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Tri-City Times

50

LAPEER

ST. CLAIR

MACOMB

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

www.tricitytimes-online.com

File photo

143rd Volume - Issue No. 1

Sheriff Scott McKenna responds to questions during earlier visit to Tri-City Times office. McKenna vows to continue to be accessible to residents and local media during his tenure in office.

McKenna to lead by example

New Lapeer County Sheriff sets the bar high for self, deputies
By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

LAPEER COUNTY
Pride in self. Pride in
Department.
Those are the standards
newly-elected Sheriff Scott
McKenna expects of himself,
Undersheriff Jeremy Howe
and his fellow officers
during his tenure, however

long it may be.


McKenna says he inherited
a good department when he
officially took the reins on
January 1.
He acknowledges the long
service of his predecessors,
Sheriff Ron Kalanquin and
Undersheriff Bob Bob Rapson;
and the support they provided
him since his election in
August 2016.

McKenna says he realizes a


period of adjustment is inevitable, given the duration of
Kalanquins 36-year tenure as
sheriff.
Its going to be a change
for the department, McKenna
admits, noting that all but two
current Sheriffs employees
were hired by his predecessor.
Regardless, McKenna
intends to establish his own

style of leadership from day


one.
There are some things I
want to demonstrate from the
jump, he says. And that is
that Im going to be a hands-on
sheriff.
Youre going to see me
out in a patrol car in our local
communities. If there is a bad
accident or emergency in the
middle of the night, Im going

to show up. I want my people


to know I have their back.
McKenna believes it is
incumbent on him to establish
and maintain the highest of
standards, trusting that deputies
will follow his lead.
Iplan to lead by example, he says. I want to know
that our people understand the
McKenna page 12-A

Capac park gets boost

Village awarded $45,000 Recreation Passport grant from MDNR


By Maria Brown

Upgrades

Imlay City DDA gives


nod to facade grants
...see page 3-A

TRI-CITY
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The Tri-City Times
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The village, adding $15,000 of their own funds, plans to use the $60,000
in grant monies to build a gazebo, install playground equipment, create
sand volleyball courts and more at the Aldrich Street Park.

happy,said Village
President John Grzyb.
Well be putting in
$15,000 in matching
funds so that gives us
$60,000 to work with.
The funds will be used
to develop the Aldrich
Park, located on the east
side of town, just south of
the Capac Museum.
Per their grant application, the village said
theyd use the money to
purchase and install playground equipment and
benches, build a gazebo
and create two sand volleyball courts along with
other accessibility amenities, such as a pathway.
Park page 12-A

Almont YOMSgroup plans Polar Palooza


Youth on Main Street invites
new members to join effort
By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

ALMONT The
continued success of
Almonts Youth On Main
Street (YOMS) group is
contingent on sustaining
membership into each new
year.
Founded several years
ago, the youth-driven
community service organization is comprised of
Almont High School students in grades 10-12.
Through a collaboration with the Almont
Downtown Development
Authority (DDA), the
young volunteers annually
coordinate projects to benefit the community.
Those projects can
include the successful

spring and fall cleanup efforts downtown,


along with participation in
various other community
events for residents of all
ages.
Last Saturday, Dec. 3,
YOMS members were stationed at the Almont
Historical Museum, where
they helped youngsters
make Christmas cookies
and simple ornaments for
their trees at home.
The group is now
switching its focus to
planning the 2017 Polar
Palooza, a winter festival
to take place Saturday,
Jan. 28 from noon-3 p.m.
at Almont Community
Park.
Almont DDADirector
YOMS page 12-A

Photo by Tom Wearing

Meeting on tap to bring


pheasants back to area,
...see pages 6-B

CAPAC The village is one of 36 communities to receive a 2016


Recreation Passport grant
from the Michigan
Department of Natural
Resources
Capac will receive
$45,000 of the more than
$1.46 million awarded
last month. Funds for the
program come from the
sales of the states
Recreation Passport, the
$11 annual pass that
grants residents vehicle
entry at state parks and
recreation areas throughout Michigan.
We are very

Photo by Maria Brown

Bring them back

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

Almont Youth on Main Street (YOMS) members get into the holiday
spirit during last weekends Holly Day Light Parade activities downtown.

Page 2-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 4, 2017

Photo by Tom Wearing

Dispatch log...

Shelly and Ray Swain of Lum with cedar birdhouse crafted as a memorial to longtime Tri-City Times secretary Rosie Ruby.

In memory of Rosie
Lum couple delivers special gift to Times office
By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

IMLAYCITY In
the spirit of the season,
Arcadia Twp. resident Ray
Swain and his wife, Shelly,
stopped by the Tri-City
Times office this week with
a very special gift.
The gift was a hand-

made all-cedar bird house


presented to the Tri-City
Times in memory of Rosie
Ruby, the Times longtime
secretary.
Rosie, who passed
away on Oct. 10th, had
devoted her life to the community of Imlay City, and
to the local newspaper,
where she worked her

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entire adult life.


Like anyone and everyone who visited the TriCity Times offices, Swain
gained an affection for
Rosie.
For starters, they both
shared a unique love for the
Eastern Michigan Fair.
Ray spent many years
on the Eastern Michigan
Fair Board before announcing his retirement in
November.
And Rosies father,
Ken Ruby, served as the
Fair Manager during the
glory days.
Back in the day when
the Fair featured horse racing and music headliners
like Kenny Rogers, George
Jones and Tammy Wynette,
and numerous other marquee country music idols.
Though Ray has built
many birdhouses over the
years for charities, fundraisers, gifts and occasionally for profit, he considers
the one he crafted in Rosies
memory to be extra special.
Ijust wanted to do
something for Rosie, Ray
says. I just liked her so
much. She was one of a
kind.
And so, too, is Rays
birdhouse, which in the
spring will be firmly planted on the Tri-City Times
front lawn; right in front of
Rosies window.

December 30
a civil posting in the
3600 block of Miller Rd. in
Mussey Twp.
a citizen assist in the
530 block of N. Walker St.
in Capac
December 31
a vehicle in the ditch at
Tubspring and Capac roads
in Berlin Twp.
malicious destruction
of property in the 14000
block of Sullivan Rd. in
Mussey Twp.
January 1
a suspicious circumstance in the 15000 block of
W. Park St. in Capac
a trespassing complaint
in the 14000 block of
Tubspring Rd. in Berlin
Twp.
a structure fire in the
8400 block of Capac Rd. in
Lynn Twp.
a civil matter in the
16000 block of Almont Rd.
in Berlin Twp.
January 2
neighbor trouble in the
14000 block of Turner Rd.
in Lynn Twp.
report of a larceny in
the 5500 block of Miller
Rd. in Mussey Twp.

Gary Howell hosts office


hours Friday, January 6
By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

TRI-CITY AREA
State Rep. Gary Howell
will host monthly in-district office hours at two
locations on Friday, Jan. 6.
On that day, Howell
invites district residents to
join him for a legislative
update at the following
locations:
The Silver Grill, 535
N. Cedar St., Imlay City,
from 10:30 a.m. to noon.
Hungry Dan's, 195
W. Genesee St., Lapeer,
from 2:30 to 4 p.m.

CASH PAID
for Old Gold
WE BUY
Silver Coins

The
Legislature
passed a number of bills in
the past month, many of
which have an impact on
Lapeer County families,
Howell says.
I also welcome questions and suggestions concerning state and local government, so we can do a
better job of representing
you.
No appointment is nec-

essary. Those unable to


attend may contact Howell
at 517-373-1800, or by
email to GaryHowell@
house.mi.gov or by mail at
S-1186 House Office
Building, P.O. Box 30014,
Lansing, MI 48909.
For questions or further
information, contact the
House
Republican
Communications Manager
at 517-373-5070.

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December 28, 2016


Editors note: The following is a compilation of 06:46 Private Property
activity and reports from Damage Accident (1000
block Norlin Dr.)
area police departments:
12:16 Funeral Escort
(Muir Brothers Funeral
In Imlay City:
Home)
December 27, 2016
11:50 Warrant Arrest 12:59 Motorist Assist
(300 block E. Third St.)
(300 block E. Third St.)
11:56 Property Damage 15:03 Citizen Assist
Accident (E. Third St./Main (300 block E. Third St.)
20:15 Civil Dispute
St.)
13:39 Funeral Escort (1800 block S. Cedar St.)
(Muir Brothers Funeral 01:20 Welfare Check
(200 block W. Third St.)
Home)
14:16
Suspicious Multiple Traffic Stops
Vehicle (Blacks Corners throughout the day
Rd./Attica Rd.)
In St. Clair
14:38 Motorist Assist
County:
(1900 block Shagbark Ln.)
17:18
Suspicious Police and emergency
Circumstance (1700 block responders responded dispatch calls for:
S. Cedar St.)
December 29
18:58
Parking
Enforcement (400 block a welfare check in the
4400 block of Capac Rd. in
Colonial Dr.)
19:06
Property Mussey Twp.
Damage Accident (E. Capac a citizen assist in the
100 block of E. Church St.
Rd./N. Cedar St.)
20:24 Private Property in Capac
Accident (1900 block S. report of a harassment
call in the 16000 block of
Cedar St.)
00:20 Welfare Check Burt Rd. in Mussey Twp.
(600 block S. Almont Ave.) a suspicious circum 05:42 Medical Assist stance in the 16000 block of
(600 block Maple Vista St.) W. Park St. in Capac

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Tri-City Times
Published weekly by Delores Z. Heim. Office:
594 N. Almont Ave. P.O. Box 278, Imlay City,
MI 48444. USPS No. 014440. Additional entry
application pending.

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Subscriptions: $30 per year Lapeer & St.


Clair Counties; Out of Counties $32 per year,
Senior Citizens $27 per year In-County. Outof-State mailing $40 per year. Outside USA $60
per year. Single Copies 50.

172 N. Cedar (M-53), Imlay City


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Periodicals paid at Imlay City.


Postmaster please send address changes to
P.O. Box 278, Imlay City, MI 48444.

ShowcaSe SerieS SponSored

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Their music combines hot jazz, western swing
and American standards in a style reminiscent
of Stephane Grappelli and Django Reinhardt
and yet uniquely their own. Its members have
been musical ambassadors for the U.S. State
Department, played Lincoln Center and been
inducted into the Texas Western Swing Hall of
Fame.

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Page 3-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 4, 2017

DDA awards grants to


Imlay City businesses
By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

IMLAYCITY

Three more downtown


businesses have been
approved for matching
50/50 facade grants awarded through the Imlay City
Downtown Development
Authoritys Board of
Directors.
Those business awarded grant funding at the
DDA Boards December
meeting were: Heritage
Church: $1,500 for replacement of the sign at the
M-53 entrance; Doug
Halabicky-State
Farm
Insurance: $1,500 for a
new awning in front of
business; and Fourth Street
Antiques: $225 for a new
sign.
DDADirector Dana
Walker said business and
building owners within the
DDA District may apply
for grants of up to 50% of
eligible improvements up
to a maximum of $5,000.
Walker said the DDA

budgets about $13,000 for


facade grants during each
fiscal year.
The grant money is
awarded first come first
serve until the next budget
cycle, she said. The
board reviews any submitted facade grant applications at every monthly
meeting.
Grant objectives
Walker outlined the
facade grant programs
objectives as:
To improve/upgrade
vacant or underutilized
buildings to accommodate
new uses.
To enhance the unique
aesthetic appeal of downtown related to its architecture by encouraging the
rehabilitation of certified
historic structures.
To stimulate investment into district buildings
to increase the property
value and economic potential of participating properties.
To facilitate improvements that add value, are

consistent with the buildings architecture, and are


compatible with the downtown main street setting.
Walker noted that
funding amounts differ
depending on the type of
project.
The maximum grant
funding allowed is $1,500
for new signage, window
graphics, text or images for
awnings, marquees and
related lighting and electrical fixtures.
Grant eligibility
Projects eligible for
grant funding of up to
$2,500 include: repairs to
exterior facades, masonry
repair or cleaning; restoration, repair or replacement
of windows, doors, exterior walls, chimneys and
other architectural elements; exterior painting;
lighting not related to signage; exterior work necessary for conversion to a
retail or entertainment
store entry.
Listed among those
projects that are ineligible

Photo by Tom Wearing

Facade program gives boost to district storefronts

Nachos restaurant in downtown Imlay City has been the recipient of the
DDAs facade grant. The DDA just awarded facade grants to three more
businesses within the district.
for facade grant funds are:
roofing, additions to existing structures, furnishings
or equipment, and repairs
or additions of features not
compatible with a buildings original architecture.
Applicants may request
up to 50% or a maximum
of $500 for the cost of
architectural services. The
$500 gets counted in the
maximum grant money per
year of $2,500.
DDAs added value
Walker pointed out that
the purpose of the DDA is
more than just sponsoring
annual movies and con-

certs at Lamb-Steele Park


and coordinating many
popular downtown events.
Our purpose is also to
help our downtown businesses make improvements
and upgrades to their buildings, so they may thrive
and be successful, said
Walker. This is why our
DDA facade grant program
is so beneficial to participating business owners.
The program assists
with the costs of making
changes and upgrades,
she said. Our overall goal
is to help our business
owners increase their sales

and services, while maintaining the charm and


architectural flavor of the
downtown district.
Past facade grants have
been awarded to: Nachos,
Kellys Pet Salon, Duthler
Land Surveyor, The Print
Shop, Imlay City Florist,
Kittys Place and others.
For more information
about the Imlay City
DDAs facade grant program, call Dana Walker at
the DDAoffice at 810724-2135; send an email to
dwalker@imlaycity.org, or
visit the Imlay City DDA
website.

Sharkey, and more importantly, the duties of the


County
Prosecuting office.
Attorney's Office.
I especially like how
You also likely know frank and to the point he
that Mr. Kozma has had is. Just as important, I
both a criminal and civil believe he has the right
law practice here in Lapeer disposition to deal with
for the last 20 years, victims, the courts, the
Sharkey continued.
defense bar and the police.
I have gotten to know
Frankly, Sharkey
Mr. Kozma to be not only continued, he (Kozma) is
very
knowledgeable the complete package and
regarding the law, but that we are so lucky to have
he has the reasonable and him; consequently, I expect
fair minded disposition to hit the ground running
required for the position. and am looking forward to
He clearly under- working with him.
stands his role, said High profile cases

Kozma gained national


attention in 1993 for prosecuting Dr. Jack Kervorkian
for assisting in the suicide
of a 72-year-old woman
with Lou Gehrigs disease.
Following his 1999
conviction, Kervorkian
spent eight years in jail,
before being released in
June 2007.
News reports suggest
he may have helped more
than 100 people end their
lives through various
methods of assisted suicide.
He died in Royal Oak
Beaumont Hospital in June

of 2011, at the age of 83.


In 2011, Kozma was
the court-appointed attorney for Frank W. Choate,
the man charged with and
later found guilty of the
2006 murder of 86-yearold Marie Warren in
Deerfield Township.
Early in the trial,
Choate fired Kozma for
what was described as a
breakdown in their attorney-client relationship.
Choate was eventually
found guilty of all charges
and sentenced to life in
prison in November of
2012.

Sharkey picks Larry Kozma as his chief assistant

Attorney has extensive experience in high profile cases


By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

LAPEERNewlyelected Prosecutor Mike


Sharkey
has
named
Lawrence Larry Kozma
as Lapeer Countys next
chief assistant prosecutor.
An Oakland County
assistant prosecutor for 20
years, Kozma has in recent
years worked out of an
office on Court Street in
downtown Lapeer.
Both Sharkey and
Kozma officially assumed

their new positions on


January 1, 2017.
Sharkey informed the
Lapeer
County
Bar
Association of his choice
in a recent letter. Following
are some excerpts from
that letter.
I have appointed Larry
Kozma as the new Chief
Assistant
Prosecuting
Attorney, said Sharkey.
Most of you know Mr.
Kozma and all about his
prior experience as a Chief
Assistant
Prosecuting
Attorney in the Oakland

Generosity reigns in area communities


Donations, volunteers help make holidays bright for local families
By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

TRI-CITY AREA Were on Facebook!


Navigate your way to the Tri-City Times Facebook
page and become a follower. Well be posting frequent news updates, photos and event reminders.
You can find us at www.facebook.com/
Tricitytimes.

