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Treasure Quest 5.

0 Steve Lefort

Treasure Quest
Version V.O
A Rule set created by
Steve Lefort

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

april 2008

Introduction
What is Treasure Quest?
Treasure Quest is an adaptation of various dungeon crawl games and systems primarily
consisting of a simplified version of the WOTC D&D 3.5 D20 system and an expanded
version of the WOTC D&D Minis rules. If the regular D&D system was referred to as
Advanced and the D&D Minis system was considered Basic, the Treasure Quest system
would be somewhere in betweenExpert I believe they used to call it
Treasure Quest is a quick playing dungeon crawl/ action/RPG system using terrain,
miniatures, dice, counters and cards. I created this method of playing in order to expedite
and simplify the D20 system yet provide character growth with items, weapons,
experience points, magic spells and abilities, co-operative play and other RPG elements.
Essentially what I wanted to do is create a multiplayer, grid/hex based board/ miniature
game version of popular video games like the Diablo and the Dungeon Siege series and
other action/ RPGs.
At first glance, one might think that there is not much different from D&D, but I assure
you, if you try out the Treasure Quest system you will find that it flows quite well,
retains the open ended, limitless, adventure flavor of D&D and is quick to learn and play.
If you feel that this method of playing is not for you, by all means enjoy whatever rule set
you prefer. I imagine it may be too complex for some and too simple for others. I created
this only as an alternative for people wishing to try something different.
Enjoy!

Steve Lefort
aka: BLAST

PS: I loosely use the terms developed, designed etc. throughout this rules guide in
describing the creative process that went into Treasure Quest. I am in no way claiming to
have completely developed Treasure Quest from the ground up. I realize it is a
conversion of existing ideas and rule sets and I am in no way trying to steal anyones
intellectual property(s). Please keep this in mind when reading this guide.

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

Table of Contents
Introduction ..............................................................................................................3
Table of Contents .............................................................................................4
Getting Started .................................................................................................10
Objectives ..........................................................................................................10
Adventure Level .................................................................................11
Creating The Environments ...............................................11
Entrance and Exit Points and Unknown
Depths .....................................................................................................................12
Set Up ...................................................................................................................................13
The Round Sequence ....................................................................................14
Phase I: Upkeep Phase .............................................................................15
Wandering Enemies: Round 0.............................................15
The Round Counter and Spawn Rate ..................16
Spawn Points and Spawn Stacks .....................................17
Threat Tokens ...........................................................................................18
Phase I: Game Play Example ...............................................19
Phase II: Initiative Phase .................................................................20
Phase III: Turn Phase ..............................................................................21
Slow Players ..............................................................................................21
Phase IV: End Phase..................................................................................22
Game Mechanics ..................................................................................................23
Abilities ................................................................................................................23
Action Points ................................................................................................24
Movement .........................................................................................................25
Combat ...............................................................................................................................26
Melee.......................................................................................................................26
Ranged ..................................................................................................................26
Attack Roll Modifiers................................................................27
Defense ...........................................................................................................................28
Armor Class..................................................................................................28

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

Armor and Shields .............................................................................28


Critical Hits and Mistakes ..........................................................30
Attacks of Opportunity..............................................................30
Saving ......................................................................................................................31

Magic .................................................................................................................................32
Magic Skill and Magic Points ............................................32
Concentration ...........................................................................................33
Starting Spells and Learning New Ones ........34
Magic Abilities ...........................................................................................34
Scrolls ..................................................................................................................34
Treasure ........................................................................................................................35
Treasure Chests .....................................................................................35
What is Inside?...........................................................................................36
The Party Leader ...........................................................................................37
Panic ......................................................................................................................................37
Legend Points .........................................................................................................38
EPMs: Expanded Party Members .............................................39
Followers .......................................................................................................39
Mercenaries..................................................................................................40
Companions ......................................................................................................40
Divine Favors .........................................................................................................41
Death ...................................................................................................................................42
Checkpoints ..............................................................................................................43
Resting ............................................................................................................................45
The Wind Crystal ......................................................................................45
Settlements ..............................................................................................................46
Skills.....................................................................................................................................47
Skill: Barter ...............................................................................................49
Skill: Climb +*! .............................................................................................49

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

Skill:
Skill:
Skill:
Skill:
Skill:
Skill:
Skill:
Skill:
Skill:
Skill:
Skill:
Skill:
Skill:

Concentration .......................................................................49
Mechanics+ ...................................................................................50
Training ...........................................................................................50
Medic+ ..................................................................................................51
Jump*! ....................................................................................................51
Knowledge ..................................................................................52
Leadership ...................................................................................52
Listen ...................................................................................................52
Magic ....................................................................................................52
Stealth .............................................................................................53
Lock Pick ..........................................................................................54
Search/ Spot ...............................................................................54
Swim+*! .................................................................................................54

Character Growth ......................................................................................55


The Party Accountant and ......................................................55
Party Adventure Sheet..................................................................55
Experience Points ........................................................................................56
Experience Point Table ..............................................................57
A Game Session Example.........................................................................58
Leveling Up................................................................................................................61
Creating a Character ..............................................................................65
Solo Rules ...................................................................................................................68
Final Notes .................................................................................................................70

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

Brave adventurers begin their TREASURE QUEST!!!

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

What You Need To Play


This is a comprehensive list of the items and tools I use to play with a brief description of
its use. You may substitute whatever items you wish.
I would suggest having this on hand as a reference tool. While I have tried to
make Treasure Quest as thorough as possible, you will need to look
something up, now and then. You will also need this in order to create your
own character, if so desired.
I use D&D minis for the enemies in the Treasure Quest world. The more
you have the better! (Variety makes each adventure unique!)
Sort all your D&D Minis and their reference cards according to their
Level # displayed on the D&D Minis side of their reference card (not
the RPG side).
You may substitute other miniatures or tokens for play, but if you do,
WOTC
you will need to download the D&D Minis reference cards and
D&D Minis
assign your own models to the cards. For example you could use
your GW Orks as any of the D&D Minis Orcs.
After sorting them by Level, sort them further into Enemies and Allies.
You may use your discretion in doing this. I basically sort all monsters and
evil looking models into the Enemies category and all hero types into
Allies. The ratio should be around 90% Enemies versus 10% Allies.
As you will be using D&D Minis, you should understand how to read the
D&D Minis
cards and be familiar with the rules.
Rules
http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/mi/errata
I use glass counters to track Hit Points (Red), Magic Points (Blue), Armor
(Green), Threat Tokens (Multiple Colors), Psionic Points (Clear) and
anything else that needs to be counted. You will also need something for
the players to put the counters in. I use the tubes/containers that sets of D&D
Counters
dice come in. A company called Litko Aero makes great stuff and I now use
their counters for Threat Tokens, Death Tokens and other counters.
http://www.litkoaero.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_
Code=LAI&Category_Code=TS
You will need something to count the Rounds in the game. I use a Reaper
Round
Counter. You may use a D20 die, paper and a pencil or whatever you wish.
Counter
I use this to randomly create treasure values.
http://www.codemonkeypublishing.com
Code
You may manually figure out values using the rules given later in this guide
Monkey
or the WOTC Players Handbook or the Dungeon Masters Guide.
Publishing:
Or you can use this great online Treasure Generator
D&D eTools
http://www.aarg.net/~minam/treasure2.cgi?minor=Y&ring=Y&count=1&se
ed=&minval=&maxval=&mode=specific
WOTC 3.5
Players
Handbook

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

Terrain

Dice

TQ Files

Pencils
DM Screen
60 Sec.
Sand timer
1 Hit
Location
Die
1 Scatter
Die
Divine
Intervention
Cards

I use Dwarven Forge (www.dwarvenforge.com) terrain for creating my


dungeons and caverns etc. While it can get expensive, it really is an amazing
product line that suits Treasure Quest perfectly. Pictures of it in use are
featured through out this guide.
If using Dwarven Forge products I also highly recommend using the
fan created Dwarven Forge dungeon creation software to design your
dungeon layouts. It is free and is located here:
http://www.muinimula.de/Muini/de/2nd/tools/mastermaze/Masterma
ze.html.
You may also use paper terrain and I suggest the Worldworks
product line (www.worldworksgames.com) (good stuff!) or Fat
Dragons E-Z Dungeons
(http://www.rpgnow.com/index.php?cPath=587).
Im currently using customized Heroscape tiles for outdoor
environments and they are shown in the pictures through this guide.
(http://www.hasbrotoyshop.com/ProductsByBrand.htm?BR=746)
Standard flat 1 square/hex gridded maps are fine as well as the
WOTC Dungeon Tiles
http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=products/dndacc/957317400
Hirst Arts (www.hirstarts.com). I am building some Sci-Fi stuff for
Bug Hunt at this time and hope to build some dungeon creations
soon!
In short, use whatever your enthusiasm and budget dictate.
1 set of standard D&D dice (D4, D6, D8, D10, D12, D20) per player & the
DM.
Download the following files I have posted here:
http://games.groups.yahoo.com/group/pschronicles/
A character Pack for the character you would like to play or a blank
character Sheet to start your own new character.
A copy of these rules, if you do not already have one.
Or any writing tool.
Some sort of screen thing, to block the players from being able to see what
the DM is doing.
Or egg timer, stop watch etc.
http://www.rpgshop.com/product_info.php?products_id=36953
You may also use 1 d8.
To randomly determine a direction
Available here:
http://www.rpgnow.com/product_info.php?products_id=18530&it=1

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

Getting Started
Objectives
Treasure Quest is different than most RPGs in that story and dialogue take a back seat
to action, combat and tactile elements. Similar to any other RPG, you could implement a
princess to rescue, dragon to slay or any other quest, but the ongoing theme/ objective
of the game is to get treasure and escape ALIVE.

Ancient crypts filled with Treasure

People tell me that it is a VERY hard game to win, which I find humorous since there
is no real win condition. What makes Treasure Quest difficult for some is: PURE
GREED! Since the (default) object is primarily: Stay alive. You could essentially enter
the dungeon for 1 turn and leave andyoure done! You won! Butmost stay in the
dungeon a little longer, risking a little more, to get to one more treasure chest
The default TQ objective:
Each Dungeon contains 1 special Objective Treasure (which you can make up
using the Players Handbook) located in an Objective Room, guarded by a Boss
enemy. An Objective Room is any room/ area that the DM wishes to declare as
the Objective Room. A Boss enemy is an enemy that is 2 levels above the
Adventure Level.
Larger dungeons may have more than 1 Boss, usually consisting of Sub-Bosses,
but you would probably know all this from the countless hours of video games
you played right? ;)
Example: Adventure Level 1= A Level 3 Boss located in the Objective Room.

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

10

Adventure Level
Since DMing Treasure Quest is a merciless task, at the start of the game, players decide
what Adventure Level they wish to tackle. The DM may decide, but if the players all die
(which they will sometimesuhhhlots of times), they usually get frustrated
and complain that it was too hard (pansies). If they decide and all dieits their own
fault! (Nave adventurers) The Adventure Level pretty much determines the
difficulty of the scenario that will be played, the default level of the Enemies the
adventurers will fight and the Traps they will face. For example, this means, that in an
Adventure Level 3 scenario, Enemies and Traps will be (default) level 3.
When I first started playing Treasure Quest we started at Adventure Level 1, but to a
group of Level 1 characters, even that proved quite difficult! I would start out with new
adventures at level or 1/3 (for really wimpy, whiny players) with a Boss being a
Level 1 Enemy. I think this would make the earlier games a little lessdeadlyfor your
(fool) hardy adventurers.
An easy way to calculate the Adventure Level going forward is to use the average
character level -1.

Creating The Environments


Throughout this guide I will usually refer to the game environments (boards) as being
dungeons but you may use any environment you wish. I frequently run outdoor Forest
adventures and they work fine. (Im currently working on an Egyptian Adventure, an
Artic Adventure and a Jungle Adventure.)
When creating the environment, pretty much anything goes, but try to keep in mind the
following guidelines:
1. Open areas really help the game move faster, especially when a large
number of players are involved (4-6 adventurers).
2. The bigger the dungeon, the longer the game. If you build a massive
dungeon, you may want to reduce the Spawn Rate or slow down the
Spawn Rate Increase (see rules: 1.2-1.3). You may also want to include
Checkpoints (more on that later).
3. When building a dungeon layout, leave a couple of corridors or areas in
different parts of the layout unfinished, (3-4 Player game = approximately.
3-4 unfinished areas). These unfinished areas will serve a number of
purposes including entrances, exits and Unknown Depths.

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

11

A mysterious, underground river

Entrance and Exit Points and Unknown


Depths
After creating the dungeon layout, pick 1 or 2 of the incomplete sections and designate
them as Entrance and/or Exit points. These points are where the adventurers start the
scenario and where they may exit the scenario. They may exit at any time, provided they
can physically make it there (i.e.: not dead). The DM may decide that certain points only
act as Exit points, or only Entrance points, or both.
The other incomplete sections are referred to as Unknown Depths and represent the
endless, unexplored corridors/ caves of the dungeon. Like any veteran adventurer will tell
you, this is where the bad things come from
In an outdoor adventure or other scenario, the DM may (or may not) declare spaces as
the locations of Unexplored Areas (that act in the same way as Unknown Depths). I
usually use edge of board spaces as Unexplored Areas. Try to use an area that is
somewhat conceal from the rest of the board.
Dont hesitate to throw a few surprises at the players, for example, when playing in an
underwater cavern, I had a water based creature use the water as an Unexplored Area.
I did not tell the players about this until the first creature crawled from the murky
depthsright behind them

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

12

Set Up
1.

2.
3.
4.

5.
6.

7.
8.
9.

10.
11.
12.
13.
14.

