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Bibliography

Primary Sources
1. "Alice Paul." Gale Biography in Context, Gale, 2010. Biography in Context. Accessed 4 Jan.
2017. This source is a picture of Alice Paul. It is a primary source because it is directly of her.
We will use this to provide a picture of her.

2. "Ani DiFranco." Gale Biography in Context, Gale, 2011. Biography in Context. Accessed 4 Jan.
2017. This source is a picture of Ani DiFranco. It is a primary source because it is a direct
picture of her. We will use this to provide a picture of her.
3. "Betty Friedan." Gale Biography in Context, Gale, 2011. Biography in Context. Accessed 4 Jan.
2017. This source is a picture of Betty Friedan. It is a primary source because it is an accurate
image of her. We will use this to provide an image of her.

4. "Citizens Looking At A Sign Declaring Equality For Women's Suffrage." Flickr. Yahoo!, 1919.
Web. 26 Oct. 2016. This source is an example of signs you would see that promote womens
rights. This source is a primary source because it is a picture from the event/period of time. We
will use this to display ways that women promoted equality in past time.
5. "Elizabeth Cady Stanton." Gale Biography in Context, Gale, 2010. Biography in Context.
Accessed 8 Jan. 2017. This source is an image of Elizabeth Cady Stanton. It is primary because
it is directly of her. We will use this to provide an image of her.
6. "Emmeline Pankhurst." Gale Biography in Context, Gale, 2010. Biography in Context. Accessed
4 Jan. 2017. This source is a photo of Emmeline Pankhurst. It is primary because it is an
accurate photo of her. We will use this to provide an image.
7. "Faye Wattleton." Gale Biography in Context, Gale, 2010. Biography in Context. Accessed 8 Jan.
2017. This source is a photo of Faye Wattleton. It is primary because it is directly of her. We
will use it to provide an image of her.
8. "Gloria Steinem." Gale Biography in Context, Gale, 2011. Biography in Context. Accessed 8 Jan.
2017. This source is a picture of Gloria Steinem. It is primary because it is directly her. We will
use this to provide an image of her.
9. "Malala Yousafzai." Gale Biography in Context, Gale, 2016. Biography in Context. Accessed 8
Jan. 2017. This source is a photo of Malala Yousafzai. It is primary because it is a direct picture
of her. We will use this to provide an image of her.

10. "Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin." Gale Biography in Context, Gale, 2010. Biography in Context.
Accessed 8 Jan. 2017. This is a picture of Mary Wollstonecraft. It is a primary source because it
is directly her. We will use it to provide an image of her.
11. "Sec. Of State Clinton Speaks On World Development In Washington." UPI Photo Collection,
2010. Biography in Context. Accessed 8 Jan. 2017. This source is a picture of Hillary Rodham
Clinton. It is primary because it is an accurate picture of her. We will use it to provide an image
of her.

12. "Suffragists Arrested for Picketing the White House, 07/14/1917." Flickr. Yahoo! Web. 26 Oct.
2016. This picture shows a suffragist being arrested for picketing. This source is a primary
source because it was taken at the time of the event. We will use this source to display how
suffragists for feminism were treated.
13. "Susan B. Anthony." Gale Biography in Context, Gale, 2011. Biography in Context. Accessed 8
Jan. 2017. This is a picture of Susan B. Anthony. It is a primary source because it is a direct
picture of her. We will use it to provide a picture of her.

14. "We Can Do It!" Flickr. Yahoo! Web. 26 Oct. 2016. This picture is a poster supporting women
equality. This source is primary because it is a picture of the direct poster used in the movement.
We will use it to show ways that women and suffragists overcame oppression.

15. Anthony, Susan B. "Letter From Susan B. Anthony." A Letter from Susan B. Anthony to
Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Web. 13 Oct. 2016. This source is primary, because it was directly
written by Susan B. Anthony. This source provides the letter written by Susan. We will use this
source to provide information about Susan B. Anthony and her point of view about feminism.

16. LOEB, SAUL. Hillary Clinton. 2016. Las Vegas. Getty Images. Web. 20 Oct. 2016. This source
is a primary source because it as a photo of the actual person. This source is a photograph of
Hillary Clinton. We will use this picture to provide a visual of Hillary Clinton.