Your Local Agent


- for -

Auto
or
Home
Photo by Debbie Marquardt

LAPEER COUNTY
Making things merry
and bright for low-income
families in Lapeer County
is the aim of 40-plus volunteers with Holiday
Depot.
Thanks to the ongoing
generosity of the community, the organization
helped do just that for close
to 500 families for
Christmas 2016.
Debbie
Marquardt,
president and chairman of
the non-profit group, said
the response from the community this holiday season
was absolutely awesome.
We have a wonderful
county in which we live.
They like to donate because
its local, because the
money is used here. I think
that means a lot to a lot of
us, she said.
Holiday Depot volunteers main task to is to
match donors with needy
recipients. This year that
equated to pairing some 95
individuals, families, businesses and organizations
with the 500 families.
Some do cash donations. Many choose to
adopt a certain number of
families, providing gifts or
food or both. We have
many organizations that
just do food, she said.
Some donors give gift
cards to families so they
can do their own shopping.
We have a lot of organizations that collect personal
items. McLaren Hospital
dropped off their collection of hats and gloves.
Marquardt said the
need for assistance is still

Join Tri-City Times on Facebook

A shopper searches for toys at the Holiday Depot storefront location in


Lapeer. This holiday season, the organization helped 500 families.
great among the countys
residents but their group of
recipients was smaller this
year than in the past.
Marquardt said the
number fluctuates from
year-to year based on a
number of factors. When
the economy was poor,
more families were in need
of assistance but some
chose to move out of the
area for employment
opportunities. Marquardt
notes that the group continues to improve their outreach efforts and, as a
result, they are connecting
with more residents over-

all.
Each year we strive to
communicate more and
more to our low income
families through the
schools, newspapers and
now we have a Facebook
page, she said.
Starting in October,
volunteers start collecting
applications from families
in need. In the ensuing
weeks, barrels are distributed throughout the county
where donations can be
dropped.
New this year, the
Depot boasts a storefront
in downtown Lapeer that

allowed applicants to
shop for Christmas gifts,
choosing items collected
through the barrels.
This was the first year
we had a permanent location so we can meet people
here, Marquardt said.
In the past, we had to
pack up our stuff and put it
in storage for the following
year. Its so nice that we no
longer have to do that.
For more information
about Holiday Depot
including how to make
donations, contact them at
(810) 834-7507 or find
them on Facebook.

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Page 4-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 4, 2017

Parenting seminars upcoming at LCCMH


By Catherine Minolli
Tri-City Times Editor

TRI-CITY AREA
Winding your way through
the streets of parenthood,
with all of the twists and
turns, can be challenging
and sometimes daunting.
Parents have an opportunity to create a roadmap
through those streets as the
Childrens Department of
Lapeer
County
CommunityMental Health
(LCCMH) hosts monthly
parent education seminars
beginning this month.
An Open House to
kick off the series is slated

from 10-11 a.m. on


Monday, January 9. The
workshops will be held at
the Maple Grove Campus
at 2020 Imlay City Road
(Old M-21), east of M-24.
After that, each seminar
will be held on the second
Monday of the month at
the same location.
These seminars are
focused on parent growth
through education. They
are not intended as part of
court-ordered treatment or
community service, and
all participation is voluntary, says Amanda House
of LCCMH Childrens
Team.

Parents can come for


one month or all 12, its up
to them.
The January 9th Open
House will offer an overview of the program and
scheduled topics, and give
parents an opportunity to
ask questions and learn
about childrens social and
emotional needs, along
with tips for identifying
problems.
Upcoming
topics
include:
Taking Care of You!
Feb. 13.
Self-Injury
and
Cutting; March 13.
Learning
Coping

Skills; April 10.


What is Trauma? May
8.
Internet Safety; June
12.
Loss and Grief; July
10.
Positive Parenting;
August 14.
Addiction
and
Recovery; September 11.
Bullying; October 9.
Special Education;
November 13.
Anger Management;
December 11.
All interested parties
are welcome to attend one
or all of the seminars. Call
810-245-4900 to register.

I.C. Chamber
director vacancy
IMLAYCITY The deadline to file an application for the vacant Imlay City Chamber of
Commerce Directors position is Monday, Jan. 9.
The position requires strong administrative and
computer skills, along with a working knowledge
of social media, promotions and event planning.
Previous chamber of commerce experience is a
plus. The position pays an hourly rate, depending
on experience.
Resumes may be sent to: Imlay City Chamber
of Commerce, 150 N. Main St., Imlay City, MI
48444. Or drop off applications at the Imlay City
Offices at the same location.

Check out our website . . .


www.tricitytimes-online.com
Tri-City Times

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Page 5-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 4, 2017

Man, 21, perishes in January 1 crash


By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

LAPEERCOUNTY
The Lapeer County
Sheriffs Dept. reports a
fatal traffic crash on
Sunday, Jan. 1 at Otter
Lake Rd. and Oliver Rd. in
Deerfield Township
At 6:04 a.m., Lapeer
County 911 dispatched
Sheriffs deputies to an

injury traffic crash that


occurred on Otter Lake
Road west of Oliver Road
in Fostoria.
Deputies report that the
occupied vehicle erupted
into flames and became
fully engulfed in fire.
Investigators determined that the 21-year-old
man was eastbound on
Otter Lake Road, when the
motorist lost control and

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traveled across the westbound lanes. D e p u t i e s


say the victims 2000
Pontiac subsequently left
the north side of the roadway and went into a ditch.
Deputies believe there
were multiple rolls and
vaults before the vehicle
came to rest on its roof.
The resulting fire
reportedly consumed the
entire vehicle.

Firefighters
from
Deerfield Township extinguished the fire and extricated the deceased occupant.
Preliminary, the male
driver is reportedly from
Otter Lake. There were no
passengers.
Deputies report that
victims family has been
notified but the name is
being withheld until posi-

tive identification is completed by the Lapeer


County Medical Examiners
Office.
Preliminary investigation suggests that both
alcohol and excessive
speeds (55 MPH speed
limit) may have been contributing factors.
Lapeer County Sheriffs
Deputies were assisted at
the scene by Deerfield

Township Fire and Rescue,


Lapeer County EMS and
Michigan State Police
Troopers/Lapeer Post.
The fatal traffic crash
remains under investigation by the Lapeer County
Sheriffs Office.
Anyone with information is requested to contact
Detective Sgt. Jason Parks
at
810-656-1015
or
jparks@lapeercounty.org.

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Page 6-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 4, 2017

Opinion Page

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Letters from our readers...

Almont lost a truly remarkable man on Christmas Day

On Christmas Day the


Almont community lost a
remarkable manMorris
Buck Bannister.
Buck was the descendant of one of the founding
families of Almont. His
great-grandfather, Levi
Bannister, came from Erie
County, New York and
established a farm northeast of Almont in 1836
180 years ago.
Buck graduated from
Almont High School in
1945. He was the greatest
all-around male athlete to
graduate from Almont. He
was in the initial class of
inductees into the Almont
High School Sports Hall of
Fame. He earned 12 Varsity

lettersfour each in football, basketball, and baseball. He was named to the


Southern Thumb League
All-Star team in all three
sports both as a junior and
a senior.
As a senior, Buck led
the football team to an
undefeated league championship and an overall
record of seven wins, no
losses and one tie. He set
the school record for scoring in a season which still
stands25 touchdowns or
150 points.
Buck led the basketball
team to an undefeated
league championship, district championship, regional championship and into

Our Opinion
List helps keep elected
officials accountable

ith the dawning of a new year


and a seemingly endless election
cycle in the rearview mirror,
there are some significant changes in some
major roles in local government underway.
With new leaders in the Lapeer County law
enforcement community, the 10th
Congressional District and on a variety of
local school and municipal boards it can be
difficult to keep up.
But keeping up with the political and
governmental goings on is instrumental
when it comes to assuring that our elected
officials are doing what they were elected
to do; using their time responsibly and
expending their energy toward goals they
set on the campaign trail.
To help area readers out, weve updated
our lists of contacts in local government
and beyond. Residents interested in contacting their representative and/or elected
official to address concerns, to bring up
issues or to attend a municipal meeting can
easily do so by referring to the contact list
printed in this issue on page 13-A, and
posted year round, 24/7 on our website at
www.tricitytimes-online.com.
This is yet another valued service were
proud to provide in our hyper-local pages
and in the digital sphere. As always, TriCity Times aims to be your hometown
newspaper, today and always. Heres to a
great start for all in 2017!

the quarterfinals of the state


basketball tournament. He
set records for scoring in a
season and for a career.
Only Larry Kersten has
exceeded his career point
total.
Buck caught and

pitched the baseball team


to an undefeated league
championship and an overall record of 10 wins and
two losses. He battled at
over a .300 clip and hit two
home runsone of them
was a grand slam. His

pitching record was six


wins and no losses. He
averaged over 12 strikeouts
per game and only allowed
an average of three hits per
game. He threw a no-hitter
against Imlay Citya
game in which there was

only one hit.


Buck was a remarkable
man. He was a great husband, father, grandfather
and great-grandfather. He
will be greatly missed.
James R. Wade, Sr.
Dryden

Preliminary reports by
the Michigan State Police
(MSP) show six people lost
their lives in six separate
traffic crashes during the
2016 Operation C.A.R.E.
(Combined
Accident
Reduction Effort) Lifesaver
Weekend. In comparison,
three people died in traffic
crashes during the 2015 initiative.
The 2016 Operation

C.A.R.E. Lifesaver Weekend ran from 6 p.m. on


Friday, December 16,
through 11:59 p.m., on
Monday, December 19,
2016. These preliminary
numbers only reflect fatalities reported to the MSP as
of 1 p.m. Tuesday, December 27, 2016.
Initiatives like this aim
to reduce injuries and fatalities resulting from crashes

caused by dangerous driving


behaviors. The MSP continues to urge motorists to not
drink and drive, to always
use proper restraints and to
avoid all distractions.
Operation
C.A.R.E.
began in 1977 as a collaborative effort between the MSP
and the Indiana State Police
and is one of the nation's
longest-running traffic safety initiatives. Today, it

includes state and highway


patrol agencies from all 50
states, the District of
Columbia, American Samoa,
Guam, Puerto Rico, the
Royal Canadian Mounted
Police, Ontario Provincial
Police, Quebec Police Force
and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
Capt. Thomas Deasy
Commander
MSP Training Division
Lansing

Operation C.A.R.E. aims to reduce crashes

Some progress begun in improving state roads


With the Michigan
transportation package taking effect this weekend,
Michigans 83 county road
commissions and road
departments are cautiously
optimistic that they will
begin to make modest
progress improving road
conditions across the state.
With fewer than 18 percent
of Michigans federal-aid
eligible roads in good conditionand the local road
system in even worse shape
restoring the roads is a
tall order.
Knowing that increased
state support for roads was
coming, and with passage
of the federal transportation bill achieved in late
2015, Michigans county
road agencies have been
able to develop longerhorizon plans for restoring
the infrastructure. The
availability of local match
dollars is another dynamic
factor involved in making
such plans.
The new road revenues
taking effect January 1,
2017, are the first increase
in state road funding in 20
years and include:
A 7.3 cent increase in
state gas tax to 26.3 cents,
all
of
which
is
Constitutionally-dedicated
to
the
Michigan
Transportation Fund (MTF)
(Note: Michigan also levies sales tax at the pump,

which most states do not;


these taxes do not go into
the MTF.);
A 20 percent increase
in registration fees for passenger vehicles and most
commercial trucks, all of
which is Constitutionallydedicated to the MTF;
An increase in tax on
diesel fuel, bringing it
equal with the state gas tax
on fuel at 26.3 cents, and
Constitutionally-dedicated
to the MTF; and
New taxes on alternative fuels and registration
surcharges on electric vehicles.
The three main categories of fee and tax increases
taking effect with the New
Year are the gas tax increase
which is expected to generate $236 million in new
funds in 2017; vehicle registration fee increases
expected to generate $155
million in new funds in
2017; and the diesel parity
increase, which is expected
to generate $69 million in
2017. Altogether, an estimated $460 million of new
monies will be directed to
Michigan roads and bridges by the end of calendar
2017.
County road agencies
are working with their
townships and communities to prioritize the limited
funds for needed work on
roads, bridges and right-of-

way issues such as drainage. Some new work will


occur this summer, but
CRA cautions that it will be
many years before county
road agencies can work on
all of the roads in a county.
Costs to resurface a
mile of road range from
$110,000-$200,000 per
mile; reconstruction costs
are likely to be higher.
Michigan has 120,000
miles of roads90,000
miles under county road
agency controland 5,700
local bridges. It is the
nations fourth-largest local

road network.
The 83 members of the
County Road Association
represent the unified credible and effective voice for a
safe and efficient local road
system in Michigan, collectively managing more
than 73 percent of all roads
in the state-more than
90,000 miles and 5,700
bridges-the fourth-largest
county road system in the
nation.
Denise Donohue
County Road
Association of Michigan
Lansing

Well, 2016 is now


behind us. It has been an
interesting year with many
ups and downs. What I have
come to realize in my short
time here is just how genuine the people are. Neighbors
that truly look out for one
another. How everyone
comes together when someone is in need.
This community has a won-

derful quality of life and I


can understand why someone would want to live here
and raise a family here. I
thank you for welcoming
me into your community; I
hope to be your Chief of
Police for a long time to
come.
Happy New Year!
Scott Pike
Police Chief, Imlay City

Chief glad to be in Imlay City

Capac Food Pantry grateful

We at the Capac
Community Food Pantry
want to thank all the organizations, schools and
individuals who have
given their time and generosity to us throughout the
year.

We couldnt do what
we do without all of you.
Bless you all from the bottom of our hearts.
Sincerely,
Capac Community
Food Pantry
Capac

y dad was right.


I couldnt see it
then because I was hyperfocused on becoming an
adult and on all of the
perks associated therewith.
Staying up late. Doing as
you please. Stopping off
for a cocktail with friends.
Being
out from
under the
thumb of
parental
control.
I
was a kid
who
wished
time
away.
used
Dad
to tell me
to be
patient and enjoy exactly
where I was at, because
soon enough it would all
go by so quickly.
Yah. Right. I felt like a
little grown-up in 12-yearold skin. Iwas thirsty for
real life adventure; to test
my all-knowing bravado in
the adult world. Freedom
was calling, loud and clear.
I couldnt wait to be
16! That meant a few more
privileges in the Minolli
household, not the least of
which was being allowed
to date. And by date,
they meant maybe seeing a

..

boy once a week or so,


mostly at the family home.
Driving was also in the
realm of possibility then,
though at the time Iwasnt
too interested in getting
behind the wheel.
When 16 came I could
not wait to be 18 because
where I come from, at that
age you were a full fledged
adult. While it meant a lot
more freedom to come and
go, it also meant paying
rent (if we still lived at
home) and working full
time and/or going to
school. As long as we were
under the Minolli roof,
there was no slacking
allowed once we cleared
high school and reached
that magical age.
When I finally made it,
the legal drinking age was
18 as well. It was the feel
good, Im-okay-youreokay 70s, and in the wake
of the Vietnam war and all
the young lives lost, lawmakers obviously concluded that if you were old
enough to vote, and to get
drafted off to war and die,
the privilege of legally
consuming alcohol should
apply as well. It was a
grand experiment, and still
holds so much irony about
when one is capable of
making mature choicesbut thats another

column for another time.


Once the 18 mark
came and went, I couldnt
wait to turn 21. Why?
Well, the 18-year-oldlegal-drinking-age experiment was a major fail, and
the very year I marked the
magical two-one, it reverted back to 21. I was indeed
born under a lucky star.
Not that life revolved
around consuming alcohol;
but to be legally viewed as
an adult for the past three
years and to have those
legal rights continue uninterrupted was a good thing.
After that, I didnt
wish time away so much.
Being an adult wasnt all I
dreamed up in my head. It
wasnt horrible, no, not at
all, but I began to slowly
understand that the childhood years are the ones to
cherishthose halcyon
days where time stretched
out in front of me like an
endless ribbon, where the
clock ticked slowly and the
greatest concern was what
Id wear to school that day
or whether Id be allowed
to ride my bike to
Northville with my friends.
Dad was right. Being a
kid, as frustrating and confounding and irrational and
mercurial as it is, is definitely a magical time that
perhaps can only be trea-

Photo by Frank Minolli

May Father Time be generous to all

The Minolli girls dressed in Sunday best before going to mass in


Charlevoix, where we spent an idyllic week (the kids did, anyway) on
vacation each August. Hindsight is 20/20 when it comes to appreciating
the blessings of being a child.
sured through the rosy lens
of hindsight.
I have come to appreciate the time I have. I still
catch myself saying things
like I cant wait until winter is over, or I cant
wait to get past that
appointment or whatnot.
Its a challenge to not wish
time away, to be perfectly

content right here, right


now...just like my dad used
to say. Go figure!
As another year on
speed dial passes, my wish
is to slow down enough to
savor what is right in front
of me, all the time, 24/7,
and to make time to share
the messy, miraculous,
beautiful, mysterious, enig-

matic and wistfully bittersweet joys of this earthly


life with those I love and
care about.
I wish everyone the
gift of time filled with
peace, laughter, and abundant love in 2017.
Email Catherine at
cminolli@pageone-inc.
com.

