COURSEWARE

Microsoft
®

Access 2010
Advanced

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

COPYRIGHT
Copyright ©2010 by EZ-REF Courseware, Ladera Ranch, CA http://www.ezref.com/ All rights reserved. This
publication, including the student manual, instructor's guide and exercise files, or any part thereof, may not be
reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, without prior written permission
of EZ-REF Courseware.

TRADEMARKS
EZ-REF is a trademark of EZ-REF Courseware. All other products or brand names mentioned are trademarks or
registered trademarks of their respective holders.

DISCLAIMER
While EZ-REF Courseware has taken care to ensure the accuracy and quality of these materials, all material is
provided without any warranty whatsoever, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability or
fitness for a particular purpose. Any persons or businesses mentioned in the text of this manual are strictly fictitious.
Any resemblances to existing or deceased persons, or existing or defunct businesses, is entirely coincidental.
Product Code: MS ACCESS 2010-3 14.9

Page 2

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

TABLE OF CONTENTS
ADVANCED MICROSOFT ACCESS 2010.................................................................................................
V INDEXING A TABLE
....................................................................................................................................2
CREATING AN INDEX ........................................................................................................................................ 3
MODIFYING AN INDEX....................................................................................................................................... 5
MULTIPLE-FIELD INDEXES............................................................................................................................... 6

PARAMETER QUERIES..............................................................................................................................9
SPECIFYING DATA TYPE ................................................................................................................................ 10
CREATING MULTIPLE PARAMETER PROMPTS .......................................................................................... 11

CROSSTAB QUERIES ..............................................................................................................................13
EDITING THE CROSSTAB ............................................................................................................................... 19

DESIGNING FORMS .................................................................................................................................22
USING FORM WIZARDS .................................................................................................................................. 23

CUSTOMIZING THE FORM ......................................................................................................................27
DISPLAYING THE FIELD LIST ......................................................................................................................... 28
SELECTING CONTROLS ................................................................................................................................. 29
RE-SIZING CONTROLS.................................................................................................................................... 30
COPYING A CONTROL .................................................................................................................................... 30
DELETING CONTROLS ................................................................................................................................... 31
UNDOING YOUR ACTIONS ............................................................................................................................. 31

SAVING/OPENING A FORM .....................................................................................................................35

SAVING THE FORM.......................................................................................................................................... 35
CLOSING A FORM ............................................................................................................................................ 35
OPENING A FORM............................................................................................................................................ 36
CUSTOMIZING PROPERTIES ......................................................................................................................... 37
USING THE DRAWING TOOLS........................................................................................................................ 40
ADDING A CHART TO YOUR FORM ............................................................................................................... 41

ADVANCED FORM FEATURES ...............................................................................................................46

BOUND & UNBOUND OBJECTS ..................................................................................................................... 46
ADDING A BOUND OBJECT ............................................................................................................................ 46
ADDING UNBOUND OBJECTS .......................................................................................................... 47
ADDING A COMBO/LIST BOX.......................................................................................................................... 50
CREATING AN OPTION GROUP ..................................................................................................................... 57
ADDING COMMAND BUTTONS TO THE FORM ............................................................................................ 62
ADDING CONTROL TIPS TO THE FORM ....................................................................................................... 66
ADDING BACKGROUND PICTURES TO THE FORM .................................................................................... 67

CREATING REPORTS ..............................................................................................................................70

USING THE REPORT WIZARD ........................................................................................................................ 74
PRINTING OPTIONS......................................................................................................................................... 79
CHANGING MARGINS...................................................................................................................................... 79
CHANGING PAPER SIZE ................................................................................................................................. 80
CHANGING THE COLUMN LAYOUT ............................................................................................................... 81
PRINTING THE REPORT ................................................................................................................................. 82

Page 3

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
CUSTOMIZING THE REPORT ..................................................................................................................83
DISPLAYING THE FIELD LIST ......................................................................................................................... 84
SELECTING CONTROLS ................................................................................................................................. 85
RE-SIZING CONTROLS ................................................................................................................................... 86
COPYING A CONTROL .................................................................................................................................... 86
DELETING CONTROLS.................................................................................................................................... 87
UNDOING YOUR ACTIONS ............................................................................................................................. 87
ALIGNING CONTROLS .................................................................................................................................... 88
ADDING A CALCULATED CONTROL ............................................................................................................. 89
CHANGING THE TYPE OF REPORT .............................................................................................................. 91
MOVING CONTROLS ....................................................................................................................................... 91
POSITIONING CONTROLS.............................................................................................................................. 91
SPLITTING CONTROLS ................................................................................................................................... 92
INSERTING COLUMNS AND ROWS............................................................................................................... 92
ADJUSTING SIZE AND SPACE ....................................................................................................................... 92
CUSTOMIZING PROPERTIES......................................................................................................................... 93
USING THE DRAWING TOOLS ....................................................................................................................... 96
DISPLAYING CHOICES WITH OPTION GROUPS ......................................................................................... 97
ADDING BACKGROUND PICTURES TO THE REPORT ............................................................................. 101

SAVING/CLOSING A REPORT ...............................................................................................................103
SAVING THE REPORT ...................................................................................................................................
OPENING A REPORT .....................................................................................................................................
CLOSING A REPORT .....................................................................................................................................
PRACTICE EXERCISE ...................................................................................................................................

103
103
103
104

USING DATABASE UTILITIES ................................................................................................................106
WORKING WITH AN OLDER DATABASE..................................................................................................... 106
SAVING A DATABASE AS A PREVIOUS VERSION ..................................................................................... 108
COMPACTING A DATABASE ........................................................................................................................ 109
BACKING UP YOUR DATABASE................................................................................................................... 110
LINKED TABLE MANAGER ............................................................................................................................ 112
SECURING YOUR DATABASE...................................................................................................................... 113
SETTING A PASSWORD................................................................................................................................ 113
OPENING A PASSWORD-PROTECTED DATABASE.................................................................................. 115
REMOVING A PASSWORD ........................................................................................................................... 115

SETTING PROGRAM OPTIONS.............................................................................................................118
GENERAL OPTIONS ...................................................................................................................................... 119
CURRENT DATABASE OPTIONS ................................................................................................................. 120
DATASHEET OPTIONS.................................................................................................................................. 122
OBJECT DESIGNERS OPTIONS................................................................................................................... 123
PROOFING OPTIONS .................................................................................................................................... 124
LANGUAGE OPTIONS ................................................................................................................................... 125
CLIENT SETTINGS ......................................................................................................................................... 126
CUSTOMIZE RIBBON OPTIONS ................................................................................................................... 128
QUICK ACCESS TOOLBAR OPTIONS.......................................................................................................... 129
ADD-INS .......................................................................................................................................................... 130
TRUST CENTER OPTIONS............................................................................................................................ 131

WORKING WITH THE QUICK ACCESS TOOLBAR...............................................................................132
VIEWING/HIDING TOOLS .............................................................................................................................. 132
CUSTOMIZING THE QUICK ACCESS TOOLBAR ........................................................................................ 133

USING ADD-INS ......................................................................................................................................134

Page 4

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

ADVANCED MICROSOFT ACCESS 2010
This book was developed using generic exercises. The course is broken down into four "modules"
along with an “If You Have Time” module that cover the objectives that should be achieved during
this class.
Each major topic starts on a new page followed by the following sections:

USAGE

This section offers a brief explanation of what the command/function is used
for, how it works and some possible examples.
This icon will be placed to the left of all mouse actions so that you can easily
see when the mouse may be used to perform a task.

This section lists the keystrokes or function keys the user may press as a
shortcut for performing the current command.

NOTE:

This box alerts you of things to watch out for. The post-it note in
the left column always indicates an important note to remember.

TIP:

This box will let you in on a little secret or shortcut when
working with Access. When you see this icon, you’ll know that
a "TIP is available.

Page 5

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced



Page 1

Indexing a Table
Parameter Queries
Crosstab Queries

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

INDEXING A TABLE
USAGE:

One of the major tasks of working with your database is to get it to run
faster and more efficiently. A large part of that speed and efficiency will
come from the way you design your table structures.
However, you have probably noticed that a lot of your database work
involves querying, searching and generating reports. These functions
can take a long time if you are working with a large database or are
searching several different fields.
One feature that can increase the performance of a table and, yet, is
often overlooked in setting up a table, is the index.
Indexes are based on fields. Any field that is often used for searching or
sorting should be indexed. Indexes work similar to a book index - if
you need to find something quickly, Access looks it up in the index and
can then go directly to the specified location.
Basically, an index is a pre-sorted list of the field, which means that
Access doesn't have to sort each time you use that field.
Although indexes usually do speed up queries and searches, they can
slow you down a little while adding or changing records, especially if
you have a lot of indexes.
The reason is that Access must update all your indexes each time you
add a new record or if you change the data in a field that has been
indexed.
Primary keys are automatically indexed.

Page 2

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
CREATING AN INDEX
In order to create or modify an index, you must be in the Design
view for the table.
NOTE:

You cannot index Memo, Hyperlink or OLE Object
data type fields.

Once the table is selected, switch to Design View.

The current table structure will be displayed in the same window that
was used to create the table, as shown below:

Notice the Indexed property (within the General tab) shown at the
bottom of the window. Whenever you select a field in the top portion,
this property will reflect the current setting.

Page 3

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
To create/change an index for a field, highlight the field in the top
portion of the design window and then click on the Indexed property
in the lower portion of the window.

Click on the down arrow
(located to the right of the Indexed
property) to view a list of index options.
The following options are available for indexing the field:

Page 4

No

This is the default setting. Use this to
remove an index from a field.

Yes (Duplicates OK)

Use this option to index the current field
and to allow duplicate entries. You will
need this for fields such as lastnames,
zipcodes, etc. where you will probably
have more than one record with the
same entry.

Yes (No Duplicates)

Use this to index the current field but not
allowing duplicate entries. You will
need this to make sure that no two
records will have the same value for this
field. Possible uses are for social
security numbers and employee ID
numbers.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
MODIFYING AN INDEX
Once an index has been created, you may want to modify the
index by changing its name or the order in which the index is to be
sorted (ascending or descending). To view/modify indexes, you
must access the Indexes window.
Click on this tool to open the Indexes window.