Players select their characters (Character Reference Sheets) from the batch of
pre-generated characters, or from 1 they have created themselves (using the
WOTC D&D 3.5 Players Handbook).
Players collect their Initiative Cards and enough counters equal to their Max Hit
Points (red), Armor Durability (green) and Magic Points (blue).
A Party Adventure Sheet is filled out and the Party Accountant is nominated.
Goods may be purchased (as each adventure is assumed to start in a town) and
EPMs (see Expanded Party Members) that are available are displayed and
selected.
Each Level 1 character is given a Divine Favor card. Any character wishing and
able to donate for a Divine Favor card may do so.
The dungeon/ environment is created. (Depending on the complexity of your
setup, I recommend doing this before players arrive as it takes up precious game
time.)
The Adventure Level is determined. (Players choose.)
The Spawn Stack(s) is created/ selected. (If the Adventure Level is determined
by the DM, the Spawn Stack(s) can be created/ selected before the game begins.)
The Objective Room is determined (if the scenario has one) and an Objective
Treasure card (Optional) and Boss card is drawn by the DM and placed hidden
from the players.
Entrance/ Exit Points and Unknown Depths are declared by the DM.
The Party Leader is declared.
Players select their dungeon entrance(s) and place their models.
Wandering Enemies are placed in random Unknown Depths entry points.
The characters pray for mercyand the DM smiles knowing none will be
given

A colorful forestfilled with danger


Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

13

The Round Sequence


For your first game, I suggest using one of the pre-generated characters and jumping right
into the action. Treasure Quest was designed for this type of play anyways. After
playing a session and seeing how it works, you may decide to create your own character
if you see fit.
So, lets see how this works

Treasure Quest is played in Rounds. Each Round consists of 4 Phases. Once you play
a few games, Phases 1, 2 & 4 should only take a few seconds, with the meat of the game
being Phase 3.
1

Upkeep Phase
1.1 Wandering Enemies (Round 0)
1.2 Round Counter & Spawn Rate
1.3 Spawn Points & Spawn Stack(s).
1.4 Threat Tokens
2 Initiative Phase
All players role for Initiative and Initiative Cards are sorted accordingly.
3 Turn Phase
All players take their turns alternating between activating 2 models and the
DM turns. Continues until all players have activated all their models once.
4 End Phase
Death Counters are placed on any Fallen model or on the board. (my
favorite part)

Ancient ruins and a Magical Gate

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

14

Phase I: Upkeep Phase


There are 4 parts to the Upkeep Phase. Following (in sequence) are the different parts of
the Upkeep Phase.

Wandering Enemies: Round 0


At the start of the game (Round 0), before any of the adventurers have entered the
dungeon, a Threat Token is placed on the board at each Unknown Depths location and
acts as a (peaceful minding its own business) Wandering Enemy. Wandering
Enemies are the regular inhabitants of the dungeon moving around; searching for food,
weapons, a place to sleep, treasure etc. Adventurers may run into the dungeon with drawn
steel, ready to fight, or may choose to quietly explore the dungeon undetected using their
Stealth Skill, (see Skills).
It is very hard for (inane) untrained (low skill level) adventurers to successfully use their
Stealth skills so they may bypass trying in early games. If they choose to skip the Stealth
test, the adventurers place their models (in Initiative Order) in any unoccupied spaces at
any entrance location.
Each round Wandering Enemies move toward the characters or EPMs (Expanded
Party Members) during the Turn Phase (like regular Threat Tokens). However;
1. If no Wandering Enemy obtains LOS on any character or EPM by the
end of the round, the players have been relatively quiet and have not
attracted additional enemies. The Round Counter remains at 0 and no
Spawn Points are generated,
2. If a Wandering Enemy does gain LOS but is destroyed by the end of the
round the sounds of the struggle have mainly gone unnoticed. 1
Wandering Enemy is placed at any Unknown Depths location.
3. If an Enemy gains LOS on an adventurer and survives until the end of the
Round, the sounds of combat and the Enemys roars attract more
Enemies. The Round Counter is started. Let the carnage begin!

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

15

The Round Counter and Spawn Rate


Time plays a crucial role in Treasure Quest and is measured in phases, turns and
Rounds. Starting with Round 1, every Round thereafter is counted by the DM and/or
players on a Round Counter. When the adventurers first enter the dungeon (typically
Round 0), creatures are roaming around doing their usual (peaceful) dungeon stuff,
(Wandering Enemies) oblivious to the (invading, intruding) adventure party
(criminals!). However, as time goes on, the adventurers create more noise (due to
combat, breaking down doors, prying open chests (and blatantly stealing the
contents!), yelling out spells and generally creating a (hell of a lot) of noise)
thereby attracting more creatures that are curious about what is going on and looking for
lunch
How does this effect play?
Once the Round Counter turns to Round 1, each Round is counted. Wandering
Enemies are no longer generated and the Spawn Rate takes affect. The quantity of
Spawn Points that are generated per Round is called the Spawn Rate.
Rounds 1-10: Spawn Rate = 2 Spawn Points
Rounds 11-20: Spawn Rate = 3 Spawn Points
Rounds 21-30: Spawn Rate = 4 Spawn Points
(Actually the longest game so far has been 23 Rounds)
The Spawn Rate above (Rounds 1-10 = 2 Spawn Points) is suited for a 3-4 player
adventure, however you may wish to adjust the Spawn Rate based on the number of
players (Ex: Rounds 1-10 = 3 Spawn Points) to increase/ decrease the difficulty. If you
are playing a first game (Adventure Level 1) the DM should receive 1 Spawn Point
every other turn.
The Spawn Rate Increase is the number of rounds played before the Spawn Rate is
increased. The DM may adjust the Spawn Rate Increase in order to make the dungeon
more or less difficult. Shorting the frequency of the Spawn Rate Increase (every 5
rounds etc.) will definitely add pressure to the players to move quickly! Lengthening the
Spawn Rate Increase (every 15-20 rounds etc.) would allow a longer or bigger
adventure.
1

Once an adventurer enters an Objective Room with a Boss (or Sub-Boss) in it, the
Round Counter is temporarily paused. Lowly dungeon minions are too afraid of a
Boss or Sub-Boss to get involved and Spawn Points are no longer generated. Once a
Boss or Sub-Boss is destroyed, the Round Counter continues from where it left off, as
the minions are not afraid of a dead Boss!
So what the heck is a Spawn Point?
Be brave
1

Thanks to Walt & Ken from Vancouver for the great idea!

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

16

Spawn Points and Spawn Stacks


As previously explained, each Round, Spawn Points are generated according to the
Spawn Rate. Spawn Points are spent by the DM on Enemies and enter play as Threat
Tokens at the Unknown Depths locations. Using the following table, Spawn Points
may be spent or saved up by the DM in order to bring more powerful Enemies into play
(to crush those petty thieving adventurers) or on weaker Enemies (to slow
down those pests).
1 Spawn Point
2 Spawn Points
5 Spawn Points

= 1 Enemy of the next lower Adventure Level


= 1 Enemy equal to the Adventure Level
= 1 Enemy of the next higher Adventure Level

So, using the above table; playing an Adventure Level 2 game, each Round, 2 Spawn
Points are generated, which could be spent on a Level 2 Enemy. Spawn Points are spent
on Enemy cards from the Spawn Stacks.
Remember when you sorted all your D&D Minis and cards according to their Level?
Well, grab a stack of the sorted reference cards that match the Adventure Level
(Adventure Level 2 = Level 2 Cards) and place that in the DMs play area (hidden from
the other players). This is your Spawn Stack. The DM spends Spawn Points to bring
these Enemies into play. Once the correct amount of Spawn Points are accumulated and
spent, the Enemy on the top of the stack is brought into play (as a Threat Token) and
the reference card is taken from the top of the Spawn Stack and placed into the DMs
play area. This means that the DM only knows what the next Enemy brought into play
will be. If playing solo, check out the solo section of the rules as Spawn Stacks are done
a little differently.
Now there are a couple of different ways to create Spawn Stacks and use them. The
main variants I use are the following:
1. Mix in Enemies of varying levels into 1 Spawn Stack. (I recommend
going a maximum of 1 level lower and 1 level higher.) This way
sometimes the DM has to save up Spawn Points to bring the next horrific
Enemy out! These Stacks can be themed (For example: a cave filled with
nothing but undead.) You could also mix in an EPM (see Expanded
Party Member).
2. Create 3-4 stacks, each one representing a different level of Enemies.
(Example: Adventure Level 2: Level 1, Level 2, Level 3 Spawn Stacks)
You could place the Spawn Stacks face up or face down. Turn by turn,
the DM can save up Spawn Points or choose to spend them quickly,
drawing from whichever pile he wishes to.
3. Same as #1 but allow the DM to have a hand of 5 cards to Spawn from,
drawing a new card each time an Enemy is Spawned!

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

17

Threat Tokens
Once the DM has spent his Spawn Points, Enemies are spawned in a square adjacent to
the Unknown Depths location the DM chooses, by placing a 1 Threat Token on each
space for each Enemy spawned. Sometimes I alternate Unknown Depths locations when
placing Threat Tokens to provide a more even spread of Enemies. Only 1 Threat
Token may occupy a space at one time. Player controlled models may never end their
turn on a space adjacent to an Unknown Depths location (thereby blocking new Threat
Tokens from being placed.). An Enemy may end their turn on a space adjacent to an
Unknown Depths location.
When the DM places a Threat Token on the board, they should place a corresponding
Threat Token on the reference card of the Enemy. Ideally you want to use different
colored/ numbered counters as Threat Tokens so you can keep track of which counter is
which Enemy. However, do not use (for example) red counters as Level 1 Enemies, blue
as Level 2, green as 3 and so on You do not want the players to know how strong or
what Enemy a counter represents!
A Threat Token is a representation of something that the adventurers can hear or sense
coming towards them (death). While they do not know what it is, they can hear it walk,
slither, fly etc. as it approaches. Once spawned, a Threat Token may take its turn as
normal. A Threat Token has a movement of 4 (as it is in no rush and is just
curious about what all the ruckus is about) and can not attack until converted
into a model. To convert a Threat Token to a model, the token is removed and replaced
with the relevant model.
Adventurers may be able to determine what the Threat Token is through the sound it
makes. Making a successful Listen check (see Skills) may allow them to identify it!
A Threat Token is usually converted into a model when 1 of 3 things happens:
1. The DM decides he wants to convert it. This is usually done to gain the
extra movement points the Enemy may possess or if he wants to attack
with it. This is done anytime during the DMs turn.
2. A character has LOS (Line of Sight) to it. The token is converted as soon
as the character gains LOS to the Threat Token. This can happen during
the DM or Player turns. When initially spawned and placed in LOS of a
character or EPM, the Threat Token is immediately converted into a
model.
3. An adventurer successfully identifies it using his/her Listen Skill (see
Skills).

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

18

Phase I: Game Play Example


(Upkeep Phase)
Adventurers have begun an Adventure Level 3 dungeon scenario and have decided not to
use their Stealth skills. They enter play (place their models) on an incomplete section of
the dungeon designated by the DM as being an Entrance point. The DM tells the players
that they may also exit using the same location and shows the players an additional Exit
point. 2 other incomplete sections of the dungeon are declared Unknown Depths. The
first Round begins. The Round Counter is turned to 1. Since the Spawn Rate is 2 and the
Adventure Level is 3, the DM receives 2 Level 3 Spawn Points, which he spends on 1
Level 3 enemy. The DM discards the Spawn Points and takes the top card from the Level
3 Spawning Stack. The DM places the card in the DM area (hidden from the other
players) and places a blue token on the reference card and a blue Threat Token on the
board at one of the Unknown Depths locations. Initiative is now rolled!

The battle commences!

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

19

Phase II: Initiative Phase


The Initiative Phase determines turn order and is quite easy to carry out. At the start of
the phase, players should have their Initiative Cards and a pen or pencil. All players roll
1D20 and add their Initiative located on their Character Reference Sheet taking into
account any bonuses or penalties. They then write this total on their Initiative Card and
pass it to the DM, (or another player can assist the DM to speed things up). Who ever is
given the cards, puts them in order highest to lowest (with the highest on top) and gives
them to the DM. This determines the turn order for this Round. If 2 players have the
same total they may decide who goes foremost or the DM may just go by whoever hands
in their card first. Keep it moving

Paladin, Granan Milner takes front and center as a pair of Nothics attack!
As each player completes his turn, or at the end of the Round, each player is given back
their Initiative Card and everyone re-rolls their Initiative for the next Round.
Effectively this means that the turn order will usually be different every Round. The DM
never rolls for Initiative (why not!) as he/she takes a turn between each player turn as
explained in the Turn Phase rules.
EPMs do not roll for initiative and take their turn during the characters turn that
controls them.

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

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Phase III: Turn Phase


Each Round, a number of player and DM turns take place during the Turn Phase.
Starting with the player that has the highest Initiative, each player may Activate 2
models per turn. If a player controls more than 2 models (for example: 1 character and 2
Followers), he may only Activate 2 of those models before the DM takes a turn
Activating 2 models or Threat Tokens. The player would now be able to Activate his
third model. A player may never control more than 4 models. The DM; never takes the
first turn (unfair rule!), takes a turn between each player turn and may Activate up to
2 models or Threat Tokens per DM turn. No model or Threat Tokens may ever be
Activated twice within the same Round under normal circumstances; however certain
spells, magic abilities or the Party Leader Command Bonus may allow it.
The following example illustrates how a regular Turn Phase may work:
Player 1: Turn A
DM Turn
Player 1: Turn B
DM Turn
Player 2: Turn A
DM Turn
Player 2: Turn B
DM Turn
Etc.

May Activate up to 2 models (Highest Initiative)


May Activate up to 2 models or Threat Tokens
May Activate up to 2 additional models
May Activate up to 2 additional models or Threat Tokens
May Activate up to 2 models (Next Highest Initiative)
May Activate up to 2 additional models or Threat Tokens
May Activate up to 2 additional models
May Activate up to 2 additional models or Threat Tokens

This sequence of turns takes place until all the players have Activated all their models. If
the DM has any models, Wandering Enemies or Threat Tokens left over that have not
Activated yet, he may now Activate them in any order he wishes until they have all been
Activated once.

Slow Players
A player has 60 seconds to complete their turn. If at any time anyone feels that a player is
taking too long, they may flip the Timer. If the active player can not complete their turn
within the allocated time, their warrior(s) is overwhelmed by what is happening and stays
frozen in place for that turn (their turn ends immediately). This rule can come into play
more frequently in games with a larger number of players or in circumstances where the
DM wants the players to feel pressured (Traps etc.)

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

21

Phase IV: End Phase


The last Phase in the Round is called the End Phase and only takes place if a character
or EPM (Expanded Party Member) has Fallen (good!). I wont go into detail here
(see Death), but the Phase basically amounts to this; if a model has Fallen, the player
controlling the model is given a Death Token (good!) which is placed on his Character
Reference Sheet, or in the case of an EPM, on their reference card. Once 5 Death
Tokens accumulate on a character or 3 Death Tokens on a EPM it truly is the End
Phase for that model (good!)he- be-dead (VERY Good!). In the case of a character, a
Death Token is then placed on the board where he died.

Emerging from the forest

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

22

how to kill adventures that steal treasure from


innocents
Game Mechanics
Abilities
Version 5 of Treasure Quest remaps a number of Attributes to different Skills and
Statistics. Following are explanations of how the Attributes are now applied.
Strength (S): A characters Strength attribute is their ability to fight in hand to hand
combat. This number is added to your roll when attacking and applying damage. It can
also be used when taking actions associated with strength (ex: prying open a chest). It is
also linked to your Climb, Jump and Swim Skills.
Dexterity (D): A characters Dexterity attribute is their ability to fight using ranged or
thrown weapons in combat. This number is added to your roll when making ranged
attacks. It is also linked to your Mechanics, Stealth Skill, Initiative and Reflex Saving.
Intelligence (I): A characters Intelligence affects their mental abilities and affects their
Concentration, Lock Pick and Medic Skills. Intelligence also affects a Wizard,
Sorcerer and Necromancers Magic Skill.
Charisma (CH): A characters Charisma affects their powers of persuasion. It affects a
characters Barter, Leadership and Training Skills. Charisma also affects a Bards
Magic Skill.
Wisdom (W): A characters Wisdom is a measurement of their willpower, natural
instincts and how attuned they are to their surroundings and the environment they are in.
It affects a characters Knowledge, Listen and Search/Spot Skills along with their Will
Saving. Wisdom also affects a Cleric, Ranger, Druid and Paladins Magic Skill.
Constitution (C): A characters Constitution is an indication of their hardiness. It
affects a characters Hit Point Increase, Defense and Fortitude Saving. Constitution
also affects a warriors (Barbarian, Fighter, Monk, Rogue) Magic Skill.