Page 7-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 4, 2017

ts a small world. Last


year I wrote a column
about restaurants that featured the McLean Family
Restaurant here in
McLean, Virginia. Audrey
and Robert Markwart, 89
and 93 years young respectively, who still live on the
180 acre family farm near
Capac, read
All the Liblong day.. it and called
their son,
Luther, to
tell him
about it. I
remember
the
Markwart
family from
Rick
Liblong high school
days.
Luther, it
turns out, lives with his
wife, Terri, and three kids,
Christian, Lauren and
Megan, in McLean and
knew the restaurant well!
He emailed me and we
reconnected after all these
years for lunchat
McLean Family, of course.
Luther, a 1973 graduate of Capac High and also
Michigan State University
alum, grew up on the sugarbeet farm that his family
has owned since 1921.
In his youth, Luther, along
with each of his siblings,
helped with dairy cows
and had an acre of sugar-

beets that was his to take


care of, which consisted
mainly of hoeing weeds in
the hot sun. It was a 4-H
project for the kids but
also put money in their
college funds. There was
no debt for Luther upon
graduation from MSU.
He told me how hard
the work was and said, I
wanted nothing to do with
cows or agriculture when I
grew older. So his degree
is in Business
Administration. He went
to work as a salesman for
Noxell Corporation, makers of shaving cream, skin
cream and Cover Girl cosmetics, with a territory that
stretched from Detroit to
Sault Saint Marie.
I got bored after a
year and a half, he said.
So he took the Dale
Carnegie Course in Flint
and it changed his life.
With greater skills and
confidence he went to
work for who else? The
Michigan - Ohio sugarbeet
growers, of course! Only
now he didnt have to
grow the beets himself. He
worked in government and
public relations and helped
with the 4-H and Future
Farmers of America programs.
In 1982, he became the
Executive Vice President

Luther works with


Republicans
and
Democrats. Here he is
with Vice President
Dick Cheney.
of the American Sugarbeet
Growers Association in
Washington D.C., a position he still holds. The
ASGA represents all
10,000 family farm sugarbeet growers in 11 states,
including Michigan, where
growers produce more that
4 million tons of the commodity annually.
Their website says:
The purpose of the organization is to unite sugarbeet growers in the United
States and promote the
common interest of state
and regional beet grower
associations, which include
legislative and international representation and public relations.
Associations, by the
way, are some of the largest employers in the
nations capital. Every

Idaho sugerbeet farmer at harvest time.

Photo provided

group or industry of any


size probably has an association representing them.
Luther explained to me
that, Political people and
policy makers dont know
your business but will
make laws and regulations
that will impact every
aspect of your business.
We explain to these people
what the impact or consequence of their action will
be.
Most people, he
says, think lobbyists are
here to pressure Congress
to spend money that
doesnt need to be spent.
Not true. Lobbyists are
more educators than anything else. We also serve
as connectors to other people or groups who may
have an impact on business. Sort of like the old
telephone operator, we can
connect one group to
another to get answers to
questions. It can get very
complicated.
This same process happens at the state and local
levels of government as
well.
The people at ASGA
monitor any proposed bill
in Congress that might
affect the growers. Bills
can get very complicated
with page after page of
details. This may include
farm policy, trade (both
here and abroad), appropriations, biotech, health policy and anything else that
could be of interest to sugarbeet growers. They also
work with other commodities as well because some
issues effect all farmers
across the nation.
Needless to say, Luther
and his team work with
both sides of the aisle,
Republicans and
Democrats alike. For
example, Michigan
Democratic U.S. Senator
Debbie Stabenow is the
ranking member (minority)
on the Senate Agriculture
Committee and has a lot of
sway on the formulation of

Dining like a king and queen in Imlay City

y husband and I
wanted to celebrate
the New Year with a local
Mulefoot meal. Id heard
good reviews of the restaurants new venue in downtown Imlay City and invited old friends to join us.
Yolanda called New
Years Eve morning. Im
sorry, she croaked, but
we cant make dinner
tonight. Well take a rain
check for when Im feeling
better.
We were sorry, too.
Yolanda and Art are fun
people, perfect companions
for dining out. But Mel and
I had waited two years for
another Mulefoot experience. After my efforts to
find alternates failed, I
called the restaurant and
amended our reservation to
two.
The hostess led our
hearty appetites to a little
table at 4:30 p.m. sharp.
Your server will be right
with you.
We took in the simple
ambience of the high tin
ceiling, mammoth artwork

hung on painted brick walls,


and an open kitchen where
the chef and sous chefs prepared orders in discreet
seamless motion. Mike, the
owner and chef, served
plates to folk at the bar.
It was good to be back
to homegrown.
Honest Living . . .
Logan
introduced
herself and
explained
our menu
options. I
was relieved

to see the
Mulefoot

Gastropub
retained the
First, Second, and Third
Course model.
May I suggest the Oxtail
Poutine for your first
course? Our guests love it,
Logan said.
Our tableside culinary
lessons began. Oxtail
Poutine is far from Moms
oxtail soup. It combines
braised oxtail with roasted
onions and pickled scapes
poured over hand-cut

French fries. Mom


wouldve loved it.
We consumed every
crunchy scape. I shall pickle and serve my garlic
scapes on French fries this
summer. Thanks, Mike.
With the second course
we learned Logan comes
from a farm family near
Emmett and studies at U of
M Flint. Mels filet mignon
with Bourbon vanilla sweet
potatoes was cooked to
perfection. Wed never
tasted a sweet potato that
divine. Now he believes in
the yams potential.
My fried rabbit surprised
me. I didnt expect bones.
The crispy breading and
succulent pink meat were
worth the knife work.
Truly, dinner at The
Mulefoot is a rustic and
artistic feast.
Dessert lovers, Mel and
I mused over our four
options. He ordered the
apple cobbler with warm
butterscotch. An exquisite
floral note in the butterscotch sauce provoked
regret for the goat cheese

cheesecake plated before


me. Sometimes ordering
bold backfires.
I didnt mention this to
Logan when she returned
with our coffee: medium
roast for Mel, dark for me.
By then she had become
our friend, a young girl
devoted to earning her
Physicians Assistant
degree by the want within
her soul.
Dear Reader, Logans
sublime cup of coffee
crowned our meal as none
other Ive ever sipped.
Perhaps it was her conscientious service, her
patience with two grayheaded mates who crave
pure food and congenial
company.
This I know. If Michael
Romine had not wanted to
be a chef, if he did not pay
the price everyday to operate The Mulefoot
Gastropub, we would not
have met Logan. We would
not dine in Imlay City like
a king and queen.
Email Iris at
irisleeu@sbcglobal.net.

By Tom Wearing

plans for the annual Imlay


City Chamber of Commerce
Dinner Dance.
This years gala event
takes place Saturday, Jan.
21, 2017 from 6 p.m. to
midnight at the Imlay
City Knights of Columbus
Hall, 1405 N.Van Dyke
Rd.

The evening is traditionally reserved for the


Chamber to honor its annual Imlay City Citizen of the
Year, Merit Award recipient, and Organization of the
Year.
Attendees will be treated to appetizers, dinner,
desert and a cash bar serv-

ing beer and wine.


Entertainment will be
provided by a comedian/
ventriloquist and a D.J. for
dancing.
For questions, tickets
or more information, contact the Imlay City Chamber
of Commerce office at 810724-1361.

I.C. Chamber gala set for January 21


Tri-City Times Staff Writer

IMLAYCITY

When you catch a break


from shoveling snow and
holiday shopping, theres
one more thing to add to
your to-do list.
Its time again to make

Letters, opinions welcome

Were always pleased when readers take the time to share their opinions with us. Were bolstered by the diversity of opinions that make our editorial pages consistently judged winners by the Michigan Press Association each year. We welcome
feedback, letters, guest columns, complaints, praise, opinionsthe whole gamut.
However, were unable to share some of the input we receive because it is sent anonymously and therefore we cant confirm
the source. As always, names will be withheld upon request, but all letters, guest columns, opinions, etc. for the editorial pages
must include a name and contact information for verification purposes. If there are any questions or the material is deemed
inappropriate, the writer will be notified or the letter will simply not be published. But if you have an opinion thats strong
enough to write about, please provide the contact information so others can consider it, too. We want to hear from you. Write
to the editor at P.O. Box 278, Imlay City, MI 48444 or send an email to tct@pageone-inc.com.

Photo provided

Capac lobbyist is really an educator

1973 Capac grad Luther Markwart (left) shakes


hands with President Bill Clinton.
legislation. The 20-member committee is chaired
by Republican Sen. Pat
Roberts of Kansas.
The House Committee is
chaired by Rep. Michael
Conaway (R-TX). Rep.
John Moolenaar, Michigan
Republican, is on the committee.
The 115th Congress
convened yesterday here in
Washington and ASGA
folks will spend many,
many hours with members
of Congress and their staff
people educating them on
how each proposal will
impact the growers in their
state and around the world.
We are not allowed to
give any gifts of any value,
including lunches, says
Markwart. We give them
a plastic pen that has a
miniature white sugarbeet
floating in it, because most
people confuse them with
red beets. He gave me
one. Its a cute pen but it
would not be enough to
swing my vote one way or
the other.
Sugarbeet prices
today are about the same
as they were during the
Jimmy Carter
Administration so our
work is even more important. I love every minute of
it, but must admit, that

The sugarbeet makes


the world a little sweeter.
there can be too many
minutes to love. Ive just
hired a young man who is
eager and knowledgeable
to help us. That will bring
the total staff to four.
It was great to see
Luther again and really
interesting that he shared
what its really like to be
one of those nameless
lobbyists.
So the next time you
hear the word lobbyist,
remember what their role
really is: to educate, not
always pressure policy
makers. Thanks, Luther,
Robert, Audrey and all of
the sugarbeet growers, for
all you do to make this
world sweeter.
Email Rick at
rick.liblong@cox.net.

Academic All-Star
Madison Fricko

Senior ~ Imlay City High School


Madison is the daughter of
John and Sue Fricko.
She has a 4.0 GPA.
Madison participates in FFA
and is a member of the Eastern
Michigan State Fair board.
Her best memory from high
school will be participating in
the national floral team for FFA.
Madison envisions a successful life for her to
include owning and managing her own life.
One thing on her bucket list is to visit a national
park.
Madisons best day ever would be spent showing
pigs at the fair.
If she had $1,000 to give to any cause, she would
give it to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation
because someone Im close to had it and I know
how this disease affects people and families.
Her plans for the future include attending Macomb
Community College.

Academic All-Star
Bryanna Walla

Senior ~ Imlay City High School


Bryanna is the daughter of
Brian and Michelle Walla.
She has a 4.0 GPA.
Bryanna participates in Skills
USA, sits on the class council,
is a member of the National
Honor Society and National
Technical Honor Society.
Her best memory from high school will be planning
her junior prom with class council.
Bryanna envisions a successful life for her to
include having a job Ilove and enjoy, being surrounded by people who provide love, compassion
and happiness and being able to give back to the
world that has given so much to me.
One thing on her bucket list is to travel to all 50
states.
Bryannas best day ever would be spent having an
endless amount of money so she could shop till I
drop.
If she had $1,000 to give to any cause, she would
give it to the Make-A-Wish Foundation because it
provides happiness and a sense of hope to children
with life-threatening illnesses and makes a difference
in the lives of those who helped the wish come true.
Her plans for the future include studying elementary education at Saginaw Valley State University on
her way towards earning a bachelors degree.

Page 8-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 4, 2017

By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

Photo provided

IMLAY CITY
Students and staff at Weston
Elementary School are utilizing important new tools
in their classroom thanks to

the efforts of the schools


Parent Teacher Organization
(PTO).
Every year, parents and
teachers team up to work
together on various projects
and events but this school
year their goals were espe-

Second grade teacher Trina Byerley uses her


new classroom document camera to help students learn about locations on a map.

cially grand.
Last school year
(2015-2016), the fundraisers that helped raise money,
at Weston, were so successful that even after helping
sponsor students for field
trips, host special events
throughout the school year,
sponsor several evening
nights for students and families, and provide fun
assemblies for all students,
the PTO was able to use the
excess funds and what was
raised this year in the annual Cookie Dough fundraiser, to purchase document
cameras for Weston teachers, said Dr. Dina Tallis,
Director of Elementary
Education for Imlay City
Schools.
Weston Principal Devon
Caudill noted how much
teachers and students appreciated the cameras already

in use in three classrooms,


she made the suggestion
that purchasing more document cameras would be a
good investment.
PTO members agreed
and voted unanimously to
help.
It has been exciting to
see the increased level of
engagement with classrooms with the use of the
document
cameras,
Caudill said.
Tallis added that the
PTO
is
hoping
to
have additional funds
this year to purchase additional cameras for specialists and resource room
teachers.
For more information
about the Weston PTO, contact the school office at
724-9812 or plan to attend
their next meeting on
January 18 at 4 p.m.

Photo provided

PTO provides new tools for classroom

Thanks to the hard work of PTOmembers, all


Weston classrooms are now equipped with
document cameras.

Photo by ?????????

Lapeer historians
host Show & Tell

Signing ceremony
Lt. Gov. Brian Calley on Dec. 28 signed legislation sponsored by Sen.
Phil Pavlov R-St. Clair Twp. (fifth from right) that prohibits profiteering
from the sale of aborted baby parts. Senate Bills 564 and 565, now
Public Acts 386 and 387 of 2016, prevent abortion providers from
receiving any financial compensation for the transfer of fetal tissue
resulting from elective abortions and outline the maximum penalties
for doing so.

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P.O. Box 278 594 N. Almont Ave. Imlay City, MI 48444


(810) 724-0254 FAX (810) 724-8552

LAPEER COUNTY
The Lapeer County
Historical Society will host
a Show and Tell lunch on
Thursday, Jan. 12.
The special event
begins at noon at the Lapeer
Center, 425 County Center
St.
Attendees are encouraged to bring along a family heirloom or artifact to
share its story and show to
others.
Lunch is $10, to include
a menu of Michigan bean
soup with ham; bread and
rolls baked in-house by Our
Daily Bread, a relish tray
and dessert.
Reservations
are
required for those wishing
to partake in lunch.

To reserve a spot, call


Karen Deming at 810-2458386 or Genni Dorr at 810664-5648.

The mailing address for


the
Lapeer
County
Historical Society is: P.O.
Box 72, Lapeer, MI 48446.

Wake-Up Almont breakfast


ALMONT The Almont Chamber of Commerce
hosts another Wake-Up With Almont networkinig
breakfast Thursday, Jan. 12 from 7:30-8:30 a.m. at the
Almont Lions Hall at 222 Water Street.
Attendees will be eligible for door prizes and
opportunities to network with other Almont business
owners. A light breakfast will be provided by Marias
Place of Almont.
The Jan. 12 gathering will serve as an annual
membership meeting to solicit ideas and make plans
for the upcoming year.
For more information, contact any Chamber Board
member or visit: www.almontchamber.com.

Obituaries
~ Paul Hoisington, 84 ~
Paul Hoisington, age
84, of Imlay City, died
Tuesday, January 3, 2017
at Medilodge of
Richmond.
Paul Eugene Hoisington
was born March 29, 1932
in Detroit. He is the son of
the late Harry Eugene and
the late Evisia Mae
(Bartles) Hoisington. He
grew up in Detroit and is a
1951 graduate of
Southeastern High School.
He served in the
United States Air Force
during the Korean War
from 1952 until 1956.
Paul married Betty
Lou Holme on January 31,
1953 in Detroit. They
moved to the Imlay City
area in 1967. He was predeceased by his wife,
Betty Lou on February 4,
2014.

