SPECIAL  TRIANGLES  

1.   The  numbers  that  our  calculator  gives  us  for  sine/cosine/tangent  are  a  little  bit  wonky.    
 
What  do  you  get  when  you  evaluate   sin(13o ) ?  _________________________  [write  out  all  decimals]  
 
What  do  you  get  when  you  evaluate   cos(45o ) ?  ________________________  [write  out  all  decimals]  
 
What  do  you  get  when  you  evaluate   tan(60o ) ?  ________________________  [  write  out  all  decimals]  
 
The  decimals  that  you  wrote  out…  are  they  exact  or  approximations?  CIRCLE  ONE:  Exact  /  Approx.  
 
2.   Although  all  seem  mighty  random,  with  wonky  decimals,  the  second  and  third  ones  are  actually  
beautiful  numbers  that  we  can  easily  express,  while  the  first  one  is  just  messy  and  not  easily  expressible.    
Use  your  calculators  to  find  a  decimal  approximation  for  

2
:  ______________________  
2

Use  your  calculators  to  find  a  decimal  approximation  for   3 :  ______________________  
   
Curious.  Very  curious.  We’re  going  to  understand  what  is  happening.  
 
3.   The  reason  some  of  the  angles  have  this  nice  property  is  that  they  are  related  to  some  nice  regular  
polygons…  An  equilateral  triangle  and  a  square.  Below  are  diagrams  of  each.  The  equilateral  triangle  has  
side  length  2t  and  the  square  has  side  length  s.1  
 

 

 

 

 
On  the  next  page  are  bigger  versions.  Cut  them  out,  and  label  all  the  side  lengths  and  angle  measures  
that  you  know.  
 

                                                                                                                       
1

 If  you’re  a  curious  sort,  and  I  hope  you  are,  you  probably  are  wondering  why  we  didn’t  give  the  triangle  a  side  length  of  t.  We  could  
have,  and  everything  that  is  to  come  would  have  worked  out.  It  just  so  happens  that  the  algebra  works  out  nicer  if  we  give  the  
triangle  a  side  length  of  2t.  That’s  all.  Nothing  special.  We  aren’t  doing  any  mathematical  trickery  or  lies.  If  you  don’t  believe  us,  do  
all  the  calculations  with  a  side  length  of  t.  We’re  cool  with  that.    

`  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

`  

 

 
 
 
`  

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
`  

4.   Now  fold  the  triangle  in  half  –  along  an  angle  bisector.  We  proved  previously  that  this  angle  bisector  will  
be  the  perpendicular  bisector  of  the  side  opposite  of  it.    So  now  you  have  a  right  triangle!    
 
Label  the  measure  of  all  the  angles  that  you  know.  
Label  the  side  lengths  that  you  know.  
 
Without  using  sine/cosine/tangent,  use  your  brains  and  some  algebra  to  find  the  side  length(s)  that  you  
don’t  know.    
 
Tape  your  triangle  here.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Use  your  triangle  to  evaluate  exactly:  
 

sin(30o )    
sin(60o )  
 
 

`  

cos(30o )  
cos(60o )  

tan(30o )  
tan(60o )  

5.   Now  fold  the  square  in  half  –  along  a  diagonal.  Now  you  have  a  right  triangle!  
 
Label  the  measure  of  all  the  angles  that  you  know.  
Label  the  side  lengths  that  you  know.  
 
Without  using  sine/cosine/tangent,  use  your  brains  and  some  algebra  to  find  the  side  length(s)  that  you  
don’t  know.    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Use  your  triangle  to  evaluate  exactly:  
 

sin(45o )    
 
 
 
 
 
`  

cos(45o )  

tan(45o )  

6.   (a)  Notice  in  your  30-­‐60-­‐90  triangle:  
The  length  of  the  side  opposite  the  smallest  angle  (30  degrees):    

   _____  (exact)  

The  length  of  the  side  opposite  the  middle-­‐sized  angle  (60)  degrees:  _____  (exact)  
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
The  length  of  the  side  opposite  the  largest  angle  (90  degrees):    
   _____  (exact)  
 
If  any  of  your  sides  involves  a  radical,  next  to  the  exact  value  write  down  the  decimal  approximation  of  the  
length  of  that  side,  to  the  nearest  tenth.    
 
(b)  Notice  in  your  45-­‐45-­‐90  triangle:  
 
The  length  of  the  side  opposite  the  smaller  angles  (45  degrees):        _____  (exact)  
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
The  length  of  the  side  opposite  the  largest  angle  (90  degrees):    
   _____  (exact)  
 
If  any  of  your  sides  involves  a  radical,  next  to  the  exact  value  write  down  the  decimal  approximation  of  the  
length  of  that  side,  to  the  nearest  tenth.    
 
7.   (a)  If  the  hypotenuse  of  a  30-­‐60-­‐90  triangle  has  a  length  of  1,  find  the  other  two  side  lengths  (exactly).  

 
 
(b)  If  the  hypotenuse  of  a  45-­‐45-­‐90  triangle  has  a  length  of  1,  find  the  other  two  side  lengths  (exactly).  
 

 

`