n Always keep an eye on the prop area and make sure it is clear while ever the engine is running. it is strongly advised as a minimum. n Spearfishing and snorkelling vessels are not always at anchor and often move about picking up and dropping off divers. Be careful of float ropes fouling your propeller. glare. raise your speargun vertically above you to be more visible to others. particularly if people are boarding over the stern. n Avoid passing between a diving vessel and the shore. Listen and look as you ascend. or when within 60m of a float/flag. Be particularly careful when visibility is poor. boat buoy or the shore. n Avoid pick-ups that might place your boat in danger from a sudden wave. It is better to have all the divers swim out to deeper water so the pick-up doesn’t have to be rushed. spearfishers may be up to 40 metres or more from their float and flag. that the Alpha flag be flown from a brightly coloured personal float and towed no more than 40m away from the diver. A person in the water could easily be hurt if you suddenly have to move your vessel. Consider switching off the engine.Fishing safely/safe boating 30 The Alpha Diver in the Water flag on the boat (or buoy) must be at least 40cm by 40cm. rocky reefs. Make sure the Alpha flag is in good condition and of right size and height to comply with regulations. n Check your local boating maps for likely areas before going out. engine off is best when people are in the water near the stern. It is also recommended your personal float has a minimum volume of 5 litres. It is recommended the flags are flown as high as possible. It is recommended that flags on personal floats be at least 15cm high and 25cm wide and that they be flown above the float. If concerned. low light and surface chop. Take Care – Be Prop Aware n When picking up divers. . slow down and keep clear n Always keep an eye out for divers’ floats and flags whenever in areas where diving activity is likely. Neutral is good. bomboras and sheltered coves. n Remember. Personal float and flags When spearfishers and snorkelers are diving away from their vessel.

Check batteries beforehand and run the auxiliary motor periodically. Your chances of disorientation and drowning are increased. Visit www.Alpha flag with additional high visibility flags Safe boating Any person who drives a recreational powered vessel on NSW waterways at a speed of 10 knots or more must hold a current Roads and Maritime Services Boat Drivers Licence. If going out to sea.  the vessel is fully equipped n Ensure for emergencies.05% but be careful.gov. at night or when alone n At other times of heightened risk n Children under 12 must wear a lifejacket at most times.  non-slip shoes and take waterproof n Wear jackets and warm clothing.au for more information.rms.rms. as well as further information.nsw. advise the local coastal patrol as you leave port. . waves and the sun combine to multiply the effects of alcohol.0. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide  someone know your expected time of n Let return. Raise your head often and look about. n Ensure  the vessel is seaworthy and fuel tanks full.  how the safety gear works. Key safe boating tips include: n You must comply with all Roads and Maritime Services requirements including the new lifejacket rules. The booklet. n Shorten up your float cord to suit shallower depths and thereby keep your float/flag closer to you. Detailed advice on safe boating is available in the Roads and Maritime Services publication “Boating Handbook”.  on’t go overboard with alcohol.nsw.  ake it a habit of wearing a lifejacket. The wind.au 31 Fishing safely/safe boating n Consider  carefully where you dive – don’t rely solely on your float and flag to protect you – use common sense and avoid busy channels and other areas of high boating traffic. It is important to stay safe when out on the water.gov. Make sure n Know everyone knows where it is stowed and how to use it. n Take plenty of food and water.8m in open water. Know n M when you and your passengers are required by law to wear a lifejacket including: n When crossing a bar n When on a vessel less than 4. The blood n D alcohol limit on the water is the same as on the roads . n Move the flag when you move. can be obtained by calling the Roads and Maritime infoline on 131 256 or by checking website www.

nsw. licenced person or support vessel) (also known as Type 1. stop and watch n On the wave pattern.  approaching the bar.  void navigating close to commercial n A oyster leases which are marked by vertical white posts and signs. 2 or 3) Boating alone (without an accompanying Level 100+. The location of oyster lease areas can be found on NSW Roads and Maritime Boating Maps and on Australian Navigation Charts. 2 or 3) On open (ocean) waters Level 100+ (also known as Type 1) On alpine waters Level 100+.  crossing a bar on an ebb or a runn Avoid out tide when the most dangerous wave conditions usually occur. Level 50 or level 50S adult. fish with another vessel.safefishing.  to take any waves as close to head n Try on as possible.  a front approaches or the weather n If changes suddenly head back to shore.rms. Level 50 or level 50S (also known as Type 1.com.8m to 8m that is underway On enclosed waters Level 100+. fishers and spearfishers are advised to remain outside oyster lease areas. n Use a tide chart and check the weather. Level 50 or level 50S (also known as Type 1. try to nW remain on the back of a larger wave and avoid surfing down any wave face. What lifejacket am I required to wear on my recreational vessel? Boating activity / Vessel type NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Children under 12 years of age On all boats less than 4. Bar crossings Bar crossings can be dangerous and require utmost care. Level 50 or level 50S (also known as Type 1. nW  atch out for divers in the water and their floats and flags. 2 or 3) At all times on open waters Level 100+ (also known as Type 1) At all times on alpine waters Level 100+. For more information on safe boating and safe fishing.au n Wear a lifejacket each time crossing the bar. For personal safety.  hen coming back in over a bar. Slow down and keep well clear of any divers. It is not worth your life and perhaps the lives of others just for a day of fishing. Look for a flat period and proceed when safe. especially when near rocky shores and headlands.8m (unless specified below) Situation Lifejacket options At all times in a vessel under 4. please visit www.Fishing safely/safe boating 32 n If  possible. Level 50 or level 50S (also known as Type 1.8 m When in an open area of a vessel 4. 2 or 3) All occupants on enclosed waters when: Boating at night Level 100+.au and www. 2 or 3) . In an emergency the other can help or radio for help. recreational boaters.gov. snorkelers or spearfishers.  not go if in doubt or if you lack n Do experience.

Level 50 or level 50S (also known as Type 1. 2 or 3) Crossing coastal bars All vessels. catamaran & centreboard boats) Sailboarding Kiteboarding When more than 400m from shore: On enclosed and alpine waters Level 100+. 2 or 3) On open waters as required elsewhere in table for particular vessel type (*Unless specified elsewhere in this table ie. 2 or 3) All occupants on open waters at all times Level 100+ or Level 50 (also known as Type 1 or 2) All occupants on alpine waters at all times Level 100+. 2 or 3) On open waters at all times Level 100+ or Level 50 (also known as Type 1 or 2) Tow-in-surfer on open waters Level 100+. Level 50 or level 50S (also known as Type 1.g. 2 or 3) On enclosed or alpine waters at all times Level 100+. 2 or 3) All towing Anyone being towed at all times on all waters Level 100+. 2 or 3) On white waters at all times Level 100+. 2 or 3) Off the beach sailing vessel (e. Level 50 or level 50S (also known as Type 1. Level 50 or level 50S (also known as Type 1. 2 or 3) On open waters Level 100+ or Level 50 (also known as Type 1 or 2) When more than 400m from shore & kiting alone: Level 100+. Level 50 or level 50S (also known as Type 1.Level 100+. Level 50 or level 50S (also known as Type 1. 2 or 3) On open waters at all times Level 100+. Level 50 or level 50S (also known as Type 1. Level 50 or level 50S (also known as Type 1. everyone on board Level 100+* (also known as Type 1) Skipper’s responsibility When the skipper considers a “heightened risk”** situation exists: On enclosed and alpine waters Level 100+. 2 or 3) Canoes and kayaks On enclosed waters more than 100m from shore Level 100+. Level 50 or level 50S (also known as Type 1. ‘open waters’ requirements) NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide On any waters PWC (jetski) 33 Fishing safely/safe boating When none of the situations above apply then at all times if the vessel is used more than 200m from shore on enclosed waters to transport people or goods between the shore and a vessel. 2 or 3) On alpine waters at all times Level 100+. Level 50 or level 50S (also known as Type 1.. or between vessels . Level 50 or level 50S (also known as Type 1. Level 50 or level 50S (also known as Type 1.

green. n Don’t  let recreational seafood or bait drip on to other food.water. Pipis and cockles may contain toxins due to natural algal blooms.au/fisheries n Avoid  collecting and eating shellfish recreationally. Runoff water following heavy rainfall carries pollution into waterways. n Do  not collect shellfish.edu/redtide. The water may have a musty. Mass fish kills can sometimes see numbers of dead or dying fish appear along the coastline. earthy or pungent smell.whoi.gov. or n Telephone 1800 999 457 NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide n Fishing closures related to food safety. If you intend to eat your catch. yellow. Like all fresh food from animals. If you choose to collect and eat shellfish such as mussels or oysters do not collect after heavy rainfall. The cause of death is often unknown and consumption of these fish can be a health risk. Check the current waterway status for: n Known algal ‘red alerts’ via n Local signs n Local media n The NSW Office of Water website: www. issued by NSW DPI via website: www.nsw. A maximum of 50 pipis is permitted to be collected for bait and within 50 m of the high tide mark (see page 61 for additional restrictions). brownish or an oily or milky appearance. Scum may form on the water surface. Tips for safe eating n Always cook recreational seafood thoroughly. Don’t collect pipis Collecting pipis by recreational fishers for human consumption is prohibited in NSW. Algal blooms can appear as water discolouration including red. there are some important tips to follow to be able to enjoy your catch and avoid causing illness. n Remember  that cooking will not destroy or remove toxins which might be present in seafood from poor quality waters.gov. n Do  not eat fish which have washed up on beaches and shorelines. nO  nly catch or collect seafood when water quality is good.au. never eat raw shellfish which has been collected recreationally as they are not subject to the same strict food safety controls as commercially harvested shellfish.Food safety 34 Food safety Many people enjoy eating the fish and seafood they catch. seafood needs to be handled carefully to minimise the risk of food poisoning. Eating seafood contaminated with toxins can result in serious illness or death. n For  further background on the risks of toxic algal blooms go to www. sometimes including sewage. n Keep equipment clean. Some other blooms are not visible but are highly toxic even at low levels.dpi. . Remember that water quality can change and not all harmful things can be seen with the naked eye. The blooms are not always visible. gastropods or crustacea such as crabs or prawns from waters affected by algal blooms. Tips for fishing Important tips for catching or collecting seafood include: n Keep fresh seafood cold and covered by putting in ice or a refrigerator straight away. ‘Red alert’ algal warnings and visible blooms Some algae produce harmful toxins that can build up in marine shellfish such as mussels. In particular.nsw. oysters and crustacea such as crabs or prawns.

