You are on page 1of 33

BRANDOO

ADS

PROJECT REPORT
ON
FLEX PRINTING

Registered Office & Location:


30-8-1/5,
BHANU STREET, DABAGARDENS,
VISAKHAPATNAM - 20

INDEX:
1. Project at a glance
2. Firm Profile
3. Product Introduction
4. Scope of the Project
5. Constitution / Sector
6. Background of the Promoter
7. Process
8. Marketing
9. Location Advantages
10.
Licenses
11.
Project Cost & Means of Finance
12.
Notes on Project Cost
13.
Notes on Means of Finance
14.
Utilities
15.
SWOT Analysis
16.
Assumptions
17.
Financial Statements

Project at a Glance
1. Name of the Unit
2. Office

3. Location

BRANDOO ADS
30-8-1/5,
BHANU STREET,
DABAGARDENS,
VISAKHAPATNAM - 20
30-8-1/5,
BHANU STREET,
DABAGARDENS,

VISAKHAPATNAM - 20
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Line of Activity
Sector
Constitution
Name of the Promoter
Project Cost & Means of

Finance
PROJECT COST

AMOUNT

FLEX PRINTING
MICRO
PROPRIETORY
Mr. S N R Manjunath Kumar

MEANS OF
FINANCE
Capital

AMOUNT
Rs in Lakhs
13.50

Land
Lease
Buildings
Lease
Machinery Present
10.00
Machinery
13.50
Term loan
Proposed
Total
23.50 Total
9. Promoters Contribution
57.44%
10.
Power
10 HP
11.
Employment
3

10.00
23.50

Firm Profile
The

firm

M/s

BRANDOO

ADSis

offering

Digital

Printing

and

advertising solutions to businesses and agencies. It connects Advertisers


with theirs Audience across any form of digital printing, using its massive
local presence to deliver appropriate messages to the right audience,
through the most relevant advertising methods.

Our goal is to create new ways of thinking about marketing and


advertising business in the private, public and non-profit sectors. We aim
to help business people promote their business more productively, more
competitively, and more creatively.
We give our best service at Visakhapatnam, East & West
Godavari';s and overall Andhra Pradesh.
OUR SERVICES:
1. Auto Campaign
2. Try Cycles
3. ADD Walkers
4. Hoarding';s
5. Bus shelter';s
6. CenterMedia';s or Poll board';s(Lolly POP';S)
7. Theater Slides
8. TV Scrolling';s
9. Event Management';s
10. Mall Branding';s
11. InoxBranding';s
12. Paper Ads
13. Flex Printing
14. Eco - solvent printing
15. Interior works
16. Aluminium & Glass partition works.
17. Acrylic, Neon & Steel signage';s
18. SS railing works
20. Fire & Safety works
21. House keeper';s and Securities.

OUR PRESENT AND PREVIOUS WORKS:

OUR CLIENTS:

NOTE: OUR NEW CLIENTS

1. VIVO MOBILES
2. ASHIRWAD PIPES PRIVATED LIMITED
3. INDIA 1 ATM';S
4. ANANDA NILAYAM - CHAITANYA CONSTRUCTIONS PRIVATE
LIMITED
5. KIDZEE - ZEE LEARNING

Name of the Promoter:


Mr. S N R Manjunath Kumar

Product Introduction
Flexography
"Flexo" redirects here. For the Futurama character, see Flexo (Futurama).

A flexographic printing plate.


Part of a series on the
History of printing

V
T
E

Flexography (often abbreviated to flexo) is a form of printing process


which utilizes a flexible relief plate. It is essentially a modern version
of letterpress which can be used for printing on almost any type of
substrate, including plastic, metallic films, cellophane, and paper. It is
widely used for printing on the non-porous substrates required for various
types of food packaging (it is also well suited for printing large areas of
solid colour).
History
In 1890, the first such patented press was built in Liverpool, England by
Bibby, Baron and Sons. The water-based ink smeared easily, leading the
device to be known as "Bibby's Folly". In the early 1900s, other European
presses using rubber printing plates and aniline oil-based ink were
developed. This led to the process being called "aniline printing". By the
1920s, most presses were made in Germany, where the process was

