The Dallas Symphony Orchestra Presents

:

The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra
October 21 & 22, 2015

Dear Teacher,
The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra is probably Benjamin Britten’s most performed
work, and with good reason. Commissioned in 1946 for a British film that introduces children
to the orchestra, the piece is a masterful essay on orchestral tone color. It is cast in the form of
a series of variations, based on a melody by the 17th century British composer Henry Purcell. Each variation features a different family of instruments in the orchestra, and the whole
thing concludes with a rousing fugue. Almost seventy years later, it still inspires young and old
alike to learn and listen more. Complimenting this seminal work will be selections from Mozart’s exciting Abduction from the Seraglio, and Mussorgsky’s imaginative and colorful Pictures
at an Exhibition.
The lessons, activities, and accompanying audio and power point CDs (the latter allows you to
follow the musical score along with the music) are designed to be accessible to young people
both at school and at home. In addition, the Dallas Symphony Orchestra now has Teaching
Artists available to come to the classroom and guide students and teachers through
these activities in a way that will make the overall Youth Concert experience a rich, stimulating,
and memorable one. To schedule a visit by a DSO Teaching Artist, please call Jenny Fridge at
214-871-4006.

I look forward to seeing both you and your students in the Fall!
Musically Yours,

VISIT THE DALLAS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA’S EDUCATIONAL WEB SITE:
www.DSOkids.com

Activities for the The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra teacher’s guide were prepared by the Dallas
Symphony Orchestra’s Curriculum Development Team: Linda Arbolino, Jane Aten, Linda Booth, Tony Driggers,
Cheryl Goodwin, and Gloria Lett. This volume of the teacher’s guide was produced and edited by Dallas Symphony
Orchestra Education Staff Members Jenny Fridge, Brittany Hewitt and Jamie Allen. Materials in this teacher’s guide
can be photocopied for classroom use. If you have any questions about the concerts or material in this guide,
please call Jenny Fridge at 214.871.4006.

The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra

Page 1

Table of Contents

Concert Specific Information
Repertoire & CD Track List
Concert Guidelines for Teachers
Who’s Who
Meet the Composers

p. 3
p. 4
p. 5
p. 7

Concert Activities

1. Orchestral Innovation
2. The Role of the Conductor
3. Pictures in Space (Art) and Time (Music)
4. “Promenade” and “Great Gate of Kiev”
5. Instrument Timbre
6. Families of Instruments Listening Map
7. Listen! What do you Hear?
Extensions for the Music Specialist
1. “Promenade” and “Great Gate of Kiev”
Grades 3-6
2. “Promenade” and “Great Gate of Kiev”
Grades 4-6
3. Theme and Variations Listening Map

p. 9
p. 12
p. 15
p. 16
p. 17
p. 18
p. 24

p. 25
p. 26
p. 28

Post-Concert Activity
Student Review

p. 30

Resources for Teachers

p. 31

Concert Logistics
1. Arriving and Departing
2. Meyerson Area Map
3. About the Meyerson Symphony Center
Symphony YES! Request Form
Amazing Music DVDs Order Form
Thanks!

Page 2

p. 32
p. 33
p. 34
p. 35
p. 36
Back Cover

The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra

Repertoire & Youth Concert CD Track List

1. Janissary Military Marching Music
2. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Overture to The Abduction from the Seraglio

3. Modest Mussorgsky

“Promenade” from Pictures at an Exhibition

4. Modest Mussorgsky

“Tuileries” from Pictures at an Exhibition

5. Modest Mussorgsky

“Bydlo” from Pictures at an Exhibition

6. Modest Mussorgsky

“Ballet of the Chicks in their Shells” from Pictures at an Exhibition

7. Modest Mussorgsky

“The Great Gate of Kiev” from Pictures at an Exhibition

8. Benjamin Britten

“Theme” from The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra

9. Benjamin Britten

“Variation A (The Flutes)” from The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra

10. Benjamin Britten

“Variation B (The Oboes)” from The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra

11. Benjamin Britten

“Variation C (The Clarinets)” from The Young Person’s Guide to the
Orchestra

12. Benjamin Britten

“Variation D (The Bassoons)” from The Young Person’s Guide to the
Orchestra

13. Benjamin Britten

“Variation E (The Violins)” from The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra

14. Benjamin Britten

“Variation F (The Violas)” from The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra

15. Benjamin Britten

“Variation G (The Cellos)” from The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra

16. Benjamin Britten

“Variation H (The Double Basses)” from The Young Person’s Guide to the
Orchestra

17. Benjamin Britten

“Variation I (The Harp)” from The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra

18. Benjamin Britten

“Variation J (The Horns)” from The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra

19. Benjamin Britten

“Variation K (The Trumpets)” from The Young Person’s Guide to the
Orchestra

20. Benjamin Britten

“Variation L (The Trombones and Tuba)” from The Young Person’s Guide
to the Orchestra

21. Benjamin Britten

“Variation M (Percussion)” from The Young Person’s Guide to the
Orchestra

22. Benjamin Britten

“Fugue” from The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra

Musical recordings under license from Naxos of America, Inc. www.Naxos.com(P)
2013 HNH International Ltd. All rights reserved.
Unlawful duplication, broadcast or performance of this disc is prohibited by applicable law.
The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra

Page 3

 Please contact Mallory Coulter at 214.  Restrooms are located on all levels and should be used for urgent needs only..871. The Day of the Concert  Before leaving school. During the Concert  The use of cameras and recorders is prohibited. including chewing gum. please be sure you and your driver have been given matching numbers by a DSO staff member. a volunteer will guide your group to your seating area.com for follow-up activities.  Please DO NOT call your bus drivers’ cell phones. Also.  Please prepare your students by using materials in this book or on the www. After the Concert  Please remain in your seats until your school is dismissed.  Students and teachers should remain in their seats for the entire concert.  No food or drink.  Check in with a volunteer in the main lobby.  Learn your bus driver’s name and be sure you can recognize him/her. TX 75201 Fax Number: 214. Back at School  Refer to this guide or www. Upon Arrival at the Meyerson  If you arrive by bus. Mailing Address: Attn: Jenny Fridge.  Students should be briefed on concert etiquette in advance.871. Schlegel Administrative Suites Dallas.  Plan to arrive at the Meyerson at least thirty minutes before concert time. and may jeopardize their school’s future attendance at DSO events. please have an adult accompany them. listen carefully and follow instructions for departing the building.fridge@dalsym. please DO NOT UNLOAD BUSES UNTIL YOU ARE GREETED BY A DSO STAFF MEMBER. We have an efficient protocol in place for calling buses back to the Meyerson.com website.Concert Guidelines for Teachers Before the Concert  Please contact Mallory Coulter at least 30 days prior to your Youth Concert experience if you need to confirm or make changes to a reservation. and preemptively calling your bus driver back will cause a delay in the dismissal process.DSOkids. please allow time for students to visit the restroom. including wheelchairs.4511 E-mail Address: j.DSOkids.  Upon dismissal. (Seating sections are assigned on the basis of group size).  Please turn off cellular phones and any other electronic devices. Youth Concerts Dallas Symphony Orchestra 2301 Flora St.com Page 4 The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra . or if you are in need of infra-red headsets for the hearing impaired.  Student letters/artwork expressing reactions to the concert are appropriate.  Students not maintaining acceptable standards of behavior will be asked to leave.  All students should be in their seats at least five minutes before the concert time. is permitted in the concert hall.4054 at least 30 days before the concert if your group includes any students or teachers with special needs.  If students must visit the restroom.