nsw. Sewage spills sometimes contaminate waters with harmful bacteria and viruses. foodauthority. Orange Roughy and Catfish should be limited to the amounts in the table below. However they should limit their consumption of certain species which are higher in mercury because too much mercury can harm developing nervous systems. women planning pregnancy and young children can continue to consume a variety of fish as part of a healthy diet. 35 More information For more information from the NSW Food Authority phone 1300 552 406 or check the websites at www. Sydney Harbour and Parramatta River Due to elevated levels of dioxins detected in some fish and seafood in Sydney Harbour/Port Jackson and the Parramatta River: n No fish or seafood caught recreationally west of Sydney Harbour Bridge should be eaten.au or www.gov. catches should be released. All commercial fishing in Sydney Harbour/ Port Jackson has been halted.au/sydneyharbour n It  is prohibited to collect shellfish such as mussels.au Children (up to 6 years) Rest of the population 1 serve equals 75 grams 1 serve equals 150 grams 2 – 3 serves per week of any fish and seafood  not listed below 2 – 3 serves per week of any fish and seafood not listed in the column below OR OR 1 serve per week of Orange Roughy (Sea Perch) or Catfish and no other fish that week 1 serve per week of Shark (Flake) or Billfish (Swordfish / Broadbill and Marlin) and no other fish that week OR 1 serve per fortnight of Shark (Flake) or Billfish (Swordfish / Broadbill and Marlin) and no other fish that fortnight    NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Pregnant women and women planning pregnancy 1 serve equals 150 grams Be mercury aware Mercury in fish Australian Dietary Guidelines advise eating one or two fish meals per week for good health. pipis and cockles from Sydney Harbour. Food safety Fishing closures Do not take seafood listed in a NSW DPI food safety closure notice.gov. .gov. Some waterways have been contaminated by industrial pollution and are not suitable for catching or collecting seafood. For further information go to www. However. Shark (flake). or to the amounts in the dietary advice for each species.nsw. Most fish caught in Australia are low in mercury. but some fish have higher mercury levels so it’s best to know the mercury levels of different types of fish and how often to eat each type.    Pregnant women. oysters. consumption of billfish (Swordfish and Marlin).foodstandards.n Fish  or seafood caught recreationally east of Sydney Harbour Bridge should be limited generally to no more than 150 gms per month. Check the table below to select fish safely. Food Standards Australia and New Zealand has found it is safe for all population groups to eat 2-3 serves per week of most types of fish. Sewage spills are especially high risk for shellfish.foodauthority.

Make this configuration.The loop C disappears as the knot slides down on to the eye.Moisten the knot before pulling tight. Use more wraps with lighter line. D B 2.Knots and rigs 36 Knots and rigs Palomar knot. 6. Trim the tag when complete. The double wrap provides a protective cushion for added strength. It is a general-purpose connection used in joining fishing lines to swivels. This is an excellent knot for connecting hooks and swivels to the end of fishing lines. less with heavier line. A 3. Pass it through the eye of the hook. A 4. The Palomar knot is quick to tie and forms a strong knot. 3.Moisten the line and form a knot by pulling tag A against loop C.Extend the loop and pass it over the hook.Form an overhand knot on the eye of the hook. 2.Double the line and form a loop about 10 cms long. C C C A NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide D 1. It can also be used to attach your fishing line to your reel by passing the line around the back of the spool rather than through the eye of the hook.Thread line through eye. 7.Begin wrapping loop C with tag A.This forms a slipping knot and loop. hooks and artificial lures.Continue wrapping four to six times. 4. 8. .As you continue to pull on the tag all of the spirals in the tag are transferred to the loop D. snaps. C D C A B 5. A very dependable knot even for deep sea fishing. 1. Uni knot or Grinner knot.

1.Make a simple overhand knot in the leader and
thread the tag through the eye of the lure or fly.

2.Pass the tag back through the overhand knot
alongside the other strand.

3.Now bend the tag back so it goes back up through
the knot as shown. The sequence is over, over,
under, over, under.

4. Moisten the knot before pulling tight. Trim the tag.

37

Knots and rigs

Perfection loop. Of many loops used to attach flies and lures, the Perfection loop is favoured
because it lays relatively straight and does not point out to the side. It is tricky to tie so follow the
instructions carefully.

Double uni knot. This is a useful knot for joining two lines.

2.Wrap the double strand inside
the formed loop.

3.Make four wraps in all.

4.Do the same with the other line
so the knot in each line is tied
around the other.

5.Moisten the line and tighten
each knot in turn.

6.Draw the knots together, tighten
once more, then trim the tags.

NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide

1.Overlap the lines to be joined
then encircle one line with the
tag of the other.

Knots and rigs

38

Running sinker rigs. A running sinker is not fixed but slides along the line until it reaches a
stop or the hook. They are used where it is an advantage to let fish pick up bait without feeling
the weight of a sinker.
1. The simplest rig features a small ball sinker running to the
hook but there is no provision for a heavier leader.

2. A conventional running sinker features a swivel or ring as a
sinker stop above the hook and allows a leader to be tied on
below the swivel or ring.
3. The EzyRig illustrated is threaded on to line just like a sinker
but the clip allows light sinkers to be swapped for heavier and
vice versa.
1.

2.

NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide

3.

Fixed sinker rigs. A simple
bottom fishing rig is the
basic fixed Paternoster rig.
It consists of a sinker tied or
looped on to the very end
of the line with one or more
hooks attached above the
sinker at various intervals
using twisted dropper
loops so they stand away
from the main line and
don’t tangle.
The use of a dropper
loop to attach hooks is an
easy rig to prepare and
strong enough for most
fishing situations.
Using a swivel or ring as
a tie off point results in the
strongest possible rig of
this type and is preferred by
many fishers.

39

Knots and rigs

Running floats – bobby cork rig.
Running floats such as a bobby cork rig have a
hole through their centres just like a running
sinker. In effect, they are used to present bait
at a deeper depth than the length of drop
which can be cast using a fixed float.
When casting out the baited hooks sink to
the depth pre-determined by the position
of the lower ball or bean sinker on the line,
whether that is 2 metres or 10 metres and
below the top stopper after casting

The waggler float.
Waggler floats are by far the most diverse float
design and can be used for almost all forms
of fishing. The straight design of wagglers
provides good buoyancy and excellent
visibility at their tip.
Depending on the situation a waggler can be
fixed in one spot or left free to slide up and down
the line. Straight wagglers as shown here are
fixed to the line with two locking shot. Extra shot
is added down the line for balance so that only
the tip will appear above the surface.

NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide

Fixed stem floats.
Stem floats consist of a thin stem with a
bulbous body for added buoyancy. Most have
a plastic or rubber sleeve which positions over
the top of the stem to fix the float in position
on the line. Steps to follow in rigging a fixed
stem float are:
Remove the sleeve from the stem and pass
the line through it and then through the line
guide at the stem base.
When the required length of line has been
passed through the guides, slide the sleeve back
into position to fix the float on the line.
With the float in position, tie on the hook and
weight the line with enough split shot to keep it
in an upright position in the water.

Fishing rules: permitted methods and activities

40

Permitted methods and activities
Fishing rules apply to help ensure healthy and
sustainable fisheries for future generations.
Abiding by the rules will help preserve our
saltwater recreational fisheries. Plan your
activity well in advance and ask about
restrictions or closed areas at your local NSW
DPI fisheries office. Different rules apply
for freshwater fishing and you should refer
to the NSW DPI Recreational Freshwater
Fishing Guide.
All fin fish and invertebrates such as crabs,
prawns, worms, nippers and squid are subject
to bag limits and many are also subject to size
limits. See bag and size limit section (pages
50-63) for details.
Recreational equipment and maximum
permitted number per person:
Rods or lines: 4 rods or handlines in total.
Hooks per line: 3 hooks or three gangs
of hooks*.
Rod/hand jigging line: 1 rod or handline
with up to 6 single hooks with lures
attached#.

Line fishing

n A 
maximum of four rods or lines can be
used by any one person at any one time.
n If any rods or lines are left unattended, they
must be clearly marked with the fisher’s
name and address or name and boat
registration number.
n A maximum of three hooks or three gangs
of hooks can be attached per line. A gang of
hooks should have no more than five hooks.
n One line may have up to six single hooks
with a lure attached to each. This line is
to be used for jigging only and cannot be
left unattended.
n A maximum of three treble hooks can be
attached to a lure.
Bait trap

Bait trap: 1 trap.
Hoop net or witches hat: 5 nets.
Crab trap: 1 trap.
Lobster trap: 1 trap.
Spanner crab net: 1 net.
Hand hauled prawn net: 1 net.
NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide

Scissors (push) net: 1 net.
Dip or scoop net: 1 net.
Spear/spear gun: –
Note:
The table provides a maximum of each gear type
permitted per person in use or in possession at any time.
All the specified recreational fishing equipment has
additional restrictions and requirements that must be
adhered to. Specific gear requirements are also provided
in this section.
* A gang of hooks should have no more than 5 hooks. No
more than 3 trebles attached to a lure.
# This gear must be used by the method of hand jigging
only. This line is included in the total number of lines
permitted as given above

nY 
ou can only use or have in your possession
one trap at any time.
n The maximum dimensions of a bait trap
are 450 mm length x 350 mm diameter
with entrance funnel no larger than 60 mm
in diameter.
n The trap must have a tag attached to a part
of the trap which is at or above water level
with dimensions not less than 80 mm x 45
mm, with initials BT, the name and address
of the person who sets, uses or lifts the trap,
all letters to be a minimum of 15 mm and in
a colour contrasting to the tag.

.25 metres.Knife n A single blade knife with a blade longer than it is wide may be used to help gather invertebrates. n No more than two hoops per net (no rigid frame between them). HN 13 mm 1.25 m NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Landing net n May only be used as an ancillary aid for retrieval of fish caught when line fishing. The float being at least 100 mm in diameter and 50 mm above the water with all letters to be a minimum of 15 mm and in a colour contrasting to the buoy. n Diameter of hoops should be no greater than 1. n Barrel diameter not more than 85 mm. n The net must not be used in ocean waters. n Mesh size cannot be less than 13 mm measured on the diagonal. Pliers n Pliers may be used to help gather invertebrates except on rock platforms. n Drop (length of net) cannot be more than 1 metre. Gloves are permitted. Hoop nets and witches hats n Not more than five nets are to be used (or in possession) by any one person at any one time. Hand (Nipper) pump n Hand (Nipper) pumps are commonly used to collect Saltwater Nippers. uses or lifts the fishing gear. n Any rocklobsters or fin fish which are subject to a size limit must be immediately returned to the water unharmed if caught. 41 Fishing rules: permitted methods and activities Hand n Hand picking may be used to take fish. n The net must be dropped and raised vertically through the water by hand. n Do not set gear in areas of high boat traffic or navigation channels. n A float/buoy to be labelled with HN and the name and address of the person who sets. n The same rules apply for witches hats as for hoop nets. n Hoop nets or lift nets must not have any rope floating on the surface of the water.