called "gummidruck," or rubber printing. In modern-day Germany, they


continue to call the process "gummidruck."
During the early part of the 20th century, the technique was used
extensively in food packaging in the United States. However, in the 1940s,
the Food and Drug Administration classified aniline dyes as unsuitable for
food packaging. Printing sales plummeted. Individual firms tried using new
names for the process, such as "Lustro Printing" and "Transglo Printing,"
but met with limited success. Even after the Food and Drug Administration
approved the aniline process in 1949 using new, safe inks, sales continued
to decline as some food manufacturers still refused to consider aniline
printing. Worried about the image of the industry, packaging
representatives decided the process needed to be renamed.
In 1951 Franklin Moss, then the president of the Mosstype Corporation,
conducted a poll among the readers of his journal The Mosstyper to
submit new names for the printing process. Over 200 names were
submitted, and a subcommittee of the Packaging Institute's Printed
Packaging Committee narrowed the selection to three possibilities:
"permatone process", "rotopake process", and "flexographic process".
Postal ballots from readers of The Mosstyper overwhelmingly chose the
last of these, and "flexographic process" was chosen.[1]
Evolution
Originally, flexographic printing was rudimentary in quality. Labels
requiring high quality have generally been printed using the offset process
until recently. Since 1990, great advances have been made to the quality
of flexographic printing presses, printing plates and printing inks.
The greatest advances in flexographic printing have been in the area
of photopolymer printing plates, including improvements to the plate
material and the method of plate creation.
Digital direct to plate systems have been a good improvement in the
industry recently. Companies like Asahi Photoproducts, AV Flexologic,
Dupont, MacDermid, Kodak and Esko have pioneered the latest
technologies, with advances in fast washout and the latest screening
technology.
Laser-etched ceramic anilox rolls also play a part in the improvement of
print quality. Full-color picture printing is now possible, and some of the
finer presses available today, in combination with a skilled operator, allow
quality that rivals the lithographic process. One ongoing improvement has
been the increasing ability to reproduce highlight tonal values, thereby

providing a workaround for the very high dot gain associated with
flexographic printing.
Process overview
1. Platemaking
The first method of plate development uses light-sensitive polymer. A film
negative is placed over the plate, which is exposed to ultra-violet light.
The polymer hardens where light passes through the film. The remaining
polymer has the consistency of chewed gum. It is washed away in a tank
of either water or solvent. Brushes scrub the plate to facilitate the
"washout" process. The process can differ depending on whether solid
sheets of photopolymer or liquid photopolymer are used, but the principle
is still the same. The plate to be washed out is fixed in the orbital washout
unit on a sticky base plate. The plate is washed out in a mixture of water
and 1% dishwasher soap, at a temperature of approximately 40C. The
unit is equipped with a dual membrane filter. With this the environmental
burdening is kept to an absolute minimum. The membrane unit separates
photopolymer from the washout water. After addition of absorb gelatine
for example, the photopolymer residue can be disposed of as standard
solid waste together with household refuse. The recycled water is re-used
without adding any detergent.[4]

Flexographic printing press


The second method used a computer-guided laser to etch the image onto
the printing plate. Such a direct laser engraving process is called digital
platemaking. Companies such as AV Flexologic, Esko, Kodak ,Polymount
and Screen from The Netherlands are market leaders in manufacturing
this type of equipment.
The third method is to go through a molding process. The first step is to
create a metal plate out of the negative of our initial image through an
exposition process (followed by an acid bath). In the early days the metal
used was zinc, leading to the name 'zincos'. Later magnesium was
used.This metal plate in relief is then used in the second step to create
the mold that could be in bakelite board or even glass or plastic, through a
first molding process. Once cooled, this master mold will press the rubber

or plastic compound (under both controlled temperature and pressure)