Use the first column to change the name of the index. The
second column is used to select the field to be indexed (you can
also use this window to create indexes).
The last column is where you define the order in which the field is
to be indexed. When you select this column, you can click on the
down arrow
to choose Ascending (A-Z, 0-9) or Descending (ZA, 9-0). In the bottom section there are three Index Properties
that can be applied to the current index, as described below:

Page 5

Primary

Specifies whether the current index is the
primary key for the table. You can only have
one primary key per table.

Unique

Specifies whether duplicates are allowed.

Ignore Nulls

Indicates whether or not null (empty) field
values are to be included in the index.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
MULTIPLE-FIELD INDEXES
When working with indexes, you may find that you end up
searching on more than one field at a time in order to find a
specific record.
For example, if you do a lot of searching based on a last name,
you may find that you have several groups of people with the same
last name.
To narrow the search down to the person you are looking for, you
may end up adding a first name to the query, along with the last
name.
Access allows you to combine more than one field into an index
to help narrow such searches.
This index can also be used to prevent more than one record
from having the same data in all the fields of the index.
Using the previous example, you would create an index that
consists of both the last and first name. Since you end up using
both fields during a query anyway, you may as well have one
index to take care of both fields.
You could then make the index unique, preventing more than
one record with the same last name and first name.
If the last name field is defined first in the index, you would
be allowed to have multiple records with the same last name.

Page 6

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
To create a multiple-field index, you would enter a name for the
index and then specify the fields to be indexed on multiple
rows.
Access will include all rows as part of the same index until it reads
a new index name. Don’t add anything else to the Name column
(other than the initial index name). Simply add each field to be
included in the combined index on a new row. The order in which
you place the fields determines the sorting order.
In the figure shown below, the multi-field index is labeled Address
and consists of both the Address1 and Address2 fields:

If you want to make sure that no two records contain the same last
and first name, use the index properties to make the index Unique.

Page 7

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

PRACTICE EXERCISE
Instructions:

Open the SALES database and then view the CLIENTS table
in design mode.

Create indexes for the City and Zipcode fields allowing duplicates.

Make the CustId field the primary key.


Create a multiple-field index based on the last and first names.
Name the index Full Names. Do not allow duplicates.
Add a new record using the following information:
George Wilson
7887 West 57th Street
New York, NY 10019



Page 8

Open the ORDERS table in design view.
Create a multiple-field index based on the CustID, Date and Item#
fields. Name the index Sales.
Close all of the open windows and return to the Database window.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

PARAMETER QUERIES
USAGE:

If you use a particular query often, but tend to change the criteria
each time, you might find using that query becomes tedious since
you have to constantly enter the design view and make changes.
For example, you may create a sales list each day summarizing the
sales of the previous day. Normally, you would have to edit the
query and change the sales date every time the query is run.
Access provides a feature referred to as a Parameter query which
allows you to run the query without having to manually change it
each time. Instead, a box will pop up asking you to fill in the criteria
to be searched for. If you have more than one criterion, you will get
more than one dialog box (displayed in sequence).
You can also use these parameter queries for forms and reports.
To create a parameter query, first create/edit the query you want
to use and make sure you are in the design view.
To create the prompt for the dialog box, access your query and
switch to Design View. Simply enter your prompt, enclosed in
square brackets [ ], in the Criteria cell. The prompt can contain the
field name, but cannot be just the field name.

When you run the query, you will see the prompt in a dialog box:

When prompted, simply fill in the data and click on

Page 9

.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
SPECIFYING DATA TYPE
In some cases you may want to specify the data type for the
prompt. This can be helpful in restricting the user from entering an
incorrect data type or format.
Once you have your parameter(s) created, you
should click on this tool (located within the
Show/Hide section on the Design Ribbon).
The following diagram illustrates how to enter your prompt:

Enter your prompt(s) in the left column exactly as you entered
them in the query - including the brackets.
TIP:

To be sure you enter it exactly the same, you might
want to simply copy it from the query and paste it
in the Parameter column.

Choose the data type by clicking in the right column and selecting it
from the pull-down list.
Once you have made all your changes, click on

Page 10

.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
CREATING MULTIPLE PARAMETER PROMPTS
If you need to prompt for more than one value for a field, you can
add multiple prompts to the Criteria cell.
This comes in handy whenever you need to ask for a range of
values, such as a beginning and ending date.
To create a multiple parameter prompt for a range, use the
Between operator in the criteria cell.
Example:
Between [Enter the first date:] AND [Enter the last date:]
When using multiple parameter prompts, Access will display a
separate prompt for each entry required.

Page 11

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

PRACTICE EXERCISE
Instructions:


Page 12

Using the CLIENTS table, create a query with prompts that will ask
for the last and first name of a client.
Using the ORDERS table, create a query that will ask for a
beginning and ending sales date. Be sure that only date formats
are accepted.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

CROSSTAB QUERIES
USAGE:

Crosstab queries show your data in rows and columns similar to a
spreadsheet. This allows you to create new types of listings that
can be summarized and grouped in different ways.
Crosstabs provide a compact overview for large amounts of data.
For example, you could create a listing that breaks your sales down
by customer and by product.
A simple query might summarize the data in columns but makes it
difficult to get the complete picture, as illustrated below:

By creating a Crosstab query, you can organize the data in a more
readable format, as shown in the diagram below:

Page 13

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
A crosstab requires a minimum of three fields of information:
Row heading

This field will be listed in the first column of
the crosstab and groups the data by row. In
the previous example, Salesperson is the
field used for the row headings.

Column heading

This field is listed across the columns. Each
unique entry is listed in a separate column. In
the previous example, Product is the field
used. Notice how each individual product is
listed in a separate column.

Value

This field is used for the actual calculation to
be performed. In the previous example, the
sales amount was used for calculating the
total sales by product for each salesperson.

Although you can create the crosstab manually, it is easier to use
the wizard, as outlined in the following steps:

Select the Query Wizard tool.

Access displays the New Query dialog box:

Page 14

Choose Crosstab Query Wizard from the right side.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
The first screen of the wizard asks you to select the table (or query
to be used), as shown below:

Select the query or table to be used in the crosstab query. If
you do not see your query/table listed, use the radio buttons
located within the View section to list other objects.
Make your selection and then click on

Page 15

.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

You are now ready to select the field to be used for the row
headings. Select the field to be included from the list in the
left box and click on
. The field name will be moved to
the list in the right section.

If you change your mind, select the field to be removed from the
right box and click on
. Click on
to remove all fields from
the right column.
If you select more than one field, the query will be broken down
into groups starting from the leftmost column. For example, if you
chose the fields region and salesperson (in that order), the
query would be summarized by region first. Each region would
then be summarized by salesperson. Select up to three fields to
be used for row headings.
Notice how Access displays a sample in the lower portion of the
box so that you can better visualize the final report.
When you are done, click on

Page 16

.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

The next step is to select the field for the column headings.
Each unique entry in the field you select will display as a
new column so be selective about which field you choose.
For example, choosing Product for your column heading will
result in a new column for each product within the table.

When you are done, click on




Page 17

.

Select the field to have calculated from the list in the left box:

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

Select the type of calculation from the list on right side. If
you want a separate sum for each row (this can be useful
when using more than one row heading), click the check box
in the middle left. When you are done, click on
.

The last step is to name the crosstab query so it can be
used. Enter the name in the space provided if you want to
change the suggested name that Access displays.

You can also choose to view the data when you are done
defining the query, or you can return to the query design
view if you feel you need to customize the query further.
For additional help after setting up the crosstab query, click
on the help checkbox in the bottom of the dialog box.
Use the

button to trace back your steps if you

want to make a change in the fields you selected.

Page 18

When done, click on

.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
EDITING THE CROSSTAB
Using the Query Wizard to create the initial crosstab structure is
simple and efficient. However, you should know how to manually
edit the crosstab so that you can customize the layout if you
change your mind after it has already been created.
As always, you should be in the design view for the crosstab
query before continuing. Notice the new row labeled Crosstab
that will be used to change the status of a field.

The following crosstab options can be used to define a field:
Row Heading

Use this setting to designate that the
current field be used for the rows.

Column Heading

Use this setting to designate that the
current field be used for the columns.

Value

Use this setting to designate the current
field as the value to be used for the
calculation. Once you have selected
the field, choose the type of calculation
you need from the pull-down list located
on the Total row.

(not shown)

Use the current field for grouping,
sorting or criteria, but don't display the
data in the final query.

Click in the crosstab cell to change/choose from the pull-down list.

Page 19

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

PRACTICE EXERCISE
Instructions:


Page 20

Using the COMPUTERS database, create a crosstab query for
the “Sales Data” table that breaks the sales down by region and
then by salesperson.
Edit the query and add another row heading so that the sales are
grouped by region first and then by product.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

Module Two







Page 21

Designing Forms
Adding Bound/Unbound Objects
Changing Object Properties
Adding Combo/List Boxes
Adding Group Options
Designing Command Buttons
Saving the Form
Using the Form

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

DESIGNING FORMS
USAGE:

Access forms are similar to the daily "paper" forms that you have
to fill out. You are constantly filling out insurance forms, job
application forms, renewal forms and many other "data-gathering"
forms. These "paper" forms are used to collect specific type of
data that are used in reports and other functions. Access provides
an easy-to-use form system that allows you to use the computer
as the data gathering "form" instead of the paper form.
A form is made up of controls, which are text boxes, buttons,
graphics, lines and anything else you place on a form. These
controls can be bound to a table or query. A bound control
represents a specific field that is connected (bound) to a
table/query. The data for the field is usually represented by a text
box, radio buttons, or drop-lists. Other unbound controls include
lines, labels, and other objects that are there for the design of the
form. A title is an example of an unbound control since it isn't
connected to a table/query. There are also calculated controls
that are based on formulas or expressions. These expressions can
be a combination of math operators (i.e., + and -), field names,
other controls, constants or built-in functions.
There are a number of forms that you can use within Access, as
discussed below.
To quickly create a form, use one of these tools:
Click this tool to create a Form which allows you to enter
information for one record at a time.
Click this tool to create a Blank Form which you will then
need to manually design.
Click on this tool to choose from a list of More Forms.

Click the Form Design tool to create a blank form and
immediately begin editing it from design view.

Page 22

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
USING FORM WIZARDS
Although you can design forms on your own, to quickly get started
with forms, Access includes a wizard which will walk you through
the basics steps.
The wizard provides a selection of form layouts and styles so you
can easily create professional looking forms.
The Form Wizard is also a quick way of getting started on your
own custom forms, since you can use the wizard to create the
basic layout and design.
To create a new form using the wizard, follow these steps:

Click on this tool (located within the Forms
section of the Create Ribbon).