In addition to Rattle and Zweden. Lincoln Center. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in violin from the Curtis Institute of Music and a Master’s degree in orchestral conducting from The Juilliard School. she subsequently played regularly in the Chicago Symphony for over 3 years. Austria. Career Assistance Award. Colorado. She was also the winner of the 2013 Taki Concordia Conducting Fellowship. She speaks French. Ms. Detroit Symphony. including innovative programs on the ReMix Series.S. Luke's. Karina Canellakis was born and raised in New York City. filling in for Nikolaus Harnoncourt. In addition to appearing frequently as soloist with various North American orchestras. In 2015. Other engagements included the Colorado Symphony. which received glowing praise from the L. and appeared on several occasions as Guest Concertmaster of the Bergen Philharmonic in Norway. and her approach to conducting is firmly rooted in her detailed and dedicated experience as a chamber musician. Already known to many in the classical music world for her virtuoso violin playing. and the Orchestra of St. Ms.Who’s Who Karina Canellakis Currently entering her second season as Assistant Conductor of the Dallas Symphony. San Diego Symphony. Canellakis is a recipient of a 2015 Solti Foundation U.A. She made her Carnegie Hall conducting debut in Zankel Hall in 2013. In the 2015/16 season. Ms. Canellakis was one of only two Conducting Fellows at the Boston Symphony’s Tanglewood Music Center. she also made headlines filling in last minute for Jaap Van Zweden in two subscription concerts with the Dallas Symphony. In 2014. She spent many summers performing at the Marlboro Music Festival. where she was the recipient of the Charles Schiff Award for Excellence in Orchestral Conducting. she was the featured guest conductor for the annual commencement concert with the Juilliard Orchestra in Alice Tully Hall. German and Italian. She plays a 1782 Mantegazza violin on generous loan to her from a private patron. Canellakis makes her debuts with the Hong Kong Philharmonic. Earlier in the season. She was a selected conductor in the 2013 Lucerne Festival master class with Bernard Haitink. As the Assistant Conductor in Dallas. she made her debuts with the Houston Symphony at Miller Outdoor Theatre. The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra Page 5 . her most prominent mentors are Alan Gilbert and Fabio Luisi. as well as her Los Angeles debut as guest soloist/conductor with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra. She recently made her European conducting debut with the Chamber Orchestra of Europe at the Styriarte Festival in Graz. In the summer of 2014. and various other concerts geared towards specific audiences in the community. conducting works of John Adams and Steven Mackey. standard repertoire on the DSO on the GO series. and the Bruno Walter Memorial Scholarship. she conducts more than 30 concerts per season with the Dallas Symphony. Chautauqua Music Festival in New York. earning rave reviews. and is equally at home performing all genres of the repertoire. and conducted the Pacific Music Festival Orchestra in Japan as well as the Tonhalle Orchestra in Switzerland as part of international master classes. and frequently appears as guest conductor of New York’s groundbreaking International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE). Youth and Family concerts. Times. Karina Canellakis has rapidly gained international recognition as one of the most dynamic and exciting young American conductors. Canellakis was initially encouraged to pursue conducting by her mentor Sir Simon Rattle while she was playing regularly in the Berlin Philharmonic for two years as a member of their Orchester-Akademie. the American Conductors Award. the North Carolina Symphony in two all-Russian programs at Booth Amphitheatre. the Grant Park Festival at Millennium Park in Chicago. conducting Shostakovich’s 8th Symphony and Mozart K 449 with soloist Emanuel Ax. Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra and at the renowned Grand Tetons Music Festival in summer 2016. Toledo Symphony. founded by Marin Alsop. Music in the Mountains Festival in Durango. Ms.

ringing high notes. The Crucible. Furthermore. He was cast in the role of the Duke of Mantua in Verdi's Rigoletto in the spring of 2014 at SMU as part of the Opera Gala. Kenya and moved to the United States in October of 2000. His voice has been heralded for his ease of production and clear. This upcoming season he will be playing the role of Bastien in Mozart's Bastien & Bastienne as a part of the Dallas Opera's outreach program. Charles was cast as Dandini as a part of the outreach program with the Dallas Opera in their production of The Billy Goats Gruff. He completed his Bachelor of Arts Degree with emphasis in Voice in December of 2013. Page 6 The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra . Some of his past performances include the role of Judge Danforth in Robert Ward's opera. he has made appearances as the tenor soloist in performances of Handel's Messiah last Christmas season. He has also appeared as featured soloist with the Meadows Chorale at Southern Methodist University.Who’s Who Charles Karanja Tenor Charles Karanja was born in Nairobi. In the 2014-2015 season.