through a second molding process to create the printing plate.
2. Mounting
For every colour to be printed, a plate is made and eventually put on a
cylinder which is placed in the printing press. To make a complete picture,
regardless of printing on flexible film or corrugated paper, the image
transferred from each plate has to register exactly with the images
transferred from the other colors. To ensure an accurate picture is made,
mounting marks are made on the flexographic plates. These mounting
marks can be microdots (down to 0.3 mm) and/or crosses. Special
machinery is made for mounting these plates on the printing cylinders to
maintain registration.
3. Printing
A flexographic print is made by creating a positive mirrored master of the
required image as a 3D relief in a rubber or polymer material.
Flexographic plates can be created with analog and digital platemaking
processes. The image areas are raised above the non image areas on the
rubber or polymer plate. The ink is transferred from the ink roll which is
partially immersed in the ink tank. Then it transfers to
the anilox or ceramic roll (or meter roll) whose texture holds a specific
amount of ink since it is covered with thousands of small wells or cups
that enable it to meter ink to the printing plate in a uniform thickness
evenly and quickly (the number of cells per linear inch can vary according
to the type of print job and the quality required).[5] To avoid getting a final
product with a smudgy or lumpy look, it must be ensured that the amount
of ink on the printing plate is not excessive. This is achieved by using a
scraper, called a doctor blade. The doctor blade removes excess ink from
the anilox roller before inking the printing plate. The substrate is finally
sandwiched between the plate and the impression cylinder to transfer the
image.[6] The sheet is then fed through a dryer, which allows the inks to
dry before the surface is touched again. If a UV-curing ink is used, the
sheet does not have to be dried, but the ink is cured by UV rays instead.
Basic parts of the press

Unwind and infeed section The roll of stock must be held under
control so the web can unwind as needed.

Printing section Single color station including the fountain, anilox,


plate and impression rolls.

Drying station High velocity heated air, specially formulated inks


and an after-dryer can be used.

Outfeed and rewind section Similar to the unwind segment, keeps


web tension controlled.

Operation
Operational overview
1. Fountain roller
The fountain roller transfers the ink that is located in the ink pan to the
second roller, which is the anilox roller. In Modern Flexo printing this is
called a Meter or "metering" roller.
2. Anilox roller
This is what makes flexography unique. The anilox roller meters the
predetermined ink that is transferred for uniform thickness. It has
engraved cells that carry a certain capacity of inks that can only be seen
with a microscope. These rollers are responsible to transfer the inks to the
flexible-plates that are already mounted on the Plate Cylinders.
3. Doctor Blade (optional)
The doctor blade scrapes the anilox roll to ensure that the predetermined
ink amount delivered is only what is contained within the engraved cells.
Doctor blades have predominantly been made of steel but advanced
doctor blades are now made of polymer materials, with several different
types of beveled edges.
4. Plate cylinder
The plate cylinder holds the printing plate, which is soft flexible rubber-like
material. Tape, magnets, tension straps and/or ratchets hold the printing
plate against the cylinder.
5. Impression Cylinder
The impression cylinder applies pressure to the plate cylinder, where the
image is transferred to the substrate. This impression cylinder or "print
Anvil" is required to apply pressure to the Plate Cylinder.
Flexographic printing inks
The nature and demands of the printing process and the application of the
printed product determine the fundamental properties required
of flexographic inks. Measuring the physical properties of inks and
understanding how these are affected by the choice of ingredients is a
large part of ink technology. Formulation of inks requires a detailed
knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of the raw materials
composing the inks, and how these ingredients affect or react with each
other as well as with the environment. Flexographic printing inks are
primarily formulated to remain compatible with the wide variety of

substrates used in the process. Each formulation component individually


fulfills a special function and the proportion and composition will vary
according to the substrate.
There are five types of inks that can be used in flexography: solvent-based
inks, water-based inks, electron beam (EB) curing inks, ultraviolet (UV)
curing inks and two-part chemically-curing inks (usually based on
polyurethane isocyanate reactions), although these are uncommon at the
moment. Water based flexo inks with particle sizes below 5 m may cause
problems when deinking recycled paper.
Ink controls
The ink is controlled in the flexographic printing process by the inking unit.
The inking unit can be either of fountain roll system or doctor
blade system. The fountain roll system is a simple old system yet if there
is too much or too little ink this system would likely control in a poor way.
The doctor blade inside the anilox/ceramic roller uses cell geometry and
distribution. These blades ensure that the cells are filled with enough ink.
Presses
Stack press
Color stations stack up vertically, which makes it easy to access. This
press is able to print on both sides of the substrate.
Central Impression press
All color stations are located in a circle around the impression cylinder.
This press can only print on one side. Advantage: excellent registry
In-line press
Color stations are placed horizontally. This press prints on both sides, via a
turnbar. Advantage: can print on heavier substrates, such as corrugated
boards.
Applications
Flexo has an advantage over lithography in that it can use a wider range
of inks, water based rather than oil based inks, and is good at printing on
a variety of different materials like plastic, foil, acetate film, brown paper,
and other materials used in packaging. Typical products printed using
flexography include brown corrugated boxes, flexible packaging including
retail and shopping bags, food and hygiene bags and sacks, milk and
beverage cartons, flexible plastics, self-adhesive labels, disposable cups
and containers, envelopes and wallpaper. In recent years there has also
been a move towards laminates, where two or more materials are bonded