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

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Action Points
Hey Steve, so what does an Activation consist of?
Each time a model is Activated, the player (or DM) that controls it may spend 2 Action
Points (APs) in any way he wants. The Action Points Reference Table covers the cost
of performing each action (how long it takes to do it). A player does not have to
determine how he will spend all his Action Points at the beginning of his turn. He may,
for example, choose to attack an enemy first and then decide to move away depending on
how combat turned out. Some actions do not require an Action Point while others cost
Speed (ex: 1S). In order to do a Speed action, a character must spend an AP on
Movement and then may decide to actually move their character and/or just take Speed
actions. For Example: At the cost of 1 AP; A character with a Speed 4, could move 3
spaces and open a door. (Am I over-explaining this?)
A quick glance at a few of the available actions and their cost is shown in the table
below: You should also notice the 3rd column called Provokes Attack of Opportunity
(see Attacks of Opportunity for more explanation).
Action Points Reference Table
Action
Attack (Melee or Ranged)
Cast a Spell*
Move
Activate Item (Rod, Staff, Wand etc.)
Cast a spell
Draw/ Change/ Equip a weapon or item
Drink potions (You may drink multiple as 1 Action)
Drop an item
Load light or hand crossbow
Load a heavy or repeating crossbow
Open or close a door
Pick up an item
Read a scroll
Stabilize a dying "model" (using Medic skill)
Attempting to Pick a Lock (Chest/ Door)
Swim
Defensive Stance

Action
Points
1
0+
1
1
0+
0
1
0
1S
2
1S
1S
1+
1
1
1
1

Provokes Attack Of
Opportunity
No
No-Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No

*When casting a spell with a 0 AP cost, it does not provoke an attack of opportunity.
When casting spells with a 1+AP cost, it does provoke an attack of opportunity.
If, during play, a character wishes to take an action that is not on the Action Points
Reference Table or covered somewhere in this guide, it is the DMs discretion to
determine an Action Point Cost.

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

24

Movement
Movement in Treasure Quest is based on spending Action Points. Basically, a
character can move 1 space (square or hex) in any direction up to their maximum Speed
at the cost of 1 Action Point. This means that you may move twice in one Round by
spending 2 Action Points on Movement (run fool run). The same applies to EPMs
and any Enemies that use a D&D Minis reference card.

The Catacombs of Madness

When using stairs or moving up levels, (example: using Heroscape terrain), each increase
in elevation uses an extra 1 Speed. For example, moving up a set of 3 stairs, (starting on
the ground in front of them) would cost 6 Speed, ending your movement on the top step
(1 Speed for each step (3) and 3 increases in elevation (+3 =6). This is calculated
differently then using your Climb Skill (see Skills). Using your Climb Skill assumes
there are no stairs etc. (climbing a wall etc.) I think this should be pretty easy to
understand, so to avoid risk of over explaining it, I will stop here.
Certain types of terrain may hinder movement or cause movement penalties. For
example, moving over uneven rocky terrain may cause double, triple or quadruple the
movement. Dense foliage or brush may also impede movement. Usually irregular terrain
is pointed out at the beginning of a scenario but may be indicated by the DM when he
sees fit. Obviously both (criminals), adventurers and Enemies are affected.

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

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Combat
Using Treasure Quests Action Point system, it costs 1 Action Point to make an attack
action, (this usually means attacking once.) Therefore, in the same round you may spend
2 Action Points and attack twice (or more; see Multiple Attacks). Regardless of what
weapons a character may possess or find, he or she may only use weapons that they are
proficient with (Weapon Proficiency). A character that has the Weapon Proficiency:
Simple FEAT can use all Simple weapons, Weapon Proficiency: Martial; can use all
Martial weapons etc. If only certain weapons are listed, they are only able to use those
weapons.

Melee
Attack: When attacking in hand to hand combat (Melee) with a character the player
controlling the model makes an attack roll by rolling 1D20 and adds the attackers
Attack and Strength attribute. If attacking with an EPM or Enemy, roll 1D20 and add
the models Melee attribute. An attack roll represents your attempt to strike your
opponent. With a normal Melee weapon, you can strike any opponent within 1 space.
Some Melee weapons have reach, as indicated in their descriptions. With a typical reach
weapon, you can strike opponents up to 2 spaces away. Unarmed Attacks (no weapon)
are done in the same fashion as armed attacks as your character tries to punch, kick or
head butt his opponent. Only characters can make Unarmed Attacks.
Damage: If the attack roll result equals or exceeds the targets AC, the attack hits and
you deal damage. To determine damage when a character is attacking, roll the required
die specified by the weapon, adding the characters Strength attribute. If attacking with a
Two-Handed weapon (2HD) a +2 bonus to damage is applied. Damage is deducted from
the targets current hit points. If an Enemy or EPM has hit (D&D Minis card) roll 1D8
per 5 damage (indicated on the card) the model has dealt. An Unarmed Attack from a
character deals (1d4 plus your Strength) points of damage. If penalties reduce the
damage result to less than 1, a hit still deals 1 point of damage.

Ranged
Attack: With a ranged weapon you can shoot or throw at any target that is within the
weapons range and in LOS. If attacking with a Ranged weapon, the same process is
followed as in Melee except; when attacking with a character your Dexterity attribute is
used instead of the Strength attribute and when attacking with an Enemy or EPM their
Ranged attribute is used instead of their Melee. Character weapons have range ratings
which dictate the maximum distance the weapon can shoot. In order to keep the games
moving quickly, Enemies and EPMs are assumed to have weapons with enough range
to attack as long as they have LOS, unless their range is specifically written.
Shooting or Throwing into a Melee: If you shoot or throw a ranged weapon at a target
engaged in melee with a friendly character, you take a 4 penalty on your attack roll.
A model is considered in Melee combat when it is adjacent to an enemy model.

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

26

Damage: Ranged attack damage from any Enemy or EMP is calculated the same way as
a Melee attack (1D8 per 5 damage); however a character Ranged attack applies damage
differently. To calculate Ranged damage with a character, roll the required die specified
by the weapon and do not add the characters Dexterity attribute. Some ranged weapons
(Composite Bow) add the characters Strength attribute and will specify when this
applies. If penalties reduce the damage result to less than 1, a hit still deals 1 point of
damage.
Multiple Attacks: If a character or enemy has 2 (or more) Melee or Ranged values (Ex:
Melee 5/4) this means that the model may make 2 (or more) attacks per 1 Action Point
spent, however, all attacks (per AP) must be at the same target.

Attack Roll Modifiers


Certain circumstances award attackers bonuses or penalties. For example; it is easier to
hit someone on the ground Helpless than hiding Behind Cover. The following Attack
Roll Modifiers apply to combat.
Attack Roll Modifiers
Attacker is Dazzled
Attacker is Entangled
Attacker is Flanking defender
Attacker is Invisible
Attacker is On higher ground
Attacker is Prone
Attacker is Shaken or Frightened
Attacker is Squeezing through a space
Defender is Behind cover
Defender is Fallen/ Carrying another character
Defender is Stunned
Defender is Prone/ Helpless
Defender is Blinded
Defender is Entangled
Defender is In a Defensive Stance

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

-1
-2
+2
+2
+1
-4
-2
-4
-4
+4
+2
+4
+2
+2
-4

27

Defense
Every character starts the game with a basic Defense score (you will need it). This
score considers a number of factors including; racial characteristics, class bonuses,
Constitution and size. A characters Defense is included when calculating a characters
total Armor Class. A character may temporarily boost their Defense by spending 1
Action Point to go into a Defensive Stance. While in the Stance, you gain a +4 bonus to
your AC for 1 Round, however you may not take any other actions, nor make Attacks of
Opportunity while in a Defensive Stance.

Armor Class
Your Armor Class (AC) represents how hard it is for opponents to land a solid,
damaging blow on you. Its the attack roll result that an opponent needs to achieve to hit
you. If an opponent attacks you and their attack roll total is equal to or higher than your
AC, you have been hit. Your AC is equal to your Defense plus any Armor Class
bonuses that your armor or shields provide.

Armor and Shields


Characters usually wear protective clothing, objects or shields which may save them from
Damage if they are lucky. These items are generally referred to as armor. Like weapons,
a character may only use armor that he or she is proficient with. To differentiate between
all the types and materials that exist, all armor is rated in 3 ways;
AC Bonus (AC)
Durability (Dur.)
Hardness (Hard.)
AC Bonus (AC) is simply a bonus applied to the characters AC. So an AC of 1 provides
an additional 1 AC to the character. Incredibly strong and rare materials provide a higher
AC bonus, which means they can be quite expensive!
Durability (Dur.) is the total damage the armor can take before it is destroyed. Similar to
a characters Hit Points, armor looses points from its Durability as it takes damage.
Once it reaches zero it is discarded, as it no longer offers protection. Armor can be
mended using special skills or magic, however each time it is fixed, its maximum
Durability is reduced by 1. Armor can not be fixed once its Durability reaches zero nor
can it ever be repaired past its maximum Durability. So how do you determine if the
armor or character takes the damage? Hardness
Like real life, when someone is wearing armor (or any type of garment) and is struck, the
garment absorbs some of the impact and the persons body takes the rest. The harder or
better the armor, the more impact it absorbs and less is transferred to the body it is
protecting. To represent this, all armor has a Hardness rating. This number is the amount
Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

28

of damage the armor will take from a single Enemy in one turn (regardless of the number
of attacks), before damage is applied directly to the character. If the damage done is
minor enough, then the attack has struck the armor and not hurt the character at all,
although still damaging the armor. Confusing?
Example: During combat, twice a large, vicious Mountain Orc hits the Dwarven Fighter
Otineiros Destinaxe! The first hit causes a total of 7 Damage. Since Otineiros is wearing
a Chain Shirt which has a Hardness of 1, 1 Damage is applied to the armor instead of
the Fighter. Otineiros reduces the current Durability of his Chain Shirt by 1 and reduces
his Hit Points by 6. The second hit causes 5 Damage. Since Otineiros has already been
hit by the Mountain Orc this round, all damage is applied directly to Otineiros Hit
Points.
Easy...no?
You may only ever be wearing (or carrying) 1 piece of armor and 1 shield at a time. This
means that you can not be wearing Full Plate Armor and carrying Leather and Chainmail
in reserve. Or be running around with 6 shields! Once you purchase new armor (or a
new shield), you must sell, drop, or give away your old armor (or shield) at the same
time. You may however, wear armor and wear some sort of special helmet or boots etc.
Common sense applies

Necromancer, Ricdak Urthadar summons a Skeleton Warrior!

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

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Critical Hits and Mistakes


During combat, when a character or Enemy rolls a natural 20 a Critical Hit has been
made and total damage is doubled. Additionally, if an Enemy has hit a character (Good
job), a damage location roll is done and the following penalty is applied for the
remainder of the adventure (penalties are cumulative). If a character is wearing an item
listed in the location he was hit, the item is destroyed and no further penalty takes place.
(not even a little one?) A character cannot choose to take the damage instead of
having the item destroyed.
LOCATION
Head
Right/ Left Hand

ITEM
Helmet/ Headdress Destroyed
Ring Destroyed

Right/ Left Leg


Stomach

Belt Destroyed

Torso
Amulet Destroyed
Full Body
1 Random Item Destroyed
Right/ Left Arm
Right/ Left Foot
Boots Destroyed
**Damage can be applied to a shield.

PENALTY
-4 Using all Skills
Damage Applied to characters
weapon
-4 AC
-2 Armor Max Durability &.
Durability
Double Damage to Armour**
Double Damage to Armour**
-2 Attack (Melee or Ranged)
-1 Speed

When a character or Enemy rolls a natural 1, a Critical Mistake has been made and the
attacker automatically misses his target. Due to such an error, damage has been done to
the weapon the character was using. A bow string could have snapped, a sword chipped
when hitting a rock etc. Roll for damage like the weapon had struck its target however,
subtract the weapon Hardness from the total damage done. For each 2 points of damage
remaining, the weapon losses one point of Durability. If an Enemy attacker makes a
Critical Mistake (Never happens), the defender automatically gains an Attack of
Opportunity.

Attacks of Opportunity
Attacks of Opportunity are free Melee attacks given to Enemies, characters or EPMs
when certain circumstances take place. In order for an Attack of Opportunity to happen,
the attacking model must be in a space adjacent to the target. When the target instigates
certain actions, he opens up his defenses and awards an opponent with a free (single)
attack. The Action Points Reference Table clarifies which actions provoke an Attack of
Opportunity and which actions do not.
When a model is moving from a space adjacent to an opponent, to a space that is not
adjacent, the opponent is awarded an Attack of Opportunity. When a model is moving
from an adjacent space to another adjacent space, no attack is given.
A model may make an unlimited number of Attacks of Opportunity each round
provided that the criteria above are met and he is able (ie: not dead etc.). Questions?

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

30

Saving
Generally, when you are subject to an unusual or magical attack, you get a saving throw
to avoid or reduce the effect. Like a DC roll, a saving throw is a d20 roll plus a bonus
based on your class, level, and an ability score. The DC for a save is determined by the
attack itself. Your saving throw modifier consists of your Base save bonus + the ability
that it is linked to (shown in brackets beside the type of saving). A natural 1 (the d20
comes up 1) on a saving throw is always a failure. A natural 20 (the d20 comes up 20) is
always a success. The three different kinds of saving throws are:
Fortitude: This save measures your ability to stand up to physical punishment or attacks
against your vitality and health. Apply your Constitution modifier to your Fortitude
saving throws.
Reflex: These saves test your ability to dodge area attacks. Apply your Dexterity to your
Reflex saving throws.
Will: These saves reflect your resistance to mental influence as well as many magical
effects. Apply your Wisdom modifier to your Will saving throws.