He was employed by
Tri-City Times in Imlay
City as an advertising
salesman before retiring
from there. He worked 13
years as Lapeer County
Commissioner. Early on,
Paul was employed as a
supervisor for Park Davis
Pharmaceutical in Detroit
until 1967 before moving
on to work at Ferndale
Labs as a pharmaceutical
sales representative.
Paul was very active in
the community. He spent
years as the announcer for
the Imlay City High
School football games, he
was a member of the
Imlay City and Attica
F&AM Masonic Lodges,
Imlay City VFW, Imlay
City American Legion, and
was a founding member of
the Imlay City Athletic

Boosters.
He is survived by three
sons, Christopher
(Rhonda) Hoisington of
Imlay City, Douglas
(Debra) Hoisington of
Clinton Twp. and Mark
Hoisington of Port Huron;
two brothers, John Jack
Hoisington of Prudenville
and Robert (Linda)
Hoisington of Harbor
Springs; daughter-in-law,
Janice Ferrier Hoisington
of Imlay City; 14 grandchildren; and many greatgrandchildren.
Paul was preceded in
death by his wife, Betty
Lou Hoisington; son,
Joseph Hoisington; brother, William Hoisington;
and his sister, Jane
Hoisington-Neil.
A funeral service will
be held 1:00 p.m.,

Saturday, January 7, at
Muir Brothers Funeral
Home of Imlay City, 225
N. Main Street, Imlay City.
Rev. Ron Kersten will officiate. Interment will be in
Imlay Township Cemetery.
The family will be
available for visitation 2-5
and 7-9 p.m., Friday,
January 6 and 11-1 p.m.,
Saturday, January 7 at
Muir Brothers Funeral
Home of Imlay City. A
5:00 p.m. Masonic service
and a 7:15 p.m. Veterans
Salute will take place on
Friday, January 6th.
Funeral arrangements
were made by Muir
Brothers Funeral Home,
225 N. Main Street, Imlay
City, MI. Please be sure to
sign our on-line register
book
muirbrothersfh.com

~ Robert Dragomon, 87 ~
Robert Dragomon, age
87, of Imlay City, died
Sunday, January 1, 2017 at
Wellbridge of Romeo. Mr.
Dragomon was born
October 10, 1929 in
Detroit. He is the son of
the late Alexander and the
late Margaret (Prosser)
Dragomon.
He grew up and lived
all of his life in Imlay City
on the family farm. He is a
1948 graduate of Imlay

City High School.


He was employed by
Farm Bureau, MMPA. He
was a self-employed dairy
farmer, working hard on
the family farm.
Robert is survived by
his sister, Eleanor Dahn;
three nephews, David
Glassford of Capac, Daniel
(Lisa) Glassford of Capac
and Herbert Dahn; and two
great nieces, Margaret
Glassford and Emily

Glassford.
He was preceded in
death by his parents,
Alexander and Margaret
Dragomon; three sisters,
Victoria Dragomon,
Florence Glassford, and
Helen Romberger; and
three brothers, Alexander
(Anna) Dragomon, George
Dragomon and Albert
Dragomon.
A funeral service will
be held 11:00 a.m.,

Thursday, January 5 at
Muir Brothers Funeral
Home of Imlay City, 225
N. Main Street, Imlay City,
MI. Jerry Schriber will
officiate. Interment will be
in Imlay Township
Cemetery, Imlay City.
The family will be
available for visitation
10-11 a.m., Thursday,
January 5 at Muir Brothers
Funeral Home of Imlay
City.

To share one of these obituaries with a friend or a loved-one


VISIT US ONLINE AT:

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Page 9-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 4, 2017

By Tom Wearing

non-refundable
collection agency fee.
Upcoming activities
Aldrich notes that a
new monthly book club,
Book Buzz, is being
formed for avid readers in
grades 4-6.
The after-school book
club meets on Monday, Jan.
9 and Monday, Feb. 6; both
at 4 p.m.
Each month club members will select a new book
to read and talk over the
one from the previous
month.
All you need to bring
is a positive attitude and a
love for reading, says
Aldrich. Well provide the
rest.
Family Trivia Night
On Wednesday, Jan. 25,
the Ruth Hughes Library
will host Quizzical Family
Trivia Night.
The library invites
know-it-alls of all ages to
put their knowledge to the
test.
Groups of four or fewer
can form a team, name it,
and compete against other
teams for a prize and brainiac bragging rights.
Library auction on tap
Be sure to mark your
calendars for the dates of

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

I M L AY C I T Y
After closing for the holidays, the new year brings a
flurry of activities at the
Ruth Hughes Memorial
District Library.
New Saturday hours
There is one notable
change. Beginning on
Saturday, Jan. 7, Saturday
hours will experience a
slight change.
The librarys new
Saturday open hours will
run from 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Fine Forgiveness Day
Those with past-due
books or materials can take
advantage
of
Fine
Forgiveness Day on
Thursday, Jan. 5 to return
those articles.
Library Director Tracy
Aldrich says the program
allows everyone to get off
to a fresh start for the new
year.
Call or stop in anytime
during regular library hours
to clear overdue fines from
your
account,
says
Aldrich. Items must first
be returned.
She adds that the program does not cover fees
for lost or damaged items,
nor does it cover the $10

Feb. 1-8, when the Ruth


Hughes Library hosts its
annual Silent Auction
Fundraiser.
Aldrich
says
the
Auction is a perfect opportunity to find a Valentines
gift for a friend, relative or
special someone.
At the same time, auction attendees will be sharing their love and support
for their local library.
Aldrich says the library
is currently accepting donations of new items for the
auction,
to
include:
antiques, themed baskets,
gift certificates or services.
Please consider a donation to help support our
library, she says. And
stop by often to bid on your
favorite items.
The Silent Auction officially ends at closing time
on Wednesday, Feb. 8.
Winners will be announced
the following day.
The Ruth Hughes
Memorial District Library
is located at 211 N. Almont
Ave. in downtown Imlay
City.
For questions or information, call the library at
810-724-8043, or visit the
website at:
www.ruthhughes.org.

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Town Talk
Editors note: Due to space
constraints announcements
will be posted one week in
advance of the event. Notices
must be received in writing by
noon Monday prior to the publication date.

For Senior Citizens


Gentle Yoga Tuesdays from
9-10
a.m.
at
First
Congregational Church in
Almont. Practice led by Dina
Miramonti, RYT.
Imlay City Senior Center
Texas Hold Em 12:30 p.m.
For info 810-724-6030.
Dinner and an evening of card
playing with friends, 50/50
raffle and prizes of high and
low for each table every 3rd
Monday at the Washington
Senior Center, 57880 Van
Dyke, Washington Twp., MI
48094, from 4-8 p.m. Call for
further details, 586-752-6543.
Swing Dance Lessons offered
at the Port Huron Senior
Center, 600 Grand Avenue in
Port Huron, every Tues. from
7:30-9 p.m. and the 1st and
3rd Thurs. of the month from
7:30-9 p.m. with instructors
Lyle Malaski & Kristina
Morton. Call 810-984-5061
for more info.
Council on Aging Membership
is open to individuals 18 and
older. The Capac Senior
Center is open 8:30 a.m.-4:30
p.m. weekdays. We offer a
variety of activities such as
fitness and craft classes, a
book review group, cards and
bus trips. Call Lori at 3957889 for more info.
Almont and Dryden area
senior citizens meet the 2nd
Tuesday of the month at 12
p.m. at the Almont Lions Hall,
222 Water St., for a potluck
and program. Call 798-8210
for more info.
Adults 55 and over are invited
to Berlin Twp. Senior Center
to play cards from noon-3
p.m. the 2nd Wednesday of

every month. Bring a sack


lunch, beverages provided.
Senior stretch exercise on
Tuesdays 10-11 a.m. Potluck
luncheons will be served the
4th Tuesday of every month at
noon. Call 810-395-4518 for
details.
Ryan Smith, a certified alcohol and drug counselor will be
available at the Imlay City
Seniors Center on the 4th
Thursday of every month
from 9 a.m.-12 p.m.

Free Meals, Food


St. Pauls Lutheran Church
Food for Families kitchen is
open to the public for free, hot
meals every Monday and
Wednesday from 4-5:30 p.m.
This Heart Loves Food Pantry
is open the 1st Saturday of
each month from 9 a.m.-3
p.m. at Gateway Assembly
Church, 2796 S. Van Dyke
Rd., Imlay City.
Dryden Area Food For
Families free dinner is served
on the 2nd Tuesday of each
month from 4:30-6 p.m. at St.
Cornelius Church, 3834 Mill
Street. No proof of income is
required. Come and enjoy a
home cooked meal with us.
The Attica United Methodist
Church will be holding a free
community meal on the 2nd
and 4th Tuesday of each
month from 4:30-6:30 p.m.
For more info please call 810724-0690 or visit www.atticaumc.org.
The Attica Food Bank at the
Attica United Methodist
Church, 27 Elk Lake Rd., is
open from 2-4 p.m. the 2nd
and 4th Monday of each
month. Proof of residency
and need required.
The Capac Community Food
Pantry, 114 S. Main Street, is
open each Wednesday from
1-3 p.m. Please call LOVE,
INC. at 810-245-2414 in
advance to ensure your food

AFFORDABLE INDEPENDENT LIVING APARTMENTS WITH:

3 Nutritious Meals Daily


Compimentary Satellite TV
Life-enriching Activities

Light Housekeeping
Health Services
Available

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voucher will be received


before you stop in to shop.
Any questions, please call
Sherrie Cramton at 810-3951905.
The Capac Kitchen serves
free meals every Tuesday
from 4:30-6 p.m. at Zion
United Methodist Church.
Free meals for people in need
are offered at the North
Branch Senior Center on
Monday and Thursday evenings from 5:30-7 p.m. Call
810-441-0322 for more info.
Orchards Cupboard Food
Pantry is open the 3rd
Saturday of every month 9
a.m.-noon. Food distributed
at 74903 McKay Rd., Bruce
Twp., 586-336-4673. www.
orchardsonline.org.

Museums
The Dryden Historical Society
meets at 7 p.m. the first
Wednesday of the month and
the museum opens every
Monday from 5:30-7 p.m.
The Capac Historical Society
is open to visitors daily from
1-3 p.m. and 1-4 p.m. on
Sundays. Call 810-395-2859
for more info.
The Imlay City Historical
Museum will be closed to the
public until the first Saturday
in April 2017. During that
time volunteers will be establishing new exhibits, continuing research projects, and
planning special events.
Volunteers are at the museum
most Wednesday mornings.
For questions contact Marilyn
Swihart 724-1904.
The Almont Community
Historical Society Museum is
open Saturdays from 1-4 p.m.
Please stop by and learn about
your community. Society
meetings are held at the museum on the second Monday of
the month at 7 p.m. For more
info call 810-796-3355.

Youth Events
Ready, Set, Go! Workshop.
This is a FREE workshop for
3-5 year olds & parents/caregivers! Enjoy fun projects
that will develop your childs
skills and prepare them for
school! Children also enjoy a
snack, story time, and a free
book! Call the Family
Literacy Center today to
reserve your seat at 810-6642737 and for more info on
dates and times.

Play groups available. Free 6


week sessions. At these FREE
90-minute playgroups, children will participate in storytime, developmentally appropriate games and crafts, learn
new skills, and enjoy a snack
and social time with other
children. Parents will have
the chance to talk to other
adults with same-age children. Register now for the
next session! Numerous locations and dates available. For
more info and to sign up call
the Family Literacy Center at
810-664-2737.

Support Groups
Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)
meetings are held every
Monday night at 8 p.m. at St.
Pauls Lutheran Church in
Imlay City.
Womans Life Chapter 855
will meet January 10, 2017
(Tuesday) 6:30 p.m. at the
Lois Wagner Memorial
Library, 35200 Division Road
Richmond, MI. Everyone is
welcome to attend.
Lapeer Area Citizens Against
Domestic Assault meets 1-3
p.m. every Wednesday in the
Lapeer Court House for personal protection order clinic.
For info 810-246-0632.
FOR WIDOWED MEN &
WOMEN:
Lunch-CardsFriendship. Join us every 3rd
Tuesday of each month from
11:45 a.m.-4 p.m. at Cavis
Pioneer Restaurant, 5600
Lapeer Rd. in Kimball Twp.
48074. No RSVP necessary.
For more info call Joanne K.
at 810-324-2304. This activity
is sponsored by Widowed
Friends, a peer support group
www.widowedfriends.org.
Widowed Friends invites all
widowed to join us for breakfast and friendship in a safe
setting every 2nd and 4th
Monday of the month at 9
a.m. at Seros, 925 Gratiot in
Marysville. For more info,
call Julie at 810-388-0868.
Lapeer County Families
Against Narcotics group
meets the second Tuesday of
the month at Faith Christian
Fellowship, 69 W. Nepessing
St. in Lapeer. Call 810-6670119 for more info or email
faithchrist09@aol.com.
TOPS 620 Lapeer weight- loss
group meets Tuesday nights
at the Hunters Creek Mobile
Home Park Club House, 725
DeMille Rd. in Lapeer. Weigh-

in from 6-6:30 p.m., meeting


from 6:30-7:30 p.m. For more
info call 810-664-7579.
TOPS 888 (Take Off Pounds
Sensibly) meets Wednesdays
at the 25 Pine Ridge Dr. in
Lapeer. Weigh-in at 8:30 a.m.,
9:30 a.m. meeting. Call Linda
at 810-245-3955 or Phyllis
810-395-7035 for more info.
For those that have experienced the death of a loved
one, a support group is available facilitated by a trained
United Hospice Service (UHS)
bereavement
volunteer.
Marlette Regional Hospital,
2770 Main Street in Marlette,
hosts this support group the
1st Friday of each month at
10 a.m. in the Administration
Conference Room. For more
info, call 800-635-7490 or visit
www.marletteregionalhospital.org.

Fundraisers
Ace of Hearts Progressive
Raffle. Weekly drawing held
at Dryden Bar & Grill
Wednesdays at 7 p.m., Sept.
28, 2016-March 1, 2017. Need
not be present to win. Must
draw Ace of Hearts to win
jackpot. 50% of proceeds to
winner and 50% to Dryden
Community Schools. House
Rules available at Dryden Bar
& Grill. License #C27715
The Imlay City Christian
School is holding a fundraiser
for TAFFY (Tuition Assistance
Fundraising For Youth).
Come join us for euchre the
2nd Saturday of each month
at 7 p.m. at the Imlay City
Christian School, 7197 E.
Imlay City Rd. in Imlay City.
For more info, call 810-7245695.

Medical Care
Lapeer County Health
Department, 1800 Imlay City
Rd., Lapeer - Regular
Immunization Clinic Hours:
(held in 2nd floor clinic area)
Mondays 1-3:30 p.m. WalkIn, Wednesdays 8:30 a.m.11:30 p.m. By Appointment
Only, Thursdays 1-3:45 p.m.
By Appointment
Only.
Additional Immunization
Clinics
Offered:
By
Appointment Only (held in
2nd floor clinic area). WalkIn (held in lower level). For
additional info, to check if we
accept your insurance, or to
schedule an appointment
please call 810-667-0448.
Free hearing and vision

c
AREA UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCHES

27 Elk Lake Road, Attica, MI

(810) 724-0690

Sunday Worship: 10 a.m


Attica Food Bank: Serving those
in need in Attica Twp, 2-4 pm,
2nd and 4th Monday
Rev. Ron Rouse
www.atticaumc.org
15

Dryden
U.M.C.

Worship 8:30 & 11:00 a.m.


Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Pastor Alan Casillas

15

810-796-3341

15

Sunday School - 9:15 am - All Ages


Sunday Service: 10:30 am
Junior Church and Nursery Available
Bible Studies Every
Monday and Tuesday Evenings
Tuesday Morning
16

15

15

15

700 Maple Vista, Imlay City

810-724-1135

586.336.4673

M-T-Thurs-Fri 8 am Wed. 10 am
First Sat. 8 am

Weekend Masses

Sat. 5 pm
Sun. 9 am - English
11 am - Spanish
Reconciliation 1/2 hr. before each Mass &4pm Sat.

Father Paul Ward

15

670 N. Van Dyke


Imlay City, MI 48444
Sunday Service
Bible Study (all ages) 10:00am
Morning Worship 11:00am
1st Sunday of the
Month Evening Service 2:30pm
Wednesday Bible Classes (all ages) 7:00pm

905 Holmes Rd. - Allenton, MI


Corner of Almont Road

810-395-2409

810-724-3306

COME WORSHIP WITH US!

John Barker, Minister

15
16

Worship Service: 10:00 am

15

Family of
Christ
Lutheran Church Missouri Synod
7191 Imlay City Road
Imlay City
Educational Hour - 9:15 am
Worship Time - 10:30 am

Phone 810-724-2620

16

PASTOR KEN RENARD

Sunday 2:30 pm
Tuesday 7:00 pm
Friday Youth 7:00 pm

firstapostolichome.com

15

Sunday Mornings
10:30 am

COME & MAKE A


DIFFERENCE WITH US! 15

15

Light of Christ
Community
Wayne Boyd, Pastor
Church
881 Van Dyke - 810-798-8888
Almont
First Baptist Church

Sunday Bible Classes: 9:45 am


Worship Services
10:30 am & 6:00 pm
Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 pm
fbc@airadvantage.net
Live Webcasting Sunday all worship services
over Sermonaudio.com/fbcalmont 15
Proclaiming the Sovereign Grace of God

GATEWAY
ASSEMBLY

1 Mile South of I-69 Overpass


Sunday Worship 10:30 am

Phone: 810-724-6999

15

(ELCA) 109 E. Kempf Court Capac, MI

(810) 395-7557

Phone: 810-724-8110
Pastor Jeffrey S. Krist

2720 Winslow Road


Imlay City, MI 48444

ST. JOHNS LUTHERAN CHURCH

Supervised child care during all services

Adult & Children's Sunday School 9:00 a.m.