together to produce new material with different properties than either of


the originals. A number of newspapers now eschew the more common
offset lithography process in favour of flexo. Flexographic inks, like those
used in gravure and unlike those used in lithography, generally have a
low viscosity. This enables faster drying and, as a result, faster production,
which results in lower costs.
Printing press speeds of up to 600 meters per minute (2000 feet per
minute) are achievable now with modern technology high-end printers.
Flexo printing is widely used in the converting industry for printing plastic
materials for packaging and other end uses. For maximum efficiency, the
flexo presses produce large rolls of material that are then slit down to their
finished size on slitting machines.

Wide format (aka large format) printers (contrast to vector-rendering


"plotters") are generally accepted to be any computer-controlled printing
machines (aka "printers") that support a maximum print roll width of
between 18" and 100". Printers with capacities over 100" wide are
considered Super Wide or Grand format. Wide format printers are used
to print banners, posters, trade show graphics, wallpaper, murals, backlit
film (aka duratrans), vehicle image wraps, electronic circuit schematics,
architectural drawings, construction plans, backdrops for theatrical and
media sets, and any other large format artwork or signage. Wide format
printers usually employ some variant of inkjet technology to produce the
printed image; and are more economical than other print methods such
as screen printing for most short-run (low quantity) print projects,
depending on print size, run length (quantity of prints per single original),
and the type of substrate or print medium. Wide format printers are
usually designed for printing onto a roll of print media that feeds
incrementally during the print process, rather than onto individual sheets.
Technologies
Wide format printers can be categorized by the type of ink transfer
process they employ:

Aqueous: thermal or Piezo inkjet printers using an ink known as


aqueous or water-based. The term water base is a generally accepted
misnomer. The pigment is held in a non-reactive carrier solution that is
sometimes water and other times a substitute liquid, including a soy
based liquid used by Kodak. Aqueous ink generally comes in two
flavors, Dye and UV (alternatively known as pigment). Dye ink is high

color, low UV-resistant variety that offers the widest color gamut. UV
ink is generally duller in color but withstands fading from UV rays.
Similar in general principle to desktop inkjet printers. Finished prints
using dye inks must be laminated to protect them if they are to be
used outdoors while prints using UV inks can be used outdoors unlaminated for a limited time. Various substrates (media) are available,
including canvases, banners, metabolized plastic and cloth. Aqueous
technology requires that all materials be properly coated to accept and
hold the ink.

Solvent: this term is used to describe any ink that is not waterbased. Piezo inkjet printers whose inks use petroleum or a petroleum
by-product such as an acetone like carrier liquid. "Eco-Solvent" inks
usually contain glycol esters or glycol ether esters and are slower
drying. The resulting prints are waterproof. May be used to print
directly on uncoated vinyl and other media as well as ridged substrates
such as Painted/Coated Metal, Foam Board and PVC. The solvents
soften the base material and allow the ink pigments to mechanically
latch on to the chemically etched surface. Certain ink manufacturers
have different bite based on what solvent carriers they use. Which is
what makes solvent ink prints more durable than aqueous inks.
However, solvent inks give off strong odor or fumes when drying, as
the carrier fluid dissipates through applied heat from the printer's
platen. The are various levels of solvent ink range from "True or Full
Solvent" to "Medium/Mild Solvent" all the way down to "Eco-Solvent".
The fume and odour levels decrease accordingly, so does the surface
etch of the base material. Full to Medium/Mild Solvents require fume
extraction to be considered safe in the working environment. Most EcoSolvents can be used in an office environment with minimal or
tolerable odor levels.

Dye sublimation: inks are diffused into the special print media to
produce continuous-tone prints of photographic quality.