The druid, Druella manages to dodge a falling portcullis

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

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Magic
Magic Skill and Magic Points
Treasure Quest is a VERY combat heavy action/RPG. While developing Treasure
Quest it took a long time to determine an easy and effective way to use Magic. Using the
regular D&D 3.5 rules, Magic users are incredibly weak and ineffective at lower levels
and extremely powerful at higher levels. I found it a confusing and overly complicated
system. In addition, a lot of their spells are not particularly effective in a miniature
combat game of this nature. Because D&D 3.5 time is measured in seconds, hours and
days every spell had to be converted into turns, Rounds and adventures. Physical
dimensions of spells also had to be converted as distance, range and radius needed to be
contained within the scale dimensions of the board. (A lot of Dwarven Forge pieces are
needed to convey 400 @ 1= 5). The magic system and conversion process was a
tedious trial and error situation, but what I came up with is pretty easy to understand,
quick to use and allows magic users to jump right into the action from the beginning.
Here is how it works
Each character has a Magic Skill which represents a characters magical talent,
endurance and for fighter type classes, a measurement of their ability to use Magic
Abilities. Similar to the maximum number of Hit Points a character may have, their
Magic Skill is the maximum number of Magic Points a character may have. Each
character begins each adventure with Magic Points equal to their Magic Skill. A
character with a Magic Skill below 0 begins each adventure with 0 Magic Points.
A characters Magic Skill may be improved by spending skill points during the leveling
up process. Unlike all other Skills, a characters Magic Skill is not capped; however a
maximum of 4 Skill points can be assigned at a time during the leveling up process. This
means that a Level 2 Wizard could have a Magic Skill higher than 7 (instead of the usual
Level +10 Skill cap).
Only characters with the Spellcasting Feat may learn and cast spells from memory.
However, characters with out the Spellcasting Feat can still cast spells using scrolls and
may use Magic Points to activate Magic Abilities. In order to cast a spell, a number of
Magic Points equal to the spell level must be spent. So, to cast a Level 3 spell, 3 Magic
Points must be spent; Level 5, 5 Magic Points spent and so on. Some spells also have an
Experience Point component and entail a point cost to you. The points are expended
when you attempt to cast the spell, whether or not the casting succeeds.
This also means that a magic user of any level can cast spells of any level as long as they
know the spell and they have the available Magic Points. When casting a spell that is a
higher level than the caster, a penalty is incurred due to the incredible strain put on the
caster. For every level above the caster level, an additional Magic Point must be spent to
cast.

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

32

Example: Eldon Leagallow, a level 2 wizard wants to cast a level 5 spell. It will cost him
5 Magic Points, (Level 5 Spell), plus 3 Magic Points (Spell is 3 levels higher than the
caster). So the total to cast is 8 Magic Points, (which is quite a lot for a level 2 wizard).
To regain spent Magic Points, Magic Potions or certain Feats may be used. Magic
Potions restore Magic Points according to the potion size and/or strength.

Summoning Spells and upkeep


Pretty much all characters that can cast spells have access to spells that summon beings to
help in their fight. Summoning spells (or Raise in the case of Necromancers) are a little
different in terms of their Duration. All summoning spells have an Upkeep (U) cost.
What this means is that not only does it cost x amount of Magic Points to summon the
being, but every time the Duration runs out, the spellcaster must spend the same amount
of Magic Points in order to keep the summoned being in play. Paying the Upkeep costs
0 Action Points and does not provoke an Attack of Opportunity.
For example: Rikdac Urthadar raises a Warrior Skeleton from the corpse of a dead
enemy. Rikdac is a level 1 Necromancer and Raise: Warrior Skeleton is a level 1 spell.
Rikdac pays 1 Magic Point and the bloodied skeleton emerges from the corpse lying
before him. Since the Duration of the spell is 1 Round per level, at the beginning of
Rikdacs next Turn, the Warrior Skeleton will crumble to dust unless Rikdac pays
another 1 Magic Point Upkeep. If Ricdac was a level 3 Necromancer, he would have to
pay 1 Magic Point Upkeep after 3 Rounds.

Concentration
Because you must concentrate to cast a spell, if you cant concentrate you cant cast a
spell. If you start casting a spell but something interferes with your concentration (for
example an attack) you must make a Concentration check or lose the spell. The checks
DC (Difficulty Class) depends on what is threatening your Concentration and how hard
the spell is to cast. (see Concentration skill). If you fail, the spell fizzles with no effect
but you still lose the Magic Points.
Some spells require continued Concentration to keep them going. Concentrating to
maintain a spell costs 1 Action Point and does not provoke an Attack of Opportunity.
Anything that could break your Concentration when casting a spell can keep you from
Concentrating to maintain a spell. If your Concentration breaks, the spell ends.

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

33

Starting Spells and Learning New Ones


In Treasure Quest, new characters start with the base number of spells using the
following table. All spells (except their starting spells) for all character classes must be
learned in a settlement (see Settlements: Wizards Tower, Church). When a character
learns a new spell, he/she memorizes the spell and is assumed to know the spell for the
rest of their lives, pending any unusual circumstances. That character is now able to use
that spell whenever they wish, provided that the proper casting requirements are met
(Magic Points etc.).
Character Class
Bard
Cleric
Druid
Necromancer
Sorcerer
Wizard

Starting Spells
Level 1: 4 Spells
Level 1: 3 Spells, Level 2: 1 Spell, 1 Level
1 Domain Spell
Level 1: 3 Spells, Level 2: 1 Spell
Level 1: 4 Spells, Level 2: 2 Spell
Level 1: 4 Spells, 2 Level 2: 2 Spells
Level 1: 3 Spells, Level 2: 1 Spells

In the case of the Paladin and Ranger, they may not cast any spells, regardless of their
Magic Rating until they reach level 4 (when they automatically gain the Spellcasting
Feat). Although they do not start with any spells they may then purchase and learn them
at a Settlement.

Magic Abilities
Once a character reaches level 2 they may select their first Magic Ability and may
choose it from their respective Magic Ability list. In order to learn a Magic Ability a
character must have a Magic Skill equal to or above the Magic Ability level. Magic
Abilities use Magic Points in the same way as casting spells; spending 1 Magic Point
for each level the ability is rated at plus 1 for each additional level over their character
level. Each time a character goes up in level they gain a Magic Ability unless they gain a
Feat. As it takes an enormous amount of mental and physical energy, only one Magic
Ability can be used per character per Round.

Scrolls
Scrolls contain a collection of spells (usually between 1 and 3) and possess the magical
powers needed to use one of those spells. Reading a Scroll requires 1 or more Action
Points and activates 1 of the spells at the cost 0 Magic Points (since the scroll has been
magically imbued with energy). Anyone with a Magic Skill equal to or higher than the
spell level can read the Scroll as long as they are literate, (sorry Barbarian) Once one
of the spells has been used, the Scroll no longer has the energy to cast the other spells
and the Scroll disintegrates in the readers hands. Reading a Scroll causes an Attack of
Opportunity; however if struck and Concentration lost, the spell is not cast, nor lost, as
the person reading is just assumed to have stopped reading the Scroll.
Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

34

Treasure
Treasure Chests
Well, this is called Treasure Quest for a reason
Treasure Chests are one of the main goals in Treasure Quest and subsequently,
indirectly cause a lot of death amongst greedy players. They hold untold riches; nestled in
creepy haunted forests or buried beneath the ground in long forgotten tombs, dank evil
caves, and mazelike dungeons. Our adventurers risk life and limb, attempting to loin their
pockets with gold coins and other desirable riches!
When a DM initially designs an adventure he chooses a number of spaces on the map that
Treasure Chests are located. However, he does not necessarily have to place them on the
board at the beginning of the adventure. The DM may choose to place Treasure Chests
only when an adventurer has LOS on a chest location. This is more realistic and promotes
exploration, which can make a small dungeon set-up, seem that much larger!
When a character discovers a chest, they may try and open it from any adjacent space. A
Treasure Chest can be open, locked or trapped! An open chest can easily be opened and
costs 1 Action Point to open and grab the treasure! A locked chest can be opened in 2
ways;
1. Pick the Lock Using the characters Pick Lock Skill (see Skills) against the
DC (Difficulty Class) rating of the Treasure Chest. (1D20 + Pick Lock
Skill)
2. Pry the Chest Using the characters Strength attribute against the DC rating
of the Treasure Chest. (1D20 + Strength.)
Different locks and chests are harder to open depending on what they are made of and
how well they are made. The base DC of a Treasure Chest lock is 15, using either
technique. A character may try to open a Treasure Chest by spending 1 Action Point. If
unsuccessful, he/she may try again by spending an additional Action Point, if available.
If successful, they may take the treasure inside for 0 Action Points.
Open and locked Treasure Chests may be Trapped and any treasure inside may not be
taken until the Trap has been resolved; either disarmed or triggered.

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

35

What is Inside?
Treasure Quest was designed to play quickly, so dealing with treasure is a fast process
as well. With the exception of an Objective Treasure Chest, all Treasure Chests
contain gold coins. Dependent upon the Adventure Level, a random quantity of gold
coins is found in each chest. I use eTools to generate an amount to give to players quickly
and easily. eTools does generate items etc, but it is much faster to just give the adventures
the gold value in coins instead. This way they do not have to write a bunch of statistics
(for a weapon etc.) and may just purchase what weapons, items etc. they wish when/if
they leave the dungeon.
If you do not have eTools, you may make some sort of treasure chart or use dice. A
quick/ fun method would be to have the adventurer roll 1d20, multiply it by 10 and
multiply it by the Adventure Level. For example, on a roll of 15 a Level 2 Chest would
contain 15x 10 (150) x2 (300), 300 Gold pieces Eventually I would like to include items
with all their stats on pre-made cards, that I could just hand players, but Im working on
that
Any Treasure collected by any of the adventurers is written on the Party Adventure
Sheet, NOT their character sheet!!! A character only receives this treasure if they
survive the scenario! A party may decide to split all treasure, a portion thereof, or none of
their treasure and may change their mind at any timelet greed destroy those fools! If
someone decides that they would like to share their treasure, the models of the 2 parties
involved must be on adjacent spaces or finished the scenario.
An Objective Treasure Chest may or may not exist depending on the scenario or DMs
design. However, if one does exist, it would contain the Objective Treasure, located in
the Objective Room determined at the start of the scenario. This chest could have a
higher DC to open, may be already open or may be trapped! If using Treasure Cards,
you may give the card to players once they retrieve the treasure. If playing without
Treasure Cards, use the gold piece calculation above but multiply it by 4, (300 Gold
pieces above would equal 1200 Gold Pieces) or just tell the player(s) what special item
they have found (including all the stats.)

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The Party Leader


At the start of an adventure, the character with the highest Leadership Skill (above 0) is
declared the Party Leader. If there is a tie, all players may vote for a Party Leader. Due
to his ability to lead and inspire his allies, The Party Leader gives command bonuses to
other party members that are within the leaders Command Range. The Command
Range has a radius equal to the Party Leaders Leadership Skill. This means that a
Party Leader with a Leadership Skill of 2 may affect any model within 2 spaces (LOS
does not have to exist as he may just be shouting out to his allies, encouraging them on).
Once per round, during the Party Leaders turn, a Command Bonus of 1 Action Point
may be given to any character (or EPM) the Party Leader chooses (excluding the Party
Leader himself). The Action Point must be spent immediately by the chosen model.
If the Party Leader becomes Fallen (see character Death), confidence in his
invincibility is lost and anyone in the party (including Followers) in LOS of the Fallen
leader, must make a morale check (DC 20 Level - # of allied models in LOS) to see if
they Panic! If a member fails a morale check they have panicked (see below), otherwise
they continue in play as normal. Once a Party Leader has Fallen, his Command Bonus
is lost for the rest of the adventure.
If an EPM has a Command ability, the party may use his ability as well, but no
Command Bonus is awarded. An EPMs Command Range is equal to his command
rating (shown on the reference card). If an EPM with a Command ability becomes
Fallen, a morale check is not made and his Command ability is lost for the rest of the
adventure.

Panic
If a model ever fails a morale check they have panicked. The character, EPM or Enemy
is overcome with fear and reacts irrationally to his circumstances. Terror has consumed
him and one thing consumes his mind. RUN AWAY!!! RUN AWAY!!! On his next turn, he
must flee directly towards the exit as fast as possible (using 2 movement actions) and is
subject to all/ any attacks of opportunity. If an Enemy has panicked, it must move
towards an Unknown Depths location. At the start of each subsequent turn the model
may try to pass a morale check and if passes may take a normal turn, otherwise he still
flees.

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Legend Points
As characters roam the land finding treasure, slaying evil monsters and accomplishing
incredulous tasks, tales of their adventures are spread throughout the countryside.
Exaggerated stories of their deeds are spoken in local inns and taverns, bards and
minstrels sing songs of their journeys and young would-be adventurers (aka Cannon
Fodder) are lured into a life of excitement and danger!
Remember way back at the beginning when you sorted your minis into piles depending
on level and whether they were enemy or allied models? Well, we know what the
enemies are for, now the allies
If you look at the top right hand corner of your D&D Minis cards (D&D Minis side),
there is a number which represents the point cost of that model. (FYI: This is used to
build Warbands in the D&D Minis game.) For Treasure Quest, this number is referred
to as Legend Points. When an Enemy is slain, that model is worth however many
Legend Points are on the card (divided amongst characters and EPMs that did damage
to that model, (see Experience Points)). Legend Points collected by your character
represent the status of your character in local lore and his knowledge gained while
fighting these creatures. The more Legend Points you have, the greater your reputation
and power of influence! The greater your reputation and power of influence, the more
willing people are to follow you.
And nowhow to exploit them!

Rain Jah narrowly escapes a Cave


Worm! DAMN!