Page 23

The first step within the wizard is to select which fields are to
be included on the form. Not all fields have to be stored on
one form.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
Highlight each field you want to add to the form and then click
on the
button. This adds the highlighted field to the form.
Continue this process for each field to be included on the form.
If you click on

, all the fields will be added to the form.

If you want to remove a field from the list, highlight the field name in
the right column and click on
.
To remove all the fields you have added, click on the

Page 24

.

If you need to return to the previous step, click on

.

Once you have made all your selections, click on
continue with the next step of the wizard.

to

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

The next step of the Form Wizard allows you to select a
layout for the form (e.g., columnar, tabular).
When you select a layout from the four choices provided on
the right side of the dialog box, Access will display a preview
to the left so that you can see how the form will look.

Once you have selected a layout, click on
the next step of the wizard.

Page 25

to continue to

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

The final step allows you to add a title to the form and view
the data or return to the design mode where you can move
things around on the form.

Once you have chosen whether you want to Open the form or to go
to the design mode to Modify it, click on
.

Depending on which option you selected, Access will either open
the form or allow you to now modify it.

Page 26

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

CUSTOMIZING THE FORM
USAGE:

Once you have created a basic form, you will more than likely
want to change the layout by moving the fields around, changing
colors, fonts or adding graphics.
Switch to Design View.

The form will change to a screen similar to the one shown below:

NOTE:

The number of controls will vary depending on the
form.

You can use the Rulers to help line up the Controls within the
different Sections of the form.
Whatever controls you place in the Form Header or Form Footer
are displayed only once per screen.
Objects placed in the Details section are displayed for each record
and may be repeated several times per screen. In other words,
there may be room to display more than one record on a screen.

Page 27

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
DISPLAYING THE FIELD LIST
If you want to quickly add a field to the form, you can select
the field from a list and drag it to the required location.
First you must display the field list, as shown below:
If for some reason, the field list has been removed
from view, click on this tool (located within the Tools
section on the Design Ribbon) to display the field list.
A box similar to the following diagram will be displayed:

To place a field from the list onto the form, click on the field name
in the list and drag the field to the location on the form.
Access will add a bound text box at that location for that field.

Page 28

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
SELECTING CONTROLS
As you work with a form, you will need to select one or more of
the controls to move them around the form or to change their
properties.
To select a control, you must use the pointer tool.

Once you select the pointer, click on the control. Small rectangular
handles appear around the control, as illustrated below:

Some controls, such as the text box shown above, have an
attached label that will also be selected.
The larger handles (black rectangles) are used to reposition the
control. If, for example, you wanted to move the label for the
control, you would drag the move handle for the label.
If you only wanted to move the text box, you would drag the
move handle for the text box. To move both the control and its
attached label, place the mouse pointer over a border until it
changes to a small hand, as illustrated in the diagram below:

Once you have the hand pointer, click and drag both items to their
new location on the form. To select more than one control, hold the

S

Page 29

key down while you select additional controls.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
RE-SIZING CONTROLS
If you need to make a control larger or smaller, you must first select
the control to view the sizing handles, as shown below:

To resize a control, follow these two steps:


Place the mouse over one of the smaller sizing handles.

When the mouse pointer changes to a double-sided arrow,
drag the handle in the direction you need. When you
release the mouse button, the control will be resized.

COPYING A CONTROL
To copy a control, follow the three steps outlined below:



Page 30

Select the control(s) to be copied.
Click on the COPY tool (located within the
Clipboard section on the Home Ribbon). The
control is temporarily copied to the clipboard.
Click on the PASTE tool (located within the
Clipboard section on the Home Ribbon). Each time
you click on the Paste tool, another copy of the
control is placed beneath the original one. You will
need to move these copies by dragging them to a
new location.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
DELETING CONTROLS
If you no longer need a control, you can easily delete the item by
following the two steps outlined below:


Select the control(s) to be removed from the form.
Press =.

UNDOING YOUR ACTIONS
If you accidentally deleted the wrong item or moved an object to
the wrong spot, you can easily reverse your last action using the
Undo option.

Click on the Undo tool (located on the Quick Access Toolbar
across the top of the screen).
If you click on the down arrow
(to the right of the tool), you can
scroll through the last several actions.

Page 31

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
You can access the Format Ribbon to customize the look of the
form if needed.
Click on the down arrow
beside this tool to choose
a different font for the selected item.
Click on the down arrow

beside this tool to select a

new font size.
Click on this tool to turn bold on and off.

Click on this tool to turn italics on and off.

Click on this tool to turn underline on and off.

Click on this tool to change the font color.

Use this tool to left-align text within the report.

Use this tool to center text.

Click on this tool to right-align text.

Click on this tool to display/hide gridlines.

This tool is used to copy a format from one area within the
report to another. Begin by selecting the text you want to

Page 32

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
copy the format from and then choose this tool. Your mouse
pointer will change shape
. You can now “paint” that
format onto other report text

Page 33

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

Click on this tool to apply a background color.
Alternates the fill/background colors for rows (records).

Click on this tool to specify formatting options based on a
condition that you set. For example, you might set the
condition of values between 100 and 200 to be displayed
in red.

From within the Conditional Formatting dialog box (shown above)
select the format to be applied and then the condition (rule) that
must be met. When done, click
.

You can also format numeric fields within your
report by using this set of tools on the Format
Ribbon.

Click on the down arrow

beside this tool to choose

from a list of formats.
This tool formats the current selection for currency.

Formats the current selection for percentage.
Formats the selection for comma by adding a comma
as a thousand separator and two decimal places.
Increases the number of decimal places displayed.

Page 34

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
Decreases the number of decimal places displayed.

Page 35

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
Use this set of tools to set the font,
font size, text and background
color and alignment.

Use these tools to add a
background image to the form.
You can also specify alternate row
color to break the form up so that it
is easier to read.

From the Design Ribbon, choose
this tool to quickly apply a theme to
your form.
Themes are used to enhance
reports, making them appear more
professional with the application of
uniform color designs.
Notice as you scroll the list. Your
report reflects the currently
selected theme.
From the pull-down list, select the
theme you would like applied to
your form.

You can also adjust the width of the columns by moving the
mouse pointer just to the right of the column margin you wish to
adjust.
The pointer changes to a cross-hair
indicating you are on the
margin line. Once you see the double-arrow, double-click and the
column will be widened to accommodate the largest entry.

Page 36

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

SAVING/OPENING A FORM
USAGE:

As you can see, creating a form can be an involved task.
Designing a decent form can take several hours or even several
days depending on the complexity of the form. Therefore, you
should save the form often. Once a form has been saved, you
can "Open" the form whenever you need it.

SAVING THE FORM
Click on this tool (located on the Quick Access Toolbar
across the top of the screen) to save the form.
Access will automatically assign a generic name to the new form.
NOTE:

If you would rather assign a unique name to the form,
you will need to access the File Ribbon and select
Save As from the pull-down menu.

CLOSING A FORM
If you are finished with a form, you can close it by clicking on
the close button (which is located in the upper right corner
of the form).
If the latest changes have not been saved, Access will warn
you and give you a chance to save them.

Page 37

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
OPENING A FORM
Once you have saved a form, you can use it repeatedly
without having to recreate the design of the form.
To use a previously saved form, you must open it.
You open forms the same way you open tables - from within the
database window.
The list of forms should be displayed
along the left side of the database
window. From this list, simply doubleclick on the form you wish to open.

A new tab will have been added to the middle of the
database window and will contain the form you selected.

Page 38

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
CUSTOMIZING PROPERTIES
When working with any control on the form, Access allows you to
customize its properties. Properties include such items as font and
point size for text and can be easily modified using the tools
located on the Design Ribbon (as shown on the previous pages).
However if you want to modify the more advanced properties (such
as what message appears on the Status Bar when the object is
selected), you will need to access the control’s property sheet.
Select the object whose properties you want to customize.
Click once on the Property Sheet tool (located within the
Tools section on the Design Ribbon).
Access displays a window along the right side of the screen with
various properties. These properties can be customized for the
currently selected control object, as shown below:

The properties are divided into four major groups (tabs) that allow
you to control/customize the object’s format, data, event
information and other miscellaneous settings.
You can choose a tab to work on just that group or you can click
on the tab labeled All to see a list of all available settings in one
list.

Page 39

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
Below is a list of the most commonly used properties:
PROPERTY
Name
Control Source
Status Bar Text
IME Hold

IME Mode
IME Sentence
Mode

Visible
Display When
Enabled
Locked
Scroll Bars
Can Grow
Can Shrink
Left
Top
Width
Height
Special Effect
Back Color
Back Style
Border Color
Border Width
Border Style
Fore Color
Font Name
Font Size
Font Weight
Font Italic
Font Underline

Page 40

DESCRIPTION
Name given to a control
Data to be assigned (field or expression)
Sets custom message for display on status bar
Selects whether the Kanji Conversion Mode is
restored when the user moves to another field
and then returns to this field.
Converts your keystrokes into Asian characters.
Specifies the writing style to use when
converting to Kanji. Choose Normal for literary
documents, Plural for entering names or
addresses, Speaking for conversational or No
Conversion to leave the field as it was entered.
Makes the object visible or hidden
Determines when the object is displayed
Activates/deactivates the control
Prevents changes in form view
Makes scroll bars appear in control
Expands control when printed to fit text
Shrinks control when printed to eliminate blanks
Determines horizontal position
Determines vertical position
Determines width of control
Determines height of control
Sets 3-D effects (normal, raised or sunken)
Selects interior color
Selects style for background (clear or normal)
Select a color for the border
Select the width of the border
Sets line style (solid, dashes, dots)
Selects foreground color
Selects font to be applied to a text control
Selects point size to be applied to a text control
Selects weight of font (various weights for bold)
Determines whether text will be italicized
Determines whether text will be underlined

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
Below is a list of the most commonly used properties:
Other properties you may encounter include the following:
PROPERTY
Text Align
Format
Decimal Places
Input Mask
Default Value
Validation Rule
Validation Text
Auto Tab

DESCRIPTION
Sets the alignment of text within the control
(choose left, center, right)
Defines format of numbers, dates, times, text
Sets the number of decimal places for
numbers
Specifies how data is entered/displayed
Sets the default value for each new record
Sets expression to be evaluated when data is
added/changed.
Sets the message that appears if the
validation rule has not been satisfied.
Determines whether Access automatically
moves to the next control when the last
character of a field or input mask is entered.