UV: Piezo inkjet printers whose inks are UV-curable (Dry when cured
with UV light). The resulting prints are waterproof, embossed & vibrant.
Any media material can be used in this technology, polymer made
media are best. Ceramics, glass, metals, and woods are also used with
printing with this technology.

Pen/plotter: a pen or pens are used to draw on the print substrate.


Mainly used for producing CAD drawings. Generally being superseded
by digital technologies such as Solvent, Aqueous, and UV.

Scope of the Project


The running project is to Flex printing and Brandingsat 30-8-1/5, BHANU
STREET, DABAGARDENS,VISAKHAPATNAM - 20..The administrative
office
atat30-8-1/5,
BHANU
STREET,
DABAGARDENS,VISAKHAPATNAM - 20.. The Project cost is estimated
of Rs 13.50 Lacs. The installed capacity is 1, 80,000sft per annum with 16
working hours in 3 shifts in a day and 300 working days in a year .The
operating capacity is assumed 65%, 75% and 85% in first, second and
conceding year operations.

Constitution & Sector


Constitution
BRANDOO ADS, unit is constituted as a firm act for Flex printing
and Brandings
Sector :

The proposed sector comes under Small Sector. The firm has already
obtained

registration

Certificate

from

District

Industries

Centre,

Visakhapatnam.

Background of the Promoter


Mr.N S R Manjunath Kumar S/o S L Swami Naidu Kannaiahaged 27
years, residing at D No 49-54-6/7 21, B S Layout, IV town Police
Station, Visakhapatnam - 13.

He is a Management Graduate.He is

having over 5 years experience in same line of activity. He is


possessing good leadership qualities and 5 yrsof

experience in

business dealing and solving labour problems. With his experience


and influence he plays a key role in making this successful project

Location & its Advantages


LAND: The proposed location of the Unit is situated 30-8-1/5,BHANU
STREET, DABAGARDENS,VISAKHAPATNAM - 20.. The location of the
firm has considerable influence on the techno-economical facility of the
project. There are various factors contributing to the functioning of an
proposed firm and following are the primary factors taken into
consideration.

REASONS FOR THE SELECTION OF THE SITE:


1. Availability of labor at economically rate.
2. Adequate supply of electricity power.
3. Adequate supply of water throughout the year.

4. The site is well connected with road facility.


5. Banking facilities and Government supports.
6. Adequate Transport facilities for economical transportation of
finished product and Spare parts.
7. Nearness to the Market.
8. As the area is developing area, the setting up of a unit in this will
help the people to progress both socially and economically.

Licenses
The following licenses are already obtained for the Firm:
1
2
3
4
5

Udyog Aadhar
Electricity
VAT
Shops & Establishment
Trade License

Market Potential
Rise and Rise of flex printing in India
Flex printing future is on rise in almost all cities in India may it be Mumbai,
Delhi, Chennai, Kolkatta, Lucknow, Hyderabad and Visakhapatnam, earlier
flex printing was confined only to the banner printing for political parties
at the time of election. There used to be serious shortage of flex printers
as the quantum of work used to be huge, so it is today. To get the quality
output and maintain healthy relation with these printers, parties used to
pay them handsomely and a good relation prospered between them. Now
slowly with India Inc. growth in last 10 years, printers are seeing a
dramatic shift in their customer base with many printers solely printing
only

for

big

corporations

like

Mahindra,

ICICI

bank

etc.

As nowadays companies are participating and exhibiting in lot many


events and exhibition scenario has changed. After carefully analyzing
usage of flex, we have came out with undermentioned way in order of
their rise as far as contribution to flex and allied medium printing is
considered.
Medium

of

printing:

Flex, star flex, vinyl, solvent flex, solvent vinyl, eco solvent flex, eco
solvent

vinyl,

backlit,

Flex

non

terrable

etc.

printing

usages:

1. Regional and National Parties rallies, election meeting etc - Rising below
average rise - Highly seasonal - But as India has 28 states, you can always
assume election somewhere or the other through out the year, but as
these printers are regional, they can make merry at Ward, General and
National elections of their region only which comes once in 5 years.
2. Printing for events and exhibitions - Rising above average - Lot many
events
3.

In

happening
house

branding

round
of

the

store,

the
retail

year.

outlets,

malls.

4. Events, sports meet, annual day function, intra school and inter school
competition

in

school/colleges.