with the 26-year-old composer conducting. In 1852. which is now the most famous opera in the Russian language. The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra Page 7 . He was poor and in debt when he died of kidney failure at the age of 35. so after a few years he accepted a job with the Russian government. at the young age of 39. Mussorgsky left Cadet school to be a royal bodyguard. He also sang in the school choir and wrote his first compositions for his friends to perform. In 1858 Mussorgsky decided to devote his life entirely to music. Sadly. chamber music. symphonies. Mozart is considered by some to be the greatest composer who ever lived. During this time. concertos. while playing pool and even while his wife was having a baby. Mozart was very well-known but spent money faster than he could earn it. Unfortunately. In 1857. He wrote his first sonata for the piano when he was four and composed his first opera when he was twelve! Mozart could compose anywhere . such as Maurice Ravel.vocal music. sonatas. Hartmann died unexpectedly in 1873. It is also a comic opera. The Abduction from the Seraglio (or Die Entführung aus dem Serail. his music did not earn him enough money to live on.at meals (he loved liver dumplings and sauerkraut). and an exhibition of over 400 of Hartmann’s works was mounted in his honor. Mozart eventually learned to speak fifteen different languages. This is the version that is best known and loved today. Modest Mussorgsky (1839-1881) Modest Mussorgsky was one of the five Russian nationalist composers known as “The Russian Five. Both men were devoted to the cause of Russian art and quickly became friends. But his love of music continued. The original work was written for piano. Mussorgsky quickly composed Pictures at an Exhibition to depict an imaginary tour of the exhibition. while talking to friends. Petersburg. The sudden loss of this artist shook the Russian art world." He was born to a well-to-do landowner and began taking piano lessons from his mother around the age of six. Mozart created masterful works for almost every category of music . He was traveling all over Europe playing music by the time he was six. Singspiels have a fair amount of talking in between the songs. Unlike traditional operas. During his lifetime. Mussorgsky entered the Cadet School in St. and was buried in an unmarked grave. He composed very quickly and wrote huge amounts of music. Boris Godunov. arranged it for a full orchestra. but later composers. and he convinced the famous composer Mily Balakirev to give him composition lessons at the same time.Meet the Composers Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) Mozart was no doubt the greatest child star that ever lived. While most composers specialize in certain kinds of pieces. he was playing so well that he began performing for family and friends. While at school. he completed the historic opera. By the time he was nine. The work was premiered in 1782 in Vienna. whose plot revolves around a hero and his assistant attempting to rescue a young woman who had been captured by a Turkish aristocrat. about a famous Russian Tsar (or ruler). as it is known in German) is a special kind of opera known as Singspiel. Because of his constant travels. he showed an interest in history and German philosophy. It was probably in 1870 that Mussorgsky met artist and architect Viktor Hartmann. and (of course) opera.

he wrote an opera called Peter Grimes. he became the first musician ever to be granted the title of "Lord" by the Queen of England. England. and allowed him to continue his work as a composer. about a troubled man in a small British fishing village. he was determined to make his living as a composer. he launched the Aldeburgh Music Festival. After graduating. eventually winning a composition scholarship to the Royal College of Music in London. and successfully supported himself by writing music for a variety of documentary films and plays. and vocal works. In the last year of his life. establishing himself as one of the leading composers of the 20th century. Two years later. and numerous orchestral. He loved music and began to compose at the age of 5. Over the next 28 years. and composition. right as World War II was raging across Europe. Page 8 The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra . but after a few years he missed his homeland too much and in 1942. He moved to America in 1939. It was such a great success that it catapulted Britten to international fame. he wrote 14 more operas. He took lessons in piano. the son of a dental surgeon and an amateur singer. In 1945. chamber. choral. he returned to England. that the British government exempted him from military service. which still attracts musicians and music lovers from all over the world every year. viola. The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra was originally commissioned in 1946 for an educational film called Instruments of the Orchestra.Meet the Composers Benjamin Britten (1913-1976) Benjamin Britten was born in Suffolk. featuring the London Symphony Orchestra. He was such a talented musician. however.

Define percussion and give/ask for examples. idea. 6E). 110. (Historical D)]. Tell the students the definition of innovation. computers. Why do you think Mozart used these specific instruments for this piece (think about the story)? How do you think people responded to his innovation? Why would people like/dislike it? Extension If you were able to add any instrument into an orchestra. 113. 5C-D. Ask the students to name some of the instruments and instrument families they hear and distribute copies of the Janissary and Abduction from the Seraglio instrument bank.) 2. Historical D)].3C. The era following was the Romantic era (1820-1910).  Color Mozart’s Abduction from the Seraglio instruments (except for the green Janissary instruments) orange where you see them on the orchestra seating chart.111[2(Expression C). 117.  What do you notice about the green (Janissary) instruments? Are each of the Janissary instruments in all of the charts?  Are all of the orange (Mozart’s) instruments in the newest orchestra? Which instruments are still blank? These instruments joined the orchestra just like the Janissary instruments. 3. 117.17B. Define Janissary music and play the Janissary music example provided. 117. 117. movies. Track 1  Green & orange colored pencils/crayons  Instrument sheets (found on page 10 of this Guide)  DSOkids. Compare and Contrast  Color the Janissary Instruments green on the orchestra seating chart. Distribute copies of the seating chart to students. 5. 117. 6E-F). How has something in this world changed during your lifetime? (Possible examples: telephones. Briefly explain that music is divided into time periods. 4.14b(1A. Mozart was a composer from the Classical era (17501820). etc. 110. shaking.com  Orchestra Seating Chart (found on page 11 of this Guide) Pre Assessment  Ask the students to think about how change happens in the world.The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra: Activity 1 Orchestral Innovation Teaching Objective Students will understand the impact that Janissary music had on the evolution of the orchestra. (Historical D)].3A. 6E-F)].112(1B.114[2(Expression C). Evaluation Did the students’ responses indicate an understanding of the innovations made by Mozart? TEKS Connections English Language Arts: 110.18b(2) Social Studies: 113. Culminating Activity Ask the students about Mozart’s innovation. through people as innovative as Mozart. Vocabulary Percussion – musical instruments characterized by the striking. relating it back to the pre-assessment. 5B.115(1B.118(1B. How might these changes have come about? Who may have come up with the idea? How did/will it impact the future? How did/will people react to the change? Teaching Sequence 1.18) Art: 117.16b(21). music. 2.15. (optional) Go to DSO kids’ website’s Orchestra Seating Chart to see the evolution of the orchestra.14b(4). or scraping of the instrument to make the sound (Example: cymbals) Janissary Music – music played by Turkish and Polish army bands in the 18th and 19th centuries to inspire the soldiers during battle Innovation – the creation of a new method. 1. but ask the students to point out the one that is not. 110.16b(2).18b(1. or product Materials/Resources  Accompanying Youth Concert CD.117[2(Expression C). 113. Note that most of the Janissary instruments are percussive.202[3(Expression C)] Music: 117. what instrument would it be and why? Write about it and then draw a picture of your new addition to the orchestra on your Romantic orchestra seating chart.208(5B-D) The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra Page 9 . 117.15b(2).17C).2.

The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra: Activity 1 Orchestral Innovations Page 10 The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra .

The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra: Activity 1 Orchestral Innovations The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra Page 11 .