Enter Key Behavior Defines whether the E key moves to the
next control or creates a new line.
Allow AutoCorrect

Defines whether AutoCorrect (for spelling
mistakes) will be enabled.

Tab Stop

Determines if

Tab Index
Help Context ID

Defines the tab order for the control
Defines the identifying topic number for a
custom Windows help file
Stores additional control information
Runs a macro before a control is updated
Runs a macro after a control is updated

Tag
Before Update
After Update

T

moves to this control

You may see additional properties, such as On Enter, On Exit, On
Click, etc. These properties are used to run macros or Visual
Basic procedures when these events take place.
For more detailed information, click on the property and press !.
Access will display a page describing the selected property.
To close the Property Sheet, click the close button

in the upper

right corner or click on the Property Sheet tool a second time.

Page 41

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
USING THE DRAWING TOOLS
In addition to adding text to the form, you can customize the form
even further by adding your own drawings. Simply select the
drawing tool of your choice and begin creating whatever
customized picture you require.
TIP:

Double-Click on any tool that you want to use
more than once.

To add a rectangle to your form, follow the steps outlined below:




Click on the Rectangle tool (located within the
Controls section on the Design Ribbon).
Move the mouse pointer to where the box should appear.
The pointer changes to a thin cross-hair with a rectangle
attached to it
.
Click and drag to draw the box.
When done, release the mouse button.

To add a line to your form, follow the steps outlined below:




Page 42

Click on the Line tool (located within the Controls
section on the Design Ribbon).
Move to where the line should begin. The mouse pointer
changes to a thin cross-hair with a line attached to it
.
Click and drag to draw the line.
When done, release the mouse button.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
ADDING A CHART TO YOUR FORM
Access allows you to quickly add a chart to your form. To do so,
follow the steps outlined below:


Click the Chart tool (located within the Controls
section on the Design Ribbon).
Your mouse changes to a pointer with a small chart
attached for you to click and drag to specify the size
of the chart on the form.

When you release the mouse button, a dialog box appears:

This step is used to select the table or query that will contain
the data to be charted.

To move to the next step, click on the

Page 43

button.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

The next step of the wizard is now displayed. You will need
to specify the fields to be plotted, as shown below:

At least one field must be numeric. You will choose at least two
fields (one for the actual values being plotted and another for the
labels which identify the values).
To select a field you may either double-click on its name or
highlight it and then click on
. Click on
to add all fields.
To move to the next step, click on the

Page 44

button.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced


Select the type of chart (e.g., pie, column) to be added to the
form and then click on
to move to the next step.

This step is used to preview the chart as well as change how
the data will be summarized (e.g., sum, average).

Click on the Preview button (located in the
upper left corner) to preview the chart.
To change how the data is summarized,
double-click on the field listed on the left side
of the dialog box - towards the top of the chart.
Another dialog box will be displayed, as shown below:

Select the type of calculation to perform and click on

Click on

Page 45

to access the next step of the wizard.

.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

This next step allows you to specify if you want to chart the
change from record to record in the form.

This final step is used to enter a title for the chart. You may
also specify whether a legend should be displayed. Only if
you have more than one series of values being plotted will
you need to display a legend.

If you need additional help once you are done with this
wizard, check the option located at the bottom of the dialog
box.
Use the

button to return to previous steps.

When done, click on

Page 46

.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

PRACTICE EXERCISE
Instructions:

Page 47

Using the ORDERS, CLIENTS and ITEMS tables, create a query
called Client Sales that contains the client's name and their order
information.

Create a form called SALES using the new query that displays the
client and information as well as a chart that displays the total sales
for only the client that is currently being displayed.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

ADVANCED FORM FEATURES
USAGE:

There are a number of ways in which you can customize the form.
For example, you can add bound and unbound objects, add
combo boxes, include Control Tips, and background pictures.
BOUND & UNBOUND OBJECTS
When you embed or link an object in an Access form, it is
displayed in a control referred to as a Frame. Access offers two
types of frames for its objects: Bound and Unbound.
An unbound object frame is used to add an OLE (Object Linking
and Embedding) object to a form without actually storing the object
in a table. Therefore, the object frame is not bound to a field
within the table. For example, if you wanted your company's logo
on the form, this would be considered an unbound object - it is not
linked to a field and does not change when the record changes.
A bound object frame is used to display OLE objects that are stored
within a field of a table. For example, you could add pictures of
items that your company sells by linking the object to a Product
Code field. Whenever the product code changes (from record-torecord), the picture would also change.
ADDING A BOUND OBJECT
Although you could use the Bound Object tool, Access offers a
much quicker method for adding a bound object to your form.


Page 48

Select this tool.

Drag the desired field from the list to the form. Access will
automatically create a bound object based on the field you
have selected from the list.
You may now customize the size and properties of the
bound object - as you would any object on the form.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
ADDING UNBOUND OBJECTS
To add an unbound object to your form, follow the steps below:


Move to where the object should appear.

Click and drag to size the object on the form.

When done, release the mouse button.

Page 49

While in design mode, select the Unbound Object tool
(located within the Controls section on the Design Ribbon).

The Insert Object box defaults to creating a new object.
Select the application to create the object from and then
click on the
button.

You will be taken into the selected application where you
may create the new object. When done, exit out as you
would any other application. You will be prompted to update
the form with the newly created object.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
If you have an existing file you want to use (and, therefore, do
not want to create an object from scratch), select Create from
File while in the Insert Object dialog box (Step 5).

In the provided box, enter the name and path of the file
containing the object to embed.
If you are unsure of the correct path, select

to have

Access browse through your drive/directory listing.
After choosing the file to be used as the object, select

.

Regardless of whether you have created an object from scratch or
accessed an existing file, at this point you should now be returned
to Access with the object frame on the screen.

Page 50

You may now customize the size and properties of the
unbound object - as you would any other object contained
within the form.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

PRACTICE EXERCISE
Instructions:


Page 51

Using the SALES form you created earlier, add an unbound
object to the upper left corner that will store the logo from the file
LOGO.BMP.
Add a bound object for the field called Picture. Place the object to
the right of the form and size it as needed.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
ADDING A COMBO/LIST BOX
A list box provides a list of selections from which the user chooses
an item by using a scrollbar. A combo box is a text box and a list
box combined. It provides the user with a list of predetermined
options but also allows them to enter a new value (not contained
in the list). Access allows you to easily create either of these
boxes.
It is easier to create a combo/list box using the wizard.
The steps outlined below are used to create a combo box but the
steps for creating a list box are similar.

Be sure that the wizard tool


Click on the Combo Box


Page 52

has been selected.

or the List Box

tool

(located within the Controls section on the Design Ribbon).
Click and drag to size the box. When you release the
mouse button, the following dialog box is displayed:

This step determines how the values in the list will be
obtained. If you want the list of options to be automatically
updated based on the values in another table/query, choose
the first option. If the list will not change, choose the second
option and enter the values yourself. Use the last option to
select a record from within the current table based on the
field you select. When done, click on
.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

The next step depends on the choice you made on the
previous screen as to what is displayed at this point. The
dialog box displayed below assumes you selected an
existing table/query as the source of the values.

A list of tables and queries appears in this dialog box.
Select the name of the table/query where the values are
stored for the list. Use the radio buttons to determine what
objects are to be listed (tables, queries or both).
Click on

Page 53

to move to the next step.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

After selecting the table/query, you must choose the field(s)
to be displayed in the list, as shown below:

You may want more than one field to help identify the
selections. For example, you might have the user select
social-security-numbers but without the names to display
alongside the ssns, the user won’t know which number to
choose. To select a field, double-click on its name or
highlight it and click on
. To select all fields, click
.
Choose

Page 54

to move to the next step:

This step is used to specify a sort order (if one is wanted).

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
Choose

This step determines the width of the columns in the list.
Use your mouse to drag the right edge of the column. If you
double-click, Access determines the appropriate width.
Click on

NOTE:

Page 55

to move to the next step:

to move to the next step.

If you selected more than one field for the combo list
display, the next step will ask you to choose which one
of the fields should actually be stored in the database.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

This step is used to choose whether the values selected by
the user from the Combo Box should be stored for later use
(they might be used in calculations later) or if the values are
to be stored within the field and saved with the record.

If you choose to store the data in a field, select the name of
the field from the pull-down list located to the right.

Click on

Page 56

to move to the next step.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

The final step asks for a name for the Combo or List Box.
Notice you can also specify whether you want help displayed
with the Combo Box.

Use the

button to return to previous steps.

When done, click on

Page 57

.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

PRACTICE EXERCISE
Instructions:

Page 58

Using the form called SALES, replace the CLIENT ID control with
a three-column combo box for the client's ID field. The combo box
should display the ID and the client's last and first name, but should
only store the ID in the table.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
CREATING AN OPTION GROUP
An Option Group is a set of toggle buttons, radio buttons, or
checkboxes. The user is presented with a set of options which may
be turned on/off.
The easiest method for creating an option group is by accessing
the wizard, as outlined in the steps below:

Be sure that the wizard tool


Click on the Option Group tool

has been selected.

(located within the

Controls section on the Design Ribbon).

The mouse pointer changes shape

. Click and drag the

outline box for the group. You can always resize it later.
When you release the mouse button, the following dialog
box will be displayed:

Enter the list of items that will make up the group of options
from which the user will choose.
Click on

Page 59

to move to the next step.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

The next step allows you to determine whether a default
choice should appear in the group. For example, whether
an option should automatically be checked (enabled).

Click on the

Page 60

button to move to the next step.

The next step automatically assigns a value to each item
within the group, as shown below:

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
This value will be stored in the field or can be used later to
perform a task. By default, each item is numbered sequentially
beginning with 1. When you read a value from a field, it should
correspond with the correct item in the group.
For example, if you had three items (check, money order and COD)
a 2 stored in the field would indicate the option money order.
Click on the

button to move to the next step.

Use the next step to determine what to do with the value
(option) the user selects from the list:

You can choose to store it temporarily until you can check the
value at a later time or you can store the value immediately into a
field.
Click on

Page 61

to move to the next step.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

Use this step to select the 3-D display style and the type of
buttons to use for the group. The sample on the left
changes to display the currently selected style.

Click on the

button to move to the next step.

The last step asks for a name for the option group. Mark the
Display Help on customizing the option group checkbox
to obtain help once you return to the form.