5. Banners in form of registered and illegal hoardings which can be found


almost
6.

in

Birthday

every
party,

part

of

corporate

the
events

city
and

of
get

Mumbai.
together's.

With many different ways of consumption of flex in the Indian market, it is


on the rise in India and future looks good for digital printers.

Process
Digital printing
Digital printing can be done in various ways. Two technologies dominate
the industry:

Inkjet In an inkjet printer the image that needs to be printed is


created by small droplets of ink that are propelled from the nozzles
of one or more print heads. Inkjet devices can print on a wide range
of substrates such as paper, plastic, canvas or even doors and floor
tiles. Inkjet printing is used a lot for posters and signage. It is also
economical for short run publications such as photo books or small
runs of books. In-line inkjet printers are sometimes combined with
other types of presses to print variable data, such as the mailing
addresses on direct mail pieces.

Xerography In xerographic printers, such as laser printers, the


image that needs to be printed is formed by selectively applying a
charge to a metal cylinder called a drum. The electrical charge is
used to attract toner particles. These particles are transferred to the
media that is being printed on. To make sure the toner is fixed
properly, the substrate passes through a fuser that melts the toner
into the medium. Laser printers are not only used in offices but also
for small run printing of books, brochures and other types of
document. These printers are also used for transactional printing
(bills, bank documents, etc) and direct mail.

In 2009 both techniques jointly accounted for around 15% of the total
volume of print.

Digital printing is increasingly utilized for print jobs that were previously
printing using offset, flexo or screen printing.

In short run small format (A3 size) printing, digital is taking over
from offset for both color and B&W printing. Quick printers and copy
shops print digitally on presses from vendors like Xerox, HP, Canon,
and Konica Minolta.

Labels are also increasingly being printed digitally.

Billboard and point-of-sale or point-of-purchase jobs are being done


by wide-format inkjet devices.

In book printing publishing companies start to rely more on print-ondemand. The Espresso Book Machine pictured below is well suited

for that job.


There are a number of other digital printing processes that are geared
towards specific niche markets:

Dye-sublimation is a printing process in which heat is used to


transfer a dye onto the substrate. Dye-sub printers are mainly used
for proofing and for producing photographic prints. Some can print
on a variety of materials such as paper, plastic, and fabric.

In the direct thermal printing process heat is used to change the


color of a special coating that has been applied to paper. This
process is nowadays still in use in cash registers.

In the thermal ink transfer printing process heat is used to melt


print off a ribbon and onto the substrate. It is used in some proofing
devices but seems to be gradually disappearing off the market.

MACHINERYSPECIFICATION
S. NO
1

DESCRIPTION
ECO SOLVENT

QTY
1

AMOUNT
13.50

DIGITAL PRINTER
Grand Total

13.50

Project & Means of Finance


PROJECT COST
Land
Buildings
Machinery Present
Machinery Proposed
Total
Promoter Contribution

AMOUNT

MEANS OF FINANCE

Lease
Capital
Lease
10.00
13.50
Term loan
23.50 Total
: 57.44%

AMOUNT
Rs in Lakhs
13.50
10.00
23.50

Notes on Project Cost


Land & Buildings:

The proposed unit is being set up at 30-8-1/5,BHANU STREET,


DABAGARDENS,VISAKHAPATNAM - 20. The Promoter already running
the business at leased building. The location is quite suitable for the unit.
Machinery:The equipment worth of Rs. 13.50 Lacs are required to run the unit. The
Promoter has already approached reputed suppliers, obtained quotations
and enclosed the same for your reference.

Notes on Means of Finance


1. CAPITAL:
The Promoters capital was fixed at Rs.13.50 Lacs.
2. TERM LOAN:
The unit desires to avail Term Loan of Rs. 10.00 Lacs. from Bank/Financial
Institute to meet part cost of the project cost, which works out to 75.00%
of the total project cost of Rs. 13.50 Lacs.

The amount would be

repayable in 28 quarterly instalments of Rs.0.11lacs each with a


moratorium of twelve months from the date of commencement of
Commercial Production.

However, the interest on the term loan would be

payable as and when it is applied on the account.

The detail of the

repayment programmed is placed in this report.