17. Malala Yousafzai Published. "Speech by Malala Yousafzai at the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony
2014." Council on Foreign Relations. Council on Foreign Relations, 10 Dec. 2014. Web. 13
Oct. 2016. This source is primary, because it is a direct speech made by Malala. This website
provides a speech by Malala. We will use this source to provide direct words from Malala to
strengthen our argument on the importance of the feminism movement.

18. Parenthood, Planned. "Planned Parenthood | Official Site." Planned Parenthood | Official Site.
Planned Parenthood, 12 Oct. 2016. Web. 13 Oct. 2016. This source is a primary source, because
it is an official website that was created by the group we are researching. This website provides
insight of what Planned Parenthood does. We will use this website to create a connection
between what Planned Parenthood does and the feminist movement.

19. Susan B Anthony. 1890. Getty Images - Hulton Archive. This source is a picture of Susan B.
Anthony. This source is primary because it is a direct picture of her at the time she was alive.
We will use this source to display an image of the appearance of Susan.

20. The Asahi Shimbun. Malala Yousfazai. 2016. Getty Images, The Asahi Shimbun, London. This
photograph is primary because it was taken of the actual person. This source is a photograph of
Malala. We will use this image to provide a visual image of Malala.

21. Toth, Andrew. Faye Wattleton. 2015. FilmMagic, New York. Getty Images. Web. 20 Oct.
2016. This source is primary because it was taken of the actual person. This source is a
photograph of Faye Wattleton. We will use this source to provide an image of Wattleton.

Secondary Sources
1. "Alice Paul." Encyclopedia of World Biography, vol. 19, Gale, 1999. Biography in
Context. Accessed 4 Jan. 2017. This source is a biography of Alice Paul. It is secondary
because it is not direct. We will use this for an overlook of feminism in history.

2. "Ani DiFranco." Contemporary Musicians, vol. 43, Gale, 2003. Biography in Context.
Accessed 4 Jan. 2017. This source is a biography of Ani DiFranco. It is secondary
because she didnt write it herself. Well use this for creating an overview of feminism.

3. "Betty Friedan." Newsmakers, Gale, 1994. Biography in Context. Accessed 4 Jan. 2017.
This source is a biography of Betty Friedan. It is secondary because it does not come
from her direct perspective. We will use this for an outlook on feminism.

4. "Emmeline Pankhurst." Encyclopedia of World Biography, Gale, 1998. Biography in


Context. Accessed 4 Jan. 2017. This source is a biography of Emmeline Pankhurst. It is a
secondary source, because she didnt write it in her view. We will use this as an overview
on feminism.

5. .
feminism. Comptons by Britannica. 01 Aug. 2011. SIRS Discoverer. Web. 06 Oct.
2016. This source explains the meaning of feminism and gives examples of feminism
over time. This source is a secondary source because it is made by a person who was not
at any of the events mentioned in the article, meaning this is not in a direct point of view.
We will use this source to create short explanations and accounts of events, short
biographies of some activists, and create a timeline with some of the dates mentioned.

6. "Hillary Rodham Clinton." Encyclopedia of World Biography, Gale, 1998. Biography in


Context. Accessed 8 Jan. 2017. This source is a biography of Hillary Clinton. It is
secondary because it is not written in her view. We will use this in a timeline.

7.

Steinem, Gloria. Comptons by Britannica. 01 Aug. 2011. SIRS Discoverer. Web. 06


Oct. 2016. This source is a biography of Gloria Steinem, who is a feminist and is for
rights for women. This source is a secondary source because it is not in the view of
Gloria, which, as a result, makes it secondary. We will use this source to add a few of the
dates to a timeline, and explain from another point of view what it is like to be a feminist.

8.

Wattleton, Faye. Britannica School. Britannica School. Web. 28 Sept. 2016. This
source explains the significance of Faye Wattleton, who is an activist for abortion rights
for women. This source is a secondary source because it is not written by this person. We
will use this article for the purpose of explaining the conditions and opposition that
activists like her experience, and explaining how people like her make a difference
towards the cause.

9.