TEKS Connections English/Language Arts: 110. conductors generally make larger hand gestures for loud music and smaller hand gestures for quiet music. louder or softer. please encourage them to a write a letter to Maestra Canellakis. 2301 Flora Street.115(1C. Because she can’t talk during the music performance. Have the class practice conducting the 3-beat (“My Country ‘Tis of Thee”) and 4-beat (“Brother John”) patterns while singing the songs together as a class.3C. That person is the conductor.3B. Tell the students that at the Dallas Symphony Orchestra Youth Concert. Play the first few minutes of Mozart’s overture to The Abduction from the Seraglio (track 2 on the accompanying Youth Concert CD).14b(20B). They may use a pencil as a baton. These beat groupings reflect the meter of the music. Culminating Activity Make sure your students know the songs “My Country ‘Tis of Thee” and “Brother John. 110.15b(18B).3F) Page 12 The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra . If the school has a band and/or orchestra. or even more choppy (like a robot) or more smooth (like flowing water). 3. Then play it again. facial expressions. the tempo (or speed) of the music. c/o the DSO Education Department.2A. and many other expressive details.3C.16b(18B). she will be using her hands. Track 2 Vocabulary Conductor – the person who directs a group of musicians Baton – a stick used by a conductor to help direct the group Tempo – the speed of the music Meter – how beats are grouped in music Pre-Assessment Encourage a conversation regarding students’ familiarity with bands or orchestras (live or recorded performances). and have them actually conduct along with the music. ask the students if anyone in the class plays an instrument in one or both of these groups. Invite them to trace the patterns in the air with their right hand.3B. making the song go faster or slower. 117. When conducting. 110. Allow time for several students to try their hand at it.2A.2A. loud or soft? Teaching Sequence 1.3C. TX 75201.3B.2A.2C. so that everyone can see what a difference a conductor can make. Suite 300. Use the following questions to help guide the conversation:  Who leads a band or orchestra?  How do the musicians know the tempo (or speed) of the music?  How do the musicians know when to start or stop playing?  How do the musicians know when to play fast or slow.208(1C. She communicates to the musicians when to begin and stop playing. This is indicated by the symbols p and f . 110. Encourage the conductor to experiment with beginning and stopping. and ask the students to listen closely. and 4-beat conducting patterns on pages 13-14 (you may project the patterns on an overhead projector. Then invite interested students to come to the front of the room and conduct the rest of the group in one of these two songs. Have your students conduct along with the recording one more time with this in mind. Evaluation Did student behaviors indicate a basic understanding of the role of the conductor in an orchestra? Extension If your students are interested in learning more about what a conductor does and how they do it.2C. and where it is forte (or loud). 3.18b(17B) Music: 117.3F). 2.3F).2C. they will see a person standing in front of the orchestra directing the musicians. 4.3E). when to play louder or softer.112(1C.18(1C. Materials/Resources  A CD player (or computer)  Document Projector (optional)  Pencils (optional)  Accompanying Youth Concert CD.The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra: Activity 2 The Role of the Conductor Teaching Objective Students will demonstrate an understanding of the role of the conductor in an orchestra. 117. 117. or make copies for each individual student). and a baton (or conducting stick) to help convey these important details to a large group. Ask your students to identify where the music is piano (or soft). Dallas.” found on page 14. Have the students look at the 2.

The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra: Activity 2 The Role of the Conductor The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra Page 13 .

The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra: Activity 2 The Role of the Conductor Page 14 The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra .

29-30). but we have the titles.15b(16. etc.6). high/low. then draw or write brief descriptions of what they think the music might represent. 110. Choose an example familiar to most of the class and discuss what characteristics in the music suggest the visual image. Tell students one of the pieces they will hear the Dallas Symphony perform is Pictures at an Exhibition by Modest Mussorgsky. Culminating Activity Challenge students to imagine they are composers. Extension Activity Choose a piece of music familiar to the students. Let them listen and draw pictures the music suggests to them. Teaching Sequence 1. Pre-Assessment Activity Ask students to think of examples of pictures that are described in music — movies. One of the composer’s best friends was the artist Viktor Hartmann. A mutual friend arranged a showing of Hartmann’s paintings and drawings. let students share their responses.) that inspired what they drew or wrote.208(1A-C.16b(27-28). 3. 117. etc. Discuss what they heard in the music (loud/soft. etc.The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra: Activity 3 Pictures in Space (Art) and Time (Music) Teaching Objective Students will explore relationships between music and visual art. Many of the actual works of art Mussorgsky described in his music have been lost. 110. This walking theme is repeated four more times in the piece.18(1A-C. writing. fast/slow. Mount the pictures in an exhibit and invite other classes to view it as the music is played. TV.115(1A-C. what instruments were played. Materials/Resources  Paper  Crayons or markers  Accompanying Youth Concert CD. 117.6).27-28). Let the class hear and respond to each excerpt before moving to the next. and Mussorgsky was heart broken. After each listening/drawing experience.18b(16.5) The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra Page 15 .26-27) Music: 117.14b(18. 2.112(1A-C. Pictures at an Exhibition begins with a promenade— music that describes walking through the exhibition. Tell students they will listen to excerpts from some of the short sections of Pictures at an Exhibition. Tracks 3-7 Vocabulary Promenade — a leisurely walk Tuileries – a formal garden next to the Louvre (a famous museum) in Paris (Mussorgsky’s piece suggests nursemaids and squabbling children) Bydlo – a Polish oxcart –rolling on enormous wheel Exhibition – public display of works of art or other items of interest Excerpt – a short portion of a music. 117. Then tell the class the name of the original painting and discuss how Mussorgsky used music to describe it.6). Evaluation Did student responses demonstrate an awareness of how visual art can inspire music? TEKS Connections English/Language Arts: 110. Display a picture and ask them to describe how the music might sound if they wrote a piece to describe the art. 110. videos. Hartmann died when he was only 39 years old. which give an idea of what the pictures may have looked like.

Have a “listening time” within the lesson for everyone to stop and listen. or a student leader. 2. 117.3C. Evaluation Can the students identify this masterwork as “Promenade” and “Great Gate of Kiev” from Pictures at an Exhibition by Modest Mussorgsky? TEKS Connections Music: 117.3C. As the students listen to the music. 3. The students may copy the teacher. On a repeated listening. Use the music to teach good listening skills/manners. A. By applying this concept to the music of the upcoming youth concert. Modest Mussorgsky. Materials/Resources  Accompanying Youth Concert CD. As the students listen to the music.6A. Research shows that children learn to love that which is most familiar to them. Tell the students that this is a piece of music they will hear at the concert. have them keep the beat. they are presented many times so that the listening public is made aware of and begins to know the new piece quite quickly.6A.com 5.208(1A.112(1A-B.115(1A-B. 4. Use the music to signal the end of class and to accompany the students as they leave the classroom.6A. B. “Promenade” and say that the composer. This nondirected music listening is a perfect way to introduce children to musical masterworks. B.118(1A. Use the music to accompany transitions within the classroom. Use the music to accompany a movement experience. This may be as simple as patting the beat or playing “copy-cat” with body motions to the beat of the music. C. 117. move around the classroom by marching or walking. Tracks 3 and 7  DSO Youth Concert Power Point  DSOKids.com Note: For the Classroom Teacher People tend to like what they know best. these activities are suggestions for including this particular masterwork into the academic classroom.6D).The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra: Activity 4 “Promenade” and “Great Gate of Kiev” from Pictures at an Exhibition Teaching Objective Students will become familiar with a masterwork that will be heard at the upcoming youth concert. 117. This time the teacher tells a little more about the composer. This familiarity will grow as the children hear this particular work in many repetitions. Listen to a brief segment from the accompanying Youth Concert CD and/or view the appropriate slide from the accompanying Youth Concert Power Point. who wrote this music was describing a person strolling through the art exhibit viewing the paintings. A. Use the music to signal the start and end of class. Information about the composer may be found on page 7 of this guide and also at DSOkids.” Teacher’s Note Follow any of these suggestions to incorporate “Great Gate of Kiev” in the students’ listening experience.6D). Popular musicians know this the best and jockey to get their music into radio stations to be played.3C. Use the music as background while the students create a piece of art which represents the music of the “Promenade. Teaching Sequence 1.5A) Page 16 The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra . children will begin to recognize and know this particular masterwork. Have the music playing as the students enter the classroom. To that end. Announce the name of the music.6D). When new songs are introduced. ask students to name the piece of music and the composer.