Utilities & Services


POWER:
The Unit requires 10 HP power supply under L.T. Limit. No problems
are anticipated with regard to obtaining of power supply.
WATER:
The unit requires 500 Liters of water per day.
EFFLUENTS:
There are no harmful effluents generated in the process.
TRANSPORTATION:
The

proposed

unit

is

located

DABAGARDENS,VISAKHAPATNAM

at

30-8-1/5,BHANU

STREET,

20.. There is no problem for

transportation of raw material and finished goods.

MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS:
The unit will be employing 2 Nos. of workers besides 1 Nos. of
administrative staff. All the above persons can be recruited locally
without any difficulties.

SWOT Analysis
STRENGTH:
The unit is located at 30-8-1/5,BHANU STREET,
DABAGARDENS,VISAKHAPATNAM 20.The firm is having more than 3
yrs of experience in the same line of activity

WEAKNESS:

The unit has competition from the existing units as the proposed unit
is having latest technology and by the government encouragements to
start new proposed firm the units can competent with the old industries.

Assumptions Underlying for Preparation of Financial


Statements
(In Sft)

Installed Capacity perDay

:600sft

No of Working days

: 300 days

InstalledCapacity @ 100 % Capacity


: 600x300=1,80,000sft
In 2015-16:600x30=18,000sft
Operating Capacity is assumed as under:Description
Flex printing (Sft)
Utilization(%)

2015-16
11700
65

2016-17
1,17,000
65

2017-18
1,35,000
75

Raw materials Requirement


The average price of the raw materials per annum
Wastage of 20%
In 2015-16:
Sl.
No
1
2

Description

Qty

Unit Cost

Flex
Inks

11,700ft
100

3.

Solvents

10

4.75/ Sft
55,575.00
550.00 /
55,000.00
Litre
875.00/Litr 8,750.00
e
1,19,325.0
0

Qty

Unit Cost

Amount

4.75 / Sft

5,30,575.0
0
330000.00

In 2016-17:
Sl.
Description
No
1
Flex
2

Inks

1,11,700sf
t
600

3.

Solvents

100

Amount

550.00 /
Litre
875.00/Litr 87,500.00
e
9,48,075.0
0

Stores &Spares :In 2015-16:


Stores and Spares are estimated at 5% of Raw materials of Rs. 5,966.00
in a year
In 2016-17:

Stores and Spares are estimated at 5% of Raw materials of Rs.47,403.00


in a year.
Power &Fuel :In 2015-16:
The unit requires 5 HP load of power and the unit run for 8hrs in 3 shifts
in a day and 300 days in a year.
5x8x3x30x.746x.80x.60x6.50=8,380.00
In 2016-17:
The unit requires 5 HP load of power and the unit run for 8hrs in 3 shifts
in a day and 300 days in a year.
5x8x3x300x.746x.80x.60x6.50=55,860.48
.
Wages :Wages are calculated as under
In 2015-16
Sl.
Description
No. of
Salary /
No
employee month
s
1
Incharge
1
15,000.00
2
Skilled
1
10,000.00
Operators
3
Semi Skilled
1
6,000.00

Wages in 2016-17:
Sl.
Description
No
1
2
3

Incharge
Skilled
Operators
Semi Skilled

No. of
employee
s
1
1

Salary /
month

6,000.00

15,000.00
10,000.00

Other Manufacturing Expenses: In 2015-16:


Other Manufacturing Expenses are estimated of
8,500.00
In 2016-17:
Other Manufacturing Expenses are estimated of
67,500.00

Salary / Year
30,000.00
20,000.00
12,000.00
62,000.00

Salary / Year
1,80,000.00
1,20,000.00
72,000.00
3,72,000.00

5 % on sales Rs.

5 % on sales Rs.

Administrative Expenses: In 2015-16:


Administrative Expenses are estimated Rs 8,335.00 per year.
In 2016-17:
Administrative Expenses are estimated Rs50,000.00 per year.
SALES:
In 2015-16:
Sale price per SFT @ Rs. 14.53 x 11,700 = 1,70,001.00
In 2016-17:
Sale price per SFT @ Rs. 14.53 X1,11,700 = 16,23,001.00
Depreciation :- Depreciation was been calculated on written down value
method
Plant & machinery

25%

Interest :- Interest has been calculated as per effective rate


Term Loan

: 12.75%
Working Capital

: 12.50%