When done, click on the

Page 62

button.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

PRACTICE EXERCISE
Instructions:


Create a new form using the ORDERS table (name it “Order
Details”) that includes all of the existing fields.
Create an option group in place of the item number. Add the
following items to the option group, making sure you keep the order
of the items the same.
Chia Pet
Pet Rock
Ginsu Knife Set
PEZ Dispenser
Lava Lamp
Mood Ring
Berlin Wall Chunks
Football Phone
Elvis Plates
3-D Glasses Dancing
Flowers California
Raisin Figures


Page 63

Rearrange the option group so that the items fit side by side in two
columns (six per column).
Using the default assigned values, store the value in the Item#
field.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
ADDING COMMAND BUTTONS TO THE FORM
You can add buttons to your forms that can be assigned to
specific functions using Visual Basic commands so that when the
user clicks on the button, an action is performed.
The easiest way to create a command button without having to
learn Visual Basic is to use the Command Button wizard. The
wizard provides a list of common operations for working with such
items as records, forms, reports, and applications and automatically
creates the Visual Basic code for the button.
To create a command button, follow these steps:



Be sure the Control Wizard

is turned on.

Click on the Command Button tool (located within
the Controls section on the Design Ribbon).

The mouse pointer changes shape

. Click and drag to

size the button on the form. When done, release the mouse
button. If you simply click the mouse button, a default button
will be created. The following dialog box will be displayed:

Page 64

From the wizard screen, select from the list of operation
Categories provided in the left column.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

Select the command from the right column. For example, if
you wanted a button that would add a new record each time
it is selected, you would choose the Record Operations
category and then select Add New Record as the command
(from the right column).
Click on the

button to access the next screen.

The number of steps within the Command Button Wizard will
vary depending on what action you selected.
Typically, the next screen allows you to determine whether
the button you are creating will contain text or a picture:

If you select Picture, Access displays the various pictures
which may be assigned to the button. The sample to the left
of the dialog box displays the currently selected picture. If
you would like a larger selection of pictures, mark the Show
All Pictures checkbox.
Click on

Page 65

to continue.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

You are now asked to name the button being created:

This can be especially important if you plan on referring to
the button in programming.
If you want to change anything, click on the
button to access previous steps.
If you think you may need some additional help working on
the command button, check the box located in the lower left.
If everything is correct, select

.

You will now be returned to the design view where you should see
your new command button. To make any changes to the button,
access its Properties - as you would any other object on the form.

Page 66

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

PRACTICE EXERCISE
Instructions:


Page 67

Using the Order Details form you created earlier, add command
buttons to the bottom of the form that will add and delete records.
Also add a button to print the current record and one to undo the
last record change.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
ADDING CONTROL TIPS TO THE FORM
Access provides a feature that adds short pop-up messages to
controls that act similar to the ToolTips that pop-up when pointing
to a tool on the toolbar. Since these tips are associated with the
controls, they are called Control Tips. Use Control Tips to help
explain a field, provide a list of possible choices, or to display other
helpful information a user might need when working with a
particular control.



















TIP:

Open the form to be modified in design mode.
Select the control to add the Control Tip to.
Select the Property Sheet tool.

Select the Other tab from across the top of the box.
Click in the ControlTip Text box and enter the tip you want
to add to the currently selected control.
To create multi-line tips, press S+E for each new line
you want to add.

Page 68

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
ADDING BACKGROUND PICTURES TO THE FORM
If you want your form to look more polished, you may want to add
a background picture. For example, you could add your company
logo or a photograph to the background of a form. Of course, you
would have to select a background that would still allow your fields
and other controls to be easily seen.
To add a background picture to your form, follow these steps:





Open the form to be modified in design mode.
Select the Property Sheet tool.
Be sure the “Form” is selected and then select the Format
tab from across the top of the box.

The properties labeled Picture pertain to the form’s
background graphic.

Page 69

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
The following fields are used for the background picture:
Picture Type

Click on

to specify the picture type.

Use embedded to make the picture part
of the database file. Use linked to have
Access create a simple pointer to the
location of the picture.
Picture

Use this section to enter the full path
and filename of the picture to be used.
If you do not know the name or location
of the file, click on the
button.

Picture Tiling

Click on

to specify whether the

picture will be tiled on the form. This, of
course, assumes the picture is smaller
than the form. This is useful for
background textures such as paper,
wood, marble, etc.
Picture Alignment

Click on

to specify the position on the

form where the picture should be
placed. This, of course, assumes that
the picture is smaller than the form.
Picture Size Mode

Click on

to select how the picture is

to be sized. Choose clip to display the
picture in its actual size, but if the
picture is larger than the form, it will be
cut off (clipped). Choose stretch to
allow Access to increase the picture
width and height to fill the entire form.
Choose zoom to increase the size of
the picture as much as possible without
losing the original proportions.

Page 70

Fill in the picture information in the boxes provided.

Click on

to close the box.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

Module Three



Page 71

Creating Custom Reports
Changing Object Properties
Displaying Choices
Saving & Opening Reports

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

CREATING REPORTS
USAGE:

Access reports provide a flexible means of displaying and
presenting your data. They allow you to design and customize
your data to fit your specifications.
If you want to customize your reports, the best way is to start with
one of the built-in reports and then customize it to fit your needs.
Some added benefits of customizing your reports are the ability
to create customized company reports with graphics and logos
and the ability to add calculations based on certain criteria.
A report is made up of "controls", which are text boxes, rectangles,
graphics, lines and anything else you place on a report. These
controls can be bound to a table or query. A bound control
basically means that it represents a specific field that is connected
or bound to a table/query. The data for the field is usually
represented by a text box.
Other unbound controls are simply lines, labels, rectangles and
other objects that are basically just there for the design of the
form. A report title is an example of an unbound control since it is
not connected to a table/query field. There are also calculated
controls that are based on formulas or expressions. These
expressions can be a combination of math operators (i.e., + and -),
field names, other controls, constants or built-in functions.
Controls also have various "properties" that can be customized or
set. These "properties" include such items as color, font, style,
thickness, format and other features that directly affect that
control.
To quickly create a report, use one of these tools:
Click this tool (located within the Reports section of the
Create Ribbon) to create Labels. A wizard will walk
you through the steps.
Click on this tool to create a Blank Report. You will
then need to customize it manually.
Click the Report Design tool to create a blank report
and immediately begin editing it from design view.

Page 72

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
Click on this tool (located within the Reports section
on the Create Ribbon) to have Access create a basic
report based on the data within the currently selected
table or query.
You will not be prompted to enter any information. Instead,
Access will simply create a new tab containing a generic report
consisting
of the information within the currently selected table or query.
You can access the Format Ribbon to customize the look of the
form if needed.
Click on the down arrow
beside this tool to choose
a different font for the selected item.
Click on the down arrow

beside this tool to select a

new font size.
Click on this tool to turn bold on and off.
Click on this tool to turn italics on and off.
Click on this tool to turn underline on and off.

Click on this tool to change the font color.
Use this tool to left-align text within the report.

Use this tool to center text.
Click on this tool to right-align text.
Click on this tool to display/hide gridlines.

This tool is used to copy a format from one area within the
report to another. Begin by selecting the text you want to

Page 73

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
copy the format from and then choose this tool. Your mouse
pointer will change shape
. You can now “paint” that
format onto other report text

Page 74

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

Click on this tool to apply a background color.
Alternates the fill/background colors for rows (records).
Click on this tool to specify formatting options based on a
condition that you set. For example, you might set the
condition of values between 100 and 200 to be displayed
in red.

From within the Conditional Formatting dialog box (shown above)
select the format to be applied and then the condition (rule) that
must be met. When done, click
.

You can also format numeric fields within your
report by using this set of tools on the Format
Ribbon.

Click on the down arrow

beside this tool to choose

from a list of formats.
This tool formats the current selection for currency.

Formats the current selection for percentage.
Formats the selection for comma by adding a comma
as a thousand separator and two decimal places.
Increases the number of decimal places displayed.

Decreases the number of decimal places displayed.
Page 75

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
Use this set of tools to set the font,
font size, text and background
color and alignment.

Use these tools to add a
background image to the report.
You can also specify alternate row
color to break the report up so that
it is easier to read.

From the Design Ribbon, choose
this tool to quickly apply a theme to
your report.
Themes are used to enhance
reports, making them appear more
professional with the application of
uniform color designs.
Notice as you scroll the list. Your
report reflects the currently
selected theme.
From the pull-down list, select the
theme you would like applied to
your report.

You can also adjust the width of the columns by moving the
mouse pointer just to the right of the column margin you wish to
adjust.
The pointer changes to a cross-hair
indicating you are on the
margin line. Once you see the double-arrow, double-click and the
column will be widened to accommodate the largest entry.

Page 76

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
USING THE REPORT WIZARD
If you don’t want to manually create a report, you can use the
Report Wizard which guides you through the entire process.
To access the Report Wizard, select this tool
(located within the Reports section on the Create
Ribbon).

If the table or query name that you want to create the report from is
not already displayed in the text box, click on the down arrow
located to the right of this box and select the table/query to use.
Access displays the available fields in the left column and the
fields currently selected for your report in the right column.
To add all the fields to your new report, click on

.

If you only want some of the fields, highlight each field and click on
to add one field at a time.
If you accidentally added a wrong field, or decide to remove fields
from your new report, use
to remove all the fields, or use
to
remove one field at a time.
When you are ready to continue, click on

Page 77

.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
The next screen is used to break your report down into groups or
categories of records. This is useful for large groups of data and
can make your report easier to read. For example, a list of
customers could be broken down by state and then by city. The
state would be the first group and then cities would be sub-groups
under each state.

Use the left column of fields to choose what groups of records
should be created. As you add a field for grouping, you will see
the sample on the right adjust to show how the records will be
displayed.
If you add more than one field for grouping, you can use the
Priority arrows to rearrange the order in which the records will be
grouped.
Most users will not need to make additional changes, but if you only
want the groups to be determined by the first few characters of a
field, access
and select the number of initial
characters to scan before determining its group.
Once you are ready to continue, click on

Page 78

.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
Next you will be prompted to specify how the report will be sorted,
as shown in the diagram below:

You can select up to four fields on which to sort your data. Use the
pull-down arrows
to define which fields to sort the records on
and in what order to sort them.
Click on this button next to each field to define
whether that field should be sorted in ascending or
descending sequence.
If you selected a field to group in the previous step, Access will
automatically sort by that field first.
When you are ready to continue, click on

Page 79

.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
Now you can choose the layout of the report, as shown below:

As you make a selection from the Layout column, you will see an
example of the layout in the left window. This will help you
decide which layout best fits your report.
You can also change the page Orientation to match the type of
report you want. Landscape is good if you are trying to fit a lot of
columns across one page. Portrait is useful if you don't have
many columns, but want to fit as many records as you can on a
page.
Use the checkbox at the bottom to automatically adjust the field
lengths so that all your fields fit on the page. However, if you select
this option, some of the fields may be truncated in order to make
room for the others.
When you have made a choice, click on

Page 80

.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
The final step is to name the report, as shown below:

Use the text box at the top to enter a title for your report.
Once the report is done, choose whether you want to Preview
the final report or to switch to the design mode and Modify it.
When you are done, click on

.

