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CENTRAL VERMONTS FAVORITE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

Vol. 45, No. 36

403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 Fax (802) 479-7916
On the Web: www.vt-world.com
Email: sales@vt-world.com

January 11, 2017

Spaulding High Schools Robert M. Burdett Memorial


Award Recipients page 5

The Rink at the


Vermont Statehouse
page 3

Local
High
School
Sports
page 28

Healthy New Year


A Special Supplement to
The WORLD
pages 17-24
Weather Heights
by Roger Hill
page 35

INSERTS IN THIS WEEKS WORLD


May not be available in all papers

Quality Market
Sears
University of Vermont Health Network/
Central Vermont Medical Center Healthier Living Workshops

Training Boot Camp


New Year Bonus! Personal
Tennis Lessons Swim Lessons
Up to $150 in extra value
services with your Membership!

Locker Rental

Towel Service

Offer Details: Valid for new Members with 12 month Contract at regular rates.
May not be combined with other discounts or special offers. Extra value service
credit for Single adult Member $100, Couple $150. No cash value. Some
services may have limited availability. Offer ends January 16, 2017.

Membership includes Group Exercise Classes*


Yoga Zumba Pilates Spinning Aquatics
and more *Some exclusions apply

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Norwichs Tiny House Nets AIAVT


Peoples Choice Award

Norwich Universitys
tiny house, the CASA802,
has earned the 2016
Peoples Choice Award
from the Vermont Chapter
of the American Institute
of Architects (AIAVT).
Named
Creating
Affordable Sustainable
A r c h i t e c t u r e
(CASA)802,
the
324-square-foot micro
home was designed and
built by students and faculty members in the
School of Architecture +
Art and the David Crawford School of
Engineering over the 2015-16 academic
year.
The project was funded largely by a grant
from TD Charitable Foundation, the charitable giving arm of TD Bank, which awarded
Norwich $20,000 in February 2015. The
CASA Initiative focuses on research and
development of affordable and well-designed
housing for low-income families in
Vermont.
The house was sold to a low-income
Vermonter at cost and was moved to its permanent location in Shelburne, VT, in
November.
I have had the dream of living small and
energy-efficient for years, CASA802s new
owner, Kym Marie Glynn, said. I am so
grateful to be a part of the movement towards
a more harmonious earth, which I believe the
tiny house movement is a huge part of.
The CASA802 incorporates sustainability
through the use of locally sourced formaldehyde-free birch plywood, low voltage LED
lighting, locally harvested and milled white

cedar siding and pine flooring. High efficiency windows and doors are used throughout the
house, as well as dense pack sustainable cellulose insulated walls, a high efficiency heat
pump, ventilation system and hot water heater, and high energy star appliances. Additional
sustainable features include: low flow shower
fixture, zero VOC paint, Vermont Natural
Coatings low VOC finishes and a reclaimed
sap bucket for the bathroom sink.
The goals of this project are two-fold.
Beyond providing a similar price-point, sustainable and beautiful alternative to the trailer,
CASA802 encourages experiential learning,
said Associate Professor of Architecture Tolya
Stonorov.
The award was announced at AIAVTs
2016 Annual Meeting & Design Awards on
Thursday, Dec. 15 at ArtsRiot in Burlington,
Vt. The jury highlighted the role of students in
its remarks: The budding work of students,
whether it is high school, undergrad or graduate, is vital to the future of our evolving and
complex profession.

7th Annual Safety Day

in or ride in
the VAST RT 14
SATURDAY, Jan. 21, 2017 Trailer
Corridor

9AM to 1PM

Antique Sleds
In-Store
Specials
15% off
Farm Toys,
too!
Orange County Sheriff
Bill Bohnyak and
Orange County Deputies
will be doing
FREE Sled Safety Checks
& issuing VAST Safety Stickers

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: MARYANN BREER @ FHMOM16@AOL.COM


802-238-8012

page 2

The WORLD

January 11, 2017

Snow,
Rain or
Shine

Sled Club
Chili
Challenge
Cook-Off
open to any
snowmobile
club

Local Clubs will be serving food,


drink & merriment!