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EPMs: Expanded Party Members


Followers
Followers are adventurers that have, (through one way or another), heard of your
character and his/her exploits throughout the land. Followers are willing to join you in
your next escapade provided that they are able to learn from you (cannon fodder).
This means you must be at least equal to or better than the Follower that is seeking your
guidance. How is this all figured out?
Well, while you have a level, so does a Follower. A Followers level is determined by
their reference card, (the same as an Enemy). A Follower will only serve a character that
is at least the same level as them. This means a level 1 character can only have level 1
Followers. A Follower may only be recruited at an Inn (see Settlements) unless the
scenario (or DM) states otherwise. To gain a Follower, at the start of the game, a number
of Legend Points equal to the Followers Legend Points must be spent. The Follower
will then join that character for the entire scenario. Followers must enter the scenario at
the same entrance as the character they are accompanying. They may however leave via a
different exit. Followers may be dismissed or deserted at the players discretion.
cannon fodder Followers that are magic users or possess Psionic abilities may use

their talents during the adventure. Using the D&D Miniatures rules and the Followers
reference card, the number of squares beside a spell, is the number of times that spell may
be used in an adventure. Psionic points are spent in the same way as Magic Points and
the cost to use each ability is on the reference card of each model. Characters may give
Followers healing and magic potions to replenish themselves.
Upon finishing a scenario or restarting a scenario, you must spend the Legend Points
required in order for the Follower to stay with you. Otherwise, the Follower feels that
they have learned everything you have to offer and decide to depart on his or her own
path. Followers never gain Experience Points or Legend Points but take their share.
This means that when an enemy has been killed, Experience and Legend Points are
divided between all involved; the Followers portion is just not written down or tracked
in any way. Any treasure collected by a Follower is considered collected by the character
the Follower is following and is thus written down on the Party Adventure Sheet.
A player may control a maximum of 4 models in any combination of cannon fodder
Followers, Mercenaries and Companions. Keep in mind that in a large player game this
will considerably slow down the game and ideally the limit should be reduced (2).
Some characters have access to different Followers that other characters do not. The
Druid can call upon natures allies to provide her with animal or magical Followers. The
Necromancer can call upon the lowers pits of the netherworld where imps and lesser
demons dwell. A Paladin will not even consider the help of anyone that is not lawful
good. None of these characters enjoy the company of common folk and are unable to
have regular Followers. Some suggested Followers for these characters are below.
Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

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Class

Druid

Follower

Celestial Dire Badger (D&D Minis Ref: Deathknell #13)


Giant Frog (D&D Minis Ref: Deathknell #28)
Wood Woad (D&D Minis Ref: Deathknell #29)
Celestial Black Bear (D&D Minis Ref: Aberrations #3)
Necromancer Vargouille (D&D Minis Ref: Angelfire #49)
Ghoul (D&D Minis Ref: Harbinger #63)
Paladin
Man-at-Arms (D&D Minis Ref: Harbinger #10)
Evokers Apprentice (D&D Minis Ref: Harbinger #5)
Aasimar Fighter (D&D Minis Ref: Dragon Queen #1)

Level

3
3
8
3
1
2
1
1
2

Mercenaries
Mercenaries act the same in every way as Followers with the following exceptions:
1. They are hired by payment in gold. To calculate the cost in hiring a Mercenary,
multiply their Legend Points by 10 and pay that cost in gold. A characters
Barter skill (see skills) may be used when hiring a Mercenary.
2. Mercenaries do not have to make a morale save if the person they are employed
by becomes Fallen or if the Party Leader becomes Fallen. They just perceive it
as an opportunity to take a larger share of the treasure
3. A character may hire a Mercenary of a higher level. (Example: A level 1 Fighter
may hire a level 3 Rogue to assist in his next adventure.)
4. A Mercenary will not share any treasure collected.
Remember, like a Follower, a Mercenary will take his share of Experience and Legend
Points

Companions
Companions are animals or creatures that are linked (magically or otherwise) to their
masters (snacks). Certain characters are able to have Companions and control them like
they would a Follower. Companions are assumed to occupy the same space as a
character unless the player chooses to move them separately. Moving a Companion
counts towards the 2-model activation limit of a players turn. Depending on a characters
Training Skill, a Companion may take between 1 and 3 actions per turn. snacks
Companions can carry a maximum of 1 object with a few exceptions (noted specifically
for the Companion).
snacks Companions can be damaged and healed like Followers however they must

have healing administered to them. For example a wolf can not carry a potion of healing
in its mouth and open the flask in order to drink it. A character must spend an Action
Point in order to feed/ administer a potion. If a Companion dies, the controller must
make a DC15 Fort save. A failed save suffers an Experience Point penalty of 200 XPs
per character level. A successful save suffers a penalty of 100 XPs per character level.
The Companion will be available for the next adventure. (Dont ask me howI havent
figured out how to justify it yet!)

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Divine Favors
Divine Favor cards are created by a Third party and are a great addition to Treasure
Quest. They are available for a very affordable price and you can print them out on any
computer printer. While most of the cards can be used in Treasure Quest, some do not
really apply to the mechanics of the game. I recommend going through the deck and
removing the cards that are essentially useless in this rule set (I will eventually get around
to making a list of the ones I use). How they are used, is explained by the author with the
following additional rules for Treasure Quest:
1. All Level 1 characters start each adventure with 1 Divine Favor for free, since the
Gods look favorably upon their pure untainted, innocence.
2. To gain a Divine Favor, a character must pray (and make a donation) at the
Church (see settlements).
3. With the exceptions of the Paladin and Necromancer, no character may have more
than 1 Divine Favor card.
4. A character may use the card at any time in the game with a cost of 0 Action
Points.
5. If used at the time of death, the character is first reduced to 0 (Fallen) and then
resurrected (rolls for regained Hit Points). This order is important, especially if
the character is the Party Leader.
6. A Paladin may pray for 2 Divine Favors at the Church. In order to acquire it they
must spend 20 Legend Points in order to gain the additional favor. This
represents the offerings and undying loyalty these characters have for their
respective gods.
7. A Necromancer may spend 20 Legend Points in order to gain an additional
Divine Favor card at the beginning of an adventure. This represents the
continuous prayer, sacrifices and close ties to the netherworld that Necromancers
have.
8. All Divine Favor cards are discarded at the end of an adventure, regardless of
whether they were used or not. An additional donation at the church is needed to
gain a new Favor. Gods need to be reminded

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Death
Read this part a lot- good stuff

Dealing with character Death was the single most difficult problem to deal with when
designing Treasure Quest (and the most pleasurable to enforce). Similar to
the play mechanics of Euro-games, I wanted to make sure that everyone that showed
up for a day of gaming would be able to play, regardless of whether they lived or died.
No one wants to sit there watching for 2 hours after they died on Round 3. However, I
felt it imperative to include the possibility of death. Lets face it, if there was no element
of risk, it would be a very boring game. Years of computer and console video games
seemed to provide the answers to thisthink Checkpoints and game saves.
Characters begin each scenario as fresh, well rested adventurers with their maximum Hit
Points and Magic Points. As stated previously in this rule guide, as adventurers run
around killing (seemingly harmless, innocent) monsters collecting Experience Points,
stealing grabbing treasure and obtaining Legend Points, this is all kept track of on the
Party Adventure Sheet. The Party Adventure Sheet represents what each character has
accumulated for that scenario. If a character should (deservingly) die during an
adventure, all Experience Points, Legend Points and treasure gained by that character
within that scenario are potentially lost. How does this all happen?
Once a character or EPM reaches 0 (or less) Hit Points he/she collapses (model is laid
down on the space they were on) and is now considered Fallen (-4 AC). Their Initiative
Card is turned sideways, kept by the DM and they automatically go last every turn while
they are dead meat Fallen. If a character with a Follower has Fallen within LOS of
the Follower, the Follower must make a successful morale save (DC20- Level- # of
Allied Models in LOS) to prevent Panicking.
At the end of the Round and each Round thereafter that a character is dead meat
Fallen, a Death Counter is placed on their character sheet (or reference card in the case
of a EPM). If either a character or EPM is brought back above 0 Hit Points (1 or more)
all their Death Counters are immediately removed. If 5 Death Counters accumulate the
character dies and a Death Counter is placed on the board where the character died. If 3
Death Counters accumulate on an EPM reference card, that EPM dies. No Death
Counter is placed on the board, they are removed from the game and the character they
were serving looses double the number of Legend Points that that EPM cost (see
Companions for Companion Death). The more EPMs that die while accompanying
you, the less others will want to! Bad news travels quickly...
If a character dies and re-enters play, managing to make it back to where they died (the
space with the Death Counter on it), they may pick up (1 Action Point) any treasure
they had before they died, however they are unable to regain lost Experience Points or
Legend Points. Once they pick up their treasure, the Death Counter is removed from
the board. Another character or EPM (excluding Companions) may also pick up the
treasure as well. If another character or EPM grabs their gold, it does not necessarily
have to be returned to the original owner Viewer discretion is advised

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A Fallen model may be carried out of the dungeon by an EPM or another character. Any
model carrying another moves at -2, attacks at -4 and is at a -4 AC while defending. Only
1 character or EPM may be carried at a time. If a stabilized (see Skill: Medic) character
is carried outside the dungeon they will recover. Each Round that the Fallen character is
outside the dungeon, they may remove 1 Death Counter. Once all Death Counters are
removed, they regain Hit Points in accordance with the Resting rules and once they have
1 or more Hit Points, may jump back into the game (pathetic), using the Entrance they
exited from or level entrance on a multilevel setup.
If all characters die in a scenario, then fun has truly been had by all all Death
Counters are removed from Character Reference Sheets and the board and the players
may retry the scenario from the start (think reset button). A new Party Adventure
Sheet is used and everything gained from the previous attempt is lost.

Checkpoints
Im sure 99% of the people reading this rules guide have played at least 1 video game in
their life that incorporated a save Checkpoint. Could Treasure Quest be the first
miniature board game to do this?
Similar to a video game Checkpoint, a Checkpoint (in Treasure Quest) allows a
character to save a snapshot of their character up to that point in the game.
Checkpoints are usually a magical gateway, statue or some other mystical object that
defies explanation (so I dont have to!). When a character activates (steps on it, touches
it etc.) a Checkpoint, anything collected on the Party Adventure Sheet is transferred
to the characters reference sheet. A new Party Adventure Sheet is started (or a new
section of the same one (SAVE THE TREES!!!) which represents everything collected
after the Checkpoint was activated. If a player collects a bunch of gold, Experience
Points or Legend Points after activating the Checkpoint and then dies, he looses
everything he has collected since activating the Checkpoint. Get it?

IMPORTANT!!!
A note for the DM: Do not overuse Checkpoints. I only include them on massive day(s)
long adventures with multiple boards or dungeon levels. It is very important that
characters fear death. If they can save every 50 they will abandon all strategy and
caution and run into every battle with gunsablazin. This will become VERY boring,
VERY quickly. I would include 1 Checkpoint for every 1.5-2 hours of game time. It also
provides an opportunity for players to take a break, level up (if you permit this during
game time), each junk food etc.
A final note on character death and Checkpoints; Unlike quick saving or Checkpoints
in a computer game, any consumables (healing potions, magic potions, arrows, items
etc.) used during a game, are gone for good. They are NEVER returned.

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43

Example 1: Eldon Leagallow, the wizard started an adventure with 3 Healing Potions
and 2 Magic Potions and before he died, used 2 Healing Potions and 1 Magic Potion.
This means, when Eldon jumps back into the game or starts a new scenario etc. he does
not get back the used potions. He will only have 1 Healing and 1 Magic Potion.
Example 2: Seaendithas Pegason, the Cleric has found a golden magical sword. On a
later Round, he runs through a Magic Gateway (Checkpoint). 2 Rounds later he breaks
the sword on a Gnolls skull and is slain by a mob of unfriendly Orcs (who love shiny
golden things). Seaendithas can restart at the Magic Gateway on the next round, however
the Experience Points he gained for killing the Gnoll are gone forever, as well as his
shiny golden magical sword
Looooooooser

Cleric, Seaendithas Pegason leads the way

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Resting
Characters may leave the dungeon at any time through any available exit. They just move
to an exit location declared by the DM at the start of the game and tell the DM they are
leaving. An EPM (excluding Companions) that leaves the dungeon without the character
they are following is considered out of the game. They are either too afraid to return to
the dungeon, no longer believe the character is worth following, or have learned all they
sought out to learn and are ready to pursue adventure on their own. Any Follower whose
character left the dungeon (while they remained) must make a successful morale save,
(DC 20 Level- # Allied Models is LOS) or immediately Panics, (moves towards the
nearest exit as fast and as direct as possible.)
Upon exiting a dungeon, a character may Rest. Each Round a character spends Resting
they heal 1d4 of Hit Points. If the character is Fallen and has any Death Tokens, one is
removed per Round. Characters that have Rested and have at least 1 Hit Point; may reenter the dungeon (only through the exit they left) and take or drop off items or gold with
a pack mule or camel if they have one.

The Wind Crystal


An optional item/rule I implemented in an early game of Treasure Quest pertained to a
special magical item called the Wind Crystal. It was the first Objective Treasure I
created and was designed primarily for large adventures. The Wind Crystal is a small
crystal that fits in the palm of a human hand and weighs less than a pound. The crystal is
used to summon and control the powers of the wind. At the start of every adventure, the
players decide which character will be carrying it. It may exchange hands during the
adventure like any other item, but only the character that has it may use it. A character
that chooses to use it may attempt to travel back to a previously visited Settlement by
invoking the spirits of the wind. It may only be used above ground, as the flow of air
below ground is too weak to carry a person in the magical winds summoned by the
crystal. Using it requires 2 Action Points. Roll (1d4). The number rolled is the number of
models (invoker plus any adjacent models) that the wind spirits are strong enough to
carry. Mark the spot of the board they left from. Characters may opt not to travel and try
to invoke stronger winds (on another turn) if deemed necessary. When at a Settlement a
character may visit any locations that are available. A character leaving a Settlement
may attempt to invoke the wind spirits using the same method as above and return to the
location from which they came. However winds blow around a lot, so when returning,
roll a scatter die and depending on the number rolled on the d4, roll the following die and
place the returning characters to their new locations. If the new space is occupied or can
not be placed, place the model in a randomly determined adjacent square.
Retuning d4 Roll Scatter die roll
1
1d6
2
1d8
3
1d10
4
1d12

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Settlements
As the adventurers travel across the lands in Treasure Quest, they visit (lunch
buffets) Settlements including; towns, cities and villages. These Settlements have a
number of locations that may benefit any smart treasure hunter. Each day spent in a
Settlement costs 10 Gold in living expenses and a character may visit 1 location. At the
end of each day, a roll on the Settlement Events Table (under development) must be
made.

A Dragon attacks a small Settlement!


Every Settlement has the following locations (unless the DM states otherwise):
1. Town Inn: The Town Inn is where you can acquire Followers, Mercenaries and
find out about and choose new quests. A Druid would visit the forest to obtain
his/her Followers, since badgers would not generally hang out in Inns. A
Necromancer would have a ritual in some sort of musty abandoned building.
2. Wizards Tower: You may buy potions, magic items, scrolls and Arcane Spells
here. You may also sell magic items for half their value.
Spell Cost = Spell Level x 500 Gold.
3. Church: You may go here to pray for Divine Favors (Donation of 250 Gold x
Level), 1 card maximum, learn Divine Spells (Donation = Spell Level x 500
Gold.) and acquire holy artifacts and relics (various Donations apply)
4. Blacksmith: You may purchase and sell weapons and armor here. You may sell
used equipment for half (50%) of the value or have armor and weapons repaired
at the cost of: the Value divided by the Durability per point repaired.

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Skills
In Treasure Quest characters possess Skills that help them overcome obstacles, traps,
heal each other, swim, jump, train animals and more! Skills are primarily used when
testing against a DC (Difficulty Class). Not all the Skills available in D&D are available
in Treasure Quest; some do not translate into the play mechanics of Treasure Quest
while others have been combined into one. New skills and skill functionality have also
been added to simplify certain aspects of the game. A characters Skill is capped at his
Level +5 (not including any ability bonuses etc.) and may never be higher than this
maximum, with the exception of the Magic Skill, which has no cap. Below is a Skill
summary table that lists the available Skills and a brief description of what they do. In the
following pages, each Skill is covered in greater detail.