Ask the students to discuss among themselves.com. 7.dsokids. Glockenspiel—a percussion instrument made of steel bars arranged like a keyboard and played with mallets Mallet—a drum stick with a large tip Materials/Resources  www.  Listen to the violin. and prepare to share how the timbres differ. tone color. Teaching Sequence Grades 5 and 6. add the following: 4. Culminating Activity Divide the students into small groups equal in number. clarinet. Meyerson Symphony Center.  Listen as the violin plays “Twinkle.  Encourage the students to determine what may have been the reasons for differences in timbre.  Have their classmates close their eyes while they listen to determine what makes the voices sound different or similar. Listen to the violin as it plays a melody with the orchestra. determine the level of students’ familiarity with timbre.dsokids.dsokids. Encourage discussion and sharing of what students learned from these experiences. Have the students go to www. 3. 6. Teaching Sequence Grades 3 and 4 1.com  Accompanying Youth Concert Power Point Pre-Assessment: Using the following strategies. 5. Encourage discussion and sharing of what the students saw and heard. Twinkle Little Star. Why are instruments of different timbres included in the orchestra? Evaluation Are the students able to correctly identify a violin.118(1A-B). 117. Select the violin.112(1A-B). Vocabulary Timbre— quality of sound produced by a particular instrument or voice Tone—a sound of definite pitch and duration as distinct from noise Pitch—highness or lowness of a tone. 117. 117.208(1A-B) The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra Page 17 . 2. clarinet. trumpet and glockenspiel in the Dallas Symphony Orchestra? Remind students to be prepared to locate the instruments in the orchestra during the concert they will attend at the Morton H. Read the description of the violin. in that order.”  Follow the same procedure with the clarinet.  Select 4 students to stand before the class and say together the current day and date. October 15th. trumpet and glockenspiel.The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra: Activity 5 Instrument Timbre Learning Objective Students will learn to distinguish orchestral instruments by sight and sound. Example: Today is Monday.  Look at and describe the picture of the violin. Have the students go to www.115(1A-B). TEKS Connections Music: 117. trumpet and glockenspiel by sight and timbre? Will they be able to identify the violin. with special attention to timbre or tone color.  Ask students to rearrange themselves until similar voice timbers are together.com.

sounds that are made by plucking. Play the excerpt again. Ask students to give examples of the instruments in each family.18(1A-B. ask the students to listen to the “Theme” slide of The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra found on the accompanying Youth Concert Power Point.15(1A-B.12(22). Record students answers on the board. 6A. Explain that the theme is the main melody of the music.The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra: Activity 6 Families of Instruments Listening Maps Teaching Objectives  Students will aurally identify families of instruments Vocabulary: Theme – the main melody of a piece of music Resources/Materials  Accompanying Youth Concert Power Point  Families of Instruments visuals found on pages 19-22 of this guide  Listening map found on page 23 of this guide  DSOkids. have the students label the theme statements by the family of instruments that is performing. 5. Students will end back in the center for the original theme restatement.117. Help the students identify where the theme restatements by family begin in the slide. Ask the students to write down sound characteristics of each location on the listening map. play excerpts from several instruments from each family.18(19A) Music: 117. 2. striking.. 117. students should move to the theme and call out “Theme”. 3. After the instruments have been identified. Some are different colors. 110. students will move to those sections of the room calling out families of instruments performing those themes. some have different sleeve lengths.6F). Evaluation Did the students’ listening maps accurately portray and understanding of the instruments of families? TEKS Connections English/Language Arts: 110. some are different fabrics.e. 117.6C).15(20A).208(1A-B. break the room up into five sections based on the layout of the listening map.5A.: brassy sounds. Label each section of the room to lessen confusion while students are moving.16(20A). When the following theme presentations are played. 110.6F). 6.  Assess if students are familiar with the 4 instrument families by displaying the families of instruments visuals on pages 19-22 of this guide.com  Writing utensils Pre Assessment  Have the students stand up and look at their shirts. scraping. Have the students group themselves into “families” of shirts.6C. Teaching Sequence 1.6A.5E) Page 18 The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra . 4.6A. Ask the students to describe and give examples of how these families of instruments produce sound. Culminating Activity Play the “Theme” slide on the accompanying Youth Concert Power Point again. On DSOkids. i. After each hearing. On this final hearing. After characteristics have been described on paper.112(1A-B. Using the blank listening map as a visual reference (found on page 23) of this guide. With the pictures provided on the following pages as an aid. When the section of the original theme begins. discuss the instrument families.com. 110. challenge the student to identify which instrument is being played based on the aural characteristics of the sound. ask students to classify the individual instruments into the correct instrument family.6C.1D.

The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra: Activity 6 Families of Instruments Listening Maps VIOLIN VIOLA BASS STRING FAMILY CELLO HARP The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra Page 19 .

The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra: Activity 6 Families of Instruments Listening Maps PICCOLO FLUTE WOODWIND FAMILY OBOE Page 20 CLARINET BASSOON The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra .

The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra: Activity 6 Families of Instruments Listening Maps TRUMPET TROMBONE BRASS FAMILY HORN TUBA The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra Page 21 .

The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra: Activity 6 Families of Instruments Listening Maps PERCUSSION FAMILY CYMBALS SNARE TRIANGLE XYLOPHONE BASS DRUM TYMPANI Page 22 The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra .

The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra: Activity 6 Families of Instruments Listening Maps Family 2:____________ Family 1:____________ ORIGINAL THEME Family 4:____________ The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra Family 3:____________ Page 23 .