Children's Church during service.

810-417-0265 cbcimlay.org
Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Service 10:45 am
Evening Service 6:00 pm
Wednesday Service 7:00 pm

15

Monday - Friday: 9:00 am - 2:00 pm

Sunday 10:00 a.m.


Sunday School
9:00 a.m. September thru May
Staffed Nursery During Worship 15

Christ Evangelical First Congregational Church


Lutheran Church
United Church of Christ
1970 S. Almont Ave., Imlay City
at corner of Newark Rd.

275 Bancroft - Imlay City


(Corner of 5th Street)

810-724-7855

810-724-6207

Sunday School 9:00 a.m.


Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Thursday Worship 7:00 p.m.

Pastor

Ralph O. Stuebs
Cell-(567) 674-0438

Come to the WELS

St. Nicholas
Catholic Church

15

4331 Capac Road


Capac, MI 48014

810-395-7572

www.stnicholascapac.com

Weekday Masses are held at


St. John The Evangelist Church
Weekend Masses:
Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Rev. Mike Gawlowski, Pastor 15

Sunday School &Morning Adult Group 9:30 a.m.


Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Rev. Dr. Renee C. Jackson
No matter who you are or where you are
on lifes journey, you are welcome here!15

St. John The


Evangelist
Catholic Church
872 Capac Rd.
Allenton, MI 48002

810-395-7074

www.stjohnsallenton.com

Tickets:
Adults $30 Each
Kids (Under 13) $15 Each
For tickets call
Debbie Uren
810-338-6521
NO TICKETS SOLD
AT DOOR

1-4

screens for children of preschool age are available at


the Lapeer County Health
Department. To schedule an
appointment please call 810667-0448 or 810-245-5549.
Capac Pharmacy is teaming
with Support Million Hearts
by offering in-pharmacy
blood pressure screenings,
136 North Main St. in Capac,
Tuesdays, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
Everyone is invited to come
and have their blood pressure read for free.

Events
The American Legion will
host a New Years Eve
extravaganza on Sat., Dec.
31, 2016. Doors open 6:30
p.m. with dinner at 8.
Veterans and active service
members receive a 10 percent
discount.
Tickets
includes dinner by Scotties
Catering, Kens DJ Service,
party favors, champagne
toast with a cash bar and
plenty of prizes and 50/50
drawings. The tickets are
available now at the
American Legion. All proceeds will support local veterans. For more info. please
call the Legion office 810664-9312.

Other
Free tutor training for people
who would like to help others
in our community improve
English skills. Volunteer
basis. Please call for orientation before training at 810664-2737.
Volunteer for the Habitat for
Humanity of Lapeer County
at the office. Interested parties can call 810-664-7111
and speak to Carolyn, Cheryl
or Pete at 810-660-7823.

Veterans of Foreign Wars


(VFW) of Imlay City, Post
2492, 598 N. Almont Ave.
(Fairgrounds Rd.) Overseas
Veterans Meetings 2nd
Thursday, every other
month, 7 p.m.; Post Meetings
1st Thursday every month, 7
p.m.; Auxiliary Meetings 1st
Saturday of every month, 10
a.m.

6835 Weyer Road Imlay City, MI48444

2796 S. Van Dyke Road - Imlay City


Morning Worship - 8:55 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service - 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday Family Night - 6:45 p.m.

74903 McKay Rd., Romeo

Weekday Masses

Imlay City
Church of Christ

2008 N. Van Dyke


Box 82
Imlay City, MI 48444
810.724.1747

Come Grow With Us!

Sacred Heart
Catholic Church

West Berlin
U.M.C.

Goodland
Community
Church

Imlay City
C.R.C.

810-724-4315

Come as you are - everyone is welcome!

810-724-0687

email: nlcc@newlifechristian.net
www.newlifechristian.net
Pastor Tim Martin
Sunday 10 a.m. Service 15

395 N. Cedar (M-53)


www.imlaycitycrc.org
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School 11:15 a.m.
Youth Ministry
MOPS Program
Community Mens & Womens
Bible Studies

Church 810-395-2112

Corner of 4th St. & Almont Ave.


(Across from the Library)
www.imlayumc.org
9:15 a.m. Sunday School
10:30 a.m. Worship
Nursery Available
Jr. Church for K-5th grade
Youth Group 6th-12th grade
5pm-6:30pm Sundays
Rev. Dr. Marcel Allen Lamb

5394 Main Street - Dryden

Worship Service - 11:00 a.m.


Rev. Curtis Clarke

810-724-2702

810-724-1200

14952 Imlay City Rd., Capac

Imlay City
U.M.C.

859 N. Van Dyke Road


Imlay City, Michigan 48444

4411 Newark Road


Attica, MI 48412

Capac
U.M.C.

Attica
U.M.C.

Pastor Patricia Hoppenworth


Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service - 11:00 a.m.
EVERYONE WELCOME!

(ELCA)

February 4th, 2017


Door Prizes, Games,
Raffles, Live Auction,
Bag Prizes, 50/50
Doors Open 5pm
Dinner 6:30pm

Club News

St. Pauls
Lutheran Church
200 North Cedar (M-53)
Imlay City, MI

25th Annual
Lapeer County
Sportsmens Club
Wild Game Dinner

201 E. St. Clair, Almont, MI


810-798-8855
Sr. Pastor: Keith Langley

Sunday Worship Service at 10:15 a.m.


Nursery available and Jr. Church
for ages 3 thru 5th grade
Jr./Sr. High Youth Group ~ Sundays 6-8pm
Kidz 4 Christ ~ Wednesdays 6-7:30pm
Pre-School - 5th grade
15

Holy Redeemer
Lutheran Church
4538 Dryden Rd. Dryden, MI

810-796-3951
www.lutheransonline.com/holyred

8:00 am - BIBLE CLASS


Weekday Masses:
9:30 am - WORSHIP
Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 8:30 a.m.
11:00 am - SUNDAY SCHOOL & BIBLE CLASS
Weekend Masses:
ALL WELCOME!!!
Saturday - 6:00 p.m.
Pastor Steven Helms
Sunday - 9:00 a.m.
Christian Preschool Available 15
Rev. Mike Gawlowski, Pastor 15

Almont/Dryden
Masons
meets 7 p.m. every 2nd
Thursday of the month at
Masonic Center in Almont.
The Imlay City American
Legion Post 135 meets the
2nd and last Wednesdays of
the month at 7:30 p.m. The
post is located at 212 E. Third
Street. Contact them at 7241450 or americanlegionpost135@frontier.com.
The Evening Star Quilt Guild
meets the last Wednesday of
each month at the Davison
Senior Center, 10135 Lapeer
Rd. in Davison. Meetings
start at 6:30 p.m. and doors
open at 6 p.m. For more info
call Lisa, 810-358-7294.

Markets
Attention Cottage Food
Vendors - The Market
Lexington is currently looking for Cottage Food Vendors
for the 2016 market season.
Contact Kristen Kaatz, 810404-7570 for stall space and
pricing.
The Flea Market held each
Sunday at the Lapeer Center
Building, 425 County Center
Rd. in Lapeer, will be open
from 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Up to 50
booths inside and outside sell
a huge variety of items. This
event is sponsored by the
Lapeer Center Building, and
there is no admission charge.
For info on space rentals,
contact Logan at 810-3477915. For general info on the
Flea Market or food service
by Peacock Alley Catering
call 810-664-2109 or email
lapeercenter@charter.net.

Page 11-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 4, 2017

Rural Lifestyles
TRI-CITY AREA
Ponds can freeze over in
the winter and be just fine.
However, if you have a
small pond or a garden
pond simple maintenance
steps can prevent springtime disasters, such as
dead frogs and fish. Water
gardens especially require
winterization in northern
climates like Michigan.
Hopefully you have
already removed dead
decaying debris and nonwinter hardy plants from
your ponds. This practice
will reduce the nutrient

load in the water from


decomposition.
Decomposing plants can
reduce oxygen levels
which can stress or kill the
aquatic residents of your
pond.
One of the things
Michigan State University
Extension suggests to do is
to manage your plants. Cut
back the vegetation of
those hardy plants that will
be overwintering in the
pond. Other fast growing
plants should also be
thinned. Move any plants
that are in pots on the pond

Farmland rent meeting Jan. 5


LAPEER To help review some of the options
landowners and tenants should consider when negotiating reasonable farmland rental rates, a series of
Farmland Rent and Rental Meetings will be held,
including one in Lapeer County on January 5.
Michigan State University Extension district farm
management educator Dennis Stein will lead the discussion and consider both sides of the farmland rental
agreement issues, and provide an overview of information helpful in developing a win-win farmland
rental agreement.
The Lapeer County meeting will be held at Lapeer
Countys John T. Rich Building, 1800 Imlay City Rd.,
on Thursday, January 5 from 1-4 p.m.
For more information or to register, contact the
MSU Extension office at (810) 667-0341.

shelves deeper into the


pond to protect them from
freezing. Once seasonal
plants have been removed
from your water garden
discard them responsibly.
Never discard water plants
or animals by putting them
into other water bodies. If
the plants are invasive
aggressive growers or you
have snails do not compost
your plants. If you did
winterize before freezing
temperatures hit, plan to do
it right away after the ice
melts. It is still beneficial
in managing nutrients.
Stop feeding the fish
when water temperatures
reach 45 degrees
Fahrenheit. Even if the fish
appear active they are
entering a dormant state
and will not be able to adequately process any food
given to them. Keep at
least 10 percent of the surface of your pond open for
gas exchange. If you have
a large pond and use it for
winter sports, allowing it
to freeze over completely
you will need to remove
fountains, turning off or
your pumps and filters.
Small ponds may need
assistance to ensure adequate gas exchange with
the atmosphere through

maintaining a hole in the


ice.
If you are using
machines for this purpose,
then heaters, aerators, and
pumps should be set up
higher in the water on a
platform or shelf of the
pond to allow the water
temperatures to stratify.
This reduces stress on the
fish from water temperature fluctuations. Continue
to monitoring your pond to
ensure that water levels
and pH remain stable
through the winter. If you
have removed all of your
plants and fish in smaller
ponds and fountains drain
and cover the pond as
needed to maintain safety.
If you or your lake
association is interested in
learning more about invasive aquatic invasive species, watercraft checkpoints education or in a
volunteer training to educate boaters at local public
launches contact Beth
Clawson at clawsonb@anr.
msu.edu.
For more information
about Clean Boats Clean
Waters Aquatic Invasive
Species program or other
water quality concerns
contact Michigan State
University Extension.

File photo

Winter visits your backyard pond

Decomposing plants can reduce oxygen levels which can stress or kill the aquatic residents in backyard ponds.
Water Quality educators
are working across
Michigan to provide natural resources water quality
educational programming
and assistance. You can
contact an educator
through MSUExtensions
Find an Expert search
tool using the keywords
water quality.
This article, written by
Beth Clawson, was pub-

lished by Michigan State


University Extension. For
more information, visit
http://www.msue.msu.edu.
To have a digest of information delivered straight
to your email inbox, visit
http://www.msue.msu.edu/
newsletters. To contact an
expert in your area, visit
http://expert.msue.msu.edu,
or call 888-MSUE4MI
(888-678-3464).

Business News

SBA launches InnovateHer challenge


TRI-CITY AREA
The U.S. Small Business
Administration
today
announced the launch of
the 2017 InnovateHER:
Innovating for Women
Business Challenge, a
nationwide business competition to drive attention
and resources to innovative products and services
that make our lives easier
and longer. Competitors
vie for $70,000 in prize
money provided to SBA
for the InnovateHER competition through a gift from
the
Sara
Blakely
Foundation.
The return of SBAs
InnovateHER Business
Challenge presents an
exciting opportunity for
some of our nations foremost entrepreneurs and
innovators, said SBA
Administrator
Maria
Contreras-Sweet.
Women represent half
of the U.S. workforce and
control 80 percent of the
nations purchasing power,
but still make up less than
five percent of venture
capitalists. I decided to
launch this annual competition two years ago so that
we could begin to address
that opportunity gap,
because when women have
an equal role in the marketplace and are able to chart

their own paths, our nation


as a whole is stronger and
more globally competitive.
The number of women
venture capital partners has
dropped from 10 percent in
1999 to just six percent in
2014, a trend directly correlated to women's access
to capital; only about seven
percent of venture capital
funding in the United
States currently goes to
women-owned ventures.
Gender bias is well
documented in this area: a
Harvard Business School
study asked potential
investors to rate a series of
pitches, some of which
were narrated by women
and some by men. Even
when the scripts were
exactly the same, only 32
percent of people said they
would fund the woman,
compared to 68 percent
who said they would fund
the man.
InnovateHER:
Innovating for Women
Business Challenge officially kicks off in 2017
with local competitions to
be hosted by universities,
accelerators,
clusters,
scale-up
communities,
SBA resource partners, and
other economic development
organizations.
Through the competition,

SBA is seeking to amplify


products or services that
fill a need in the marketplace and have the potential for commercialization.
SBA continues in its efforts
to expand the InnovateHER
Challenge, focusing on
empowering more women
in the investment and innovation space. Additional
details on the InnovateHER
can be found on the online
competition
platform
https://www.challenge.
gov/challenge/2017-innovateher-innovating-forwomen-business-challenge/.
Entrepreneurs selected
as winners in local competitions will advance to the
semi-final round. From the
pool of semi-finalists, SBA
will select up to 10 finalists
who will be invited to the
National InnovateHER:
Innovating for Women
Business Challenge to be
held in mid-2017. The
finalists will pitch their
products and ideas to a
panel of expert judges and
compete for the top three
awards along with $70,000
in prizes.
In Michigan, several
organizations held competitions in 2016, including
Lansing Economic Area
Partnership, Brownstown
Downtown Development

Authority,
Michigan
Womens
Marketplace
Womens Business Center,
Grand Rapids Opportunity
for Women, and the
Independent
Business
Association of Detroit.
For more information on
Michigan competitions,
email Catherine Gase,
Lead
Economic
Development Specialist at
catherine.gase@sba.gov.
Over the past two
decades, women entrepreneurs have been critical to
growing businesses and
creating jobs in cuttingedge fields such as precision medicine or cybersecurity, as well as through
advances in agriculture and
manufacturing. Women
across the nation will benefit from investing in
research and inventions
that impact their experiences. A lack of inclusion
in the innovation space
leads to missed opportunities, especially when
women make the majority
of the buying decisions.
The SBA is encouraging
organizations across the
country to participate in
this important business
challenge.
For more information
including
competition
rules, go to www.sba.gov/
innovateHER.

Send us your announcements


TRI-CITY AREA Do you or a family member
have a recent accomplishment or milestone youd like
to share and celebrate with the community?Then send
us the details and we will gladly help you share the
news on our Announcements page.
Engagements, weddings, anniversaries, special
birthdays, births, promotions, graduations or other
educational achievements, success in competition
we post these and other announcements in our pages
free of charge. We encourage you to include photos
when possible.
Send submissions to tct@pageone-inc.com or TriCity Times, P.O. Box 278, Imlay City, MI 48444.
Have questions? Contact us at (810) 724-2615.

Subscribe online to the Tri-City Times


TRI-CITY AREA Readers can now get all
access to local news with just one click of the
mouse.
The Tri-City Times offers an
Online Edition subscription program and for half the print price,
you can access a digital edition of
every weeks newspaper no matter where you are.
For just $15 for 52 weeks,
readers can head to the Tri-City
Times Web site,
www.tricitytimes-online.com, log
into their account and read complete issues dating back to March
2010.
To take advantage of this
great deal, visit our website and
in the left navigation bar, select Subscribe now.
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For more information, call our offices at 7242615 or email tct@pageone-inc.com.

