9/4/2014

Acquired
Peripheral
Neuropathies
A/Prof Lyn Kiers
Director, Dept Clinical Neurophysiology,
Royal Melbourne Hospital

Axonal Degeneration (75%)
 Abnormal axonal transport
 Lack of growth factors
 Recover by regeneration

Demyelination (20%)
 Primary destruction of myelin 
sheath
 Recover by remyelination 

Cell body – neuronopathy (5%)
 Sensory (DRG) or motor (AHC)

1

9/4/2014

Commonest neuropathy type
 Usually chronic: weeks to months
 Predilection for large diameter, long nerve fibres
 Distal symmetric pattern
 Sensory>motor, areflexia
 Specific axonal neuropathies involve small diameter 

fibres

Axonopathy ‐ Aetiology





Diabetes
Alcohol
Uraemia
Toxic / drugs
Paraneoplastic (some)
Nutritional

2

 Distal   Tendon reflexes: Reduced or absent diffusely  Immune/Inflammatory  GBS  CIDP  Multifocal Motor Np  Paraproteinemic Np  POEMS  HIV  Metabolic  Storage disorders  Drugs/Toxins  Amiodarone  Chloroquine  Suramin  Bortezomib (mixed)  TNF alpha blockers  hexacarbons  ………….9/4/2014 Primary destruction of the myelin sheath leaving  the axon intact  Secondary axonal degeneration common late in the  disease course  Clinical features   Weakness: Proximal & Distal  >>Wasting ▪ Exceptions: MAG & Hereditary are mainly distal   Sensory: Mild. Symmetric.  Mitochondrial ▪ NARP. MNGIE  3 ..

  CRMP5. Ri. cis‐Platinum.9/4/2014 Functional involvement Distribution  ▪ Often largely one modality  ▪ Motor ▪ Proximal & Distal. Arms  involved early  ▪ Face & Bulbar common  ▪ Asymmetric ▪ Involvement of AHC ▪ Separate. distinct entities ▪ Sensory loss ▪ Sensory ganglionopathy ▪ Often severe especially  proprioception/sensory  ataxia  ▪ Autonomic   Idiopathic Immune  Sjogren’s  Paraneoplastic‐ antiHu. Ma  Acute sensory neuronopathy  Time course ▪ Often subacute: Weeks to  months  ▪ Sensory deficit often  severe & poorly responsive  to therapy  Nerve conduction  Normal motor/F‐wave  Normal EMG  Absent sensory potentials Drugs  B6.  (doxorubicin)  Hereditary – Fabry’s  4 .

 LFT FBE       B12. AutoAb Stage 2:  Nerve conduction   Stage 3  CSF‐ protein. amyloid. tremor. folate TFT CXR SPEP ESR. Vasculitic. Fabrys Mononeuritis multiplex Ie.9/4/2014 Neuropathy – Clinical evaluation Distal. urine BJ protein studies 5 . cells  Heavy metals  QST/autonomic  testing/skin biopsy if small  fibre  Oral GTT.  ataxia Pain and autonomic features Sensory neuronopathy IgM anti‐MAG neuropathy Small fibre neuropathy  ie diabetes. symmetric.  sensory>motor Early proximal weakness Axonal neuropathy Proprioceptive loss. infiltration Marked asymmetry Weakness/sensory loss in  peripheral N distribution Palpable nerve trunks Demyelinating neuropathy Inherited neuropathy Leprosy Peripheral neuropathy ‐ Investigations  Stage 1:      FBG         U&E.

 Rapid  firing ▪ Fibrillations. Polyphasic. distal>>proximal muscles ▪ Motor units: High amplitude.9/4/2014  Electrodiagnostic studies  Nerve conduction studies ▪ Reduced/Absent sensory potentials lower>>upper limbs ▪ Low amplitude distal motor responses. mildly delayed F‐waves ▪ Conduction velocities: Mildly reduced consistent with loss of  large myelinated nerve fibres  EMG  ▪ Neurogenic. Long duration. Positive sharp waves NORMAL 6 .

9/4/2014  Nerve conduction studies   Conduction velocity: Very slow (Upper extremity < 37 M/s)   Conduction block: Failure of impulse conduction along an  anatomically intact axon   Dispersion of motor response  Prolonged distal latencies & F‐waves   EMG  Reduced motor unit recruitment (fast firing motor units) in  clinically weak muscles Normal Motor Conduction Demyelinating Neuropathy 7 .