Anwar, Ghazala. Feminism. Encyclopedia of Islam and the Muslim World. Ed.
Richard C. Martin. 2nd ed. Vol. 1. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale, 2016. 372-375. Global
Issues in Context.Web. 6 Oct. 2016. This source mainly explains feminism in Middle
Eastern countries. This source is secondary because many of the accounts are not taken in
direct views of the people included. We will use this source to aid in explaining feminism
around the globe.

10.

Blumberg, Naomi. "Malala Yousafzai." Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia


Britannica, 5 Aug. 2016. Web. 28 Sept. 2016. This website is a secondary source because

the author was not physically involved in Malala's life and events. This source discusses
the life and dates of events in Malala's life. We will use the facts and other things
presented in this website to strengthen the topic of our project, since she was an activist
who argued against the prohibition of education of girls.

11. Brownson, Elizabeth. "Huda al Shaarawi." Encyclopedia of Western Colonialism since


1450, edited by Thomas Benjamin, Macmillan Reference USA, 2007. Biography in
Context. Accessed 8 Jan. 2017. This source is a biography of Huda. It is a secondary
source because it is not in her view. We will use it for a timeline.

12. Caroli, Betty Boyd. "Hillary Clinton." Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia
Britannica, 27 July 2016. Web. 06 Oct. 2016. This source is secondary because the article
is made from second hand information. This source gives us background information
about Hillary and her stand for feminism. We will use this source to add information
about people who took a stand for feminism.

13.

DuBois, Ellen Carol. Feminism. Britannica School. Britannica School, Web. 28 Sept.
2016. The point of this source is to explain the meaning of feminism and explain
feminism in history and during current events. This source is secondary because it was
made at a later time than most of the events it talks about, along with the fact that it was
not made by any of the women included. We will use this source for the wide range of
people and events it includes to use for timelines, short biographies, and the explanation
of events in history and current time.

14.

Dumas, Ernest C. Clinton, Hillary Rodham. World Book Student. World Book, 2016.
Web. 6 Oct. 2016. This article talks about the life of Hillary Clinton, and how she is a
current-time example of a feminist. This source is secondary because it is not made
directly from her view. We will use this source to relate old-time events to current events,
and we will use some dates on a timeline.

15.

Gustafson, Melanie S. Feminism. World Book Student. World Book, 2016. Web. 7
Oct. 2016. This article explains feminism in history. This is a secondary source because
many of the accounts in the source are indirect, which means that they are made later
than the actual events. We will use this source to add more information about feminism,
what it is, and how it was in history.

16. History.com Staff. "Susan B. Anthony." History.com. A&E Television Networks, 2010.
Web. 05 Oct. 2016. This source is a secondary source because the knowledge provided is
secondhand. This source talks about the history of Susan B. Anthony. We will use this
information to provide information about her participation in the right for women's
suffrage.

17. Jaffer, Jennifer. "Huda Sharawi." Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia


Britannica, 20 Oct. 2015. Web. 05 Oct. 2016. This source is secondary because the author
did not have direct knowledge of Huda. This source provides insight on Huda's life. We
will use this source to provide background knowledge to our project.

18. Johnson, Rachel. Ani Which Way. New Moon. July/Aug. 2003: 28-29. SIRS
Discoverer. Web. 05 Oct. 2016. The point of this source is to give a short biography on
Anis life and explain how she has a role in being a feminism activist, along with
gathering her views in an interview. This source is partially primary and partially
secondary, as one segment consists of an account of her life by an indirect author, while
this page also includes an interview with Ani. We will use this source to create a timeline
involving Anis participation in gaining rights for women and giving a short biography of
her life.

19. Kettler, Sara. "Malala Yousafzai." Bio.com. A&E Networks Television, 1 July 2016.
Web. 28 Sept. 2016. This source is a secondary source because the author was not
directly involved with Malala and her life. This source talks about Malala and the events
that took place in her life. We will use this source to provide a greater understanding and
idea of Malala and her struggle for females rights to education.

20. "Malala Yousafzai." Gale Biography in Context, Gale, 2012. Biography in Context.

Accessed 8 Jan. 2017. This source is a biography of Malala Yousafzai. It is a secondary


source because it is not in her perspective. We will use this for a timeline.