There must also be a 50 gram weight attached no less than one metre below the buoy so that no rope/line is floating on the surface of the water.5 metre depth or has a diameter not exceeding 1.6 metres in length and 1 metre width.5 m 1. n May only be used in ocean waters north of Korogoro Point (Hat Head). Reducing set time for any fishing gear reduces the chances of harm to accidentally caught aquatic animals such as platypus and turtles.Fishing rules: permitted methods and activities 42 n C  heck your hoop nets / witches hats regularly. Crab trap n Not more than 1 trap to be used (or in possession) by any person at any one time. n Net must not be capable of extending more than 0. uses or lifts the fishing gear. Please be extra vigilant. n No more than 4 entrances (none of which are on the top of the trap).6 m 0. n A float/buoy to be labelled with CT and the name and address of the person who sets.1 metre beneath the frame when the frame is suspended in a horizontal position. uses or lifts the fishing gear. The float being at least 100 mm in diameter and 50 mm above the water with all letters to be a minimum of 15 mm and in a colour contrasting to the buoy. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Spanner crab net n Not more than one spanner crab net can be used (or in possession) by any person at any one time. When set the mesh will now lay flat on the bottom underneath the bait line and be effective in catching crabs feeding on the bait when the net is lifted. n A float/buoy to be labelled with SN and the name and address of the person who sets.1 m 1. n T he net must be lowered and raised through the water only by hand. n Net must be attached to a rigid frame not exceeding 1.6 metres at the top or bottom.2 m 1m . n Recreational fishers can make some simple modifications to their crab apparatus to reduce the probability of entangling nontarget species. Witches hats can easily be converted to a lift net by removing the float from above the mesh and re-attaching the float line with several lengths of lines directly to the ring (See page 16).2 metres length x 1 metre width x 0. n Maximum dimensions – 1. n When fishing with nets towards the upper reaches of an estuary there is a higher risk of interacting with platypus. The float being at least 100 mm in diameter and 50 mm above the water with all letters to No more than four entrances 50mm 1m 0. n Minimum mesh size 50 mm. n The net can only be used for taking of Spanner Crabs. check nets regularly and consider moving gear further downstream.

Circular not exceeding 1.g. When fishing crab gear towards the upper reaches of an estuary.e. Reducing set time for any fishing gear reduces the chances of harm to accidentally caught aquatic animals such as platypus and turtles. Do not set gear in areas of high boat traffic or navigation channels. It is recommended that traps are deployed further down into the more saline part of the estuary to reduce this likelihood.n n n n Lobster trap n Not more than one trap is to be used (or in possession) by any person at any time. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide n n 43 Fishing rules: permitted methods and activities n n be a minimum of 15 mm and in a colour contrasting to the buoy. or joined or placed with any other net. there is a higher risk of your traps catching and drowning air-breathing wildlife species such as the platypus. n Must be continuously and manually pulled through the water and not used as a stationary net. Must not be set to impede the free passage of fish (2 traps cannot be set closer than 3 metres apart). . Either: One gap not less than 57 mm high x 500 mm wide. Do not set gear in areas of high boat traffic or navigation channels. Rectangular not exceeding 1. including turtles. To minimise the incidental capture of non-target species. There must also be a 50 gram weight attached no less than one metre below the buoy so that no rope/ line is floating on the surface of the water. cable tie or cord at the front of the trap entrance). n The base or floor of the trap may be either rectangular or circular. or two gaps not less than 57 mm wide x 250 mm wide. uses or lifts the fishing gear. Only crabs can be taken with this trap.2 metres in diameter. n Escape gaps are required.2 m n n n the name and address of the person who sets. There must also be a 50 gram weight attached no less than one metre below the buoy so that no rope/line is floating on the surface of the water. n A float/buoy to be labelled with LT and Escape Gap 1. it is recommended you make simple modifications to your crab trap: n Trap opening size: Your trap should have a maximum opening of approximately 60 cm circumference or smaller. or three gaps not less than 57 mm high x 200 mm wide so that no part of any escape gap is more than 12 cm above the floor of the trap. Prawn nets Hand hauled net n Maximum length 6 metres.2 metres by 1. Only Rocklobsters can be taken with this trap. then a barrier should be installed that will be effective in excluding turtles (e. if the trap has a funnel-type entrance/s then it is the smaller measurement of the funnel). This is a measurement of the opening/s where the crab actually enters the trap (i. Lobster traps must not be used in inland waters or any waters more than 10 m deep (contour). Must not be made of entanglement material. n If the trap opening is flexible. n Must not be staked or set.2 metres. Check your crab trap regularly. The float being at least 100 mm in diameter and 50 mm above the water with all letters to be a minimum of 15 mm and in a colour contrasting to the buoy. Crab traps must not be used in inland or ocean waters. n Mesh size between 30 mm-36 mm measured across the diagonal.

au/fisheries/ recreational/publications Note: Speargun includes spear. Diving and spearfishing n You may only use a hand or gloved hand to take lobster when snorkelling (ie no tools – implements).nsw.75 m 30-36 mm n M  ust be attached to a scissor-type frame. n Any fish caught while fishing for prawns may be kept. or joined or placed with any other net. n Any fish caught which are subject to a size limit must be immediately returned to the water unharmed. n Must not be staked or set. n Must not be joined or placed with any other net. n Any fish caught which are subject to a size limit must be immediately returned to the water unharmed. bow and arrow or other similar devices.44 Fishing rules: permitted methods and activities 6m 30-36 mm n T he net may be attached to up to 2 hauling lines that are not more than 2 metres in length each. n For more information on spearfishing in NSW including closed areas. n Hand hauled prawn nets must not be used in inland waters.6 m NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide 2.75 metres. n Length of the lead or bottom line between the ends of poles must be no longer than 2. n You may use spear/spear gun with snorkel equipment to take fish in NSW waters.25 metres. Dip or scoop net – Prawns n Maximum diameter of hoop or ring 0. n Mesh size between 30 mm-36 mm measured across the diagonal. n Must be continuously and manually pulled through the water and not used as a stationary net. n Dip or scoop nets must not be used in inland waters. n Drop (length of net) no more than 1. n Must be used by hand and not staked or set. download the factsheet at www. however bag and size limits apply. n Minimum mesh size 20 mm measured across the diagonal.dpi. Scissors (push net) – Prawns 20 mm 0. . n Must be operated by one person only.gov. n Only one net per person is permitted at any time. n You may use SCUBA or hookah apparatus to take scallops and sea urchins only. n S cissors (push) nets must not be used in inland waters.6 metres.

n Jag fish (hooking or attempting to hook fish other than through the mouth). n Collect invertebrates within intertidal protected areas such as Sydney Harbour and some zones within aquatic reserves and marine parks. Check website www. Line fishing You are not permitted to: n Carry excess fishing lines in. n Use a chemical or explosive device to take or assist to take fish.nsw.au/ fisheries for details. If you have purchased fish or bait from a commercial vendor. harm or be in possession of threatened or protected species. if the fish are for immediate consumption or immediate use as bait. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide 7 Note: Any fish altered for any reason at any location must comply with the listed legal size. Fishing rules: prohibited methods and activities Prohibited methods and activities General You are not permitted to: n Fish in waters that are closed to fishing. n Alter a fish (e. n Take. Spare lines should not be rigged and should be properly stowed. See invertebrates section for additional invertebrate restrictions.gov.g. 45 7 Invertebrates You are not permitted to: n Retain rocklobsters.g. This rule does not apply at areas normally used for cleaning fish such as boat ramp cleaning tables. n Hold prohibited size fish or fish in excess of the legal bag limit in a live well or use them for bait even if they are injured or dead on capture (e. retain the receipt to present to a NSW DPI fisheries officer. on or adjacent to waters.dpi. bugs or crabs carrying eggs. n Take or be in possession of fish or invertebrates in excess of bag limit or of a size outside the legal size limits. n Use a cast net in NSW waters. n Remove the fins of sharks while at sea. n Retain any rocklobsters caught whilst line fishing. n Use abalone gut as bait. on or adjacent to waters. They must be returned to the water. Lines must be held in the hand or fixed to a boat or the shore. n Use drift lines. n Use any methods/gear to take fish or invertebrates that are not specified in legislation.n P  ossess prohibited or excess fishing gear in. You may clean fish by gilling and gutting only. undersize fish such as Tailor). All prohibited size fish must be released immediately and unharmed. removing the head or tail) until well away from the water. n Interfere with commercial fishers or fishing gear. . It is an offence to remove any eggs. n Collect octopus from ocean rock platforms or from rock platforms in Sydney Harbour. n Sell any recreational catch. by filleting. or for fish that do not have a legal length. attempt to take. This is due to the AVG virus (see page 73).

coastal lagoons and other tidal waters are closed to spearfishing. until well away from the water. chisels. n Spearfish using SCUBA apparatus. n A  lter or shuck an abalone.NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Fishing rules: prohibited methods and activities 46 n U  se hammers. n S pearfish on ocean beaches (except the last 20 metres at each end of the beach).  Shuck any intertidal invertebrate (e. 7 7 7 7 n T ake pipis. tail or meat).g. This rule does not apply to intertidal invertebrates (other than abalone. Pipis can not be taken more than 50 m from the high tide water mark. limpets.au/fisheries. For more information on spearfishing in NSW visit www. until well away from the water. n T ake fish with a spear/spear gun whilst using a light. Brown or Red Groper. Oyster leases You are not permitted to: n Interfere with any oyster lease infrastructure n Take any stock from an oyster lease n T ie up to oyster lease marker posts or infrastructure Spearfishing You are not permitted to: n Use a spear/spear gun to take Blue. removing the head. e.gov. mattocks.nsw. claws or meat). Note: Invertebrates used for immediate consumption or for immediate use as bait must comply with the listed legal size. shell. cunjevoi.g. dredges or other instruments not specified in legislation. shell. rocklobster or turban snail) for immediate use as bait. except for use as bait. removing the head. Please note: All inland waters and many entrances. tail. rocklobster or turban snail (e.g. pipis and cockles.dpi. . crowbars. n Use a spear/speargun to take crabs from intertidal rock platforms.

ignoring any attached hairs. Measuring devices for abalone. carapace Spanner Crab measurement How to measure fin fish and invertebrates legal length/total length Spanner Crab Spanner Crabs are measured along the body from the base of the orbital notch (eye socket) to the centre of the posterior margin of the carapace. are measured along the body from the notch between the two most protruding frontal teeth to the centre of the posterior margin of the carapace or shell. along a straight line from the point of the union of the second antennae or large feelers to the centre of the back edge of the carapace. Rocklobster Rocklobsters are measured along the length of the carapace or head. Abalone Abalone are measured along a straight line at the widest point of the shell. measurement measurement carapace NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Crab Crabs. .47 How to measure fin fish and invertebrates carapace measurement Fin fish To determine the legal length of a fish. the fish is measured from the tip of the snout to the tip of the tail – this is also known as the total length. rocklobster and crabs are available from NSW DPI fisheries offices. except Spanner Crabs.