9/4/2014 Focal Conduction Block Sural Nerve biopsy Only in select cases  if aetiology unclear  Considering  treatable cause  Functionally  disabling  More useful if:   Asymmetric  symptoms/signs  Sensory presentation  Abnormal NCS 8 .

standing from chair. buttoning his clothes.9/4/2014 Sural Nerve biopsy – diagnostic abnormalities       Vasculitis Amyloidosis Sarcoidosis Leprosy Tumour infiltration Inherited (eg HNPP but rarely required due to  genetic studies – 17p deletion PMP 22 gene) Case 1 – 30 yo man        4 month history of LL>UL weakness Difficulty climbing stairs. finger abductors 4/5 hip flexion. ankle dorsiflexion Reduced UL reflexes. carrying bags Mild paraesthesia fingers 4/5 power biceps. triceps. absent LL reflexes Decreased JPS great toe Formulation:  Proximal>distal weakness  Hypo/Areflexia  Minimal sensory abnormality = ? Demyelinating neuropathy 9 .

9/4/2014 Case 1 – 30 yo man  Nerve conduction studies  Prolonged distal and F‐wave latencies  Slow conduction velocities – motor>sensory  Conduction block/temporal dispersion    CSF – raised protein Serum protein EP/Immunoelectrofixation Autoantibody profile Case 2 – 70 yo lady    2 years progressive numbness and paraesthesia feet  bilaterally Slight paraesthesia finger tips  4/5 power EHL. EDL Absent ankle reflexes Reduced pinprick and temperature sensation to lower 1/3 leg   Formulation: Length dependent sensory>>motor  =?  Axonal neuropathy   10 .

 Impaired JPS fingers/ankles Wide‐based unsteady gait.  B12.9/4/2014 Case 2 – 70 yo lady   Nerve conduction studies  Reduced amplitude sural /superficial peroneal  Mild slowing sensory NCV  Low CMAP amplitude in peroneal nerves BL   Selective blood tests may include GTT. positive Romberg test    11 . ESR Medication history. LFTs. and 3W later reported  trouble walking and numbness over chest and abdomen Stated that floor felt “funny” and she couldn’t identify if it  was hot or cold After 2 months unable to ambulate     Normal power LL and UL Areflexia Loss of VS to wrists/knees. U&E. alcohol Case 3 – 54 yo woman  4 month history of numbness and tingling sensations in D3/4  bilaterally Spread to involve entire hands.

 burning pain  2M numbness/paraesthesia right thumb and dorsum of hand  1M weakness left hand     4/5 power left ulnar innervated muscles 4/5 power left toe extension and ankle eversion Reduced LT/PP sensation left peroneal sensory innervation and  right radial sensory innervation  Asymmetic. CxR. anti‐neuronal antibodies ? Lip biopsy. sequential neurological deficits in the distribution of  isolated peripheral nerves = mononeuritis multiplex ? Vasculitic ?  MADSAM 12 .9/4/2014 Case 3 – 54 yo woman  Profound proprioceptive loss. areflexia  = sensory neuronopathy/ganglionopathy or IgM (anti‐MAG)  paraproteinemic neuropathy  Nerve conduction studies  Absent/reduced  sensory amplitudes in UL and LL  Normal motor responses B12. cancer screen     Case 4 – 59 yo man 8M history of numbness lateral aspect of left leg and dorsum of  foot. B6 levels CSF  Autoantibodies including ENA. Schirmer’s test. ataxia.

9/4/2014 Case 4 – 59 yo man    Nerve conduction studies  Reduced left peroneal motor amplitude and absent  superficial peroneal sensory response  Reduced right radial sensory amplitude  Reduced left ulnar sensory amplitude and ulnar motor  amplitude. FBE. CRP. with uniform conduction slowing Bloods – ESR. ANCA etc Nerve biopsy 13 . Hep C . autoantibodies.  paraproteins.