Page 12-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 4, 2017

DRYDEN There
may be no more beautiful
location locally to view
winters natural beauty
than Seven Ponds Nature
Center.
For the uninitiated,
Seven Ponds annually
sponsors a Winter Series,
a group of programs highlighted by noted naturalists
and photographers, live
animals, fascinating natural
history and fun for all ages.
The Winter Series is
open
to
everyone.
Admission is $3 for adults
and free for Seven Ponds
members and children
under the age of 13; unless
otherwise noted.
The series begins on
Sunday, Jan. 29, at 2 p.m.
with an Animal Magic
program, featuring Mark
Rosenthal.
Attendees will experience live animals from
around the world and get
up close and personal with
many fascinating creatures,
to include a sloth and a
tarantula.
There is a $5 fee per
person for this program.
The fee for members is $3.
On Sunday, Feb. 5,

Seven Ponds will present


Sky Islands, Sweetwater,
and Saguaros, featuring
Seven Ponds Executive
Director Mike Champagne
at 2 p.m.
Champagne describes
southeast Arizona as a

Tarantuala is also a
special guest at the
Jan. 29 Animal Magic
program.
spectacular area of deserts,
grasslands and mountains,
and a favorite destination
for birders and naturalists.
Champagne will share
images and stories from the
nature centers 2016 field
tour to the area.
It includes visits to
birding areas around
Tucson,
Santa
Rita
Mountains,
Patagonia,
Huachuca
Mountains,
Chiricahua Mountains and

Wilcox Playa.
It was the sixth birding
tour that Mike has led to
Southeast Arizona, and
participants were treated to
great birds, wildflowers,
mammals, reptiles, and
spectacular scenery.
This program is geared
toward adults and young
adults.
On Sunday, Feb. 12,
photographer Dave Stimac
will present Birds & More
from Ecuador, a travelogue from the month he
spent in that country last
winter.
From the high Andes to
the Amazon, Ecuador
boasts more than 1,600
species of birds; 130 of
them hummingbirds.
He will also share some
of his recent bird, bug, and
bloom photos from close to
home.
The Sunday, Feb. 19
program at 2 p.m. is The
Milkweed Community,
More than Monarchs, presented by Don Drife, an
independent naturalist and
blogger.
Drife says everyone
knows about the Monarch
butterfly and its need for
milkweed plants to survive. But many are
unaware that other insects

Visitors to Mark Rosenthals Animal Magic program will see fascinating


creatures, like the sloth pictured above.
and some non-insects also
make their home in the
milkweed community.
Drife presents a program on the many organisms which feed on and
among the different species
of milkweeds. This is a
young adult to adult program.
On Sunday, Feb. 26,
Seven Ponds Carrie
Spencer presents The Art
of Tracking, also at 2 p.m.
Attendees of all ages
will learn all about tracking
from; scat, tracks and other
clues.
Visitors will also make
tracks to take home. Call to
pre-register for this program by February 24.
For questions, information or to reserve a spot at
any of the aforementioned
programs, call the nature

center at 810-796-3200.
Seven Ponds Nature
Center is located at 3854

Crawford Rd. in Dryden


Township. Visit the website
at www.sevenponds.org.

Photo provided

By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

Photo provided

Winter Series on
tap at Seven Ponds

Attendees at the Feb. 26th Art of Tracking


workshop will learn all about tracking from
Seven Ponds naturalist Carrie Spencer.

McKenna: New sheriff sets bar high

Park: Capac gets boost from grant

from page 1-A

from page 1-A

importance of their role in the community


and the responsibilities that go along with
that.
He is confident that pride in oneself
and the department can be achieved
through demonstrating professionalism,
leadership and integrity.
We need to live those qualities at all
times, says McKenna. It may require
some buy-in on the part of some, but
thats what Ill be expecting.
Accessibility is key
Another
of
McKennas
goals to is
to be accessible to his
fellow officers and
deputies,
and to the
public.
Iwant to
be accessible to our
residents
to encourage communication and
allow them to talk, says McKenna. A
lot of times, people just need a chance to
vent.
Ialso want to personalize the position; to be able to walk into local schools
and to meet with the people; the staff, the
students, everyone.
Yet another goal, says McKenna, is to
work to break down any existing barriers
between departments.
I want to eliminate the us versus
them syndrome, he says. We all have to
work together to best serve Lapeer County
residents. None of us can be islands unto
ourselves.
Challenges lie ahead
As he indicated during his campaign,
McKenna views the prevalence of opioid
drug use and abuse, along with heroin, as
priorities for law enforcement.
Id like to be able to start our own, or
a county drug team; or if not, at least
assign one of our people to the TNU
(Thumb Narcotics Unit).
The public needs to be educated
through our parents and kids, to ensure
they understand the problem, and that it
exists everywhere, not just in the inner

cities.
McKenna believes that not admitting
there is a problem is a problem in itself.
The fact is our towns are not overrun
with drugs, but there is a serious problem, he says. Its tough for families to
talk about some things, but we need to
deal with reality and take these problems
head-on.
We definitely cant sweep them
under the rug, he continues. We have to
admit these problems exist and deal with
them.
Other areas of concern include cyberrelated crime, mental health issues that
can lead to crime, and the myriad scams

"I want to eliminate


the 'us' versus 'them'
syndrome. We all have
to work together to
best serve
Lapeer County
residents. None of us
can be islands
unto ourselves."
--Scott McKenna
Lapeer County Sheriff
perpetrated against the elderly.
Culture change
To some degree, McKenna believes in
bucking the system in favor of one that is
rooted in service and accountability.
I know I have a lot to learn, says
McKenna, but Im going to be focused
on law enforcementnot politics.
Instead of accepting the status quo,
we need to review and evaluate and make
things better if possible.
Im sick of hearing thats the way
we always did it, he says. Police need
to be held to a higher standard. I want our
people to feel proud every time they put
on that uniform.

We want recreational
opportunities for residents
living on the east side of
town, Grzyb said.
The villages Lions
Park is on the west side of
town, adjacent to school
grounds.
Grzyb anticipates the
village can start the grant
projects sometime this
spring.
Once we get started
we can build on it some
more, he said.
The village will use
parks and recreation millage money thats distributed to municipalities
through St. Clair Countys
levy for the match
requirement.
Visitors can access the
park from Aldrich Street
or the museum grounds.
Currently the park is
open space. The village

acquired the property in


2010, purchasing the three
acre parcel from the
Council on Aging for
$25,000.
The land was already
in the villages name
through a trust agreement
dating back to the early
1990s. Terms of the deal
stipulated that the village
develop it into a park,
allow senior citizens to
place some sort of memorial on the site and pay the
closing costs.
This year, Recreation
Passport grant applicants
sought funding for a broad
range of public outdoor
recreation projects,
including playground
development and renovations, sports and fitness
facility development and
improvements, trail and
walkway development,

park and picnic area


improvements and
improved access for those
with disabilities.
Successful applicants
clearly demonstrated projects designed to increase
public access to quality
outdoor recreation opportunities. The selected projects were chosen from a
field of 77 grant applications seeking $3,053,000
million in funding.
Recreation Passport
grants support local units
of government in their
efforts to offer their residents and visitors quality
recreation opportunities,
said Steve DeBrabander,
DNR grants manager.
This funding enables
us to work together to
improve quality of life
and tourism in communities across the state.

YOMS: Polar Palooza plans in works


from page 1-A
Kim Schall says YOMS
members usually meet
once a month after school;
but more frequently prior
to major events such as the
Polar Palooza.
Schall says not only do
YOMS members experience the personal rewards
of giving back to the community, participation in the
organization meets Almont
High School students public service mandate.
By participating in
the YOMSprogram, students can earn community
service hours, says
Schall. As long as they
put in at least two hours at
a specific event, it counts
for their community service requirements.
Additionally, the organization annually awards a

Almont Pride Community


Service Award and
Scholarship to a deserving
high school senior.
New recruits sought
Because there are currently only nine active
YOMS members, Schall
hopes more interested student volunteers will step
up soon.
She says members
serve as student ambassadors, while modeling
community pride by donating their time and energy
to their hometown.
High school senior
Madeleine Maddy Gray
says membership in
YOMS has yielded unexpected rewards.
I became a member in
my sophomore year when
(former DDA Director)

Nancy Boxey came to a


student council meeting
and talked to us about the
value of community
involvement, Maddy
recalls. A group of my
friends and I went to the
first meeting and we
signed up. We love it.
I enjoy the feeling of
helping people and my
community, she says. I
especially like making the
little kids happy. That
makes it worth all the time
we put into it.
Any Almont High
School students interested
in becoming a part of the
Youth On Main Street
team, should talk to a current member; or contact
Kim Schall at the Almont
DDA office at 810-7988125.

Visit www.tricitytimes-online.com for all your local news!

Tri-City Times Online

Page 13-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 4, 2017

Speaker says
live your brand

the sole author of his first


book titled Decisions:
The Power To Overcome
Self-Defeating Behaviors.
Sean inspires the uninspired, and motivates people to Live Your Brand
so that you can grow personally and professionally.
He teaches mental, physical, social, and spiritual
resilience skills that
empower individuals to
withstand, recover, and
grow through the face of
adversity, stress, and the
changing demands in life.
Sean empowers people and
equips them with the tools
necessary to live an epic
life. His mother owns
ComPAS Home Health
Care in Imlay City.
I liked him because
he wasnt a conventional,
boring motivational speaker that just told us that we
should be just like them,
says senior Haylee Wolle.
He didnt do that at all.
He told us that we should
just aspire to reach our
goals. He didnt tell us we
should do exactly what he
did to make it, like we
have seen with speakers in
the past. He asked us what
we wanted to do in our
future and told us that we
should do it. He didnt say
anyones dreams or goals
were absurd, in fact he
wanted them to be absurd.
That way it would be
astounding when we actually reached them. I loved
that aspect of his presentation the most. He told us to

Special guest speaker Sean Douglas (back row, center) poses for photo with Dryden High School
students.
reach as high as we could
imagine instead of how
high we thought was realistic. It was just so unlike
what most adults tell high
school students that it
actually blew my mind.
Adds senior Jake
Hagemeister, He had an
ability to inspire and
intrigue like no other
speaker we have had thus
far. He enthralled all of us
with his heart wrenching
stories, passionate delivery
and quick witted humor.
Above all, it was his
authenticity that made him
such a great speaker.
This fall, Dryden High
School is offering a Senior
Seminar College Planning
Course to all high school
seniors in conjunction with
the Michigan College
Access Network (MCAN).
The goal of MCAN is
to increase college readiness, participation, and
completion in Michigan,
particularly among lowincome students, first-generation college-going students, and students of

color.
Further, the goal of the
College Planning Course is
to increase college completion by lowering barriers that prevent students
from getting to and
through college, including
social capital, academic
preparation, college
knowledge, and
affordability.
As part of the course,
weekly speakers have been
scheduled to share worthwhile and relevant information with Dryden students. Topics may range
from specific educational
opportunities to post-secondary life skills, as well
as knowledge necessary to
be productive members of
a community, among others.
Editors note: The foregoing article was submitted by Sheryl Czerwinski
of Dryden High School.
Czerwinski is an English,
SAT prep, freshman seminar and senior seminar
teacher, drama club director, co-sponsor of the

Photo by Sheryl Czerwinski

DRYDEN The
senior class at Dryden
High School has had multiple speakers this year,
senior Jessica Smith says,
but Sean Douglas has to
be the best yet. He started
off his presentation giving
us random lyrics and we
all wondered why, then he
had us dance and sing
along. After the singing, he
immediately began talking
about the importance of
dominating in everything
that you do.
This domination is
exactly the way Sean
Douglas lives his life.
Recently, he shared his
passions with members of
the freshman and senior
Seminar Classes at Dryden
High School.
Sean Douglas was born
in Detroit on July 23,
1983. He is a U.S. Air
Force veteran, a Certified
Master Resilience Trainer,
a professional inspirational
speaker, and author. Sean
spent four years as a Drill
Instructor in Air Force
Basic Training, where he
developed over 600 young
men and women into military leaders.
Not surprisingly, he is
energetic and passionate
about inspiring others to
succeed. Seans interactive
training develops the participants skill in the mental, physical, social, and
spiritual domains of resilience, and leaves people
better equipped to manage
change effectively. He is

Photo by Sheryl Czerwinski

Dryden students motivated


by presenter Sean Douglas

Douglas engages students and challenges


them to live an epic life.
Class of 2018 and a member of the Professional
Growth Committee at the
high school. She is also a

Concurrent Enrollment
Instructor for Ferris State
University and Adjunct
Faculty at Baker College.

Stay in touch with elected officials


By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

TRI-CITY AREA
With the new year comes
new elected officials at the
local and county level.
As the result of elections in 2016, new township officials assumed their
jobs in November while
new county officials started
their new assignments on
January 1.
What follows is a listing of all the elected boards
that serve communities in
the Tri-City area. This listing is available year-round
on our website, www.tricitytimes-online.com, under
the Online Extras tab.
Officers for both counties commissions and local
school boards will be
decided at meetings later
this month. Members of
these boards are listed in
alphabetical order. Well
update our online listing
once those elections have
taken place.
Village of Almont
President: Steve
Schneider
President Pro-Tem: Tim
Dyke
Council members:
Mary Ligon
Dave Love
Gary Peltier
Steven C. Schneider
Melinda Steffler
The council meets the
first and third Tuesdays of
the month at 7:30 p.m. at
the village offices, 817 N.
Main St.
Village of Capac
President: John Grzyb
President Pro-Tem: Paul
Libkie
Council members:
Bruce Lawrence
Joe Nemecek
Samantha Ramirez
Patricia Weyhrauch
The council meets the
first and third Mondays of

the month at 7 p.m. at the


Capac American Legion
Hall, 115 N. Main St.

months) at the township


hall, 4900 Spencer St.,
Attica

Village of Dryden
President: Elizabeth
Thiemkey
President Pro-Tem: Stan
Roszczewski
Council members:
Mike Franz
Daniel Listerman
Jeff Quail
The council meets the
first Tuesday of the month
at 7 p.m. at the Lamb
Memorial Building, 5602
Main St.

Attica Township
Supervisor: Al Ochadleus
Clerk: Nancy
Herpolshimer
Treasurer: Pam Mason
Trustees:
Richard Lacey
Phil Madeline
The board meets the
second Thursday of the
month at 7:00 p.m. at the
township
hall,
4350
Peppermill Rd.

City of Imlay City


Mayor: Walt Bargen
Mayor Pro-Tem: Marty
Rankin
Commissioners:
Joi Kempf
Amy Planck
Al Ramirez
Mike Romine
Bob Tanis
The commission meets
the first and third Tuesdays
of the month at 7 p.m. at
city hall, 150 N. Main St.
Almont Township
Supervisor: Paul Bowman
Clerk: Carol Hoffner
Treasurer: Roberta
Kudsin
Trustees:
Gary Groesbeck
Kim Streeter
Clay Stroup
Scott Stroup
The board meets on the
second Monday of the
month at 7 p.m. at the
township hall, 819 N. Main
St.
Arcadia Township
Supervisor: John Howell
Clerk: Sharna Smith
Treasurer: Lisa Skovran
Trustees:
Kathleen Howe
Jack Jostock
The board meets the
second Tuesday of the
month at 7:30 p.m. (summer) and 7 p.m. (winter

Berlin Township
Supervisor: Bill Winn
Clerk: Karen Klos
Treasurer: Madeline
Parks
Trustees:
Bob Christian
Mark Wittstock
The board meets the
second Monday of the
month at 7:30 p.m. at the
senior center, 740 Capac
Road, Allenton
Dryden Township
Supervisor: Tina Papineau
Clerk: Bonnie Rumley
Treasurer: Carol Stone
Trustees:
Carol English
Kimberly Evans
The board meets the
second Tuesday of the
month at 7:00 p.m. at the
township offices, 4849
Dryden Rd.
Goodland Township
Supervisor: Ron Cischke
Clerk: Mavis Roy
Treasurer: Louis Parsch
Trustees:
Mike Juip
Norm Tanis
The board meets the
second Tuesday of the
month at 7:00 p.m. at the
township offices, 2374 N.
Van Dyke
Imlay Township
Supervisor: Steve
Hoeksema

Clerk: Elizabeth
Makedonsky
Treasurer: Melanie Priehs
Trustees:
Michael Guerin
Carla Jepsen
The board meets the
third Wednesday of the
month at 7:30 p.m. at the
township offices,
692 Fairgrounds Rd.
Lynn Township
Supervisor: Steve
Kalbfleisch
Clerk: Annette Ferrett
Treasurer: Gary Drain
Trustees:
Constance Kendzierski
Arthur Miller
The board meets the
second Wednesday of the
month at 7:00 p.m. at the
township hall.
Mussey Township
Supervisor: Mike
Lauwers
Clerk: Sheila McDonald
Treasurer: Marsha Libkie
Trustees:
Bruce Downey
Monica Standel
The board meets the
second Wednesday of the
month at 7:30 p.m. at the
fire hall, 550 W. Mill St.