paler below. . Some species look quite similar. Tiger Flathead Tail – distinctive black spot at caudal end over a brown/grey speckled background. Dark olive/grey/green on back fading to off-white or yellowish white below. Snout profile – slightly concave to straight. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide All fins dark. Black spot at base of pectoral fin. no bars or blotches. Tail – lines of orange/brown spots on upper half. Snout profile – concave. Dark bars often visible across rear of body. widely spaced blue spots. The following tips have been prepared to help identify characteristics of various fish species. Yellow ventral and anal fins. Tail – lower half has 3-5 irregular dark blotches. Estuary Perch Australian Bass Snout length shorter than Estuary Perch. Particularly large teeth on the roof of the mouth. Dark grey and silvery on back. Mottled brown with small. It is important to know exactly what fish you catch as different regulations may apply to different species. Dusky Flathead Light brown to orange/brown with spots on upper body. Snout tapered and elongated (longer than bass).Fish identification 48 Fish identification Some families of fish have a number of different species which can make identification difficult. Sand Whiting Bluespotted Flathead (Sand Flathead) High first dorsal fin. Uniform body colour. Pelvic fin white at leading margin. Various reference books are available which clearly outline the defining characteristics of fishes.

background colour silver. Uniform olive/green to brown colour. particularly the spines. Head more rounded and Prominent golden lines snout not as pointed as on head and body with that of Bream. Ventral and anal fins canary yellow. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Teraglin . See the bag and size limits which apply to these species in the following Fin fish bag and size limits section (pages 50-59). no distinctive markings. Tail profile – rounded (concave). Mulloway Tail profile – rounded (convex).Yellowfin Bream 49 Tarwhine Underside profile of head continued as almost straight line to the anus. distinctly blotched or mottled. Dorsal fin extends a little forward of anal fin. Longfin Eel Southern Shortfin Eel Dorsal fin extends markedly forward of anal fin. Uniform olive/green to brown colour. Fish identification Body colour varies from silver to bronzy green. Dark spot above pectoral fin.

bays and lower estuaries. Habitat: Coastal waters. See page 47 for how to measure fish. gut and scale fish. Figure plus asterix (*) denotes limit comprised of any single species or a combination of listed grouped species.Fish bag limits. 4 in possession. size limits and closed seasons The following information is current at time of printing but some bag and size limits may change over time. Bag limit: 10. You may only gill. size limits and closed seasons 50 Fin fish bag limits. crustaceans and worms. Note: You must not alter the length of a fish with a legal size limit by filleting or removing the head or tail until well away from the water or at a fish cleaning facility. Australian Bonito Legal length: None. Abiding by the regulations will help maintain our saltwater recreational fisheries. For all saltwater species except Australian Bass and Estuary Perch the daily bag limit is also the possession limit. A maximum daily bag limit of 20 applies to any species not listed below. Some species have maximum length restrictions to protect larger breeding females. squid. Retained fish: All retained fish should be dispatched swiftly and humanely. Closure: Zero bag limit for Australian Bass and Estuary Perch in rivers and estuaries from 1 June to 31 August each year. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Australian Bass and Estuary Perch Legal length: Only 1 over 35cm. Explanation of terms Bag limit: The maximum number of fish or invertebrates per person in possession. Bag limit: 2 in total*. they must be returned to the water immediately. Estuary Perch live in estuaries and inlets and are most prevalent in waters south of Sydney. Good baits: Bass and perch feed aggressively on insects. Habitat: Bass migrate to saltwater to breed during the winter months. Any Australian Bass or Estuary Perch caught during this period must be immediately returned to the water unharmed. Both species respond well to artificial flies and lures. Australian Bass Estuary Perch . Why have bag and size limits? Regulations apply to help ensure healthy and sustainable fisheries for future generations. Undersize fish cannot be used as bait. Size limits aim to allow fish to reach maturity and complete their breeding cycle. small live fish or artificial lures. A fish which does not reach this minimum length must be immediately returned to the water (see responsible fishing section pages 16-23 for more information). Good baits: Pilchards. while bag limits help make sure everyone gets a fair share of the resource and species are not overfished. Possession limit: The maximum number of fish a person is allowed to have in their possession at any one time. small fish. even if they are injured or dead. Legal length: The minimum length of a fish unless otherwise stated. It is the responsibility of fishers to ensure they are acting within the law at all times.

Good baits: Often caught as a by-catch by fishers targeting luderick on marine weeds. Prohibited catch in all NSW waters other than Lord Howe Island Marine Park. Bream and Tarwhine Yellowfin Bream Black Bream Tarwhine Cobia Legal length: None. inlets. especially in the southern half of NSW. estuaries. Yellowfin Bream 25cm. Bag limit: 20 in total*.51 Australian Salmon Australian Sawtail (Surgeonfish) Legal length: None. Will also respond to small minnow lures and soft plastics. Tarwhine: Favours estuaries. size limits and closed seasons Legal length: None. squid or fish strips. Yellowfin or Silver Bream: Rivers. marine worms. Bag limit: 0 – release only. Bag limit: 5. Habitat: Usually found on offshore reefs but is known to frequent inshore reefs. bays. Bag limit: 5. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Legal length: Black. Good baits: Crustaceans. Good baits: Baitfish. Habitat: Favours rocky reefs and areas of structure inside bays and harbours. Live prawns are a great bait for bream. Will tolerate brackish or even fresh water. inshore reefs. beach worms. Lord Howe Island Marine Park: 5. Tarwhine 20cm. small baitfish. Good baits: Live bait such as yellowtail or slimy mackerel. Salmon are a regular catch by beach fishermen using pilchards and lures. rocky headlands. headlands and bays. molluscs. Bag limit: 5. An aggressive. Blue Drummer Legal length: None. Habitat: Black or Southern Bream: Creeks and estuary systems. beaches. schooling fish known for its sporting prowess. . Often found with Yellowfin Bream. Habitat: Coastal and offshore rocky reefs. rocky headlands. Fish bag limits. inshore reefs. rocky reefs and beaches. pipis. Habitat: Beaches.

Habitat: Coastal rivers. Banded Rockcod (Bar Cod). Habitat: Deep offshore waters. Only 1 over 70 cm. Good baits: Squid. All other Flathead species 20 in total*. Habitat: Estuaries. All other dogfish species 2 in total*. rivers and brackish water zones. beaches and offshore areas. Bag limit: Harrisson’s and Southern – 0. squid or fish strips. Longfin Eel Southern Shortfin Eel Flathead Legal length: Dusky (Common) Flathead 36 cm. oily fish such as tuna or mackerel. lakes. flies and soft plastics. Eastern Red Scorpionfish (Red Rock Cod) Legal length: None. Good baits: Molluscs. Eel: Southern Shortfin and Longfin NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Legal length: Southern Shortfin Eel 30 cm. Blue-Eye Trevalla (Cod) Legal length: None.Fish bag limits. prawns. Good baits: Pilchards. crustaceans. Bag limit: 5 in total*. Banded Rockcod Good baits: Squid. Bag limit: 10 of each species. usually on or over the continental shelf. oily fish such as tuna or mackerel. Longfin Eel 58 cm. estuaries. Bass Groper. marine worms and fish strips. marine worms. Bluespotted and Tiger Flathead 33 cm. Dusky Flathead Bluespotted Flathead Tiger Flathead . inlets. Good baits: Baitfish (live poddy mullet are a great bait). Bag limit: 5. Habitat: Inshore and offshore reefs. size limits and closed seasons 52 Deep-Sea Fish: Hapuku (Hapuka). Gemfish. Habitat: Deep offshore waters. Bag limit: Dusky (Common) Flathead 10. Gemfish: Only 2 and boat trip limit of 10. A common catch on diving lures. Gemfish Blue-Eye Trevalla Hapuku Bass Groper Dogfish Legal length: None.

Good baits: Red rock crabs. pilchards or fish strips. squid. pilchards and fish strips. prawns. bread. inlets and over reefs extending offshore. Habitat: Inshore coastal and estuarine waters. Hairtail tend to fish best at night. Bag limit: 10. Only 1 over 60 cm. Habitat: Tidal rivers. (female) Hairtail Legal length: None. Good baits: Bread. Habitat: Rocky headlands and inshore reefs. Garfish: Eastern Sea Legal length: None. cunjevoi. Good baits: Live yellowtail or slimy mackerel. especially in the Hawkesbury River north of Sydney. Bag limit: 20. Habitat: Deep water regions in estuaries. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Legal length: None. pipis and worms. Bag limit: 2 by line only. Habitat: Found in shallow coastal areas. bays. . Bag limit: 20. Leatherjackets Luderick (Blackfish) Legal length: 27 cm. Sole none. pipis. Blue Groper.53 Flounders and Soles Note: Flounder have a distinct tail. Habitat: Rocky headlands. Bag limit: 20 in total*. Red/Brown Groper. ganged pilchards. Sole have a single fin around their body. Good baits: Marine weeds (green weed and cabbage). Good baits: Prawns. Good baits: Worms. large bays and estuaries. (male) Flounder Fish bag limits. Groper: Blue. cunjevoi and marine worms. Red/Brown Legal length: 30 cm. size limits and closed seasons Legal length: Flounder 25 cm. Bag limit: 20 in total*. coastal rivers and estuary systems.

Habitat: Mangroves and rocky structure in estuaries and rivers. pilchards and other oily fish. yellowtail and tuna. Bag limit: 5. Habitat: Offshore. size limits and closed seasons 54 Mackerel: Spanish and Spotted Legal length: Spanish 75 cm. driftwood and seaweed. Good baits: Live or dead slimy mackerel. live fish or artificial lures. Bag limit: 1 of each species. Habitat: Offshore reef systems. Black and Blue Legal length: None. Bag limit: 5 in total*. Migrate to offshore reefs when mature. Commonly found around floating objects such as buoys. Only 1 over 110 cm. Largely restricted to northern NSW waters during the summer season. Black Marlin Blue Marlin Striped Marlin . Good baits: Live mullet. Also respond well to cast and trolled minnow and skirted lures.Fish bag limits. All species will also respond well to trolled skirted lures. Spanish Mackerel Spotted Mackerel Mahi Mahi (Dolphinfish) Legal length: 60 cm. Mangrove Jack Legal length: None. Good baits: Live slimy mackerel. Also takes cast and trolled deep-diving lures. fish strips. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Marlin: Striped. Sharp teeth require the use of wire leaders. yellowtail or tuna. Oily fish such as tuna and mullet. rocky headlands. yellowtail or prawns. Good baits: Pilchards. Habitat: Oceanic waters. Bag limit: 10. bays. usually around or over the continental shelf although Black Marlin will come much closer inshore. Spotted 60 cm. Largely restricted to northern NSW waters although an occasional capture around Sydney.

Good baits: Crustaceans. squid and fish strips. Habitat: Rivers and estuary systems. squid and fish strips. mangroves. Habitat: Inshore/offshore reef systems. Good baits: Prawns. Migrates annually along coastline. Legal length: None. Morwong: Banded Fish bag limits. Bag limit: 5. Habitat: Inshore/offshore reef systems. Bag limit: 20 in total*. Bag limit: 5. Also responds aggressively to small minnow lures and soft plastics. Habitat: Around rocks. Habitat: Inshore reef systems. peeled prawns. Common over areas where rock and sand mix. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Mullet . Good baits: Prawns. squid. generally restricted to northern NSW waters. Good baits: Bread. Bag limit: 5. marine worms. piers and wharves in estuary systems. Good baits: Prawns. oily fish such as tuna or mullet. Legal length: 30 cm Sea (Bully) only. Moses Snapper (Moses Perch) Legal length: None.55 Morwong: Jackass and Grey (Rubberlip) Jackass Morwong Grey Morwong Morwong: Red Legal length: 30 cm. Bag limit: 10 of each species. size limits and closed seasons Legal length: 30 cm.