CHAMPLAIN VALLEY EQUIPMENT


313 VT Rte 14 East Randolph, VT
802-728-5453 www.champlainvalleyequipment.com

The rink at the Vermont Statehouse will be open Wednesdays through Fridays from 3-7 p.m. and on
the weekends from noon until 7 p.m. through the winter season, pending ice that is safe for skating.
The rink will be free and open to the public during these monitored skating hours. The rink is a 40 by
80-foot kit, and there is also a 50-gallon Bambini for resurfacing the ice.

Stormwater Master Plan Completed for


the City of Montpelier

The impacts of stormwater on our rivers


and streams has been an increasing topic of
concern in the state over the past few years. In
response, the City of Montpelier added a goal
to its Council priorities in 2014 to develop a
stormwater master plan and in 2015 applied
for and received an Ecosystem Restoration
Program (ERP) grant from the Vermont
Department of Environmental Conservation
to develop the plan. The consulting team of
Stone Environmental and Greenman Pedersen
was hired by the City and recently completed
the project. A copy of the plan is available at
http://www.montpelier-vt.org/documentcenter/view/3620 and is also summarized below.
The goals for stormwater master planning,
and for Montpeliers Stormwater Master Plan,
include:
Identifying as many needs as possible,
along with conceptual projects or solutions to
meet those needs;
Prioritizing potential projects based on
criteria that accounts for both local and statelevel priorities;
Supporting the near term implementation
of one or more projects; and
Providing a basis to move from reactive
one-off projects to a comprehensive and proactive program.
The consultant team collaborated with the
City to develop a thorough understanding of
previous work and the Citys current related
activities. Information was inventoried,
assessed, and documented from a variety of
sources. Through this work a total of 58
potential problem areas were identified

throughout the City. The stormwater problem


areas identified through the screening were
carried forward through a more detailed
examination and prioritization process that
considered possible regulatory changes,
future growth, and the suitability of different
types of best management practices to each
identified problem area.
The highest priority opportunities were
advanced to concept design, including:
Green stormwater infrastructure opportunities to be incorporated with planned road
reconstruction and combined sewer separation.
Addressing areas of steep slopes and concentrated flow adjacent to neighborhood
streets.
Addressing erosion and drainage issues in
Hubbard Parks gravel road network, using
strategies that include ditch and culvert
improvements, plunge pools, and ditch turnouts to sediment basins.
Supporting Montpeliers Department of
Public Works on-going effort to decrease
roadway width (where applicable) to reduce
the amount of impervious surface, and therefore reduce stormwater run-off by developing
approaches for road shoulder protection and
restoration following pavement and subbase
removal.
In addition, three sites were chosen as
models for illustrative concepts for integrating green stormwater management practices
into other City infrastructure (such as roadways and parking lots) in the future, one of
which is shown below.

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403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin Barre, Vermont 05641 (802) 479-2582
Toll Free: 1-800-639-9753 Fax: 802-479-7916
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O P E N E N R O L L M E N T E N D S J A N U A R Y 3 1 S T, 2 0 1 7 !

Whether youre new to Vermont Health Connect or


you already have a plan, Open Enrollment is the time
to review your health insurance.

ENROLL IN
A NEW PLAN

CHECK ON
YOUR PLAN

HAPPY WITH
YOUR PLAN

Choose a plan
for the rst time.

Make sure your


plan is still right
for you.

If youre happy,
you dont need
to do a thing.

GET STARTED OR
GET SOME HELP

VISIT VermontHealthConnect.gov
CALL Toll-Free 855-899-9600

50 each additional

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Open 5am M-S, 6am Sun.

DVHA does not exclude people from its programs, deny them benets, or treat them unfairly because of race,
color, national origin, age, disability, or sex.

BARRE 479-0629
Open 24 hrs

MONTPELIER 223-0928

ATENCIN: si habla espaol, tiene a su disposicin


ATTENTION: Si vous parlez franais, des services daide
linguistique vous sont proposs gratuitement. Appelez le servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingstica. Llame al
1-855-899-9600 (TTY: 711). (Spanish)
1-855-899-9600 (ATS : 711). (French)

Open 5am M-S, 6am Sun.