  AMSAN) CIDP + variants (MADSAM. autonomic/resp uncommon  Gradual onset over months‐years.9/4/2014    Guillain‐ Barre Syndrome + variants (AMAN. DADS) Paraprotein associated neuropathy  MGUS‐CIDP  POEMS  Multifocal Motor Neuropathy with  Conduction Blocks  Symmetric motor & sensory deficits  Proximal & distal weakness>wasting  Absent or  reflexes  Distal LL>UL sensory loss ‐20% painful. all ages (mean 50yrs)    <10% children 14 . progressive > 2M  Natural history variable  10% acute onset      Chronic progressive 60% Relapsing ‐remitting 30% Monophasic 10% Spontaneous remission not uncommon but difficult to predict M>F.

 dispersion Long distal/F‐wave latencies Absent/low ampl. SNAPs (UL>LL)  CSF protein elevated.9/4/2014  NCS‐ Segmental Demyelination     Motor slowing. enhancement  inflammation + atrophy  segmental demyelination /remyelination 15 .  Conduction block. <10 cells/mm  MRI  Nerve biopsy‐  Nerve root hypertrophy .

9/4/2014     Prednisolone‐ daily IVIG‐ ~4 weekly Plasma Exchange IV Methyl Prednisolone – pulse     +/‐ Azathioprine +/‐ Cyclosporin A. Waldenstrom’s  macroglobulinemia. lymphoma. specific features for IgM Raised CSF protein NCS – 1/3 demyelinating. Mycophenolate. amyloidosis Distal predominantly symmetrical  sensorimotor neuropathy. Rituximab ? (Cyclophosphamide +/‐IVMP +/‐ Plasma Exchange) Paraproteinemic neuropathies     MGUS. or  polyradiculoneuropathy resembling CIDP  (esp IgA and IgG). 2/3 mixed  axonal/demyelinating 16 . POEMS/OM.

 CMV) Inflammatory demyelinating  polyradiculoneuropathy Sensory neuronopathy HIV treatment neuropathies eg. oral cyclo + prednisolone  monthly to 6 months HIV neuropathies      Distal symmetric polyneuropathy Lumbosacral polyradiculopathy (cauda  equina syndrome. ddI. lamivudine etc 17 .  d4T. ddC.9/4/2014 Paraproteinemic neuropathies ‐ treatment      Treat MGUS‐neuropathy only if significant  neurologic disability IgG/IgA demyelinating neuropathies respond  to treatment for CIDP IgM neuropathy responds poorly Rituximab some benefit in some patients PE+IV cyclo.

 hexacarbons  Bortezomib Axonal  Chloramphenicol  Ethionamide  Pyridoxine  Ethambutol Axonal Hydralazine Isoniazid  Dapsone Nucleosides ddC.ddI.  pseudoathetosis  Cross‐links DNA – mechanism neuropathy  uncertain  Symptoms after 1st or 2nd treatment  Progression dose‐ dependent  Disruption of  microtubular function – mitotic spindle  dysfunction 18 . Gold  Hexane. Taxols Ethanol Colchicine Disulfiram Nitrofurantoin Vinca alkaloids Statins Leflunomide               Chemotherapy induced PN   TAXOL  CISPLATINUM/CARBI‐  Sensory>motor  D0se‐dependent. VP‐16. severe   Large and small fibre pan‐sensory neuropathy  Proprioceptive loss  Sensory ataxia.9/4/2014 Demyelinating  Chloroquine  Tacrolimus  Perhexiline  Procainamide  TNF alpha blockers Mixed  Amiodarone   Suramin. Phenytoin Thalidomide Platinum.

 responds to  immune treatments  Proteasome inhibition. peak        within 24‐48 hrs Cold induced paraesthesias Pharyngolaryngeal  dysaesthesias Muscle tightness (jaw and  throat)  Leg cramps Resolve within 1 W Recur with subsequent  infusions  Chronic neurotoxicity  Clinical and EP features  similar to cisplatinum PN  Sensory axonal neuropathy  +/‐ neuronopathy  Accumulation of platinum‐ based compound within DRG  Coasting. then gradual  improvement after drug  discontinued 19 .  mechanism neuropathy  unclear Oxaliplatin‐induced neurotoxicity  Acute neurosensory Sx  Begin during infusion. motor   Painful sensory axonal  and autonomic  Distal weakness late  legs>arms  Can cause profound  weakness  Promotes microtubule  formation neuropathy – toxic  Immune‐mediated  motor>sensory  demyelinating  neuropathy.9/4/2014 Chemotherapy induced PN  Vincristine  Bortezomib  Mixed sensory.

MO 20 . St Louis. Washington University. etanercept and  adalimumab Develops early (within M) after treatment  introduction Immunomodulating Rx usually required for  neuropathy control. even if drug discontinued Neuromuscular disease Centre.9/4/2014 TNF‐alpha blocker drugs     Demyelinating neuropathy is rare adverse  event Reported with infliximab.