Description
Skill
Barter
Reduce prices while shopping for goods or paying for services.
Climb+*! Scale walls, uneven surfaces or out of pits.
Concentration Hold your concentration while casting spells. Focus on a skill.
Mechanics+ Disable traps and mechanical devices.
Training Train and control Companions.
Apply First Aid, Stabilize a Fallen ally, Mend Critical Injuries and Treat
Medic+
Poison.
Jump*!
How far and high you are able to jump.
Leadership Inspire your allies within your range of influence.
Listen
Identify enemies that are currently unseen due to lack of LOS.
Magic
Your ability to use Magic Spells and Abilities.
Stealth* Walk quietly thereby reducing the chance of being discovered.
Search for hidden passages, secret doors and traps! Spot invisible,
Search/ Spot
incorporeal Enemies or Enemies with the Conceal ability
Swim+*! Travel in and under water.
Lock Pick Open locked doors and chests.
Knowledge Reveal information about your Enemies.
+: Skills marked with a + may be used with the assistance of an ally. You can help
another character achieve success on his or her Skill check by making the same kind of
Skill check in a cooperative effort. If you succeed on a DC 10 on your Skill check (same
Skill), the character you are helping gets a +2 bonus to his/her check.
*: Skills marked with a * are affected by the Armor Weight Penalty. Your
characters Armor Weight Penalty is subtracted from your Skill whenever the Skill is
tested or used.
!: Skills marked with a ! are Movement Skills and may be used at any time during a
Movement action. However, once a Movement Skill is used, (successful or not), it ends
a characters Movement allowance during that Action. (Ex: Druella moves 4 spaces and
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47

Jumps! Regardless of where she lands, in order to move again, she would have to spend
an additional Action Point.
Sometimes a circumstance may arise where a character wishes to
Difficulty (DC)
do something that is out of the ordinary or does not fall into one of
Very easy (0)
the charts, tables or examples provided. In that case the DM may
Easy (5)
Average (10)
wish to make up a DC for the task or consult the Difficulty Class
Tough (15)
Chart provided to the right.
Challenging (20)
Formidable (25)
Heroic (30)
Nearly impossible (40)

A Deadly Labyrinth

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Skill: Barter
Each point in the Barter skill awards a character 1% off the purchase price of weapons,
items, scrolls and any other type of good. It also provides the same discount on the hiring
price of Mercenaries. When selling items it provides the same bonus percentage.
Example: Skill Modifier =8
Buying: 8% off the purchase price of a Long Sword.
Selling: You received 58% of the purchase price when selling a Long Sword.

Skill: Climb +*!


A characters Climb skill is his/her ability to move over or up certain objects and
surfaces. The Climb skill is considered a Movement Skill and is primarily used when a
character is Climbing up a wall or anything that does not have steps. The greater a
characters Climb skill, the faster they are able to scramble over obstacles. Once a DM
has told the players how high a wall or obstacle (default 10) is in feet, a character may
use their Climb skill. In order to use a characters Climb skill the player rolls 1d20, adds
his Climb skill and Strength and subtracts his Armor Weight Penalty. This is the total
number of feet the player has Climbed. If he has not scaled the entire wall, put a d20(s)
beside the model to keep track of how many feet he has climbed. If his total is 0 or less,
he falls from wherever he is and may suffer damage (impact damage = number of feet
5). If the character is hit while climbing, he must make a Climb check with a DC equal to
the amount of damage inflicted. If successful, nothing happens and the character has been
able to maintain his/her grip. If unsuccessful, the character falls and may suffer damage.

Skill: Concentration
A characters Concentration skill determines how well he/she is able to keep focused in
extreme or dangerous circumstances. This is usually tested when casting spells in combat
or using other types of magic.
A character may also spend 1 Action Point on Concentrating before using any other
skill. A successful check (DC 10) awards a +4 bonus to the skill the character chooses to
Focus on. An unsuccessful check means no bonus is given as the character finds it too
difficult to fully Focus on what they are about to do, (regular skill check applies). A
couple of examples are listed below:
Concentration
Damaged while casting a spell
Entangled while reading a scroll
Concentrate on Lock Pick skill
Focus on a Skill

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

DC
10 +damage dealt
+spell level +1/ level
above the caster level
15
10
10

49

Skill: Mechanics+
A characters Mechanics skill is used when disarming traps, disengaging mechanical
objects or when any general tinkering is involved. A certain number of Action Points
must be spent in order to try to disable a device. If you fail by 5 or more, something goes
wrong. If the device is a trap, you spring it.
Device
Simple
Tricky
Difficult
Wicked

Action Points
1 Action Point
1 Action Point
2 Action Points
2 Action Points

Mechanic DC
10
15
20
25

Skill: Training
A characters Training skill is referred to when a character has a Companion.
Companions are assumed to be occupying the same space as the character controlling it
unless activated. Once activated, a Companion is controlled like a Follower.
However, in order to effectively use a Companion a certain degree of skill must be
possessed by the handler. Consult the following table to determine how many APs a
Companion receives based on the handlers skill.
Training
Action
Skill
Points
1
1-7
2
8-14
3
15+

An open areausually spells


doom

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50

Skill: Medic+
By using their Medic skill, characters may; provide First Aid, Stabilize Fallen allies,
Mend Critical Wounds or Treat Poison that an ally has been subjected to. A character
may not provide treatment to him/herself. Medical treatment must be administered from
an adjacent space.
First Aid: You may apply First Aid to an ally. At the cost of 2 Action Points and a
successful Medic check, your ally gains Hit Points equal to your total (1d20+ Medic
Skill) roll 10. An unsuccessful check has no effect. You must Stabilize a Fallen ally
before applying First Aid.
Mend Critical Wound: You may spend 2 Action Points to attempt to mend another
characters Critical Wound. If successful, all effects of the wound are gone. If
unsuccessful, you have caused the victim more pain, causing damage equal to 20 your
total Medic check. You may only treat 1 Critical Wound at a time.
Stabilize: If a character has Fallen and is receiving Death Tokens, you can make him or
her Stable. At the cost of 1 Action Point you may attempt to Stabilize a character. If
successful a Stabilized character regains no hit points but no longer takes Death Tokens.
An unsuccessful check has no effect.
Treat Poison: To treat poison means to tend a single character who has been poisoned
and who may take more damage from the poison (or suffer some other effect). At the cost
of 1 AP you may make a saving throw against the poison, using your Medic skill. A
successful save cures the poisoned character. An unsuccessful attempt has no effect.
Task
First aid
Mend Critical Wound
Stabilize
Treat poison

DC
10
15
20
Poisons save DC

Skill: Jump*!
Yes, you can all jump, but how far? How long? The Jump skill is considered a
Movement Skill and enacts incredible jumping abilities which no common person would
be normally able to do. The greater a characters Jump skill, the higher and/or further
they are able to Jump. When determining the height and distance of a Jump, 1d20 roll is
made and calculated as follows:
Height: The player adds his Jump skill and Strength and subtracts his Armor Weight
Penalty. This is the total height (in feet) the player has Jumped. If Jumping straight up
(ex: to grab a ledge) ignore the distance calculation.
Distance: The player adds his Jump skill, Strength and subtracts his Armor Weight
Penalty. Divide the total by 5, rounding down. This is the total number of spaces the
character has Jumped!

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

51

Skill: Knowledge
As a character gains experience and increases his reputation, he also gains Knowledge
about the world surrounding him/ her. A characters Knowledge is focused around his
familiarity with the inhabitants of the Treasure Quest world. A character may test his
Knowledge when trying to identify a foe. When LOS is obtained on an Enemy, a
Knowledge check may be made by the character to determine the opponents strength,
weaknesses and abilities (0 AP cost). The DC for all Knowledge checks is 20+ Enemy
Level and is made in the same way as any other Skill check. If a successful Knowledge
check is made, the DM must tell the party all information displayed on the Enemies
reference card. As a Knowledge check represents what a character remembers or heard
about a particular type of adversary, only one attempt may be made per character, per
enemy type, per encounter.

Skill: Leadership
A characters Leadership skill is used to determine the Party Leader and how far his
range of influence reaches. (See Party Leader)

Skill: Listen
Characters can make a Listen check (DC 5 +1 per 1 Space distance) to attempt to identify
a Threat Token close by. A DC penalty of +5 is applied if listening through a door and
+15 through a stone wall. A successful check requires that the DM convert (to a model)
the Threat Token targeted by the character. Using the Listen skill costs 1 Action Point
as the character stops everything and focuses all his attention on what he/she hears.

Skill: Magic
The use of Magic has been drastically simplified in Treasure Quest and a Magic skill
has been introduced. (See Magic) A characters Magic Skill serves three purposes:
1. A characters Magic Skill determines the maximum number of Magic
Points a character may have.
2. It determines what level Magic Abilities a character may be able to use or
what Scrolls they can read.
3. It determines the number of Magic Points a character begins each
adventure with.

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

52

Skill: Stealth
If the party decides to try and use Stealth (cowards), any adventurers may enter the
dungeon (in initiative order), however each party member must make a separate Stealth
check when entering and each Round thereafter (as long as they are still moving in
Stealth). If all adventurers inside the dungeon make a successful check, the dungeon
inhabitants are completely oblivious to their presence, the Round Counter is not started
and the game remains at Round 0. While the Round Counter remains at 0, no Spawn
Points are generated.
Each Round, Wandering Enemies may be activated by the DM in a similar fashion to
regular Threat Tokens with the following exception: All Wandering Enemies have a
movement of 4 in a random direction, using a single roll of a scatter die (a roll of
anything other than an arrow means the Wandering Enemies do not move). That is all a
Wandering Enemy does until 1 of the following happens:
1. A Wandering Enemy obtains LOS on any party member: It roars forward
(creating a lot of noise) and attracts other enemies! Immediately convert the token
to a model (equal to the Adventure Level or the next card in the Spawn Stack).
On its current and/or next activation it no longer uses the scatter die for movement
and behaves like a regular enemy (see Turn Phases). Other Wandering Enemies
(that have not activated this round) no longer use the scatter die for the rest of the
Round and move towards the Wandering Enemy that roared! If any Wandering
Enemy that has LOS to any character or EPM, lives to the end of that Round, the
Round Counter begins (as more Enemies are attracted to the clamor) and the
next Round is Round 1*. If all Wandering Enemies (that had LOS) are
destroyed by the end of the Round, the Round Counter remains at 0 and a new
Wandering Enemy is placed (at a randomly determined Unknown Depths
location) during the next Upkeep Phase.
2. An unsuccessful Stealth check is made: If a Stealth check is failed, the closest
Wandering Enemies no longer use the scatter die and move towards the
character or EPM that created the noise (failed the check). If no Wandering
Enemy obtains LOS on any character or EPM by the end of the round, the
characters did not make too much noise and they may try to use their Stealth
Skill again next round. Once it has achieved LOS, it roars forward (creating a lot
of noise) and attracts other enemies! (See #1 above).
*Once a Round Counter starts (is turned to Round 1), it can not be turned back to
Round 0, unless the party leaves the scenario and starts again, (essentially starting a new
game).

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

53

Skill: Lock Pick


Characters use their Lock Pick Skill in order to try and open locked treasure chests,
doors and other objects. (See Treasure) It costs 1 Action Point to attempt to open a lock.
Some examples are below.
Lock
Bad Lock (Door/ Crate)
Very simple lock (Small Chest)
Average lock (Chest)
Good lock (Iron Chest)
Amazing lock (Magical)

DC
10
15
20
25
30

Skill: Search/ Spot


A character uses his/her Search Skill when attempting to locate a secret door, trap trigger
or anything else that may be hidden. It costs 1 Action Point to Search all spaces adjacent
to the character. The character makes a Search check and discovers anything with a DC
lower than his result. Some examples are below.
Invisible, Concealed or otherwise hidden or hard to see enemies can be located using a
characters Spot skill. For each multiple of 4, a character is awarded +1 on rolls versus
enemies (or allies) with Incorporeal, Conceal, Invisible etc. It does not cost any Action
Points to use your Spot skill.
Task
Notice a typical secret door or a simple trap
Find a difficult nonmagical trap
Find a magic trap
Notice a well-hidden secret door

Search DC
15
20
25
30

Skill: Swim+*!
The higher your Swim skill, the further you can move in the water. The Swim skill is
considered a Movement Skill, can be assisted and is subject to Armor Weight
Penalties. In order to use your Swim skill, roll 1d20, adding your Swim skill, Strength
and subtracts your Armor Weight Penalty. If your total is 0 or less, you may only move
1 space per AP as you are struggling to keep your head above water (you may not attack
or cast spells etc.). In your total is above 0, divide the total by 5, rounding down and add
1. This is the number of spaces you may Swim using 1 Action Point. It sounds
complicated but is actually quite simple. This example makes it easier to understand:
Rain Jah, ever greedy for some more treasure, decides to swim for a chest in the middle
of a small pond. His rolls 1d20 (12) and adds his Swim skill (+8), Strength (+2) and
subtracts his Armor Weight Penalty (-1). Since his total is 21, (which is above 0) he
divides the total by 5 (=4) and adds 1. Rain Jah swims 5 spaces, enough to get his paws
on a wet treasure chest!

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

54

Character Growth
The Party Accountant and
Party Adventure Sheet
Each new adventure begins with a new Party Adventure Sheet. The Party Adventure
Sheet is where all the characters track Experience Points, Legend Points and treasure
that they have accumulated during an adventure. The Party Accountant (nominated at
the beginning of the game) writes everything down on the Party Adventure Sheet as the
characters collect it. EPMs are not tracked on the Party Adventure Sheet (or anywhere
else for that matter).

Snowden, the bard, tries a little music on a small group of brigands

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

55

Experience Points
Do I really need to explain how Experience Points work?
Similar to every RPG and video game that has character growth; Experience Points in
Treasure Quest track the progression of a characters abilities, skills and understanding
as they embark on numerous adventures. Like real life, (hopefully) we all learn how to do
new things and become better at what we already know as we accomplish tasks and go
through our daily lives. Characters level up, acquiring new Skills, increasing their
attributes, and generally become more powerful and better prepared to handle more
dangerous missions and enemies. Treasure Quest Characters seem to level up every 3
games on average, so progress is pretty steady.
Experience Points are awarded in a few ways:
1. By destroying enemies: The most frequent way adventurers gain experience
points in Treasure Quest is through killing Enemies. Each Enemy is rated in
level and when destroyed is compared to the level of the person(s) that
destroyed it. In Treasure Quest, Experience Points are divided as follows:
Figure out the total Experience Points rewarded according to the Experience
Point Table (below). The total Experience Points are divided evenly (round
up to the character that made the final blow) amongst all characters and
EPMs that did any damage to the now dead Enemy.
For example: An Enemy worth 100 Experience Points has been killed. A
Rogue, Wizard and Follower each did damage to the enemy. The Rogue made
the final blow killing the enemy. The Rogue is awarded 34 Experience Points
(1/3; plus the extra 1 for rounding up), the Wizard is awarded 33 Experience
Points (1/3) and the Follower is awarded 33 Experience Points (1/3; which is
essentially ignored). The Rogue and Wizards Experience Points are written
down on the Party Adventure Sheet (see Party Adventure Sheet), not their
character Reference Sheets. The Followers Experience Points are not
tracked (see Followers).
2. Completed Quests or Objectives: Characters earn Experience Points by
completing certain tasks, quests, objectives etc. and are rewarded by the DM
using his/ her discretion. If you are playing with some kind of story, you may
reward the players with an Experience Point bonus for the successful
completion of said story. If you are playing with Objective Rooms, same
applies.
3. Traps: Similar to #1, (but different), any character that has triggered or
disabled a Trap and survives is awarded an Experience Point bonus
dependent upon the Trap Level.
Keep in mind; any Experience Points gained are only rewarded at the end of a scenario.
If a character dies he looses all the Experience Points he gained that scenario (see
Death).