) 4. another starts to give her opinion. this time slowly so that everyone can hear it over the activity.6A). in the same family order. The only difference is that they each say it in their own unique voice. or timbre can be discerned.The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra: Activity 7 Listen! What do you Hear? Teaching Objective Students will practice active directed listening and develop an understanding of theme and variations. Track 22 Fugue – After each individual has had a chance to speak. then the strings. or timbre. brass and percussion in turn. If you choose not to read it aloud. for example. consult the CD track list on page 3 of this Guide. Teaching Sequence 1. the members start to restate the announcement one at a time. First they will hear the whole orchestra (theme). the announcement can be heard loud and slow over the rest of the talking. Tracks 8-22 Pre-Assessment Teacher note – consider reading this short explanation of The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra (taken from Wikipedia). In the introduction. and finally the percussion. but this time in their own words. Some say it more simply while others elaborate. an important announcement is made. and so on. using more flowery language as the others listen and consider what they think about it. then by each major family of instruments of the orchestra: first the woodwinds. One by one all the individuals chime in with an opinion. and the variations were the different versions from the individual instruments as they repeated the announcement. (For the order in which each individual instrument comes in. one individual decides to tell the others what he thinks about it. the brass are re-introduced (with a strike on the tam tam) playing Purcell's original melody. the sound in the room gets more and more chaotic. As the party concludes. Track 9-21 Variations A thru M – After each family has repeated the announcement.5A) Page 24 The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra . and generally moving through each family from high to low. and finally by the percussion. Evaluation Did students practice active directed listening and develop an understanding of theme and variations. As they ‘speak’. The piece of music is written in a form called theme and variations. then the brass. you should be sure and familiarize yourself with it as it explains how the piece is put together.115(1A-C. Once everyone has entered. 117.6A). the theme is initially played by the entire orchestra. followed by all the woodwinds. then each instrument individually (variations). Have a discussion about the experience. brass. it is reassembled using an original fugue which starts with the piccolo. asking the students which way they prefer to think about the piece and why.118(1. strings. Tell students that at the upcoming youth concert they are planning to attend they will hear a piece of music written to introduce them to all the instruments of the orchestra. brass. After the whole orchestra has been effectively “taken to pieces” in this way. followed by the String family and then the Percussion family. either remind the students of the fictional story or read the explanation from the preassessment and listen to the entire piece without stopping. tell them the following story: 2. 117. ending with the bassoon.112(1A-C. TEKS Connections Music: 117. through the strings. Each variation then features a particular instrument in depth. Culminating Activity On a different day. As soon as he is finished. It is decided that maybe the announcement needs to be made again. 117. the first variation features the piccolo and flutes. as you play the piece one track at a time. So. As each one chimes in. They are so amazed by the announcement that each family repeats the announcement one group at a time – first the Woodwind family. each family’s unique sound. then each of the instrument families (woodwinds. Explain to them that in this piece the ‘theme’ was the announcement in the story. each member of the woodwind family then gets a variation. Resources  Accompanying Youth Concert CD.208(1A-D. 3. strings and percussion). In order to understand the concept of theme and variations. Track 8 Theme – In a large room where four families are gathered for a party. then the Brass family. It turns out that they are all saying the exact same thing.6).

3. Culminating Activity The teacher shows the full Rhythmic Score found on page 27 of this guide. 4. The teacher asks the students to derive the rhythm for the first 4 measures and writes it on the board above the beat blanks. Evaluation: Were the students able to derive. As the students listen a second time. Students pat the beat as they listen to the opening 4 measures of “Promenade” whether from the accompanying Youth Concert CD or from the teacher playing it on a keyboard instrument. and perform the rhythm of Mussorgsky’s “Promenade?” The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra Page 25 . read. the teacher draws the appropriate number of beat blanks on the board. The teacher points to the beat blanks as the student listen a third time. Have the students perform the rhythm by clapping and saying rhythm duration syllables as they read from the Rhythmic Score. including bar lines. and perform the rhythm of Mussorgsky’s “Promenade. Students listen to the entire piece as they follow the notation of the rhythms Mussorgsky used. Listen a fourth time and clap to discover that the first two measures are rhythmically repeated for measures 3 and 4. 2. What do the students notice? 5. The teacher asks the students to read and perform the notated rhythm by clapping and saying rhythm duration syllables. read.” Materials/Resources  Accompanying Youth Concert CD.Extensions for the Music Specialist “Promenade and Great Gate of Kiev” from Pictures at an Exhibition Grades 3-6 Objective Students will derive. Track 3  Accompanying Youth Concert Power Point  Rhythmic Score of “Promenade” from Pictures at an Exhibition (found on page 27 of this Guide) Vocabulary Derive – to “figure out” by using the logical extension of prior knowledge applied to a new learning situation Teaching Sequence 1.

Time Signature—The time signature is found at the beginning of the composition (and/or measure if there is changing meter present) and is notate with two numbers. (Note: In the first half of the piece. have students listen and follow the melodic line to “Promenade” as performed by Alexander Ghindin.2A. Review the meaning of each part of the time signature. Tracks 3 and 7  Accompanying Youth Concert Power Point  Rhythmic Score of “Promenade” from Pictures at an Exhibition (found on page 27 of this Guide)– to be projected on to the board  Projector/ELMO device  Piano score for “Promenade” if available  Youtube examples: Alexander Ghindin. https://www.118(1C.youtube. Materials/Resources  Accompanying Youth Concert CD.5B. Visually derive and write in the time signature for each measure whenever there is a change. The teacher tells the students that to signify a person wandering through an art exhibit. The top number denotes the number of beats in each measure.2A. 117.6C) Page 26 The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra . Meter—the organizational grouping of beat according to naturally stressed and unstressed beats. as if the viewer were changing directions or going off to view an additional paintings close by. 3. Mussorgsky changed the meter almost every measure.com/watch?v=SFYBN8XCjbA Culminating Activity Have students listen to “The Great Gate of Kiev” from Pictures at an Exhibition and compare its opening rhythm to that of the opening of “Promenade.115(1C.2A.6C. Review the term time signature as being the symbolic notation of the meter.com/watch?v=ZZqJcdF_OKk Vocabulary Derive—to “figure out” by using the logical extension of prior knowledge applied to a new learning situation.6B.youtube.” What do you hear? What similarities do you find? Evaluation Were students able to derive and notate the time signature(s) Mussorgsky used in his “Promenade” from Pictures at an Exhibition? Extension Activity Listen to an arrangement of the “Promenade” performed by the Piano Guys. 117. Teaching Sequence 1.https://www.6E).Extensions for the Music Specialist “Promenade and Great Gate of Kiev” from Pictures at an Exhibition Grades 4-6 Objective Students will derive and notate the time signature(s) Mussorgsky used in his “Promenade” from Pictures at an Exhibition. If the piano score is available.3E. After reading and performing the entire Rhythmic Score of “Promenade” from Pictures at an Exhibition (See first lesson on page 25 of this Guide).6E).youtube.5C.3F. 2. Teacher tells the students that Pictures at an Exhibition was originally written for piano.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZqJcdF_OKk TEKS Connections Music: 117. The bottom number denotes the note value that represents the beat.https://www.112(1C. https://www. the students will derive the meter and discover that it changes from measure to measure. one on top of the other. the meter alternates between 5/4 and 6/4).com/watch?v=SFYBN8XCjbA Piano Guys .