Access will now create the report and display the results.

Page 81

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
PRINTING OPTIONS
Before printing the report, you may need to change the paper
size, page orientation, margins, or other features that affect the
page layout.
Click on this tool (located within the Page Layout section
of the Print Preview Ribbon).
The following dialog box will be displayed:

CHANGING MARGINS
Be sure that the first tab labeled Print Options has been selected
at the top of the screen. As mentioned, you can adjust the top,
bottom, left or right margins.
A preview box is provided on the right side of this dialog box to see
how your new margin settings will change the document. This box
also allows you to display/hide headings as well as specify whether
only the form or only the datasheet should be printed.

Page 82

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
CHANGING PAPER SIZE
To change the paper size and/or page orientation, select
the second tab at the top of the screen, labeled Page.

Orientation The page orientation (portrait or landscape) can be
changed by clicking on the appropriate radio button.
Paper

Click on the down arrow

to the right of the "Paper

Size" section to select from one of many predefined
sizes. You may also select the source (tray) for the
paper.
Printer

Allows you to specify the printer to be used. Click on
to choose a printer other than the default.

Once settings have been changed, select

Page 83

.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
CHANGING THE COLUMN LAYOUT
The last tab of the page setup box is used to modify the layout
of the columns on the report, as shown below:

Grid Settings

Use the top section of this tab to specify the
number of columns to print on one page and
the spacing between rows and/or columns.

Column Size

Use the middle section to specify the
width/height of each column.

Column Layout

Use this section to specify if the columns will
be printed across then down, or down then
across the page.

Once all settings have been changed, select

Page 84

.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
PRINTING THE REPORT
Once you have made all your changes and are ready to print the
report, follow these steps:
Click on this tool (located within the Print section of the Print
Preview Ribbon).
The following dialog box will be displayed:

Select the printer, enter the number of copies desired, and select
which pages of the report you want printed.
When done, select

Page 85

.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

CUSTOMIZING THE REPORT
USAGE:

Once you have created a basic report, you will more than likely
want to change the layout by moving the fields around,
changing fonts or adding graphics. All of this is accomplished in
report design mode.
Switch to Design View.

The report will change, as illustrated in the diagram below:

NOTE:

The number of controls will vary depending on the
report.

You can use the Rulers to help line up the Controls within the
different Sections of the report.
Whatever controls you place in the Report Header or Report
Footer are displayed only once per report.
Objects placed in the Details section are displayed for each record
and may be repeated several times per page. In other words, there
may be room to display more than one record on a page
depending on how you design the page layout.

Page 86

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
DISPLAYING THE FIELD LIST
If you want to quickly add a field to the report, you can select the
field from the list along the right side of the window and drag it
to the required location.
If for some reason, the field list has been removed
from view, click on this tool (located within the Tools
section on the Design Ribbon) to display the field list.

A box similar to the following diagram will be displayed along the
far right side of the screen:

To place a field from the list onto the report, click on the field
name in the list and drag the field to the location on the report.
Access will add a bound text box at that location for that field.

Page 87

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
SELECTING CONTROLS
As you work with a report, you will need to select one or more of
the controls to move them around the report or to change their
properties.
To select a control, you must use the pointer tool
(located
Ribbon). within the Controls section on the Design

Once you select the pointer, click on the control. Small rectangular
handles appear around the control, as illustrated below:

Some controls, such as the text box shown above, have an
attached label that will also be selected.
The larger handles (black rectangles) are used to reposition the
control. If, for example, you wanted to move the label for the
control, you would drag the move handle for the label.
If you only wanted to move the text box, you would drag the
move handle for the text box. To move both the control and its
attached label, place the mouse pointer over a border until it
changes to a small hand, as illustrated in the diagram below:

Once you have the hand pointer, click and drag both items to their
new location on the report. To select more than one control, hold
the S key down while you select additional controls.

Page 88

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
RE-SIZING CONTROLS
If you need to make a control larger or smaller, you must first select
the control to view the sizing handles, as shown below:

To resize a control, follow these two steps:


Place the mouse over one of the smaller sizing handles.

When the mouse pointer changes to a double-sided arrow,
drag the handle in the direction you need. When you
release the mouse button, the control will be resized.

COPYING A CONTROL
To copy a control, follow the three steps outlined below:


Select the control(s) to be copied.
Click on the COPY tool (located within the
Clipboard section on the Home Ribbon). The
control is temporarily copied to the clipboard.

Page 89

Click on the PASTE tool (located within the
Clipboard section on the Home Ribbon).
Each time you click on the Paste tool, another
copy of the control is placed beneath the
original one. You will need to move these
copies by dragging them to a new location.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
DELETING CONTROLS
If you no longer need a control, you can easily delete the item by
following the two steps outlined below:


Select the object(s) to be removed from the report.
Press =

UNDOING YOUR ACTIONS
If you accidentally deleted the wrong item or moved an object to
the wrong spot, you can easily reverse your last action using the
Undo option.

Click on the Undo tool once.

If you click on the down arrow
(to the right of the tool),
you can scroll through the last several actions.

Page 90

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
ALIGNING CONTROLS
As you move controls around on the report, you will realize that it is
a tedious job to align the objects using only your eyes. Fortunately,
Access provides an option that allows you to quickly align several
selected objects at once.
The steps for aligning controls are outlined below:

Select the objects that should be aligned. Remember to
hold S down as you click on each control to be aligned.

Select the desired alignment from the pulldown menu (located within the Sizing &
Ordering section of the Arrange Ribbon).

The following alignment options are available:

Page 91

To Grid

Used to align the upper-left corners of the selected
controls with the grid.

Left

Used to align the left edges of the selected controls
with the left edge of the leftmost control.

Right

Used to align the right edges of the selected controls
with the right edge of the rightmost control.

Top

Used to align the top edges of the selected controls
with the top edge of the highest control.

Bottom

Used to align the bottom edges of the selected
controls with the bottom edge of the lowest control.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
ADDING A CALCULATED CONTROL
In addition to adding normal fields to your report, you can also
create mathematical calculations based on numeric fields. For
example, if you have an existing field containing current
salaries, you may want to create a report displaying how a 5%
increase would affect those salaries.
The following mathematical operators can be used:
+
*
/

Addition
Subtraction
Multiplication
Division

You can also use functions, such as those listed below:
SUM
AVERAGE
MAXIMUM
MINIMUM
COUNT
When using the Report Wizard, you are given the option to
summarize fields and define what type of calculation should
be used. This information will be used to automatically create
the calculated control.
To manually create a calculated control, you will need to assign a
function or formula to an existing control that has been placed
within your report.
The placement of the control determines what records will be
calculated, as outlined below:
Detail Section
Group Footer
Page Footer
Report Footer

Page 92

Calculates the data for the current record only.
Calculates the data for the current group only.
Calculates the data for all records on a page.
Calculates the data for all records in a report.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
Follow these steps to place a calculated control in your report:

Click on this tool to insert a text box (located within
the Controls section on the Design Ribbon).


Select the text box and then click inside the box to actually
enter the formula. If you don’t need the label placed to the
left of the control, click on it and delete it.
Start the calculation by typing an equal (=) sign, followed by
the function or formula you want to create.
To include a field within your calculation, the field name must
be enclosed within square brackets [ ] so that Access knows
where to get the data from, as illustrated in the example
below:
=[Salary]*1.05
To combine text with your calculation, enclose the text within
quotation marks, as illustrated in the example below:
=“Projected Salary Increase for” & [Employee] & “: “& [Salary]*1.05

The ampersand (&) is required to combine the various parts
of the calculation. Everything within quotes is printed
verbatim and fields are placed within square brackets.
Using this example, Access would print the following:
Projected Salary Increase for John Jones: 87,000

You can also use these predefined fields:
[Page]
[Pages]
Date()
Time()
Now()

Displays the current page number
Displays the total number of pages
Displays the current date
Displays the current time
Displays the current date and time

You should see the formula displayed within the text box. Switch
to the Preview mode to actually view the result of the calculation.

Page 93

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
CHANGING THE TYPE OF REPORT
You can also use these tools (located within
the Table section on the Arrange Ribbon) to
change the format of your report.
Choose Stacked to create a layout similar to a
paper form where labels are placed to the left
of each field.
Select Tabular to create a layout similar to a
spreadsheet with labels across the top and
data placed in columns below the labels.
Select Remove Layout to remove the layout
applied to the controls within your report.

MOVING CONTROLS
You can use these tools (located within the
Move section on the Design Ribbon) to move a
control up or down a section on your report.

POSITIONING CONTROLS
These two tools (located within the Position
section on the Arrange Ribbon) are used to
define specific margins for the selected control
and any padding (extra space) between
controls.
Use these tools to send the selected control
back or forward (if it overlaps with another
control).

Page 94

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
SPLITTING CONTROLS
If space is an issue, you can instruct Access to split a control
across rows or columns.
Begin by selecting the control to be modified.
Use these tools (located within the Merge/Split
section on the Arrange Ribbon) to split the
selected control vertically (across two rows) or
horizontally (across two columns).
INSERTING COLUMNS AND ROWS
These tools (located within the Rows &
Columns section on the Arrange Ribbon) are
used to quickly insert columns and rows within
the report.
ADJUSTING SIZE AND SPACE
This tool (located within the Sizing & Ordering
section on the Arrange Ribbon) is used to
specify the size and space of the selected
control(s).

Page 95

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
CUSTOMIZING PROPERTIES
When working with any control on the report, Access allows you to
customize its properties.
Properties include such items as font and point size for text and
can be easily modified using the toolbar (as shown on the
previous pages).
However, if you want to modify additional properties (such as
margins and line spacing), you will need to access the control’s
property sheet.
Select the object whose properties you want to customize.