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

56

CHARACTER LEVEL

Experience Point Table

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

1
200
200
200
100
100
100
75
75
75
50
50
50
25
25
25
25
-

2
300
300
300
200
200
200
100
100
100
75
75
75
50
50
50
50
50
-

3
500
500
500
300
300
300
200
200
200
100
100
100
75
75
75
75
75
75
-

ENEMY/ TRAP LEVEL


4
5
6
1000
2000
3000
1000
2000
3000
1000
2000
3000
500
1000
2000
500
1000
2000
500
1000
2000
300
500
1000
300
500
1000
300
500
1000
200
300
500
200
300
500
200
300
500
100
200
300
100
200
300
100
200
300
100
200
300
100
200
300
100
200
300
100
200
300
100
200
300

7
4500
4500
4500
3000
3000
3000
2000
2000
2000
1000
1000
1000
500
500
500
500
500
500
500
500

8
6000
6000
6000
4500
4500
4500
3000
3000
3000
2000
2000
2000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000

9
7500
7500
7500
6000
6000
6000
4500
4500
4500
3000
3000
3000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000

10+
10000
10000
10000
7500
7500
7500
6000
6000
6000
4500
4500
4500
3000
3000
3000
3000
3000
3000
3000
3000

Crossroads

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

57

A Game Session Example


An adventure party consisting of 3 members, (Rutegar (Barbarian),
Seva Leafwhisper (Druid) and Darius Blackthorn (Necromancer)
embark on an adventure to find the fabled Ring of Carnage
(Objective Treasure). It is decided that this scenario will be at
Adventure Level 2 since the average party level is 3 (Adventure
Level = Party Level -1). The DM constructs the dungeon layout
leaving 4 unfinished sections and indicates the Entrance, Exit and 2
Unknown Depths locations. All the players grab their Initiative
Cards, a Party Adventure Sheet and fill their counter containers
with Red (Max Hit Points), Green (Current Armor Durability) and
Blue (Magic Points= Magic Skill) counters. While they are doing
Setup
this, the DM quickly creates a mixed Spawn Stack consisting of
Level 1, 2 and 3 Enemies. Seva decides to donate 750 Gold to the
church in order to gain a Divine Favor (250 x Level). Darius
sacrifices 20 Legend Points to the dark gods of the Netherworlds and
receives a Divine Favor as well. Rutegar is feeling extremely
confident and needs no favor.
Since Seva has the highest Leadership Skill, she is declared the
Party Leader. All players place their model at the dungeon Entrance
and 2 Wandering Enemy (Threat Tokens) are placed in the
dungeon, 1 at each Unknown Depths location.
Rutugar has trained extensively in the use of his Stealth Skill and
decides to use it upon initially entering the underground labyrinth.
Round 0: Player 1 Darius and Seva are not so good at moving with cat like Stealth so
they decide to wait outside until Rutugar calls for them.
Turn
Rutugar does a Stealth check and is successful. He moves into the
dungeon undetected.
The DM moves the Wandering Enemies using a Scatter die and they
Round 0: DM
roam around oblivious to the intruder.
Turn
Another Round begins and Rutugar is again successful using his
Stealth and moves deeper, towards a Treasure Chest he has spotted.
In the distance he hears the snorting of some creature (Listen Check)
but can not identify it (Failed).
The Wandering Enemies are moved by the DM, again using the
Scatter die.
Rutugar is almost at the Chest although his anticipation gets the best
Round 0: Player 1 of him (tests his Stealth and fails) and he carelessly kicks a stone
which tumbles against some loose rocks, creating a noise which
Turn
echoes through the long stone passages.
The Wandering Enemies hear the noise and curiously move toward
Round 0: DM
the adventurer (no longer using the Scatter die for movement).
Turn
Round 0: Player 1
Turn: Stealth,
Movement, Listen
Check
Round 0: DM
Turn

Round 0: Player 1 Rutugar curses his foolishness and progresses on, hearing the
Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

58

Turn: 1st Action:


Movement
Round 0: Player 1
Turn: 2nd Action:
Lock Pick

scrambling of nearby monsters. Rutugar quickly moves to the


Treasure Chest, eager to open it before the Enemies arrive.
Rutugar fumbles around with the lock (Lock Pick Skill check) and is
fortunate as the rusty old lock opens! He reaches in to grab the
contents and manages to pocket treasure worth 212 Gold.
The Wandering Enemies hear the Barbarians running footsteps and
snarl with hunger. The second Wandering Enemy turns a corner and
Round 0: DM
sees the Barbarian beside a wooden chest. The snarl turns to a roar as
Turn
the Wandering Enemy turns out to be a Young Minotaur! (Token
converted.)
During the DMs turn, an Enemy (Young Minotaur) had obtained Line of Sight to a
character (Rutugar) and had not been killed before the end of the Round. This means the
Round counter is started.
Monsters throughout the dungeon hear the loud roar of a Young
Minotaur as it charges. Eager for the possibility of some fresh meat
they start heading towards the sound. The Round Counter is started,
2 Spawn Points are generated and the DM spends them on the Level
2 Enemy that is the top card on the Spawn Stack. The DM places a
Round 1:
red Threat Token at one of the Unknown Depths locations and a
corresponding red Threat Token on the Enemys reference card.
Meanwhile, Seva and Darius who are waiting outside also hear the
Minotaurs roar and jump into action! Rutugar has been discovered
and will need our help!
Initiative is rolled and turn order is determined. Luckily Rutugar is
Round 1:
quick to react (highest initiative, goes first), ignores the Treasure
Initiative
Chest and turns to engage the Young Minotaur!
Round 1: Player Rutugar moves in for the kill and
1: 1st AP:
Movement
swings his axe at the monster which stands in front of him. Rutugar
rolls 1d20 adding his Attack and Strength. The total is 18, a hit
Round 1: Player
against the Young Minotaurs AC of 15! The axe digs into the tough
1: 2nd AP:
hide of the creature. Rutugar rolls 1d12 and adds his Strength. The
Attack
Damage total is 10! (Rutugar has spent 2 Action Points. His turn is
over.)
The Minotaur roars in pain and furiously swings its own axe at
Rutugar. The Minotaur rolls 1d20 and adds its Melee (shown on its
reference card), totaling 22. Surprised by the swift reaction of the
Round 1: DM
Minotaur, Rutugar is caught off guard and is struck by the axe on his
Turn: Model 1:
left side. Luckily the axe hits on its side (Minotaur rolls 1d8 per 5
1st AP: Attack
Damage = total 4) and Rutugars thick hide manages to absorb
(Armor Hardness 1) some of the damage (Armor Durability -1, -3
Hit Points to Rutugar).
The Minotaur strikes again, this time missing as Rutugar is more
Round 1: DM
Turn: Model 1: prepared for the attacking Enemy.
2nd AP: Attack

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

59

Round 1: DM
Turn: Threat
Token 1: 1st AP:
Movement
Round 1: DM
Turn: Threat
Token 1: 2nd AP:
Movement

The closest Threat Token moves towards the sounds of combat. It


pauses to focus on what direction the sounds are coming from,

and moves towards the source.

(2nd Highest Initiative): Seva Leafwhisper runs (2 Action Points on


Round 1: Player 2
Movement) through the corridors towards the battle that rages on. She
Turn: 1st & 2nd
cries to Darius to hurry up (Command Bonus) and he quickens his
Actions:
pace (1 Free Action spent on Movement).
Movement
Round 1: DM
Turn: Threat
Token 2: 1st AP:
Movement

The (red) Threat Token slowly lumbers (Threat Tokens =Speed 4)


towards the chaotic clashes, curious about the fray.

Round 1: DM
Turn: Threat
Token 2: 2nd AP:
Movement

The (red) Threat Token moves closer.

(3rd Highest Initiative): Darius scrambles into the area where the
Round 1: Player 3 Young Minotaur and Rutugar are fighting. Hmmma Minotaur. I
have fought these before. Darius makes a (Free Action) Knowledge
Turn: 1st AP:
Check (1d20+ Knowledge + Wisdom= total of 10). I cant
Movement
remember its weaknesses.
Round 1: Player 3 If it bleeds, it will die Darius calmly states as he (spends 1 Magic
Point) and casts Teeth directed at the Minotaur.
Turn: 2nd AP:
Cast Spell

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

60

Leveling Up
When characters attain a certain amount of Experience they increase in level. This
usually means they gain a new skill or ability and/or increase in their stats. Below is a
step-by-step guide to leveling up a character. Follow the steps in order to complete the
process.
1. Attack Bonus: Add the bonus below to your existing Attack ability. If there are
2 or more numbers, this means that multiple attacks are updated. For example: At
level 6 a Barbarian gains a 2nd attack, at level 11, a 3rd.
Attack
Bonus
Barbarian
Bard
Cleric
Druid
Fighter
Monk
Necromancer
Paladin
Ranger
Rogue
Sorcerer
Wizard

1
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0

2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

3
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
0

4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

5
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0

6
1/1
1
1
1
1/1
1
1
1/1
1/1
1
1
1

LEVEL
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16
1/1 1/1 1/1 1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1/1
1 1/1 0 1/1 1/1 1/1
0
1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1
1 1/1 0 1/1 1/1 1/1
0
1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1
1 1/1 0 1/1 1/1 1/1
0
1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1
1/1 1/1 1/1 1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1/1
1 1/1 0 1/1 1/1 1/1
0
1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1
0 1 0 1
0
1/1
0
1/1
0
1/1
1/1 1/1 1/1 1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1/1
1/1 1/1 1/1 1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1/1
1 1/1 0 1/1 1/1 1/1
0
1/1 1/1/1 1/1/1
0 1 0 1
0
1/1
0
1/1
0
1/1
0 1 0 1
0
1/1
0
1/1
0
1/1

17
1/1/1/1
0
0
0
1/1/1/1
0
0
1/1/1/1
1/1/1/1
0
0
0

18
1/1/1/1
1/1/1
1/1/1
1/1/1
1/1/1/1
1/1/1
1/1
1/1/1/1
1/1/1/1
1/1/1
1/1
1/1

19
1/1/1/1
1/1/1
1/1/1
1/1/1
1/1/1/1
1/1/1
0
1/1/1/1
1/1/1/1
1/1/1
0
0

20
1/1/1/1
1/1/1
1/1/1
1/1/1
1/1/1/1
1/1/1
1/1
1/1/1/1
1/1/1/1
1/1/1
1/1
1/1

2. Saving Bonus: Add the bonus below to your existing Saving attributes as shown
below. The 3 numbers represent the 3 types of Saving in order. For example: A
level 3 Barbarian gains +0 Fortitude, +1 Reflex and +1 Will save.
Saving Bonus
(Fort/Ref/Will)
Barbarian
Bard
Cleric
Druid
Fighter
Monk
Necromancer
Paladin
Ranger
Rogue
Sorcerer
Wizard

1
2/0/0
0/2/2
2/0/2
2/0/2
2/0/0
2/2/2
0/0/2
2/0/0
2/2/0
0/2/0
0/0/2
0/0/2

2
1/0/0
0/1/1
1/0/1
1/0/1
1/0/0
1/1/1
0/0/1
1/0/0
1/1/0
0/1/0
0/0/1
0/0/1

3
0/1/1
1/0/0
0/1/0
0/1/0
0/1/1
0
1/1/1
0/1/1
0/0/1
1/0/1
1/1/1
1/1/1

4
1/0/0
0/1/1
1/0/1
1/0/1
1/0/0
1/1/1
0/0/1
1/0/0
1/1/0
0/1/0
0/0/1
0/0/1

5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

LEVEL
6 7 8
9
10 11 12
1/1/1 0 1/0/0 0/1/1 1/0/0 0 1/1/1
1/1/1 0 0/1/1 1/0/0 0/1/1 0 1/1/1
1/1/1 0 1/0/1 0/1/0 1/0/1 0 1/1/1
1/1/1 0 1/0/1 0/1/0 1/0/1 0 1/1/1
1/1/1 0 1/0/0 0/1/1 1/0/0 0 1/1/1
1/1/1 0 1/1/1 0 1/1/1 0 1/1/1
1/1/1 0 0/0/1 1/1/0 0/0/1 0 1/1/1
1/1/1 0 1/0/0 0/1/1 1/0/0 0 1/1/1
1/1/1 0 1/1/0 0/0/1 1/1/0 0 1/1/1
1/1/1 0 0/1/0 1/0/1 0/1/0 0 1/1/1
1/1/1 0 0/0/1 1/1/0 0/0/1 0 1/1/1
1/1/1 0 0/0/1 1/1/0 0/0/1 0 1/1/1

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

13
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

14 15 16 17 18 19 20
1/0/0 0/1/1 1/0/0 0 1/1/1 0 1/0/0
0/1/1 1/0/0 0/1/1 0 1/1/1 0 0/1/1
1/0/1 0/1/0 1/0/1 0 1/1/1 0 1/0/1
1/0/1 0/1/0 1/0/1 0 1/1/1 0 1/0/1
1/0/0 0/1/1 1/0/0 0 1/1/1 0 1/0/0
1/1/1 0 1/1/1 0 1/1/1 0 1/1/1
0/0/1 1/1/0 0/0/1 0 1/1/1 0 0/0/1
1/0/0 0/1/1 1/0/0 0 1/1/1 0 1/0/0
1/1/0 0/0/1 1/1/0 0 1/1/1 0 1/1/1
0/1/0 1/0/1 0/1/0 0 1/1/1 0 0/1/0
0/0/1 1/1/0 0/0/1 0 1/1/1 0 0/0/1
0/0/1 1/1/0 0/0/1 0 1/1/1 0 0/0/1

61

3. Increase your Maximum Hit Points equal to your HP Increase.


HP Increase
12 +Constitution
Barbarian
6 +Constitution
Bard
8 +Constitution
Cleric
8 +Constitution
Druid
10 +Constitution
Fighter
8 +Constitution
Monk
Necromancer 4 +Constitution
10 +Constitution
Paladin
8 +Constitution
Ranger
6 +Constitution
Rogue
4 +Constitution
Sorcerer
4 +Constitution
Wizard