Extensions for the Music Specialist “Promenade and Great Gate of Kiev” from Pictures at an Exhibition The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra Page 27 .

208(1A-D.118(1. 117. 117. 4. When each variation begins.115(1A-C.6).Extensions for the Music Specialist Theme and Variations Listening Map for The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra Objective Students will be able to determine and aurally identify individual instruments and plot their findings on a listening map. Evaluation Were the students able to aurally identify the families of instruments as well as the individual instruments performing on the recording? TEKS Connections Music: 117. Review that Theme and Variations form consists of a theme statement and subsequent variations on that theme. 117. that the object of the game will be to identify each variation in the listening of The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra by the instrument that is performing the variation. Distribute listening map game boards and instrument cut outs to each students. Review the instrument families and how each family makes sound on the instrument. the students will place the corresponding instrument (group of instruments) game piece on the listening map board. Resources  Accompanying Youth Concert CD. 3.6A).6A). 2. 5. Explain to the class. play The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra on tracks 8-22 of the accompanying Youth Concert CD.112(1A-C. Tracks 8-22  Listening Map found on page 29 of this Guide  Instrument Cut Outs. found on pages 19-22 of this Guide  Families of Instruments Visuals found on pages 19-22 of this Guide Teaching Sequence 1.5A) Page 28 The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra . While handing out the pieces.

Extensions for the Music Specialist Theme and Variations Listening Map for The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra THEME AND VARIATIONS LISTENING MAP Variation B Variation F Variation A Variation H Variation G Theme Theme Variation C Variation E Variation I Theme Variation D Variation J Fugue Theme Variation K Variation M Theme Variation L Page 29 The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra .

Page 30 The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra .

Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. Alfred A. 1992. Baines. books. Milwood Press. Robert & Bergethon. Alan.ca An education website sponsored by the National Arts Centre in Canada www. Ann. Crescent Books.org The New York Philharmonic’s website for teachers and students www. Krull.com The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra Page 31 . Knopf.DSOkids.playmusic. 1994. Sven. and videotapes can be found at:  DSO Symphony Store. Barber. Concise Introduction to Music Listening. Online www. 1981.. (See p. Amazing Music. The World of Music. “Pictures in Music”. 1995. The Music Pack. B. 1983. Charles. Nicola. features Music Director Emeritus Andrew Litton as your guide to “Emotions in Music”. 1984. Michael. Moss. The Oxford Companion to Musical Instruments. call 1-800-828-0229 for a free catalog. Anthony. Lives of Musicians. Kruckenberg.Resources for Teachers Books Apel. “Families of the Orchestra”. Wadsworth Publishing Co. Video The Dallas Symphony Orchestra’s television series for children. Basic Music.  Music in Motion. Meet the Orchestra. A Young Person’s Guide to Music.org The San Francisco Symphony’s educational website for children www. Ardley. Wadsworth Publishing Co. Prentice Hall. The Understanding of Music.artsalive. Harvard University Press.com The Dallas Symphony’s website for teachers and students www. 1995.org A children’s website from the American Symphony Orchestra League www. Van der Meer & Berkeley.nyphilkids. The Orchestra: An Introduction to the World of Classical Music.sfskids. 1993. Neil.. Publisher. Simon & Schuster. and “Jazz”. 1991. Hoffer. Blackwood. 1993. 1993. Harvard Dictionary of Music. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.youtube. Gulliver Books. Kathleen. audio. Nye. Hoffer. Charles. Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin. Hays. 1967. Wili. The Symphony Orchestra and its Instruments. 47 for order form) Classroom Materials Sources for pictures of instruments. call 214-871-4058 for information  Friendship House. call 1-800-791-9876 for a free catalog  Music Educator’s National Conference (MENC). Inc. call 1-800-445-0649 for a free catalog. 1995. Silver Burdett Press. Llyod.

00 service fee. east on Woodall Rodgers Freeway (exit marked “to Sherman I-45 and US-75”).4054 at least 30 days before the concert if your group includes any students or teachers with special needs. Take Ross to Routh Street and turn left. exit at Griffin Street. there is a $1. turn left and pull up in front of the Meyerson to unload. From Northbound I-35 Stemmons. near the corner of Ross and Crockett. Take Routh to Flora Street.  Departures: Students are dismissed by school and directed to their buses. Take Griffin Street to Ross and turn left. An elevator is available for the physically challenged. turn left on Flora and pull up in front of the Meyerson to unload. I-45 and US-75”). From Central (US-75). Please follow directions from Symphony personnel. Turn slightly left to access Pearl Street. Then turn left on Routh. All bus drivers will be given directions on where to park. Both cash and credit cards are accepted.  Please contact Mallory Coulter at 214. Please follow directions from Symphony personnel. turn left and pull up in front of the Meyerson to unload.  After students disembark. exit on the left towards downtown. After parking. exit at Griffin Street. Following identical routes is recommended so that your group arrives at the Meyerson at approximately the same time. Please do not come upstairs until your entire group has assembled.Arriving and Departing the Meyerson Symphony Center Buses  Arrivals: buses unload in the front of the Meyerson Symphony Center on westbound Flora Street. Turn left on Ross to Routh. south on the Tollway. On level 3 of the parking garage. Continue to follow signs to downtown. after the main toll plaza. buses should proceed to their designated parking area. or if you are in need of infra-red headsets for the hearing impaired. From the Dallas North Tollway.00. Take Ross to Routh Street and turn left. including wheelchairs. Cars and Vans  Schools coming by cars and vans should park in the Hall Arts Center Parking Garage. please note that when using a credit card. there is a walk-through into the lower level of the Symphony Center. which is entered from Ross Avenue between Leonard and Pearl Streets. stay in the left lane and take the Hines Blvd.  DO NOT UNLOAD YOUR BUS UNTIL YOU ARE GREETED BY A DSO STAFF MEMBER. Turn right on Routh. take a ticket and proceed to levels 4 through 7. The Hall Arts Center Garage has an overhead clearance of 7 feet.871. take the Pearl Street exit and stay in the far left lane. Cars: Access the Hall Arts Center Garage from Ross Avenue. east on Woodall Rodgers Freeway (exit marked “to Houston. turn right onto Ross Avenue. Page 32 The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra . Pearl Street and the Arts District. A volunteer will guide you to the Main Lobby.  Bus drivers: PLEASE DO NOT LEAVE YOUR BUSES DURING THE PERFORMANCE. A note to schools arriving in carpools: Please pr ovide all of your dr iver s with a map and clear instructions on where to park (Hall Arts Center Parking Garage). and left on Flora. I-30 or I-45. Be sure all drivers and chaperones know to meet in the Lower Lobby. west on Woodall Rodgers (366).  When you arrive at the garage. Please do not come upstairs until your entire group has assembled. then stay on Pearl to Ross Ave. U-turn onto Woodall Rodgers Access Road going east. take the Symphony Center elevators to the Lower Lobby. Pull up in front of the Meyerson to unload. The parking fee for Youth Concert events is $6. Take Routh to Flora Street. Turn left on Routh. Take Griffin Street to Ross and turn left. Bus Directions to the Meyerson Symphony Center From Southbound I-35E Stemmons. Assemble your group in the Lower Lobby. turn right on Flora and pull up in front of the Meyerson to unload. From downtown or East Dallas. north on Pearl Street.