Bag limit: 20 in total* for live bait only. Amberjack Samsonfish . Bag limit: 5. Good baits: Garfish. beaches. live fish. Mulloway (Jewfish) Legal length: 70 cm. marine weeds. Good baits: Squid. Often taken on rigged baits or artificial lures. prawns. size limits and closed seasons Mullet: Juvenile (for live bait only) Legal length: Under 15 cm Sea (Bully) only. fish strips and artificial lures. often around some sort of reef or structure. Samsonfish and Amberjack Legal length: None. although can be caught in bait traps. prawns.56 Fish bag limits. Habitat: Sand flats and weed beds in rivers and estuary systems. Habitat: Frequents deep offshore waters around reefs. mullet. baitfish and oily fish such as tuna. rocky points and headlands. Bag limit: 2. Good baits: Squid. Good baits: Live squid. Pearl Perch Legal length: 30 cm. Habitat: Inshore and offshore reefs. small tuna. inshore reefs. Habitat: Rivers/estuary systems. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Sailfish Legal length: None. Prefers warm sub-tropical waters. Good baits: Cunjevoi. Good baits: Bread with fine line and small hooks. rocky headlands. Most common in northern NSW waters. baitfish. Habitat: Offshore waters. Habitat: Reefy areas. bread. Bag limit: 10. Bag limit: 5 in total*. Rock Blackfish (Black Drummer) Legal length: 30 cm. beach worms. Bag limit: 1.

octopus. # Only Smooth Hammerheads may be taken. Bag limit: 1. Fish bag limits. Not common in NSW waters. prawns. Great and Scalloped Hammerheads are protected species in NSW and must be released immediately with minimal harm. Good baits: A pelagic predator favouring similar foods as marlin and sailfish. Bag limit: 5 in total*. size limits and closed seasons Legal length: 91cm School Shark only. Habitat: Inshore and offshore reef systems. Good baits: Most sharks and rays will respond to oily fish such as tuna. Mako. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Swordfish . Good baits: Most swordfish are caught on squid fished deep on heavy tackle at night. Habitat: Deep offshore waters. Adult Juvenile Spearfish Legal length: None. Only 1 Tiger. Bag limit: 10. An occasional capture on artificial lures. Legal length: None. rocky reefs and open ocean. release only.57 Sharks and Rays School Shark Wobbegong Snapper Legal length: 30 cm. fish. Smaller fish common in estuary systems and protected bays. Bag limit: 1. Habitat: Various species occupy a diverse range of habitats including estuaries. Good baits: Squid. 0 for Wobbegong. Smooth Hammerhead# or Whaler/Blue Shark. beaches. Rocky headlands and points. Habitat: Open ocean.

au/fisheries Albacore Big-Eye Longtail Yellowfin Southern Bluefin . size limits and closed seasons Tailor Legal length: 30 cm. Good baits: Small baitfish such as pilchards and whitebait or oily fish such as tuna. rocky areas and bays. Good baits: Pilchards. Longtail. which favours inshore reefs. even if they are injured or dead.58 Fish bag limits.dpi. Bag limit: 5. Yellowfin Legal length: None (see below).gov. Bag limit: 20 in total*. inshore reefs. Trevallies Legal length: 30 cm for Silver Trevally only. Check with your local NSW DPI fisheries office or www. oily fish such as tuna. Only 2 of 90 cm or over and 5 under 90 cm Habitat: Open ocean. Teraglin Legal length: 38 cm. Bag limit: 20.nsw. they must be returned to the water immediately. Bag limit: 7 in total*#. slimy mackerel. prawns. Good baits: Marine worms. Southern Bluefin. live slimy mackerel or yellowtail. Responds aggressively to metal lures and diving minnows. Please note: Undersize fish cannot be used as bait. rocky headlands. yellowtail. Habitat: Beaches. Good baits: Squid. estuaries. Silver Trevally NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Tuna: Albacore. squid and fish strips. # Please note: The rules relating to Southern Bluefin Tuna may change during the life of this publication. sometimes found close inshore following schools of baitfish. Tuna also respond well to trolled skirted and diving lures. Habitat: The most common trevally in NSW waters is the Silver Trevally. Big-Eye. Habitat: Inshore/offshore reefs.

. Kingfish respond well to cast and trolled lures and jigs. Sand Whiting Baitfish bag limits (excluding charter boat operators) Bag limit of 50 for each of the following: Australian Anchovy. Bag limit: 20 in total*. size limits and closed seasons Legal length: None. sandflats. Southern Herring. marine worms. estuaries. oily fish such as tuna. Jack Mackerel and Yellowtail Scad. Blue Mackerel Yellowtail Scad NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide A bag limit of 50 comprised of any single species or a combination of: Garfish (other than Eastern Sea Garfish). Bag limit: 5 Habitat: Open ocean.59 Wahoo Yellowtail Kingfish Legal length: 65 cm. Wahoo also respond aggressively towards skirted or diving lures. Australian Sardine (Pilchard). Bag limit: 5. Hardyhead and Silverfish. crustaceans. Blue Sprat (Bluebait). Maray (Round Herring). Good baits: Saltwater nippers. Sandy Sprat (Whitebait). Blue Mackerel (Slimy Mackerel). small tuna. Good baits: Live squid/slimy mackerel/yellowtail. Habitat: Inshore and offshore reefs. Fish bag limits. Good baits: Live slimy mackerel. rocky headlands. Whiting Legal length: 27 cm for Sand Whiting only. Habitat: Beaches.

It is an offence to remove any eggs. Please note that you must pay the NSW Recreational Fishing Fee to catch or collect invertebrates. The parasite is not harmful to humans but has been a key factor in the decline of abalone stocks in these waters over recent decades. Carapace measured from spike to spike at its widest point. squid) and worms. Note: To allow abalone stocks to recover following outbreaks of the aquatic parasite Perkinsis olseni. Abalone Legal length: 11. Balmain Bug Legal length: 10 cm. on or adjacent to the water so your catch may be measured if necessary. Bag limit: 20. turban snails and intertidal invertebrates (see pages 45-46 for more information). NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Note: Bugs carrying eggs must be returned immediately to the water.7 cm. lobsters). between Port Stephens and Wreck Bay Beach (Jervis Bay) abalone can only be taken on weekends and adjacent NSW public holidays. Bag limit: 2. You must not shuck (remove the meat from the shell) in. mussels. measurement Beach Worms Legal length: None Bag limit: 20 in whole or part*. rocklobster. Special rules apply for abalone. before being put in a catch bag and before leaving the water. Other worm species Legal length: None Bag limit: 100 in total*. Bag limit: Figure plus asterix (*) denotes limit comprised of any single species or a combination of listed grouped species. A maximum daily bag limit of 20 applies to any invertebrate not listed below (excluding molluscs which have a combined bag limit of 20 in total*).Bag and size limits for saltwater invertebrates 60 Invertebrates bag and size limits Invertebrates are creatures without a backbone and include crustaceans (eg crabs. . Note: You must not alter the length of an invertebrate with a legal size by shucking and/or removing the head/shell/tail until well away from the water. Heavy penalties apply for closure breaches. molluscs (eg scallops. Abalone should be measured as soon as collected.

Legal length: None.5 cm. Crabs Blue Swimmer Crabs Legal length: 6 cm. Bag limit: 10 in total*. Bag limit: 5. Bag limit: 20 in total*. Bag limit: 100 in total*. Bag and size limits for saltwater invertebrates Legal length: None Bag limit: 50 in total*.61 Cockles. Bag limit: 10. Soldier Crabs Legal length: None. Spanner Crabs Legal length: 9. Cunjevoi All other crabs Legal length: None. It is an offence to remove any eggs. . Mud (Black/ Mangrove) Crabs Legal length: 8.3 cm. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Note: Crabs carrying eggs must be returned immediately to the water. Bag limit: 20. Mussels and Pipis (Pipis for bait only) Cockle Mussel Pipi Note: You cannot take Pipis to eat or remove them more than 50 m from the high tide mark.

Max 18 cm. but not with a hook. Note: Octopus cannot be taken from ocean rock platforms in NSW or from rock platforms in Sydney Harbour.5 cm Bag Limit: 2 in total (with Eastern Rocklobster). Colour: Red Eastern Rocklobster Southern Rocklobster Note: You must not shuck (remove the head/shell/tail/meat) a rocklobster in. Southern Rocklobster Legal Length: Male 11 cm.4 cm. Colour: Green. on or adjacent to the water. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Note: Lobsters may be taken by hand or in a lobster trap (1 trap per person). Body: Various bright multiple combinations. In any combination. In any combination. Lobsters or crabs carrying eggs must be returned immediately to the water. Female 10. Slipper Lobster (Flat) Legal length: None. Bag limit: 2 in total (with Southern Rocklobster). Colour: Beige/grey. spear or snare. Colour: Legs and antennae: Mottled black and white. Tropical Rocklobster (Ornate and Painted) Legal length: None. Bag limit: 2 in total*. . Bag limit: 10 in total*. Octopus Legal length: None. Bag limit: 2.62 Bag and size limits for saltwater invertebrates Lobsters Eastern Rocklobster Legal length: Min 10. It is an offence to remove any eggs.

Bag limit: 50 in total*. All other molluscs 20 in total* including Turban Snails. Bag limit: Sydney. Bag limit: 10 in total*. Military 20 in total*. Pacific. Sea Urchins Legal length: None. on or adjacent to the water. See www.nsw. Bag limit: 10 litres in total*. Warning: Oysters. Eating contaminated shellfish can cause serious illness or death. Legal length: None. Turban Snails and other molluscs Legal length: Sydney. mussels and other shellfish may be contaminated through either pollution or naturally occurring algae.au/industry/industry-sector-requirements/ shellfish/shellfish-area-harvest-status Prawns Legal length: None. Scallops Legal length: None.63 Oysters: Sydney Rock. Military 7. Bag limit: 20 in total*.gov.5cm. Bag and size limits for saltwater invertebrates Legal length: None. Bag limit: 50 in total*. Turban Snail measurement Note: You must not shuck (remove the meat from the shell) a turban snail in. Diameter measured along its longest axis. Commercially grown oysters are harvested under strict guidelines to safeguard public health. Saltwater Nippers Legal length: None. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Squid and Cuttlefish . Native Note: Removal of oysters from an oyster lease is theft and attracts heavy fines.foodauthority. Bag limit: 100 in total*. All other molluscs none.