Almont School Board


John Brzozowski
Jennifer Mitchell
Stephan Manko
John Miles
Jill ONeil
Jonathan Owens
Anthony Sullivan
The board meets the
fourth Monday of the
month at 7 p.m. in the
Middle Schools media
center.
Capac School Board
James Crane
William Ellis
Travis Fahley
Barry Geliske
Marie Killingbeck
Timothy Lewis

Monica Standel
The board meets the
third Thursday of the
month at 7 p.m. in the high
school library. Meetings
are typically held at an
alternate
location
in
December.
Dryden School Board
Stacey Abromaitis
Lori Angel
Kelly Fuerst
Kathryn Giles
Richard Kage
Richard Nash
Susan Polakowski
The board meets the
second Monday of the
month at 7 p.m. in the high
school library.
Imlay City School Board
Ashley Campbell-Whiting
Greg Dennis
Sharon Muir
Jim Preisel
Dave Spoelma
Doug Van Dyk
(Vacancy)
The board meets the
fourth Monday of the
month at 7 p.m. at the
Educational Service Center,

634 Borland Rd.

Lapeer County
Commission
Cheryl Clark, District 1
Dyle Henning, District 2
Gary Roy, District 3
Lenny Schneider, Dist. 4
Rick Warren, District 5
Linda Jarvis, District 6
Ian Kempf, District 7
The commission meets
every Thursday at 9 a.m. in
the lower level of the county complex building, 255
Clay St.
St. Clair County
Commission
Greg McConnell, Dist. 1
Karl Tomion, District 2
Howard Heidemann,
District 3
Duke Dunn, District 4
Jeff Bohm, District 5
Dave Rushing, District 6
Bill Gratopp, District 7
The commission meets
every third Thursday of the
month at 6 p.m. at the
county
administration
building, 200 Grand River

Get more Tri-City Times online


TRI-CITY AREA Our print edition arrives in
your mailbox and on the newsstands once a week, but
theres more news and information to be found at our
website, www.tricitytimes-online.com, seven days a
week.
In addition to our latest news and sports stories,
readers can view and post community events in our
online calendar; see a list of our local elected officials
and municipal information in our Local Government
guide and determine where you can buy paper copies
of our newspaper by checking out our newsstand list.
Online tools also allow readers to offer instant
feedback on stories. Users can write a letter to the
editor, email the article link to a friend or share the
story on one of several social media platforms.
Theres also an opportunity to comment on stories
through the reader feedback submission form.

Find us at: www.tricitytimes-online.com

Page 14-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 4, 2017

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Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Sports

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Spartans
second
at Howell

Five Imlay City grapplers


go 5-0 in tough tourney
IMLAY CITY The
Imlay City wrestling team
went 4-1, paving the way to
a second-place finish last
Friday at the Howell
Tournament.
Imlay City began their

successful day on the mats


with a 42-33 win against
Howell. That was followed
by a 60-24 victory over a
team consisting of wrestlers
representing
several
schools; a 46-33 triumph
against Ann Arbor Pioneer;

Photo by Kevin Kissane

By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Second page 3-B


Andrew Sams, of Capac, drives to the hoop during the finals of the Harry Moore Tournament.

Capac falls in finals, 65-49


By Kevin Kissane

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Imlay Citys Adriel Rojas, top, went 3-2 in the


135-pound weight class at the Howell Tourney.

CAPAC The Capac


varsity boys basketball
squad saw their bid for a
top finish at the Harry C.
Moore Tournament it hosted denied, falling by a
65-49 count to North
Branch in the championship
matchup last Thursday
night.
With the result, Capac
drops to 2-1 this season.
In Thursdays matchup,
North Branch jumped out to
a 17-10 advantage after one
quarter was over with.
The next eight-minute
stretch saw Capac bounce
back with 15 points and
North Branch generate 10.

That trimmed their deficit


to 27-25 at the halftime
break.
When play resumed,
the momentum shifted back
over to North Branchs side.
Bolstered by an 18-9 third
quarter edge, the Broncos
forged a 45-34 cushion with
24 minutes elapsed.
North Branch then outscored Capac 20-15 the rest
of the way, assuring themselves of a 65-49 victory
when the final scores were
added up.
Chance Calvert collected 15 points, including a
pair of trifectas, and Riley
Bugg supplied 15 to lead
North Branch.
Adam
Finals page 2-B

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Third quarter surges carry North Branch to a win

All-Tourney team members Jimmy Schroeder,


Adam Barrows, Calvin Cook, Chance Calvert,
Andrew Sams and Grant Koehler.

Capac rolls past


Kingston, 62-39
By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Capac page 2-B

Photo by Kevin Kissane

CAPAC Capac
made Kingstons varsity
boys basketball team
absorb a 62-39 loss in a
semifinal encounter last
Wednesday evening at the
Harry
C.
Moore
Tournament it hosted.
With the outcome,
Capac raises its mark to
2-0 this season.
In
Wednesdays
encounter, Capac bolted
out to an 11-4 advantage

with 2:56 elapsed.


Not content with that
cushion, Capac followed it
up with a 10-2 run over the
next five minutes-plus.
That staked the Chiefs to a
21-6 advantage with one
quarter done.
The second quarter of
action would see Capac
further distance themselves
from their opponents.
Thanks to a 17-12 advantage there, the Chiefs were
able to enjoy a 38-18 lead

Imlay Citys Griffin Schirmer looks to score under pressure from a pair of Goodrich defenders.

Imlay City outplayed by Goodrich


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

IMLAY CITY The


Imlay City varsity boys
basketball team now stands
at 1-3 this season following
a 76-38 setback to Goodrich
in a meeting last Friday at
the
Venture
Global
Engineering Foundation
Holiday
Basketball
Showcase.
Imlay City High School

is where the action unfolded.


In Fridays meeting,
Goodrich opened up a 13-8
advantage after one quarter
was done.
Quarter number two
would belong to Goodrich.
It was there they amassed
24 points and Imlay City
managed nine, leaving
them with a 37-17 cushion
at the halftime break.
When
the
action

resumed, Goodrich picked


up where it left off. Aided
by a 21-12 third quarter
edge, they were able to
forge a 58-29 lead with 24
minutes gone.
Goodrich then outscored Imlay City 18-9
over the final eight minutes
of play, putting the finishing touches on a 76-38 triumph.
Kevin David-Rice led
Goodrich with 24 points.

He drained a pair of triples


along the way.
Griffin Schirmer paced
Imlay City with nine
points. Jose Bartolomei
Castro (eight points,
including a pair of trifectas), Noah Galbraith
(eight), Curtis Homer
(five), Mitch Allen (four)
along with Bruce Bollini
and Damian Vaubel (two
each) supported his performance.

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Spartans slow start leads to lopsided loss to Martians, 76-38

Trevor Boers, of Capac, fires up a shot during


his teams win against Kingston.

Page 2-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 4, 2017

Capac drops consolation matchup


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

resumed, Kingston continue to pull away. Aided


by an 8-4 third quarter
edge, the Cardinals widened the gap to 29-6 with
24 minutes elapsed.
Kingston then outscored Capac 10-9 the rest
of the way, putting the
finishing touches on a
39-15 win.
Camryn Maguire led
Kingston that afternoon.

Maguire hit for 10 points,


draining a pair of triples
along the way. Lily Lyons
added eight points to the
Cardinals cause.
For Capac, Kristen
Paynes six-point performance proved tops. The
Chiefs also had Alexys
Anderson (five points,
including a trifecta) and
Shelby Husovsky (four)
reach the scoring column.

Photo by Kevin Kissane

CAPAC The Capac


varsity girls basketball
team wound up on the losing side of a 39-15 semifinal verdict to Kingston at
the Harry C. Moore
Tournament it hosted last
Wednesday afternoon.
With the outcome,
Capac slips to 1-2 overall.

In Wednesdays confrontation, Capac spotted


Kingston a 16-0 advantage after one quarter was
over with.
The next eight-minute
stretch saw Kingston produce five points and
Capac net two. That left
Kingston with a 21-2 lead
to protect at the halftime
break.
When the action

Photo by Kvin Kissane

Aubree Smith, of Capac, hauls in a pass during


her teams game versus North Branch.

Gerilyn Carpenter, Becki Krause, Kristen Payne, Camryn MacGuire, Kendall Muxlow and Reese
Ruhlman earned spots on the All-Tournament team at the Harry Moore Tourney last week.

By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

CAPAC Capac fell


one point short when the
clock zeroed out for the
final time, incurring a
26-25 setback to the North
Branch varsity girls basketball squad in the consolation game of the Harry C.
Moore Tournament it hosted last Thursday afternoon.
With the decision,
Capac slips to 1-4 thus far

this season.
In Thursdays game,
North Branch grabbed a
7-6 edge after one quarter
was finished.
The second quarter
would prove a closely contested one as well. It was
there North Branch managed 10 points and Capac
generated nine, giving the
Broncos a 17-15 lead at the
halftime break.
Quarter number three
saw North Branch collect

six points as did Capac.


That left North Branch up
23-21 with 24 minutes
elapsed.
Capac then put together
a 4-3 fourth quarter rally,
only to drop a narrow 26-25
verdict.
Reese Ruhlman led
North Branch with 14
points. She hit a trifecta en
route to that total.
Kristen Payne paced
Capac with seven points.
The Chiefs also had Shelby

Husovsky (six points),


Delaney Verschure (five,
featuring a trey), Alexys
Anderson (four), Emma
Shellenbarger (two) and
Kelsey Payne (one) reach
the scoring column.
A l l - To u r n a m e n t
team- Gerilyn Carpenter,
Kingston; Becki Krause,
Brown City; Kristen Payne,
Capac; Camryn MacGuire,
Kingston, Kendall Muxlow,
Brown City; and Reese
Ruhlman, North Branch.

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Capac falls to Kingston in semifinals

Mary Rilley was honored as this years Woman


of Honor at the Harry Moore Tournament in
Capac.

Finals: Capac falls in title matchup

Barrows (11, featuring a


trey) hit for double figures
as well.
Andrew Sams (17
points)
and
Jimmy

Schroeder (15, with three


triples) proved Capacs top
offensive threats.
The
Chiefs also received points
courtesy of Jacob Parski
(five), Trevor Boers (four),
Jordan Hellmuth (three),

Athlete of the Week

Brent Boers (a triple) and


Jacob Witt (two) reach the
scoring column.
All-Tournament teamJimmy Schroeder, Capac;
Adam Barrows, North
Branch; Calvin Cook,
Brown
City;
Chance
Calvert, North Branch;
Andrew Sams, Capac; and
Grant Koehler, Kingston.

Capac:
rolls past
Kingston in
semis

Photo by Kevin Kissane

from page 1-B

Bill Friedsberg, second from left, is named this years Former Player of
Honor at the Harry Moore Tournament in Capac.

Capac junior Andrew


Sams averaged 15 points
per contest at the Harry
Moore Basketball
Tourney last week.
For his effort, Sams
shares our Boys Athlete
of the Week honor.

Be sure to pick up your t-shirt at the Tri-City Times office.


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at the halftime break.


When both sides
returned to the floor, Capac
widened the gap even
more. Aided by a 10-9
third quarter edge, the
Chiefs made it a 48-27
ballgame with 24 minutes
gone.
Capac then outscored
Kingston 14-12 during the
last eight minutes of play,
good enough for a 62-39
victory when the final second ticked off the clock.
Trevor Boers (19,
including a trifecta),
Andrew Sams (13, featuring a trey) and Jimmy
Schroeder (11) led Capac
with double figure point
outputs. Jordan Hellmuth
(eight points, with a triple),
Jacob Witt (six) and Brent
Boers (five, including a trifecta) also reached the
scoring column.
Schroeder provided the
highest Capac rebound
total, pulling down nine
missed shots.
Capac also received
eight steals courtesy of
Sams and six blocked shots
from Trevor Boers.
Evan Neff paced
Kingston with nine points.
Neff drained a triple en
route to that total.

Madison Woodall, Kaila Gormley, Jade DeLong and Emma Shellenbarger


were the female nominees for the Harry Moore Scholarship. Gormley
won the honor.

Photo by Brad Robbins

Imlay City freshman


130-pounder Luke
Stephens went 5-0 at the
Howell Highlander
Tourney last Friday.
For his effort,
Stephens shares our
Boys Athlete of the
Week honors.

Photo by Kevin Kissane

from page 1-B

Former Capac hoops players were recognized at halftime of Wednesdays


Capac versus Kingston boys basketball team at the Moore Tourney.

Page 3-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 4, 2017

By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

ALMONT
The
Almont wrestling team
registered an eighth-place
finish last Fridays Ryan
Mercer Tournament in
Mayville.
Cass City paced the
15-team field with 196.5
points. They were followed by Perry (166.5
points), Mayville (152),
Bad
Axe
(117.5),
Sandusky (117), North
Branch (107.5), Pontiac
(100), Almont (92),
Brown City (89), Flint
Beecher (82), Richmonds
B team (63), Sterling
Heights (44), Swan Valley
(32) plus Caro JV and
Michigan
Lutheran
Seminary (15 each).
Gavin Dempz provided the top Almont showing that day.
Dempz
reached the 103-pound

title bout where he picked


up a 3-0 win against
Richmonds JD Gross.
Jacob Burchi gave
Almont a second. Burchi
advanced to the 125pound
championship
clash where he was pinned
by Flint Beechers Clavin
Moten with 1:30 gone.
Jack DeMara and
Hunter Spies collected
Almonts third. DeMara
ended his day on the mats
with a pin 3:42 into his
bout with Brown Citys
Whitley Blake and Spies
concluded his tournament
run with a 3-0 victory
over North Branchs Evan
Caudill.
Michael Rinke was
the other Almont grappler
that placed, obtaining a
fifth. Rinke wrapped his
run at 152 pounds with a
pin 3:08 into his clash
with Pontiacs Michael
Patrick.

Photo by Randy Jorgensen

Almont places
five times at
Mayville Invite

Listen up
A pair of youth wrestlers get ready to take the mat during a tournament in Almont last
Wednesday. The event attracted about 250 grapplers from eight schools. The competitors
ranged in age from 5-14. A near capacity crowd watched the action unfold.

Jack DeMara, Michael Rinke, Jacob Burchi,


Hunter Spies and Gavin Dempz placed for
Almont at the Mayville Tournament.

Bowling Scores
Cedar Lanes
Magic Eight
1st Place: Scottys Liquor
Mens High Game
Brett Sevon, 299
Mens High Series
Robb Lyman, 803
Team High Series Schlaud Trucking, 2541

Thursday 50 Plus
1st Place: 3 Bolts & One Nut
Mens High Game
Larry Mundt, 233
Mens High Series
Hoyt Showler, 648
Womens High Game
Dee Stack, 189
Womens High Series
Betty Shore, 529
Team High Series
3 Bolts &

One Nut, 2181

Early Birds
1st Place: TTMX3
Mens High Game
Tom Bissett, 241
Mens High Series
Tom Bissett, 611
Womens High Game
Jan Sherman, 192
Womens High Series
Karen Irvine, 495
Team High Series
Yahoos, 1553
Early Thursday
1st Place: Castaways
Womens High Game
Barb Jurn, 256
Womens High Series
Barb Jurn, 609
Team High Series
Castaways, 2646
Monday Niters
1st Place: Cedar Lanes
Mens High Game
Eric Sandusky, 300
Mens High Series
Eric Sandusky, 736
Team High Series
Cedar Lanes, 2996

Boys Basketball
Friday, January 6
Thursday, January 5
Almont at Algonac, 6 p.m.
Dryden at Caseville,
Capac at Cros-Lex, 6 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
Dryden at Caseville,
Friday, January 6
7:30 p.m.
Almont at Algonac,
Saturday, January 7
7:30 p.m.
Imlay City at Richmond,
Capac at Cros-Lex,
4 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
Monday, January 9
Saturday, January 7
Capac vs. Memphis at SC4,
Imlay City at Richmond,
6 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
Tuesday, January 10
Monday, January 9
Yale at Almont, 7 p.m.
Capac vs. Memphis at SC4, Algonac at Capac, 7 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
Cros-Lex at Imlay City,
Mayville at Dryden,
7 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
Mayville at Dryden,
Tuesday, January 10
7:30 p.m
Almont at Yale, 7 p.m.
Wrestling
Girls Basketball
Wednesday, January 4

SCORING


Sams (C)
Kage (D)
Schroeder (C)
DelCampo (D)
Schirmer (IC)
T. Boers (C)
D. Revoldt (A)
Z. Revoldt (A)
Kapron (A)
Lesniak (IC)

G
3
5
3
5
4
3
3
3
3
4

REBOUNDING

DelCampo (D)
T. Boers (C)
Schirmer (IC)
Z. Revoldt (A)

STEALS


Sams (C)
Kage (D)
Castro (IC)
Conn (A)
Knox (D)
Czape (D)

ASSISTS


Sams (C)
Castro (IC)
D. Revoldt (A)
Homer (IC)
Lesniak (IC)
Z. Revoldt (A)

G
5
3
4
3

G
3
5
4
3
5
5

P
47
70
39
60
48
31
29
24
20
25

Avg.
15.7
14.0
13.0
12.0
12.0
10.3
9.7
8.0
6.7
6.3

R Avg.
42 8.4
19 6.3
24 6.0
15 5.0

S Avg.
10 3.3
13 2.6
10 2.5
7 2.3
10 2.0
10 2.0

G A Avg.
3 12 4.0
4 10 2.5
3 7 2.3
4 9 2.3
4 8 2.0
3 6 2.0

Blue Water Area Conference


Team
League Overall
Capac 0-0 2-1
Almont 0-0 1-2
Imlay City
0-0
1-3
North Central Thumb League
Team
League Overall
Dryden 3-0 5-0