Click on the Property Sheet tool.

Access displays a window along the right side of the screen with
various properties. These properties can be customized for the
currently selected control object.
The properties are broken down into four major groups (tabs) that
allow you to control/customize the object’s format, data, event
information and other miscellaneous settings.
You can choose any tab to work on just that group or you can
click on All to see a list of all available settings in one list.

Page 96

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
Different control objects will have a different set/number of
properties that can be customized.
Below is a list of the most commonly found properties:
PROPERTY
Name
Control Source
Format
Decimal Places
Input Mask
Visible
Hide Duplicates

Can Grow
Can Shrink
Running Sum
Left
Top
Width
Height
Special Effect
Back Color
Back Style
Border Color
Border Width
Border Style
Fore Color
Font Name
Font Size
Font Weight
Font Italic
Font Underline
Text Align
Tag

Page 97

DESCRIPTION
Name given to a control
Data to be assigned (field or expression)
Defines format of numbers, dates, times, text
Sets the number of decimal places for
numbers
Specifies how data is entered/displayed
Makes the object visible
Specifies whether the data should be
displayed if it is the same as the previous
record
Expands control when printed to fit text
Shrinks control when printed to eliminate
blanks
Determines whether a running sum is
calculated by group or the entire report
Determines horizontal position
Determines vertical position
Determines width of control
Determines height of control
Sets 3-D effects (normal, raised or sunken)
Selects interior color
Selects style for border (clear or normal)
Select a color for the border
Select the width of the border
Sets line style (solid, dashes, dots)
Selects foreground color
Selects font to be applied to text control
Selects point size to be applied to text control
Selects weight of font (various weights of
bold)
Determines whether text will be italicized
Determines whether text will be underlined
Sets the alignment of text (left, center, right)
Specifies additional control information

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
Other properties include the following:
PROPERTY
Left Margin

Top Margin
Right Margin
Bottom Margin
Line Spacing

DESCRIPTION
Defines the left margin of the information
displayed within a label or text box control.
Keep in mind, this is the space between the
inside border of the control and the text/data
that is displayed within the control.
Sets the top margin for the information
displayed within a label or text box control.
Specifies the right margin for information
displayed within a label or text box control.
Sets the bottom margin for information
displayed within a label or text box control.
Defines the line spacing for the information
within a label or text box control.

For more detailed information on any of these properties, click on
the property and press !. Access will display a page describing
the property.

Since the Property Sheet window does not take up the full screen,
you can see the properties for each control you select as you are
working on the report.
To close the Property Sheet window, either click the close button
(located in the upper right corner) or select the Property Sheet
tool a second time.

Page 98

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
USING THE DRAWING TOOLS
In addition to adding text to the report, Access allows you to
customize it even further by adding your own drawings. Simply
select the drawing tool of your choice and begin creating whatever
customized picture you require.
TIP:

Double-Click on any tool that you want to use
more than once.

To add a rectangle to your report, follow the steps outlined below:




Click on the Rectangle tool (located within the
Controls section on the Design Ribbon).
Move the mouse pointer to where the box should appear.
The pointer changes to a thin cross-hair with a rectangle
attached to it
.
Click and drag to draw the box.
When done, release the mouse button.

To add a line to your report, follow the steps outlined below:




Page 99

Click on the Line tool (located within the Controls
section on the Design Ribbon).
Move to where the line should begin. The mouse pointer
changes to a thin cross-hair with a line attached to it
.
Click and drag to draw the line.
When done, release the mouse button.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
DISPLAYING CHOICES WITH OPTION GROUPS
When customizing your report, you may want to show which option
was selected from the available choices. An Option Group within
a report is composed of a group frame containing a set of
checkboxes or option buttons. The frame has an attached label.
The easiest method for creating an option group is by accessing
the wizard, as outlined in the steps below:

Be sure that the wizard tool

Click on the Option Group tool

has been selected.

(located within the

Controls section on the Design Ribbon).

Click and drag the outline box for the group. If needed, you
can always resize the group later. When you release the
mouse button, the following dialog box is displayed:

Enter the list of items that will make up the group of options.
When the report is generated, the option that matches the
value in the current record will be selected. You can use the

Y

key to move to the next line.

Click on

Page 100

to move to the next step.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

The next step determines whether a default choice should
appear in the group. For example, whether an option should
automatically be checked (enabled).
Typically, you shouldn’t need to have a default value
displayed since each record will already contain the data.

Click on









Page 101

to move to the next step.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

This step automatically assigns a value to each item within
the group. Since you are working with a report, the value in
the record will be matched to a corresponding option in this
group and if a match is found, the corresponding option will
be displayed in the report. By default, each item within the
group is numbered sequentially beginning with 1, however,
you can change the values as needed. Make sure the
values and labels within the group match the values and
labels stored within the table.
Click on

Use the next step to define what is to be done with the value
(option) retrieved from the current record. You can choose
to store it temporarily for possible use at a later time (such
as in a calculation) or store the value immediately in a field.
Since this is a report, storing the value in a field is not really
a viable option, but you will need to select this item in order
for the option group to know where to read the data from.

Click on the

Page 102

to move to the next step.

button to move to the next step.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

Use this step to select the style of the controls and the type
of button to use for the group.

Click on

to move to the next step.

The last step asks for a name for the option group.

When done, click on the

Page 103

button.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
ADDING BACKGROUND PICTURES TO THE REPORT
If you want your report to look more polished, you may want to add
a background picture. For example, you could add your company
logo or a photograph to the background of a report. Of course, you
would have to select a background that would still allow your fields
and other controls to be easily seen.
To add a background picture to your report, follow these steps:





Open the report to be modified in design mode.
Select the Property Sheet tool.
Be sure the “Report” is selected and then select the Format
tab from across the top of the box.

The properties labeled Picture pertain to the report’s
background image.

Page 104

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced
The following fields are used for the background picture:
Picture

Use this section to enter the full path
and filename of the picture to be used.
If you do not know the name or location
of the file, click on the
button.

Picture Type

Click on

to specify the picture type.

Use embedded to make the picture part
of the database file. Use linked to have
Access create a simple pointer to the
location of the picture.
Picture Size Mode

Click on

to select how the picture is

to be sized. Choose clip to display the
picture in its actual size, but if the
picture is larger than the form, it will be
cut off (clipped). Choose stretch to
allow Access to increase the picture
width and height to fill the entire form.
Choose zoom to increase the size of
the picture as much as possible without
losing the original proportions.
Picture Alignment

Click on

to specify the position on the

form where the picture should be
placed. This, of course, assumes that
the picture is smaller than the form.
Picture Tiling

Click on

to specify whether the

picture will be tiled on the form. This, of
course, assumes the picture is smaller
than the form. This is useful for
background textures such as paper,
wood, marble, etc.

Page 105

Fill in the picture information in the boxes provided.

Click on

to close the box.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

SAVING/CLOSING A REPORT
USAGE:

As you should realize by now, creating a report can be an involved
task. Designing a decent report can take several hours or even
several days depending on the complexity of the report. Therefore,
you should save the report often. Once a report has been saved,
you can open the report whenever you need it.
SAVING THE REPORT
Click on this tool (located on the Quick Access Toolbar
across the top of your screen) to save the report.
Access will automatically assign the name of the table to the new
report. If you create a second report using the same table and
save it, Access will add the number 1 after the table name. For
example, if you created three reports using the “Clients” table, the
reports would be named Clients, Clients1, and Clients2.
NOTE:

If you would rather assign a unique name to the report,
you will need to access the File Ribbon and select
Save As from the pull-down menu.

OPENING A REPORT
To open an existing report, simply
select it from the left side of the
screen (where the database objects
are all listed).

CLOSING A REPORT
If you are finished with a report, you can close it by clicking
on the close button.

Page 106

PRACTICE EXERCISE
Instructions:





Use the Client Sales query or create a query that links the
CLIENTS, ITEMS and ORDERS tables. Add all of the fields.
Using the query, create a report called Sales.
Add the logo from the file LOGO.BMP to the upper left corner of
the header section.
Place the Picture for the item to the right side of the detail section
and re-size it as needed.
Add an option group in place of the current Item# control. Use the
following items for the option group. Make sure you keep the order
of the items the same.
Chia Pet
Pet Rock
Ginsu Knife Set
PEZ Dispenser
Lava Lamp
Mood Ring
Berlin Wall Chunks
Football Phone
Elvis Plates
3-D Glasses Dancing
Flowers California
Raisin Figures


Rearrange the option group so that the items fit side by side in two
columns (six per column).
Preview the report.

Module Five




Backing Up Your Database
Converting a Database
Compacting/Repairing Databases
Linked Table Manager
Securing Your Database

USING DATABASE UTILITIES
USAGE:

Access provides several utilities that can be used to perform
special functions on your databases.

WORKING WITH AN OLDER DATABASE
If you are working within an environment where several users are
still working on the older version of Access, you will want to keep
the older version of the database intact without converting it to
Access 2010 so that everyone can access the database.
Although you will be able to edit the data within the tables, you will
not be able to make changes to the database objects (such as
forms, reports or queries).
To open a previous version, access the following menu:
Access the File Ribbon

Select Open from the pull-down list.

The following dialog box will be displayed:

Click on the

button to locate files from a

previous version of Access or another database application.
Once you have located the older database, double-click on it or
highlight the name of the file and click
.

SAVING A DATABASE AS A PREVIOUS VERSION
Once the older version is open, you can edit it as you normally
would but then will need to save it back to the previous version
by accessing the following menu:
Access the File Ribbon

Select Save Database As from the pull-down list.

Click on the down arrow beside the box labeled Save as type.
From the list provided, choose the original format.
When done, click on

.

Notice that if you were trying to save an earlier version of an
Access database, you could now choose to save it as an Access
2010 version.

COMPACTING A DATABASE
As you work with your database and make changes (such as
deleting and adding items) the database gets scattered across your
disk drive. This fragmentation can cause the system to run slower
and less efficient than it should. To correct this problem, you
should periodically compact your database to reorganize it and
make it more efficient (and possibly smaller in size).
To compact the currently opened database:

Access the File Ribbon.

Select Compact and Repair Database from the
right side of the screen.

Depending on the size of the database,
you will see a progress bar along the
status line at the bottom of the screen.
NOTE:

Once Access is done, you should notice an increase in
speed. The exact amount of improvement depends
on how badly the file was fragmented and how large
the database is.