January 11, 2017

The WORLD

page 3

Funding Available for Programs that Increase Access to


College and Career Education in Vermont

veteransparticularly those enrolled in the Vermont State


Colleges; further the equitable implementation of recent state
legislation including the Flexible Pathways Initiative; and
build partnerships between employers and academic institutions.
A primary goal of the McClure Foundations grantmaking
program is to improve education and training pathways to
jobs listed in Pathways to Promising Careers, a new resource
published in partnership with the Vermont Department of
Labor. Pathways identifies 54 promising jobs expected to pay
at least $20/hour and have at least 100 openings over the next
decade. The resource is available online at www.mcclurevt.
org/pathways.
Nonprofits and municipal entities interested in applying for
funding can submit a Letter of Interest (LOI) by 5 p.m.
February 6, 2017. Additional information about the grant
round is available at www.mcclurevt.org.

The J. Warren & Lois McClure Foundation has announced


available funding for the 2017-18 school year to support projects that create systemic improvement in the access all
Vermonters have to postsecondary and career education. A
supporting organization of the Vermont Community
Foundation, the McClure Foundation envisions a Vermont
where no promising job goes unfilled for lack of a qualified
applicant.
The McClure Foundations primary interest is in funding
projects with statewide impact that are aligned with multisector postsecondary attainment or workforce development
efforts. Grant awards range from $10,000 to $60,000. For the
2017-18 school year, McClure Foundation funding will prioritize projects that accomplish one or more of the following:
encourage equal access to career and technical education programs that articulate pathways to further education and training; promote postsecondary attainment for low-income students, first-generation college students, adult learners and/or

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North Branch Nature Centers

Naturalist Journeys Slide Show


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All programs start at 7:00 pm at the Unitarian Church on Main Street in Montpelier
Vapor World Spencers Discount Tobacco / Smoke Shop
Moody Building - 24 Opera House S

Friday January 13
America's Snake

The Rise and Fall of the Timber Rattlesnake. Author and Naturalist, Ted Levin will discuss a six-year
inquiry into the natural and not-so-natural history of the timber rattlesnake. Ted looks at the biology and
the conservation efforts in New England, to protect timber rattlesnakes, as well as the misguided
attempts to destroy them or to take them home as a pet.
[A]s darkness congealed over the talus, barred owls and coyotes sent vespers across the river while
the stuttering call of an eastern screech owl wafted over the rocks. In early October, if the temperature
remains warm, homebound rattlesnakes stay on the talus; if the temperature falls,
they go under, braided together like so many twists of licorice.

Friday January 27

John OMeara, Associate Professor of Physics at Saint Michaels College will excite viewers with a question that
has inspired humanity, "Are we alone in the universe? Through new technologies and theories, astronomers are
on the verge of being able to answer this question. In this talk, John will describe our current efforts to search for
planets like Earth around Sun-like stars in the Galaxy, and the tools and telescopes used to see if life exists
beyond Earth.

Friday February 10
Naked in Montpelier

Bryan Pfeiffer and Ruth Einstein have already thrilled you with Naked in
Norway and Naked in the Grand Canyon. Now, direct from home, Bryan
and Ruth bring you Naked in Montpelier. Youll discover the odd and
shocking wildlife that swims, slithers, walks, hops, flies or just sits there as
the rest of us go about our lives in the capital city. This will be a revealing
portrait of the wild in our own backyards.

Friday February 24

Native Bee Conservation in Vermont & Beyond


Leif Richardson, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Gund Institute, UVM. Vermont has more than 250
species of native bees, many of which are important pollinators of wild and cultivated plants. These
wild bee species may be threatened by land use change, pesticides, disease, climate change, and
competition with honey bees. Leif will discuss how we know when insect species are of conservation
concern, and recent efforts to protect declining bee pollinators in Vermont and beyond.

Friday March 3

Bobcat, Wolf, Marten

The effects of land use on furbearer populations in Vermont: Kimberly Royar, Wildlife Biologist for the
Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department, will walk through the history of land use in Vermont since
pre-settlement times and discuss how changes to the distribution of forests, farms, and development have
influenced the populations of species like bobcat, beaver, wolves, coyotes, lynx and marten.

Admission by donation.
For more information about these and other programs and events contact:
The North Branch Nature Center, 713 Elm Street, Montpelier, VT 05602
(802) 229-6206 info@NorthBranchNatureCenter.org www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
Help us thank our sponsors by giving them your support!