GIRLS
BASKETBALL
STATLEADERS
SCORING

Schefka (IC)
Rinke (A)
Sommer (IC)

G
6
5
6

P
81
55
57

Avg.
13.5
11.0
9.5

REBOUNDING

Rinke (A)
Schefka (IC)
Walton (A)

STEALS


Rinke (A)
Kerby (A)
Schefka (IC)
Measel (A)
Zimmerman (A)

G R Avg.
5 46 9.2
6 42 7.0
5 28 5.6
G S Avg.
5 15 3.0
5 14 2.8
6 15 2.5
5 12 2.4
5 10 2.0

ASSISTS


Rinke (A)
Kerby (A)
Zimmerman (A)
Curtis (A)

from page 1-B

a 45-34 win over Plymouth;


and a 45-30 loss to Anchor
Bay.
Wesley Hampton (125),
Luke Stephens (130),
Hunter Mullins (140), Joe
Harper (215/285) and
Jaykob Shaw (215/285)
headlined for Imlay City

G A Avg.
5 5 1.0
5 5 1.0
5 5 1.0
5 5 1.0

GIRLS
BASKETBALL
TEAM STANDINGS

Blue Water Area Conference


Team
League Overall
Almont 0-1 3-2
Capac 1-1 1-4
Imlay City 1-1
1-5
North Central Thumb League
Team
League Overall
Dryden 0-2 1-3

WRESTLING
LEADERS

MOST WINS
Mullins (IC)
Shaw (IC)
Harper (IC)
Hampton (IC)
Trudo (C)
Stephens (IC)
DeMara (A)
Pawlaczyk (IC)
J. Lee (C)
Spies (A)
Hellebuyck (IC)
Burchi (A)
Battani (A)
Kulin (IC)
Fritz (C)
G. Navarro (C)
T. Wheeler (C)

Tournament, TBA
Competitive Cheer
Wednesday, January 4
Almont, Capac, Imlay City
at BWAC Competition,
Capac, 6 p.m.
Saturday, January 7
Capac at Merrill Invite,
TBA

Second: Imlay grabs


second in Howell

that day. Those grapplers


posted 5-0 marks in their
respective weight classes.
Zac Hellebuyck supplied the next best Imlay
City showing. Hellebuyck
wound up 4-1 at 145 pounds.
Eric Pawlaczyk (119)
and Adriel Rojas (135)
added 3-2 marks to Imlay
Citys cause.

Stats and Standings


BOYS
BOYS
BASKETBALL
BASKETBALL
TEAM
STANDINGS
STATLEADERS

Almont, Capac, Yale at


Algonac, 5:30 p.m.
Imlay City, Richmond,
Armada at Cros-Lex,
5:30 p.m.
Saturday, January 7
Imlay City Invite, 9 a.m.
Capac at North Branch
Tournament, 9 a.m.
Almont at Sandusky

13
13
13
11
10
10
9
9
8
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7

Canelo (C)
Wojie (C)
D. Navarro (C)
Dempz (A)
M. Wheeler (C)
King (IC)
Torres (IC)
Hausmann (A)
Scott (C)
Tyson (C)
Moore (IC)
Rojas (IC)
Barragan (IC)
Hernandez (IC)
D. Kruse (A)
C. Kruse (A)
P. Houghten (IC)
Rinke (A)
Pagano (A)
B. Lee (C)
Moreno (C)
Rager (IC)
Pope (IC)
Morse (IC)
Rickman (C)
Arms (A)
Phelps (A)

MOST PINS
Shaw (IC)
Hampton (IC)
Harper (IC)
Trudo (C)
Mullins (IC)
J. Lee (C)
Hellebuyck (IC)
Pawlaczyk (IC)
DeMara (A)
Battani (A)
Kulin (IC)
Dempz (A)
Canelo (C)
Stephens (IC)
G. Navarro (C)

6
6
6
5
5
5
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
11
10
10
9
8
5
5
5
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

M. Wheeler (C)
Spies (A)
T. Wheeler (C)
Wojie (C)
D. Navarro (C)
Burchi (A)
Hernandez (IC)
King (IC)
D. Kruse (A)
Rojas (IC)
Torres (IC)
Pagano (A)
Hausmann (A)
Barragan (IC)
Moreno (C)
Fritz (C)
Rinke (A)
Tyson (C)
P. Houghten (IC)
B. Lee (C)
Rickman (C)
Scott (C)
Phelps (A)
Arms (A)
Morse (IC)

Quick Pins

Trudo (C)
Harper (IC)
Battani (A)
G. Navarro (C)
Shaw (IC)
D. Navarro (C)
Trudo (C)
Wojie (C)
J. Lee (C)

4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
16 secs.
16 secs.
18 secs.
19 secs.
19 secs.
20 secs.
22 secs.
25 secs.
27 secs.

Wrestling Team
Standings

Team
League Overall
Imlay City
0-0
7-7
Capac 0-0 5-6
Almont 0-0 1-8

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Photo provided

Sports Schedule

Jacob Witt, of Capac, seeks out an open teammate at the Harry Moore Tournament.

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Page 4-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 4, 2017

Business
Directory

Legal Announcements

Nicole F. Frost
City Clerk
1-1

eading
Together

Not only is
the newspaper
informative for
you, its a great
learning tool for
kids. Here are
some simple tips
you can use to
help improve your
childs reading
skills at any age:

Read the newspaper to your child regularly.


Explain what youre reading and
encourage a discussion.
Read the newspaper together as a family.
Let children choose what they want to
read.
Encourage your children to read the
newspaper on their own.

Give your family the knowledge they need.


SUBSCRIBE TO:

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P.O. Box 278 Imlay City, MI48444 (810) 724-2615

SUBSCRIBE ONLINE!

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Contact Joseph Minaudo at

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2-16-16

Notice is hereby given that the City Commission of the City of Imlay
City will hold a public hearing on the 17th day of January, 2017 at 7:00
p.m., or as soon thereafter as may be heard, at City Hall, located at 150
North Main Street, Imlay City, MI 48444.
The purpose of the public hearing is to receive comments on the draft
5-Year Community Recreation Plan prior to consideration of its adoption
by the City Commission.
Comments may be submitted in writing or in person. Persons with
disabilities needing accommodations for effective participation should
contact the City Clerk a week in advance of the meeting to request mobility, visual, hearing or other assistance. You may contact the City Staff at
(810) 724-2135 with any questions.

Heating &
Cooling

1-25-17

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


5 YEAR COMMUNITY
RECREATION PLAN

Accounting &
Tax Preparation
2-15-17

CITY OF
IMLAY CITY

on any future documents pertaining to


the grant program; and the City shall
enter into agreements with the contractors to ensure that the City has
control over the grant improvement
expenditures on the properties;
approved an additional $100,000.00
contribution to the MERS Defined
Benefit Retirement Plan as follows:
$46,000.00 to Division 01 - General;
$34,000.00 to Division 02 - Police/
Fire; and $20,000.00 to Division 20 Police POAM; approved Personnel
Policy Amendments # 2016-1 and
2016-2, as presented; approved the
proposal from Michigan Office
Solutions for a 60 month lease on a
7845 Xerox WorkCentre and maintenance agreement to include the 7845
Xerox WorkCentre, five (5) HP P2035
Black & White Printers, one (1) HP
P4014 Black & White Printer and one
(1) HP M451 Color Printer at a cost of
$463.65 per month; approved
Resolution
2016-19
Budget
Amendment No. 2 for FY2016/17, as
presented; and accepted the resignation of WWTP Operator Brad Snyder,
effective December 31, 2016, with
regrets. The meeting was adjourned
at 7:50 p.m. Submitted by Nicole F.
Frost, City Clerk. Complete copies of
the minutes are available in the
Clerk's office during normal business
hours or at www.imlaycity.org.
1-1

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REGULAR COMMISSION
MEETING
DECEMBER 20, 2016
SYNOPSIS

Dana Walker; District 7 County


Commissioner Ian Kempf; and six
members of the community. The
Commission approved the agenda
with the following addition: 7.C.
Proposed CDBG Faade Grant. The
Commission approved the Consent
Agenda Items as presented, including
Regular Meeting minutes of
December 6, 2016; DDA Meeting
minutes of October 10, 2016 and
November 14, 2016; and Payment of
Bills including Payroll of $95,656.63
and Accounts Payable and Trust &
Agency of $417,746.40.
The
Commission removed from the table
the agenda item of Amendment to
Traffic Code Ordinance; approved the
first reading of the Amendment to the
Traffic Code Ordinance; Chapter 71 Parking Regulations; Section 71.06 Schedule of Offenses and Fines, as
presented; ratified the proclamation
for Pat Benson as the 2016 Imlay City
Fire Department Firefighter of the
Year; authorized DDA Director Dana
Walker to sign the MEDC Letter of
Interest for the Imlay City Downtown
Faade CDBG Grant and require the
following program parameters: contractors on the projects are to provide
sworn statements with waivers; any
funds the building owners put forth
shall be placed in an escrow account
with the City; City Commission
review and consent will be required

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Mayor Bargen called the meeting to order at 7:00 p.m.
Commissioners present were Bargen,
Rankin, Kempf, Planck, Ramirez, and
Tanis. Commissioner Romine was
absent. Also present were City
Manager Tom Youatt; DDA Director

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1-11-17

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HELP WANTED
IMLAY CITY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE HAS
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Strong administrative and computer skills required. A working
knowledge of social media and promotions is necessary, as is
experience in event planning and management. Salary DOE.
Please send resume to the
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150 N. Main Street, Imlay City, MI 48444
prior to the January 9, 2017 deadline.

HW-52-2

Imlay City Schools


Clerical Support Position
Imlay City Schools is accepting applications
for a part-time Clerical Support position at
Borland Elementary.
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Apply online at www.icschools.us

52-2

Imlay City Schools


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P.O. Box 278 Imlay City, MI48444 (810) 724-2615

Page 6-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 4, 2017

Outdoors

Have you seen this bird?

Hunter, activist not ready to think pheasant hunting in Michigan is gone forever,
organizes Town Hall meeting to discuss programs other states have done

questions. He has piles of


some people upset, but
Asking Questions...
The poster reads...
news
clippings
and
reports
what weve been doing

Do
you
know
we
have
Have you seen this
on the subject of pheasants nearly three decades of
is taking our money and
bird?
and pheasant hunting.
people who have not hunted building bike trails! We
dont need any more bike
Last seen: Rural
wild pheasants in Michitrails, Ken says sternly.
gan?
he
asked
me.
Sparking
an
interest...
areas in midwestern
Ken believes in recruit- Ken Dalton, hard working activist, looks to
Have you thought

Ken
is
working
hard
to
Town Hall meeting on pheasant hunting for
states.
about the conservation, re- ment and retention.
somehow spark an interanswers January 8, 4 p.m. at Castle Creek Golf
Description: Iritail and tourism dollars we What we need is to get Club.
est once again in pheasant
have lost because there are Michigan hunters back in
descent green head,
hunting.
no pheasants? he went on the fields, using our pubLike the
white ring around
raised birds on state ap10 minutes away from
ask me, his brow and arms lic lands for recreational
interest
great angling opportunities
proved
lands
are
released
neck, copper and gold
hunting opportunities, he
raised.
Verley
and world-class fisheries.
throughout
the
season.
explains to me.
feathers, red wattle,
The moment Ken
Davis
If funding is an issue

Is
that
philosophy
not
walked into my office you
long tail and cackles
sparked
to build a pheasant raise
worth
looking
into
here
in
in him as could feel his passion, you Raise and Release...
and release program then
when flying.
Michigan?
Ken
asks.
could see it and you could

Ken believes in raise
a boy.
lets look at a gas tax,
We dont have to reIf found please call:
hear it in his voice. He
I
and release programs simi- invent the wheel.
Pittman-Roberts money,
Ken Dalton, 810-358royalties from timber sales
By Randy saw my understands why pheasant lar to those in Wisconsin,

is so poor. He unor a new license, Ken
9372.
Pennsylvania, South DaJorgensen neighbor hunting
Why not pheasants
derstands the effect of large
questions.
here are many
acting

who miss the


good ol days
of Michigans
pheasant hunting. Most of us understand
pheasant hunting in Michigan will never be what it
once was.
Ken Dalton, a soft spoken man carries an undeniable passion for pheasant
hunting. Hes tireless in
asking pointed questions. A
man who, I suspect is being
a pain in the side of some
DNR officials. A man who
is not ready to give up.
I think I can safely say,
Ken Dalton is as persistent
as a badger.

Some close friends
have joked with him, asking
if hes running for Pheasadent of the United States.
Ken, I can assure you,
is clearly not joking! He has
studied what other states
have done, he has talked
with newspaper reporters,
radio and TV hosts. He
has talked with hunting
preserve hunters, preserve
owners, clubs, DNR officials, Senators, State Representatives and anyone who
will listen or answers his

strange...
he had a bird wing hooked
to a fishing pole. And his
young dog was chasing it
all over the back yard. I
thought that was odd? he
told me chuckling.
Verley, what you
doin? I asked him.
He told me he was
training his pheasant dog.
I had never seen anything
like it, after all, I was raised
on concrete in downtown
Pontiac, he explained.
As the story unfolded,
Verley took the 15 year-old
Ken under his wing and
introduced him to pheasant hunting. The two often
hunted pheasants north of
Pontiac in Auburn Heights
on Truman Bollins farm.
Soon Kens brothers, Terry
and Jeff became interested
in the sport.
I owe Verley and Truman a great deal for taking
the time to share pheasant
hunting with me. What I
learned from them I taught
to my brothers and we have
shared so many wonderful
times together hunting, we
are grateful, Ken tells me.

kota, Illinois and Nebraska.


Several thousand pen raised
birds are released on public
lands for recreational hunting. It is considered a great
tool for hunter recruitment
for both young and old
alike to bring family and
friends together. Ken would
like to see that happen here
in Michigan.
Wisconsin is building
a $1.5 million hatchery
releasing 200,000 pheasants
for hunters.
They hatch and rear the
chicks in prison facilities
to keep the costs down.
In Wisconsin it is funded
of habitat and increase in
through the state with a $10
predators.
Ken wants everyone to pheasant stamp.
Pennsylvania has four
know and understand hes
game farms releasing nearly
not against the DNR, he
250,000 pheasants, which
has no answers they dont
generates about $35 million
already have. He is a supporter of Pheasants Forever, in revenue for the economy.
The program is funded by
The Pheasant Restoration
the revenue captured from
Incentive and any and all
other programs which pro- hunting license sales.
South Dakota has about
mote pheasant hunting.
$170 million in hunting
But weve been dorevenue from pheasants,
ing the same thing for 25
with the majority of those
years now. Are we going
to just keep doing the same revenues coming from
non-residents. Wild birds
thing? he wonders.
I know this will make and well over 200,000 pen
farms, the use of pesticides,
lack of grass lands, loss

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and fish?
Before everyone gets

all excited about a pheasant release program here in


Michigan lets think about
it, we do offer it for fishing, Ken says, as he smiles
slightly.
Fish stocking creates numerous fishing
opportunities throughout
Michigan. The DNR fish
stocking trucks release a
prized recreational cargo
into hundreds of lakes and
streams throughout the state
each year. According to the
DNR news releases, fish
stocking is a valuable tool
used by fisheries managers
to restore, enhance and create new fishing opportunities. Fisheries Division has
six fish rearing facilities in
Michigan.
Over the course of a
typical year the DNR will
stock roughly 20 million
fish. Michigan anglers have
access to four Great Lakes,
3,000 miles of shoreline,
more than 11,000 inland
lakes and tens of thousands of miles of rivers and
streams. That puts residents
and visitors no more than

Can we afford it? I


asked Ken.
He looked me sternly
in the eye and said, We
cant afford not to!

Town Hall meeting...


Wisconsin, Penn-

sylvania South Dakota


and some other states are
offering successful raise
and release pheasant hunts.
Why cant Michigan?
Currently we have
fewer and fewer pheasant
hunters, only because we
have fewer pheasant hunting opportunities, Ken
explains.
If you would like to
get involved in offering a
solution and or discussing this issue a Town Hall
meeting has been set up
for January 8th, 2017 at
Castle Creek Golf Club,
5191 Lum Rd. Lum MI
48412. The meeting is to
discuss ideas on how to
recruit pheasant hunters,
putting them back in the
fields. Doors open at 4
p.m. at Castle Creek Golf
Club on January 8th.

Ken Dalton can be


reached at
810-358-9372.

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