BACKING UP YOUR DATABASE
It’s a good idea before making significant changes to a database to
make a backup copy of it - just in case something goes wrong.
To backup the current database, access the following menu:
Access the File Ribbon.

Select Save & Publish from the list of items.

Choose Back Up Database
from within the “Save Database
As” section (located to the right
side of the window).
Click on this button to save the database.

The following dialog box will be displayed:

Enter a name for the backup version (notice that Access
automatically puts today’s date as part of the file name).
When done, click on

.

LINKED TABLE MANAGER
This utility is used to verify the location of linked tables within
your database. This ensures that the links are always pointing to
the correct location.
To use this feature, click this tool (located within the
Import & Link section on the External Data Ribbon).

The following dialog box will be displayed:

From within the dialog box, select the linked tables to be updated.
If a link has been broken (the external table cannot be found),
you will be asked for the new location.
When done, click on

. You will receive a confirmation

message indicating that the linked tables have been updated.

SECURING YOUR DATABASE

USAGE:

Once you have created your database, you will probably want to
protect the database objects from being viewed, edited or removed.
Access provides various levels of security, ranging from simple
password protection to an extensive user-level security method.
SETTING A PASSWORD
If you simply want to prevent other users from opening your
database, you can set a password that will be requested each time
a user attempts to open the database. However, once a database
is opened, all of its associated objects are accessible to the user
(unless you have defined additional security methods).
To set a password for a database, follow the steps outlined below:

Select Open from within the File Ribbon.

The following dialog box will be displayed:

Highlight the name of the database you want to
protect and then click on the down arrow
beside this button to access the available
options.

Select Open Exclusive
from the pull-down list.

Once the database has been opened in
exclusive mode, click on the Info item
from within the File Ribbon.

Click on this button to encrypt the
database with a password.

The following box will be displayed:

In the box labeled Password, enter a password for the
database. Passwords are case sensitive.

Click in box labeled Verify to re-enter the password.

When done, click on

.

OPENING A PASSWORD-PROTECTED DATABASE
Once a password has been assigned to a database, any time a
user attempts to access the protected database, the following box
will be displayed:

Enter the password and click on

.

REMOVING A PASSWORD
To remove a password from a database, you will need to open it
again in Exclusive Mode and then follow the steps outlined below:

Access the File Ribbon.




Select Info from the pull-down list.

Select this option.

The following box will be displayed:


In the box provided, you will need to enter the previously
assigned password again.

When done, click on
removed from the database.

. The password will now be

If You
Have
Time


Setting Program Options
Working with the Quick Access Toolbar
Accessing the Add-In Manager

SETTING PROGRAM OPTIONS
USAGE:

Access has many different settings which can be customized as
needed. Although there is one category within the options window
which allows you to make changes to the current database only,
the rest of the categories contain options which are applied to all
databases that are opened or created.
To change the program defaults, access the following menu:
Access the File Ribbon.

Click on this item from
within the pull-down list.

Along the left of the dialog box is a group of categories by which
Access displays the options that can be customized.

GENERAL OPTIONS

This first category contains the most popular options within Access.
You can specify whether LivePreview and ClearType will always
be
used. ClearType makes the text on your screen easier to read.
This category also allows you to specify the color scheme and what
ScreenTip style to use.
The middle section is used to define the file format, storage
location, and sort order for all databases.
The bottom section of this box allows you to personalize Access by
entering your user name and initials. This information is then
stored with databases you create.

CURRENT DATABASE OPTIONS
This category defines options for the current database only.

Application Options

This section defines how the
current database will be
displayed and formatted.

Navigation

Use this section to show/hide the
navigation pane and set defaults.

Ribbon and Toolbar Options

Use this section to show/hide
custom ribbons and menus.

Name AutoCorrect Options

Use this section to have Access
track and log errors when using
the AutoCorrect feature.

Filter Lookup options

This section is used to specify
whether local indexed, local
nonindexed, or ODBC field
values are shown in a list when
you choose to Filter by Form.

Caching Web Service
and SharePoint tables

Use this section to select the
cache format to be used.

DATASHEET OPTIONS
This third category specifies how datasheets look in Access.

Gridlines and cell effects

Use this section to specify
whether to display horizontal
and/or vertical gridlines, the
default column width to use, and
the cell effect to be applied.

Default font

This section is used to define the
text font, text size, and attributes
to be applied.

OBJECT DESIGNERS OPTIONS
This category contains the various design options within Access.

The box is divided into table, query, and form design so that you
can modify each type of design as needed.
There is also a section at the bottom of this box which allows you
to customize how error checking will be handled.

PROOFING OPTIONS
This next category is used to specify how Access corrects and
formats your text.

Click on

to access a second dialog box where

you can add, remove, or modify autocorrect options within the
program.
The bottom section contains a series of checkboxes which can be
used to set instructions to be followed when spell checking your
database. For example, you can choose to ignore word in all
uppercase, those containing numbers, or those containing
Internet addresses.
You can also choose whether to use the main dictionary when spell
checking (or a custom one) as well as the language to use when
spell checking.

LANGUAGE OPTIONS
This tab allows you to set language preferences:

Choose Editing Languages

This section allows you to specify
which additional language(s) will
be available when editing
databases (dictionaries, etc.).

Choose Display and
Help Languages

Use this section to specify the
language priority order for
buttons, tabs and Help.

CLIENT SETTINGS
This tab is quite lengthy and contains a host of client options:

The first section contains a series of editing option checkboxes.
For example, you can define the action that should occur when the

E

key is pressed while editing or the arrow key behavior. You can
also specify whether you want record changes, deletions, and
action queries to be confirmed as well as set the general alignment
and cursor movement default.

Client Options (Continued)

The “Display” section contains a series of checkboxes including
options for determining the number of recent documents to
display, whether to display the Status Bar, and whether to display
Smart Tags on datasheets.
The “Printing” section simply allows you to set the default margins
to be used when printing. The “General” section contains options
for providing feedback sound and formatting of years.
The “Advanced” section is used to specify such settings as whether
to open the last used file, to automatically open files in “Shared” or
“Exclusive” mode, and the default settings for record locking.
There are also options for setting OLE/DDE Timeouts. Timeouts
set the time interval (in seconds) after which an OLE/DDE
operation will be considered to have failed. You can also define the
number of times to retry updating, time intervals for refreshing the
data, and how long to wait between update retries.

CUSTOMIZE RIBBON OPTIONS
This category contains the following options:

This category is used to add/remove commands from the Quick
Access toolbar.
To add a command, begin by clicking on the down arrow

beside

the box at the top labeled “Choose commands from”. A pulldown list of locations to find commands will be displayed. If you
are unsure where a command is located, choose “All Commands”
from the list.
Next, scroll through the command list (from the left side) until you
see the one you want to add. Highlight the command and click
. You should see it copied to the right side of the box.
Notice you can also remove an unwanted command from the
toolbar.
Use
to rearrange the commands.

To reset the Quick Access toolbar, click

.

QUICK ACCESS TOOLBAR OPTIONS
This category is used to customize the Quick Access Toolbar, as
shown below:

This box is used to select which commands you wish to
add/remove from the Quick Access toolbar.
To add a command, begin by clicking on the down arrow

beside

the box at the top labeled “Choose commands from”. A pulldown list of locations to find commands will be displayed. If you
are unsure where a command is located, choose “All Commands”
from the list.
Next, scroll through the command list (from the left side) until you
see the one you want to add. Highlight the command and click
. You should see it copied to the right side of the box.
Notice you can remove an unwanted command from the toolbar.
Use

to rearrange the commands.

To reset the Quick Access toolbar, click

.

ADD-INS
This category contains options for Add-In programs:

Add-ins are typically third party programs/applets that add
functionality/features to the program.
For example, SmartTags are considered to be an add-in since they
add a specialized functionality.
You can specify the location of the add-ins and then manage
them all from within this box.

TRUST CENTER OPTIONS
This category contains the following privacy options:

Protecting your privacy

Use this section to review
Microsoft’s privacy policies.

Security & more

Use this section to adjust your
local security settings (firewall,
virus detection, etc.) as well as
obtain additional information on
secure computing.

Microsoft Access Trust Center This section is used to access a
dialog box which provides
additional security and privacy
settings.

Once all program settings have been, choose

to save

the settings, close the dialog box and return to your database.

WORKING WITH THE QUICK ACCESS TOOLBAR
USAGE:

As you work with Access, you will find that certain tools are used
more often than others. These often-used tools can be placed
on your Quick Access toolbar for easy access while the lesserused tools can be set aside.
VIEWING/HIDING TOOLS
Click on the

button (located to the far right side of the Quick

Access toolbar) to display the list of available tools:

The items displaying a check along the left side are the ones
currently shown on the Quick Access toolbar. If you decide you’d
like another one displayed, simply click on it and it will be added to
the toolbar. For example, you will probably want to add both “New”
and “Open” to the Quick Access toolbar for easy access.
If an item is checked but you no longer want it placed on the
Quick Access toolbar, simply click on it to deselect it. The check
will be removed and the item will no longer be shown.
Notice you can also move the Quick Access toolbar below the
Ribbon if you prefer it displayed there.

CUSTOMIZING THE QUICK ACCESS TOOLBAR

Click on the

button (located to the far right side of the

Quick Access toolbar).

Select More Commands… from the list.

Select which commands you wish to add/remove from the
Quick Access toolbar. To add a command, begin by clicking
on the down arrow
beside the box at the top labeled
“Choose commands from”. A pull-down list of locations to
find commands will be displayed. If you are unsure where a
command is located, choose “All Commands” from the list.
Next, scroll through the command list (from the left side) until
you see the one you want to add. Highlight the command
and click
. You should see it copied to the right
side of the box. Notice you can also remove an unwanted
command from the toolbar.
Use
to rearrange the commands.

To reset the Quick Access toolbar, click

When done, click

.

.

Microsoft Access 2010 Advanced

USING ADD-INS
USAGE:

Access provides an Add-In Manager to access special utilities for
more advanced features. Add-ins typically consist of Visual Basic
procedures and any associated objects. You can create your own
add-ins or purchase them from third-party vendors.
To access the Add-Ins Manager, click on this tool
(located within the Database Tools section on the
Database Tools Ribbon).
From the pull-down list, choose Add-In
Manager.

The following dialog box will be displayed:

From within this dialog box, you can choose to install new addins or to uninstall an existing item (take it off your computer).
When done, click on

.