Caudal peduncle Colour Variations of Black Rockcod Great Hammerhead Sphyrna mokarran Conservation Status: Vulnerable species. Tall sickle shaped dorsal fin. Help increase knowledge of these species by reporting sightings by e-mail to fisheries. Lives in estuaries and shallow coastal waters around south-east Asia and northern Australia.dpi. A large ray with a long studded snout or ‘saw’. Other rare species with stable numbers are protected. Black Rockcod are found along the entire NSW coast and also occur in estuaries. Numbers reduced by fishing and accidental capture by prawn trawlers.au or online at www.nsw. It is illegal to take.nsw. Grows to at least 5 m. Largest species of hammerhead in the world. Now extremely rare and presumed extinct in NSW.au/fisheries/species-protection/report-it Threatened species Black Rockcod Epinephelus daemelii Conservation Status: Vulnerable species.gov. Occurs in NSW waters south to about Sydney during the warmer months. Growing to 1. Tall sickle shaped first dorsal fin Height of second dorsal fin equal to or greater than anal fin NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Rectangular and relatively straight head profile Teeth with clear serrations Anal fin Green Sawfish Pristis zijsron Conservation Status: Presumed extinct.Threatened and protected species 64 Threatened and protected species A threatened species is rare with numbers declining to a point where it is at risk of becoming extinct in NSW.gov. .dpi.au/fisheries.gov.5 m and weighing over 80 kg. It is also illegal to damage the habitat of a threatened species. harm or possess threatened or protected species.threatenedspecies@dpi. it has a distinctive black blotch on the upper caudal peduncle.nsw. If caught they must be returned carefully to the water. living for years in the same deep cave or ledge. This magnificent but timid creature is territorial. You can keep up to date with threatened or protected species listings on the website www.

called critical habitats. mate and pup at a small number of locations. Pelagic species found in deep offshore waters. Strongly arched head profile Threatened and protected species Conservation Status: Critically endangered species.gov. which are vital to the survival of the Greynurse Shark. Grows to 2.nsw.au/fisheries . Critical habitats are defined as areas 200 m out from the relevant natural feature such as an island or a part of the coastline.65 Greynurse Shark Carcharias taurus Scalloped Hammerhead Sphyrna lewini Conservation Status: Endangered Species.dpi.dpi. Marine scientists have identified ten sites. Occurs in NSW waters south to about Sydney during the warmer months. Greynurse Sharks roam over very large areas of the NSW coast. Serious decline in many geographic regions around the world. The rules relating to Southern Bluefin Tuna may change during the life of this publication. Additonal information and maps of critical habitats is available from the NSW DPI website at www. White Sharks can grow to an estimated 6 m. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Conservation Status: Endangered species.4 m.nsw. Prominent ‘scallop’ or indentation in the centre of the front edge of the head.gov. but are known to gather to feed. Check with your local NSW DPI fisheries office or www.au/fisheries Height of 2nd dorsal fin smaller than anal fin Distinctive “scallop” Teeth smooth edged Anal fin Southern Bluefin Tuna Thunnus maccoyii White Shark Carcharodon carcharias Conservation Status: Vulnerable species. Limited recreational fishing is allowed (see page 58). Some Greynurse Shark critical habitats are located in marine parks and recreational fishers should consult the relevant marine park zoning plan to check the fishing rules and regulations. Found throughout the world in temperate and subtropical oceans.

Threatened and protected species 66 Protected species Ballina Angelfish Haetodontoplus ballinae Found in very deep water in the north and around Lord Howe Island. Elegant Wrasse Anampses elegans Found around Lord Howe Island. Found in northern NSW waters. Male Female NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Goldspotted Rockcod (Estuary Cod) Epinephelus coioides Found mainly in the reefy inshore waters and estuaries of northern NSW. Growing to 2 m and weighing over 250 kg. Growing to 2 m and weighing over 225 kg. Blue Drummer Girella cyanea This fish inhabits coastal and offshore rocky reefs. The taking or possessing of Blue Drummer from NSW waters other than the waters of the Lord Howe Island Marine Park is prohibited and heavy penalties apply. Queensland Groper Epinephelus lanceolatus Bold and curious. It is bright blue with small yellow dots and grows to about 75 cm length. they can be hand-fed by divers. Adult Juvenile . Grows to 30 cm. Eastern Blue Devil Fish Paraplesiops bleekeri Inhabiting caves and ledges in about 15-20 m of water along the southern NSW coast (has been seen as far north as the Solitary Islands Marine Park). Grows to 20 cm. occasionally along the NSW coast south to Montague Island. Grows to 40 cm.

Fish Rock.dpi. au/fisheries.au/fisheries/species-protection/report-it Identifying a Greynurse Shark It is illegal to harm a Greynurse Shark – so it is important fishers and divers can distinguish Greynurse Sharks from other sharks. Two upper dorsal fins of almost equal size. PELVIC FIN PECTORAL FIN Bronze colour. called critical habitats.6 m. Pipehorses and Seadragons belong to the Syngnathidae family and together with their close relatives. Solenostomids and Pegasids Seahorses. Some Greynurse Shark critical habitats are located in marine parks and recreational fishers should consult the relevant marine park zoning plan to check the fishing rules and regulations. . Pipefish. are called Syngnathiformes. All Syngnathiformes are protected. mate and pup at a small number of locations. but are known to gather to feed.gov.dpi. 1st dorsal fin set well back from the pectoral fin. up to 420 m and is found along the entire coast. 5 GILL SLITS 2nd dorsal fin set well forward of the anal fin. Grows to 3.au or online at www. The use of bait (other than soft plastics or vegetable based bait) is prohibited in critical habitats at Green Island. The Greynurse Shark’s most distinctive feature is the similarity in size of the two upper dorsal fins. Top lobe larger than bottom.67 Sandtiger Shark (Herbsts Nurse) Odontaspis ferox Threatened and protected species Related to the Greynurse Shark. which are vital to the survival of the Greynurse Shark. the Ghost Pipefish and Seamoths. Full details are available at www. Brownish spots on the upper body and tail fin. Paler undersurface. Critical habitats are defined as areas 200 m out from the relevant natural feature such as an island or a part of the coastline. Help protect these species by reporting sightings by e-mail to fisheries. Anal fin similar in size To both dorsal fins. Marine scientists have identified ten sites.threatenedspecies@dpi. Syngnathiformes Syngnathids. nsw. It inhabits deeper waters. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Fishing and diving rules to help protect the Greynurse Shark Greynurse Sharks roam over very large areas of the NSW coast.nsw.nsw.gov. and within 200 m of key aggregation sites at North and South Solitary Islands and Mermaid Reef (see page 68).gov. and Magic Point. A major review of Greynurse Shark protection recently concluded with new fishing and diving rules introduced at several Greynurse Shark critical habitats and key aggregation sites along the NSW coast.

NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Threatened and protected species 68 .

nsw. The response supports the intent of the audit recommendations and details how the NSW Government will take a new approach to the sustainable management of the NSW marine estate as a whole. including marine park management.au Cook Island Byron Bay Cape Byron Marine Park Tweed-Moreton Bioregion Coffs Harbour Aquatic Reserves Solitary Islands Marine Park Lord Howe Island Marine Park Manning Shelf Bioregion Intertidal Protected Areas Port Stephens -Great Lakes Marine Park Hawkesbury Shelf Bioregion Sydney Jevis Bay Marine Park Narrabeen Head Long Reef Cabbage Tree Bay North (Sydney) Harbour Eden Twofold Shelf Bioregion Cape Banks Towra Point Boat Harbour Shiprock Dee Why Headland Shelly Beach Headland Sydney Harbour Bronte . providing independent advice across ecology.gov. n Improving community engagement in managing the marine estate. including the state’s six marine parks.Coogee Batemans Shelf Bioregion Batemans Marine Park Manly Bungan Head Mona Vale Headland Bondi Long Bay Inscription Point Cabbage Tree Point NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Barrenjoey Head Bushrangers Bay 69 Consrving our biodiversity Managing the marine estate In March 2013 the NSW Government announced its response to the report of the independent scientific audit of marine parks in NSW.marine. dunes and headlands n coastal lakes and lagoons connected to the ocean n islands including Lord Howe Island It extends seaward out to 3 nautical miles and from the Queensland border to the Victorian border. . For up-to-date information on marine estate management please visit www. Aquatic Reserves and Intertidal Protected Area Locations The new approach includes: n Undertaking an assessment of the threats to the marine estate that will include social and economic issues as well as ecological. mangroves. The marine estate is the: n ocean n estuaries n coastal wetlands (saltmarsh. This assessment will prioritise threats that need to be addressed and will lead to identifying management actions to reduce these threats. economics and social sciences. seagrass) n coastline including beaches.Marine Parks. n Establishing two new advisory bodies: The cross-agency Marine Estate Management Authority will replace the Marine Parks Authority and will be informed by the work of the Marine Estate Expert Knowledge Panel.

including marine parks and aquatic reserves. The Census of Marine Life recorded almost 33. Collecting cunjevoi or any invertebrates.gov.000 marine species may be present. starfish. octopus. snails and worms. Each marine park has a zoning plan which outlines the rules for that park. These areas have particular fishing restrictions so you need to plan your fishing trip in advance and check the rules for the area you intend to fish. animals and microorganisms.au/fisheries and www. and pollution reduction programs to protect biodiversity.gov. The kinds of fishing activities that are allowed in an aquatic reserve depend on the values of the individual reserve. coastal rocky reefs and the pelagic and seabed habitats of the continental shelf.au Marine biodiversity The Australian Museum describes biodiversity as the variety of all living things. dolphins. mussels. For example you cannot collect anemones.mpa. For up-to-date information please contact your local marine parks office or visit the website www.mpa.000 marine species in Australian waters and estimated that up to 250. whether they are dead or alive. In addition. You need to check the relevant zoning plan before you go fishing in a marine park. research. mainly in the Sydney region (see map on page 69). chitons. You can enjoy recreational fishing in every NSW marine park! Each marine park provides opportunities for fishing. Manly) n Towra Point Aquatic Reserve in the sanctuary zones (Botany Bay) n Shiprock Aquatic Reserve (Port Hacking) n Bushranger’s Bay Aquatic Reserve (Bass Point. animals and microorganisms interacting with each other and their physical environment. Key recreational fishing species are reliant on their ecosystem for survival. cockles. Marine parks work together with other land and marine management programs in NSW. pipis.nsw. Marine parks The system of six marine parks in NSW (see map on page 69) helps to conserve marine biodiversity across the marine estate. These multiple and complex interactions are why it is important to maximise protection of biodiversity. An ecosystem is a community of plants. are managed to help ensure the conservation of marine biodiversity.dpi. crabs. bait fish. is prohibited in all aquatic reserves.nsw.nsw. aquatic reserves help to conserve marine biodiversity and are important areas for research and education. Shellharbour). barnacles.nsw. collecting or killing these animals to provide berley or to feed fish is prohibited. For up-to-date information please contact your local NSW DPI fisheries office. such as catchment management. oysters. Some aquatic reserves are more than 30 years old and the newest reserves have been in place for at least 10 years. the different plants.dpi. For more information on each aquatic reserve please contact your local NSW DPI fisheries office or visit the website www. There are 12 aquatic reserves in NSW. predatory fish. Maintaining and rebuilding marine biodiversity is a fundamental part of keeping the estuaries and oceans of NSW healthy and productive into the future. marine parks office or visit the websites www. seals and seabirds through to estuarine wetlands.gov.au Aquatic reserves Together with marine parks. Fishers understand that marine biodiversity includes a wide variety of marine life and ecosystems – from plankton. unless specifically listed as exempt.au/fisheries Fishing by any method and collecting are prohibited in: n Cook Island Aquatic Reserve in the closed waters around Cook Island (Tweed Heads) n Cabbage Tree Bay Aquatic Reserve (Shelly Beach. sea urchins. the genetic information they contain and the ecosystems they form. public appreciation and enjoyment. .gov. fisheries management. shellfish. sandy beaches.NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Conserving our biodiversity 70 Conserving our biodiversity Some areas of NSW.