Meyerson Area Map The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra Page 33 .

535 pipes The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra .5 tons 50 bathrooms An 85 foot high ceiling in the concert hall A 40 foot hollow area under the stage to increase resonance An organ with 4 keyboards. Pei’s design combines basic geometric shapes. Pei was chosen to design the building.000 limestone blocks from Indiana 35. each weighing up to 2. World-renowned architect and major arts supporter I. Meyerson Center One of the world’s greatest concert halls. Acoustical features include:        Double sets of doors at all entrances Terrazzo and concrete floors Mohair fabric on the seats Walls covered with African cherrywood Sound-absorbing curtains which can be drawn over the walls A reverberation chamber with 72 acoustical doors used to “tune” the hall The canopy over the stage. ft. 1989. the heating and air conditioning system is located in a different building so that no vibrations from the machinery can be felt in the concert hall. 84 ranks. with a rectangle (the concert hall) set at an angle within a square (the outer walls). which can be raised and lowered to enhance the sound Fun Facts about the Meyerson! The Meyerson Symphony Center has:              Page 34 2. of Italian travertine marble 22. 61 keys.M.About the Morton H. 65 stops and 4. working closely with acoustician Russell Johnson. Segments of circles also enclose the building.130 cubic yards of concrete 918 panels of African cherrywood around the concert hall 216 panels of American cherrywood around the stage 62 acoustical curtains 4 canopies with a combined weight of 42 tons 72 concrete acoustical doors. which opened on September 6. In the concert hall.000 sq. every detail was designed to make the sound or acoustics as perfect as possible for orchestral music.056 seats 30. the Meyerson Symphony Center was made possible through the efforts of the citizens of Dallas. Over ten years were spent in the planning and construction of the Meyerson. 32 pedals. For example.

fridge@dalsym. two performances per visit) _____Woodwind Quintet (grades 2-4. two performances per visit) The ensembles usually perform on Friday mornings. Fax. two performances per visit) _____String Trio (grades K-3.871. two or three performances per visit) Enhance your Symphony YES! classroom experience by scheduling a DSO Teaching Artist to come to your school ahead of the performance to teach materials from Music Fun Facts! _____String Quintet (grades 4 and 5. ______________________ your school in the past school year? ________ Comments: Be sure to make a copy of this completed form for your records. State. Questions? Contact Jenny Fridge at 214. All teachers who schedule a Symphony Y ES! visit will receive one Music Fun Facts booklet to prepare their students before their scheduled visit. Copies of the book may be made for classroom use. This form must be filled out completely and signed by the participating teacher and school principal. perform an engaging variety of repertoire. You will be e-mailed a copy of this request. mail or e-mail the completed and signed agreement form with full payment to the information listed below. two performances per visit) _____String Duo (grades PreK-3. Please fill out the following information to be considered for a Symphony Y ES! booking. Failure to return the Symphony Y ES! School Agreement Form will result in a cancellation. introduce their instruments to the class. Today’s Date: __________ School Name: _____________________ ________________ ___________ School Phone: ________________________________ School Fax: __________________ _________ Address: ____________________________________ City.4006 or email: j. You will be contacted by the DSO Education Coordinator after reviewing your information. After scheduling the visit. Zip: ________________ _________ Contact Teacher Name: _________________________ Contact Teacher Phone: ______________ ______ Contact Teacher E-mail Address: ______________________________________________________ __ Classroom Grade Levels (PreK-6): __________________ Please indicate your first and second choices of ensemble. Each ensemble costs $350: _____Brass Quintet (grades 3-6. Please indicated your first and second choices for a performance month: 1. ______________________ Has a Symphony Y ES! ensemble visited 2.Symphony Y ES! Request Form Symphony Y ES! is a perfect way to prepare your students for or follow up from a Youth Concert. you will be faxed or mailed a Symphony Y ES! School Agreement Form. two performances per visit) _____Percussion (grades 3 and 4. The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra Page 35 .com. This performance is NOT BOOKED until you receive and return the Symphony Y ES! School Agreement Form with FULL PAYMENT. Each ensemble will come directly to your school. and interact directly with students.

0825 (Tax exempt? Please include a copy of your tax exempt certificate) Shipping: 1-3 Classroom Editions 4+ Classroom Editions ` + $6.00= Texas residents add 8. especially in the light of current research that validates music as an effective teaching tool. 2301 Flora St. supplementing a special time-coded version of each video with a booklet containing lesson plans developed by educators. is a strong advocate for music education as well as a charming host for the concerts.. Order Form Name Address City State Telephone (daytime) Zip (evening) Please send me the following “Classroom Editions” Volume 1 Volume 2 Volume 3 Volume 4 Number of DVDs Emotions in Music Pictures in Music Families of the Orchestra Jazz Total number of Classroom Editions x $40.25% sales tax x .4511 (Attn: Jenny Fridge) Page 36 The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra . the Dallas Symphony Orchestra has developed Classroom Editions of A mazing Music for the educational market.50= + $8. The Dallas Symphony Orchestra’s A mazing Music programs have been broadcast on A&E and PBS.50= Total: $ □Enclosed is a check payable to Dallas Symphony Orchestra -Or□Mastercard/Visa Card Number: Expiration Date: □Discover □American Express Signature: Mail form to: Dallas Symphony Orchestra c/o Jenny Fridge. Suite 300. Litton. who was inspired to become a conductor by Leonard Bernstein’s Young People’s Concerts.871. TX 75201 or Fax to: 214. featuring fast-paced explorations led by Music Director Emeritus Andrew Litton.Amazing Music DVDs The Dallas Symphony Orchestra’s A mazing Music concerts are the perfect introduction to the orchestra. Designed to be educational as well as entertaining. Dallas. Therefore. The activities support in-school use of the programs with curriculum that integrates music with other classroom subjects. A mazing Music programs are a natural for the classroom.