4. Ability Bonus: Add 1 to one Ability of your choice. (For example: +1 to


Wisdom.)
Ability Bonus
Barbarian
Bard
Cleric
Druid
Fighter
Monk
Necromancer
Paladin
Ranger
Rogue
Sorcerer
Wizard

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

8
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

LEVEL
12 16 20
1
1 1
1
1 1
1
1 1
1
1 1
1
1 1
1
1 1
1
1 1
1
1 1
1
1 1
1
1 1
1
1 1
1
1 1

62

5. Magic Skill Bonus: Increase your Magic Skill by the bonus given below. For
example: A 3rd level Cleric gains a bonus of 4 to his Magic Skill.
Magic Skill
Bonus
Barbarian
Bard
Cleric
Druid
Fighter
Necromancer
Monk
Paladin
Ranger
Rogue
Sorcerer
Wizard

LEVEL
1
0
1
2
1
0
3
0
0
0
0
3
1

2
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1

3
0
1
4
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
2

4
0
1
3
3
0
3
0
0
0
0
7
3

5
0
3
6
3
0
2
0
0
0
0
2
3

6
0
2
5
5
0
5
0
1
1
0
11
5

7
0
0
9
5
0
5
0
0
0
0
5
5

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5 3 0 7 4 0 9 6 2
7 12 9 16 11 20 13 24 15
7 7 9 10 11 13 13 16 15
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7 4 9 9 11 11 13 13 18
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 2 0 3 0 1 4 2
0 0 2 0 3 0 1 4 2
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
15 4 19 9 23 11 27 13 31
7 7 9 9 11 11 13 13 18

17
0
14
28
19
0
15
0
3
3
0
15
15

18
0
10
17
17
0
17
0
1
1
0
35
17

19
0
11
21
21
0
16
0
9
9
0
17
16

20
0
6
17
17
0
17
0
4
4
0
18
17

6. Skill Points: You gain a number of skill points according to the table below
which can be split up and assigned to any skills you choose. However, a
characters Skill is capped at his Level +5 and may never be higher than this
maximum, with the exception of the Magic Skill, which has no cap. For example:
A Paladin gains 2+ his Intelligence in Skill Points which he decides to split up
between 4 different skills.
Skill Points

LEVEL

1
2+
(4+Intelligence)x4 4+Intelligence
Barbarian
(6+Intelligence)x4 6+Intelligence
Bard
(2+Intelligence)x4 2+Intelligence
Cleric
(4+Intelligence)x4 4+Intelligence
Druid
(2+Intelligence)x4 2+Intelligence
Fighter
(4+Intelligence)x4 4+Intelligence
Monk
Necromancer (2+Intelligence)x4 2+Intelligence
(2+Intelligence)x4 2+Intelligence
Paladin
(6+Intelligence)x4 6+Intelligence
Ranger
(8+Intelligence)x4 8+Intelligence
Rogue
(2+Intelligence)x4 2+Intelligence
Sorcerer
(2+Intelligence)x4 2+Intelligence
Wizard

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

63

7. Feats and Magic Abilities: Depending on the level achieved your character gains
either a Feat (F) chosen from the master list of Feats; or a Magic Ability (MA)
chosen from your class Magic Ability list.
FEATS &
MAGIC
ABILITIES
1
F
Barbarian
F
Bard
F
Cleric
F
Druid
F
Fighter
Necromancer F
F
Monk
F
Paladin
F
Ranger
F
Rogue
F
Sorcerer
F
Wizard

LEVEL
2
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA

3
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F

4
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA

5
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA

6
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F

7
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA

8
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA

9
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F

10
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA

11
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA

12
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F

13
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA
MA

14 15 16 17 18 19 20
MA F MA MA F MA MA
MA F MA MA F MA MA
MA F MA MA F MA MA
MA F MA MA F MA MA
MA F MA MA F MA MA
MA F MA MA F MA MA
MA F MA MA F MA MA
MA F MA MA F MA MA
MA F MA MA F MA MA
MA F MA MA F MA MA
MA F MA MA F MA MA
MA F MA MA F MA MA

8. Companions: Certain character classes gain a Companion at certain levels.


Consult the WOTC Players Handbook. You may choose to take a Companion
on some adventures and not on others.

9. Class Bonuses: Depending on your character Class, your character may gain a
unique ability at certain levels. See WOTC Players Handbook.

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

64

Creating a Character
*Due to the imminent release of D&D 4e, this section is incomplete.
You may find it strange that I put the character creation process at the end of this rule
guide, but I have assumed most of your will just be using the pre-generated characters
and will not bother with creating a character from scratch. For those of you wishing to do
so
Creating a character in Treasure Quest is a relatively quick and painless task. I have
provided a step-by-step procedure to follow while creating your character. Take a second
to scan the process so you get a general idea of what you want to be and then start at #1,
recording the information on your handy character Reference Sheet!
Here we go!
1. Race: Pick what Race you want to be. Different Races apply various rewards or
penalties to characters. Choose one of the following:
Race
Human
Dwarf

Elf

Gnome

Half Elf
Half Orc
Halfling

Effect
Speed 6, +1 FEAT, +4 Skill Points @ Level 1, +1 Skill Point each level
Speed 4, Ignore Armor Speed Penalties, +2 Constitution, -2 Charisma,
+2 Search Skill if terrain is stone, may treat Dwarven Waraxes and
Dwarven Urgoshes as Martial Weapons, +2 Saving vs Poison, +2 Saving
vs Spells, +1 Attack vs Orcs and Goblinoids, +4 AC vs: giant types, +4
Skill Points
Speed 6, +2 Dexterity, -2 Constitution, Immunity to Sleep effects, +2
Saving vs Enchantment spells, +2 Listen, Search/Spot Skills, Weapon
Proficiency: Longsword, Rapier, Longbows, Shortbows, +2 Skill Points
Speed 4, +2 Constitution, -1 Strength, +1 Defense, may treat Gnome
Hooked Hammers as Martial Weapons, +2 Saving vs Illusions, +1 DC to
Illusion spells cast, +1 Attack vs Kobolds, Goblinoids, +4 AC vs: giant
types, +2 Listen Skill, +2 Skill Points, Magic Abilities: Dancing Lights,
Ghost Sound, Prestidigitation
Speed 6, Immunity to Sleep effects, +2 Saving vs Enchantment spells,
+2 Listen, Search/Spot Skills, +4 Skill Points
Speed 6, +2 Strength, -2 Intelligence, -2 Charisma
Speed 4, +2 Dexterity, -1 Strength, +1 Defense, +2 Climb, Listen,
Stealth, Jump Skills, +1 Saving Throws, +2 Saving vs Fear, +1 Attack
with Slings and Throwing Weapons

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

65

2. Class: Pick what Class you want to be. Each character begins play with 1 or more
unique Attributes or FEATS. These are spectacular abilities that can be used
through out their adventures! Some FEATS are automatically given while others
are chosen by the players from the FEAT list. Choose a Class from the following:
Character Class
Barbarian
Bard
Cleric
Druid
Fighter
Monk
Necromancer
Paladin
Ranger
Rogue
Sorcerer
Wizard

Attributes/ FEATS
Illiterate: Can not use Scrolls, Fast Movement: +2
Speed (When using No, Light or Medium Armor)
FEAT: Spellcasting, Weapon Proficiency: Longsword,
Rapier, Sap, Short Sword, Shortbow, Whip
FEAT: Spellcasting

FEAT: Spellcasting

FEAT: Spellcasting
FEAT: Spellcasting

3. Abilities: Roll 6 D6. Keep them all in front of you and assign them to your
characters Abilities using the following table:
Dice Roll
1
2
3
4
5
6

Score
-1
0
+1
+2
+3
+4

Example: if you rolled a 4, you may assign a score of +2 to any Ability you wish.
Each character class has a key (most important) Ability(s). The key Abilities for
each character are below. I recommend that you assign your highest score(s) to
your key Ability(s).

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

66

Character Class
Barbarian
Bard
Cleric
Druid
Fighter
Monk
Necromancer
Paladin
Ranger
Rogue
Sorcerer
Wizard

Key Ability(s)
A Barbarian fights using his Strength and Dexterity.
A Bard uses Charisma to cast Spells.
A Cleric uses Wisdom to cast Divine Spells.
A Druid uses Wisdom to cast Divine Spells.
A Fighter fights using his Strength and Dexterity.
A Monk fights using his Strength and Dexterity.
A Necromancer uses Intelligence to cast Arcane Spells.
A Paladin fights using his Strength and Dexterity.
A Ranger fights using his Strength and Dexterity.
A Rogue fights using his Strength and Dexterity.
A Sorcerer uses Intelligence to cast Arcane Spells.
A Wizard uses Intelligence to cast Arcane Spells.

4. Starting Equipment/ Items/ Gold: Each Class starts with everything listed on
the pre-generated character sheet for that Class.
5. Skills: Each character begins the game with a number of Skill points that must be
assigned to the different Skills available. The number of points is given below.
(Keep in mind that a skill is capped at the character Level +5, with the exception
of the Magic Skill.)
Character Class
Barbarian
Bard
Cleric
Druid
Fighter
Monk
Necromancer
Paladin
Ranger
Rogue
Sorcerer
Wizard

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

Skill Points
(4+Intelligence)x4
(6+ Intelligence)x4
(2+ Intelligence)x4
(4+ Intelligence)x4
(2+ Intelligence)x4
(4+ Intelligence)x4
(2+ Intelligence)x4
(2+ Intelligence)x4
(6+ Intelligence)x4
(8+ Intelligence)x4
(2+ Intelligence)x4
(2+ Intelligence)x4

67

Solo Rules
With a few minor modifications, Treasure Quest can also be played solo. The following
changes are implemented when playing solo.
Characters: When playing solo, I would suggest controlling 3-4 characters yourself.
Essentially you will be controlling the entire adventure party, so you can decide how
many characters you would like to use/ handle. An adventure party with less than 3
characters will have very little chance of surviving. (Which is not necessarily a bad
thing)
Setup: First you will need to buy some card sleeves with black (or any other color)
backings. As long as you can not see both sides of a card when in the sleeve, it should be
alright. Put all your Enemy cards in these sleeves with the D&D Minis side viewable.
Depending on which Spawn Stack variation you choose to use, you may want to
separate all the Enemies into piles sorted by level. Place the Spawn Stack face down
beside the playing area. While I do not recommend using EPMs (or Legend Points) in
solo play, if you so choose to, EPMs should also be sorted by level, then each level
shuffled and 3 Followers and/ or Mercenary cards should be dealt, available for
selection in the adventure.
Objectives: Objectives can be the same in solo play, however when selecting a Boss, this
should be done blindly, by randomly selecting an Enemy card 2 levels higher than the
Adventure Level. This card, along with an Objective Treasure card, should be placed
face down at the side of the playing area. (No peeking!)
Spawn Stack: There are 2 variations in creating and dealing with the Spawn Stack,
Threat Tokens and Enemies. Both variations assume that an Adventure Level is
determined.
1. All Enemies are of the same level: Spawn Points are not used. When generating
Threat Tokens, each turn (or every other turn, to make things easier), 1 Threat
Token is created and placed at an Unknown Depths location. Threat Tokens
use the same movement as the regular game (Wandering Enemies etc.). Once a
Threat Token is converted into a model, the top card in the Spawn Stack is
turned over and the corresponding Enemy model is placed.
2. Enemies are of mixed levels: Each turn Spawn Points are generated in
accordance with the regular game rules and put into a pile. In addition, 1 Threat
Token is created and placed at an Unknown Depths location. Threat Tokens
use the same movement as the regular game (Wandering Enemies etc.). Once a
Threat Token is about to be converted into a model, the top card in the Spawn
Stack is turned over. If enough Spawn Points are available to generate the
Enemy, the Spawn Points are spent, the Threat Token removed and the Enemy
model is placed. If enough points do not exist, the Threat Token is removed, the
Enemy card is discarded and no model is placed. It must have been some random
dungeon sounds echoing through the corridors

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

68

In either variant, once the last card in the Spawn Stack is drawn, the discarded cards are
reshuffled and placed face down into a new Spawn Stack.
Enemy Attacks: Once converted into a model, on its turn an Enemy will always try to
attack the closest character (or EPM) using its strongest or smartest attack method. This
means that an Enemy that has a ranged weapon will always give priority to attack with
the ranged weapon instead of his melee weapon. An Enemy with spells or Psionics will
always try to use those first dealing the maximum amount of damage to the maximum
number of targets. In general, any Enemy with any sort of ranged attack will not move
into melee attack and if in melee will move out of melee (unless its melee attack is
substantially stronger), in order to use its ranged attack. Since you will be controlling
both the Enemies and adventurers, you will really have to try to be objective when
controlling the Enemies and how they would best destroy your adventurers.
You will have access to all the Enemy stats, so the Knowledge Skill is essentially
ignored in Solo play. Any points assigned to Knowledge may be reassigned to a different
Skill.

Traps: If you wish to use Traps in solo


play, make yourself a simple trap table or
use the one I have made for the regular
game. Put a number of empty card sleeves
in the Spawn Stack that represent Traps.
When a model is converted and a Trap
sleeve is unveiled, it means that the
character closest to the Threat Token has
sprung a Trap. Roll a die to determine the
type of Trap sprung and deal with it
accordingly. Move the Threat Token
(that triggered the Trap) 8 spaces away
from the model that spotted it. During
subsequent Rounds, that Threat Token is
considered the same as any other regular
Threat Token.

A Trap?

Treasure Quest 5.0 Steve Lefort

69

Final Notes
Treasure Quest will be put on pause for a while, until D&D4e is released. At that time, I
will re-evaluate TQ and decide which direction to take it. It may stay based on D&D 3.5,
take on 4e characteristics or become something more unique. Regardless of what the
future brings, I hope you enjoy TQ and I truly do appreciate the feedback and enthusiasm
offered
My primary focus will now be Bug Hunt, which is shaping up to be more than what I
initially planned. For those of you interested; it is a cross between, Space Hulk, Aliens
(the movies) WH40K, Starship Troopers and Treasure Quest. Creating TQ taught me a
lot, most of which I hope to apply to Bug Hunt and other projects going forward. And
who knows, maybe one day I may actually get to do this for a living!
Special Thanks:
Steve Vennard: The longest running TQ player.
Buni: For her continued, unwavering support throughout my life.
Justin: The most enthusiastic TQ player.
Andrew: The TQ Party Leader and most K.I.A. player.
Xombe: For his continued criticismuh enthusiasm
Wert786 & gorillacrab: For introducing TQ out west and providing invaluable feedback.
And to everyone that gave TQ a try!
Steve

The journey continues

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70