is not permitted in these reserves. Bronte-Coogee. octopus. You can fish in the areas but you cannot gather or collect seashore animals. sea lettuce (Ulva) and bait weed (Enteromorpha) from Barrenjoey Head. Bronte-Coogee. These include crabs. See map. They extend from mean high water to 10 m seaward beyond mean low water. migrate to and from. oysters and saltwater nippers. Narrabeen Head. Conserving our biodiversity Mean high tide mark 71 . Habitats are those places were fish live. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide You can go spearfishing in: n Cook Island Aquatic Reserve outside the closed area n Barrenjoey Head. Cape Banks and Boat Harbour aquatic reserves n Bronte-Coogee Aquatic Reserve except in Clovelly Bay and Gordons Bay and between Shark Point and the southern headland of Gordons Bay which is closed to spearfishing n Long Reef Aquatic Reserve for finfish (bony fish and cartilaginous fish) only. Fishing by any method for any invertebrates. Fishing in any aquatic reserve must also be done in accordance with other fishing restrictions such as closures. A large amount of fish habitats have been lost or degraded to the point where they no longer support native fish populations. for locations of the eight intertidal protected areas around Sydney. You can go line fishing in: n Cook Island Aquatic Reserve outside the closed area (except using setlines) n the refuge zone of Towra Point Aquatic Reserve n all areas of Barrenjoey Head. Narrabeen Head. cunjevoi. cockles.Intertidal Protected Area Intertidal zone at high tide 10 metres Low Tide Level Mean low water mark Intertidal zone at low tide You can collect rocklobster. pipis. abalone.gov. For example. anemones. on page 69. For more information check our website www. bag limits and size limits. such as cuttlefish and squid. from the northern end of Clovelly Bay to the southern end of Gordons Bay and the adjoining waters to 100 m offshore under a fishing closure. mussels. the taking of Blue Groper by any method is prohibited at BronteCoogee Aquatic Reserve. Narrabeen Head.nsw.au/fisheries Healthy and diverse fish habitat means more fish Healthy and diverse habitats mean healthy and diverse fish populations: A must if you want to catch fish. Cape Banks and Boat Harbour aquatic reserves as long as bait is not collected n Long Reef and North (Sydney) Harbour aquatic reserves for finfish (bony fish and cartilaginous fish) only.dpi. sea urchins. Intertidal protected areas Intertidal protected areas preserve and protect intertidal animals and habitat. Cape Banks and Boat Harbour aquatic reserves. feed and breed. snails.

n Removal of in-stream native aquatic vegetation or snags (large woody debris).gov. Protecting biodiversity – tips to remember: n When over seagrass beds either drift fish or place the anchor within a sand patch. trim your motor up high and travel slowly. Watch out for: n Saltmarsh. Do not litter. NSW DPI also regulates activities that impact on key fish habitat. Funding support from the recreational fishing trusts has been provided to assist with this venture.au and register your contact details. sediment etc. Never release them into a waterway or a drain.nsw. new waterway crossings. e-mail newstreams@dpi. and supporting research and investigation of aquatic animal health issues. n When turning rocks to collect bait. fill).g. boulders. water or weeds from one waterway to another. nets. NSW DPI produces Newstreams.fishhabitatnetwork. n Materials or fill being placed into a waterway (e. n Drains being dug or other works taking place in wetlands. silt fences. n Take all rubbish home. n Get your friends or local fishing club involved in restoring fish habitat and check out the website www. n Discharge of pollutants into waterways.com. n Placing of permanent or temporary barriers to fish passage across a waterway (e. Pests and diseases The Aquatic Biosecurity unit works to prevent the spread of diseases through controls on the management of stock. n Snags are for fish. river oaks or saltmarsh plants. Diseases can also be inadvertently introduced when fresh or . conducting surveillance for key diseases including QX oyster disease and Australian Bass nodavirus. To subscribe. tyres. a free bi-monthly electronic newsletter to keep people up to date with aquatic habitat activities. n Dredging or removal of in-stream sediment. If the fish kill is due to a suspected pollution event. put them back the way you found them. responding to aquatic animal health emergencies. If you see or suspect any illegal activities affecting fish habitat contact your local NSW DPI fisheries office or the Fishers Watch Phoneline on 1800 043 536. n Use environmentally friendly fishing tackle such as lead-alternative sinkers. there are many and varied causes of fish kills and a large proportion are due to natural events. concrete. Fish kills A fish kill is defined as any sudden and unexpected mass mortality of wild or cultured fish. not for use as firewood. n Aquarium fish should stay in an aquarium. n Take care not to transport fish. mangroves or seagrasses being damaged or destroyed. n New waterfront structures such as jetties and boat ramps. Fish kills are often very visible events which cause considerable interest and concern to the public and the media because they are often perceived to be the result of pollution or contamination of waters. n Travelling at low speed near riverbanks prevents your boat wake from undermining them.). cobbles.NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Conserving our biodiversity 72 NSW DPI is working with many people and organisations to protect and rehabilitate fish habitat to improve fish stocks. gravel beds. contact the Environmental Protection Authority on 131 555. Fish kills in the wild should be reported to your local NSW DPI fisheries office (see pages 84-85) or call NSW DPI on 1800 043 536. assisting stakeholders to improve aquatic animal health management.au. Contact NSW DPI to find out how you can help and access funding. In fact.g. biodegradable line and non-stainless hooks where possible. n If you cannot avoid motoring across shallow seagrass beds. n New bed or bank stabilisation works within a waterway. n Tread carefully around shoreline vegetation such as mangroves. n Machinery working in waterways.

nsw. Marine pests present in NSW include Pacific Oysters. New plants can grow from small pieces. European Fan Worm and the New Zealand Screw Shell. However AVG was detected in retail outlets in 2011. the alga Caulerpa taxifolia. pests@dpi. European Green Crab The European Green Crab. Education. lethargy and often death. AVG affects the nervous system of abalone and symptoms include swollen mouthparts. Conserving our biodiversity frozen seafood products imported for human consumption are used as bait. Note: It is illegal to release live fish into NSW waterways without a permit and heavy fines apply. .gov. To reduce risk of transfer of AVG to NSW abalone stocks a fishing closure is currently in place in NSW banning the recreational and commercial use of abalone gut as bait or berley. n Dispose of sewerage and bilge water at an approved pump-out facility n Don’t dump that fish! Give unwanted aquarium fish to friends or a pet shop rather than letting them go in the wild. the crab has been recorded in several NSW south coast estuaries and lakes. n Check out the NSW DPI website for further information. n Slip and clean moored boats regularly. Japanese Seaweed. research. curling of the foot. Currently there is no indication of AVG in NSW wild abalone stocks. The quick-growing alga can alter marine habitats and can adversely impact native seagrass and fauna.gov. also known as the Green Shore Crab. n Contact NSW DPI on 02 4916 3877 (recorded 24 hour service). It is listed as a Class 1 noxious species in NSW prohibiting live possession and sale of the species. However. is a voracious predator that feeds on shellfish and other crabs. Reporting You can help protect our waterways and native fish by helping to stop the introduction and spread of aquatic pests and diseases into new areas by: n Reporting any suspect aquatic pest or disease to your local NSW DPI fisheries office. legislation and control measures are being used to manage this marine pest. Some areas are now closed to netting.nsw.dpi. clean. Asian Green Mussel and Black Striped Mussel. n If you are able to collect samples. AVG has also been identified in wild and farmed abalone in Tasmania. n Take a photograph and send to NSW DPI. European Green Crab.au/biosecurity. Potential marine pests to be on the lookout for in NSW include the Northern Pacific Seastar. Asian Date Mussel. Check with your local NSW DPI fisheries office before using nets other than a landing net in affected waterways. keep them cool but do not freeze them. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide AVG: Ban of Abalone gut as bait Abalone Viral Ganglioneuritis (AVG) is caused by a herpes-like virus first detected in wild and farmed abalone in Victoria in 2005 where it has resulted in extensive abalone mortalities (Note: AVG has no impact on human health).au or online at www. e-mail aquatic. 73 Caulerpa taxifolia Caulerpa taxifolia is an invasive marine alga native to tropical waters including northern Australia and the South Pacific. It has been detected in 14 NSW estuaries and one oceanic location from Brisbane Waters (central coast) to Wallagoot Lake (far south coast). difficulty adhering to surfaces. motors and fishing gear away from the waterway to remove any potential marine pests. drain and dry boats.What you can do: n Before leaving a location check. It is native to the Atlantic coast of Europe and northern Africa.

74 Tide tables                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide    .

75                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Tide tables                                                                                                                                                                                                             NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide            .

76 Tide tables                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide                                                                                                                                                                                                           .

77                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Tide tables                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide        .

78  Tide tables                                                                                                          NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   .

Tucombil Creek +2:30 Coraki Lismore Airfield South. River Entrance +0:04* Greenbank Island +0:40 Murwillumbah +2:40 Caddys Island. Cudgen Creek Mouth +0:17 Brunswick River Basin Location Hour: Mins Grafton +4:15 Wooli River Entrance +0:12 Wooli Caravan Park +1:40 Coffs Harbour Region Harbour Jetty -0:07* Highway Bridge. South West Rocks (Kemps Corner) +0:23 Smithtown +2:10 Kempsey +3:25 +4:05 West Euroka +4:05 +5:10 Hastings River Basin Clarence River Basin 0:00* Port Macquarie.Location Hour: Mins Tweed River Basin Tweed Heads. Kalang River +1:45 Brunswick Heads. Terranora Creek +1:40 Cobaki Broadwater +2:10 Kingscliff. River Entrance 79 Tide tables Lag times (* Indicates secondary ocean location) In view of the variations caused by local conditions and meterorological effects. Add or subtract the appropriate hours and/or minutes listed here to adjust for the time difference between when high or low tide occurs at Sydney (Fort Denison) and when the corresponding tide will occur at the secondary location. Lows may be fractionally later than the highs because the falling water levels will no longer have the tidal force behind them. All times are Eastern Standard Time. Wilson River +3:05 NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Ballina. River Entrance +0:06* Billinudgel. Boambee Creek +1:50 Bellingen River Basin East Bellingen +2:10 Urunga Bridge. During summer time add one hour. River Entrance Yamba. Wilsons River. . River Entrance +0:19* Settlement Point +0:50 Palmers Island. Palmers Channel +2:40 Wauchope Railway Bridge +1:55 Maclean +2:00 Telegraph Point. Marshalls Creek +3:55 Stuarts Island +1:10 Mullumbimby +1:10 Macksville +2:00 Nambucca River Basin Richmond River Basin Macleay River Basin +0:07* Byrnes Point Ferry +0:30 Highway Bridge. Coffs Creek +1:50 Boambee. these times are approximate and must be considered as a guide only.

Harbour Entrance +0:01* Wallamba Island. Pittwater +0:08 Berowra Waters Ferry +1:00 Huskisson -0:01* +0:08* St Georges Basin Lumeah +0:18 . Lake Mouth 0:00* Brisbane Waters/ Broken Bay Lake Illawarra Basin Ettalong +0:40 Woy Woy Bridge +2:15 Greenwell Point. North Tuncurry +2:05 Tiona +3:25 Hunter River Basin NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Location Roseville Bridge Marina +0:03 Gladesville Bridge +0:05 Ryde Railway Bridge +0:12 Georges River Basin Canterbury Bridge. Crookhaven River East Gosford +2:20 Jervis Bay Patonga +0:10 Newport Wharf. Harbour Marina -0:02 Sackville +3:55 Harrington +0:11 Windsor +5:40 Taree +2:25 Freemans Reach +7:30 Wingham +3:45 Sydney Harbour Wallis Lake Forster. Port Stephens +0:05* Picnic Point +1:10 Nelson Bay. Cooks River +0:40 Tomaree. Port Stephens +0:30 Milperra +2:15 Stockton Bridge +0:20 Lansvale +2:35 Tea Gardens. Belmore Bridge +4:50 Shoalhaven River Basin Paterson.80 Tide tables Location Hour: Mins Camden Haven Basin Hour: Mins Hawkesbury River North Haven +0:18 Spencer +1:10 Laurieton +0:45 Wisemans Ferry +2:25 Lower Portland +3:10 Manning River Basin Crowdy Head. Port Stephens +1:30 Warwick Farm +2:45 Hexham Bridge +1:10 +0:03* Raymond Terrace. Port Hacking Morpeth +3:30 Port Kembla Maitland. Williams River +1:55 Cabbage Tree Point. Paterson River +4:30 South Shoalhaven Heads +0:55 Shoalhaven Heads Inlet +1:05 Nowra Bridge +2:00 Crookhaven River Entrance +0:16 +0:40 Swansea.

dpi.gov. West Tuross Head +1:40 Tee Tree Point.nsw.au/ fisheries/recreational/publications NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide . Merimbula Lake +2:40 Moruya Region Tuross River. Highway Bridge +0:55 Far South Coast Region Batemans Bay Hour: Mins Bermagui. Whether you are a resident or a visiting fisher you can find details on fishing Tide tables Location locations. Regatta Point +2:50 Nelligen. local fishing rules and closures along with summary maps in the local areas on our website at: www. Pambula Lake +1:10 Moruya Quarry Wharf +0:35 Eden. Fishing Co-operative Jetty +0:08* Local recreational fishing guides Local guides provide valuable information on fishing in the coastal areas from Tweed Heads in the north to Eden on the far south coast. Boat Harbour +0:08* Snapper Island +0:03* Wallaga Lake Entrance +1:40 Princes Highway Bridge +0:20 Wallaga Lake.81 Hour: Mins Location Sussex Inlet Coastal Patrol Jetty +0:35 Wagonga Inlet (Narooma) Talofa Caravan Park +1:15 MSB Boatshed/Jetty +0:15 Island Point +3:40 Apex Park Boat Ramp +0:55 Lake Conjola Entrance +1:35 Princes Highway Bridge +1:15 Narrawallee Inlet +0:45 Barlows Bay +2:00 Burril Lake. Clyde River +0:45 Merimbula Wharf +0:40 Bonnie Doon.

au .com.safefishing.Don’t put your life on the line ™ Get the free DVD Email us at info@safefishing. Multiple copies available for clubs and community groups. www. spearfishing and freshwater fishing safety videos.com.au and we’ll send you a free multilingual DVD of rockfishing. boatfishing.

They deal with recreational fishers. hoop nets and crab traps from the water for their inspection. to examine your fishing gear. seven days a week. If you are found breaking the fishing rules. just about everywhere there are fish and fishers. You will see fisheries officers at boat ramps. aircraft and on foot. Remember that fisheries officers are there to ensure the rules are being adhered to so there will be healthy fisheries and environment for the enjoyment of future generations.500. fish and bait and NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide . They advise recreational and commercial fishers and the general community of fishing rules and restrictions. In serious matters you may have to face a court and have the matter determined by a magistrate. Your recreational fishing fee is being used in part to improve salt and freshwater fisheries compliance and employs additional fisheries officers throughout the state. on beaches and rivers. fishing gear. in vessels. Fisheries officers Fisheries officers Fisheries officers have an important role in helping our fisheries resources and the environment remain healthy and sustainable into the future. vessels and vehicles and can make an arrest. In most cases penalty notices range between $75 to $500 but some offences can attract penalties up to $2. They can also require you to lift any set fishing gear such as fishing lines. you may be issued with a written caution or a penalty notice. fish farmers. In serious matters they can also seize fish. Most fisheries officers are keen fishers and are happy to provide you with local knowledge and tips for a given area. Fisheries officers patrol our coastal estuaries. and patrol NSW waters to ensure everyone is abiding by the state’s fishing laws. streams and dams. Under the Fisheries Management Act 1994 fisheries officers have powers which enable them to search your boat and vehicle. boats. This results in more fisheries officers spending time in the field with better equipment to detect and deter illegal activity. They also assist with conservation issues plus educational and advisory programs. commercial fishers. fish shops and restaurants.83 to require certain information including your name and address. lakes and offshore waters plus our inland rivers.

Contact details 84 Reporting illegal activities Report illegal or suspect fishing activities to the nearest NSW DPI fisheries office via the Fishers Watch Phoneline on free call 1800 043 536 or online at www.nsw. Maclean. 2281 02 4980 9202 0419 185516 Central Coast Northloop Road.gov. n Your own name and contact details to further substantiate your report and provide you with follow up information. Far North Coast Office Mobile Tweed 10/12 Greenway Drive. identify the affected area of NSW. date and location of activity. This allows callers to record a message and through a menu system. Tuncurry. Ourimbah. Tweed Heads. Sans Souci. Port Macquarie. Ballina. 2258 02 4348 1999 0419 185517 North Coast NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Central Coast Sydney metropolitan Sydney North 12 Shirley Road. information received will be used in targeting on-going surveillance and enforcement activities. When lodging any report be prepared to provide the following information: Coastal offices n T ype of activity. all identifying details will be treated as confidential. Taylors Beach.au/fisheries/compliance After hours calls to the Fishers Watch Phoneline are now handled by an interactive voice response system. identity if known and descriptions.dpi. 2444 02 5524 0600 0407 957631 Wallis Lake 2 Palm Street. n N  umber of people involved. n R  egistration numbers of any boats or cars involved and their descriptions. n Time. 2486 07 5523 6900 0419 185537 Richmond 15 Regatta Avenue. These areas are aligned with the regions specified below and fisheries officers on duty in the area identified will be immediately sent notification of new reports. 2478 02 6618 1800 0417 692608 Clarence 18A River Street. Where information is given in good faith. Wollstonecraft. Swansea. 2463 02 6645 0500 0419 185533 Coffs Harbour 32 Marina Drive. 2316 02 4916 3933 0427 497341 Hunter 55 Lambton Parade. 2219 02 9529 6021 0408 601951 . 2428 02 6591 6300 0428 546078 Port Stephens Taylors Beach Road. Coffs Harbour Jetty. 2450 02 6652 3977 0419 185536 Hastings 3/22-24 Acacia Avenue. Where an immediate response is not possible due to conducting of other operations or safety considerations. 2065 02 8437 4903 0419 185363 Sydney South 1 Water Street.

2720 02 6941 1404 0408 484 299 NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Central Tablelands . 2360 02 6722 1388 0419 185 532 Peel 4 Marsden Park Road. Calala. Tumut. 2795 02 6331 1428 0488 220 443 Hume 3/556 Macauley Street. 2830 02 6881 1208 0438 410 585 Monaro Kosciusko Road. 2640 02 6042 4200 0419 185 548 Far West Agricultural Research and Advisory Station. 2528 02 4220 8499 0439 162981 Shoalhaven 4 Woollamia Road. Braysyth Building. Lake Illawarra South. 2717 03 5019 8408 0427 429 579 Macquarie Cnr Hampden and Cobra Streets. Silver City Highway. Inverell. Narooma. 2340 02 6763 1132 0417 480 933 Riverina. 2627 02 6451 3402 0427 460 226 New England 127 Otho Street. Batemans Bay. 2551 02 6496 8200 0428 899876 Office Mobile South Coast Contact details Illawarra/Shoalhaven Inland offices Region Research Station Drive. Jindabyne. Huskisson.85 Coastal offices continued Illawarra 43 Reddall Parade. 2540 02 4428 3400 0419 185557 Batemans Bay Suite 8. 449 Charlotte Street. Deniliquin. Eden. 2536 02 4478 9100 0427 855008 Montague Riverside Drive. Dareton. 2710 03 5881 9928 0427 897 145 South West Slopes 64 Fitzroy Street. Albury. 2546 02 4476 0100 0409 316508 Far South Coast 13 Cocora Street. Bathurst. Dubbo. Cnr Beach Road and Orient Street.

gov. Please report illegal or suspected fishing activities to the Fishers Watch Phoneline on 1800 043 536 (free call). It is best to call before visiting any office.nsw.Contact details 86 Marine park offices Marine parks Office Cape Byron Marine Park Tallow Beach Road Byron Bay NSW 2481 02 6620 9308 Solitary Island Marine Park 32 Marina Drive Coffs Harbour NSW 2450 02 6691 0600 Lord Howe Island Marine Park Anderson Road. NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Fisheries office locations For general fishing information call 1300 550 474 or check the website www. Lord Howe Island NSW 2898 02 6563 2359 Port Stephens-Great lakes Marine Park 12B Teramby Road Nelson Bay NSW 2315 02 4984 8270 Jervis Bay Marine Park 4 Woollamia Road Huskisson NSW 2540 02 6563 2359 Batemans Marine Park Cnr Graham & Burrawang Street Narooma NSW 2546 02 4476 0802 Fish kills Fish kills in the wild should be reported to your local NSW DPI fisheries office or the NSW DPI hotline on 1800 043 536. office hours vary. If the fish kill is due to a suspected pollution event contact the Environmental Protection Authority on 131 555.au/fisheries As officers spend a lot of time in the field. .dpi.

87 Date Comments Catch Comments Catch Comments Catch Comments Catch Comments Contact details Catch Location Date Location Date Location Date Location Location NSW Recreational Saltwater Fishing Guide Date .

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