Auto Craftsmen Paul P. Hanlon, Attorney


Union Mutual Fire Insurance Company
Accura Printing/Jet Service Stone Environmental

page 4

The WORLD

The Summit School of


Traditional Music and Culture,
Presents its 7th Annual Spice on
Snow Winter Music Festival

Get ready for Spice on Snow


Winter Music Festival. A fourday, city-wide celebration.
From January 26-29, Montpelier
will be filled with the sounds of
Spicy-hot of Cajun and Oldtime
Stringband music, culture and
cuisine from Louisiana and
Southern Appalachia.
The 2017 headliners are the
Cedric Watson Trio from
Lafayette, Louisiana, accompanied by Desiree Champagne
(rub board and percussion) and
Jourdan Thibodeaux (fiddle),
four-time Grammy-nominated
fiddler, singer and accordionist. Cedric Watson is one of the
brightest talents to emerge in Cajun, Creole, and Zydeco
music over the last decade.
From Virginia come Anna and Elizabeth. Old-time
Applalachian musicians and storytellers, Anna Roberts-Gevalt
and Elizabeth Laprelle bring old songs to life with guitar,
banjo, fiddle, and their voices in close harmony. Anna and
Elizabeth revive the old scrolling picture show, dubbed
Crankies intricate picture-scrolls illustrating the old
songs they sing, which they create in tandem with papercuts,
shadow puppets, prints, and embroidered fabric.
And from Vermont, the Young Tradition Touring Group,
consists of 22 teen players, singers, and dancers who focus on
learning and performing traditional music and dance repertoire.
Rounding out the lineup will be top-notch talent from
throughout Vermont: Big Hat, No Cattle (western and honky
tonk) Mayfly (Family Program) Daddy Long Legs (Old Time)
Starline Rhythm Boys (Country, Swing) Jon Gailmor (Folk,
Family Program) Kick Em Jenny (Old Time) Two Cents in
the Till (Folk-Bluegrass) Anything Goes (Folk Standards and
Tin Pan Alley), Eric Gillard (Storyteller), Old Rocket (Old
Time), Family Contra Dance, Afternoon Music and Dance
Workshops, plus Irish, Bluegrass, and Old Time Jam
Sessions.

In Search of Earth 2.0

Thank you to:

The Cedric Watson Trio and Anna and Elizabeth (above) will headline the 7th Annual Spice on Snow Winter Music Festival in
Montpelier at the end of January.

January 11, 2017

Teaching Students to Play


with Knives and Fire

Registration is now open for Jr Iron Chef VT, a culinary


competition for Vermont middle and high school students.
Those looking to demonstrate their adeptness in the kitchen
chopping, slicing, blanching, frying, plating, and other kitchen
skillsare invited to put them to cook in the statewide contest, to be held March 18, 2017 at the Champlain Valley
Exposition in Essex Junction.
This is the tenth consecutive year Jr Iron Chef VT has challenged teams of students to create healthy and delicious
dishes, made from local ingredients, which will ultimately
inspire school lunch menus. Preparing for and participating in
the contest provides hands-on experiential learning which
helps create positive attitudes toward healthy food and a
greater awareness of our local food system.
This year weve got a few special twists in the works, Jr
Iron Chef VT coordinator, Amy Gifford said. The tweens and
teens participating will be treated to a special birthday celebration and we are working on a special guest list for the
Judges Panel. More details will be revealed soon!
Applications will be accepted until January 24, 2017 on a
first-come, first-serve basis. The registration fee is $150 for
each team. Registration is limited to the first 72 teams, consisting of three to five students in 6th-8th grade, or 9th-12th
grade. More information, including competition rules and
instructions for registering, is available online at www.
jrironchefvt.org.
The contest guidelines are rigorous, intending to demonstrate the real-life challenges that food service face in creating
healthy meals for schools. Two heats will be held the day of
the competition, with 90 minutes of cooking time per heat.
The contest features three award categoriesMise en
Place, Crowd Pleaser, and Lively Localwith winners in
each age group, judged by a panel of judges. Winning teams
receive prize packages, and have an opportunity to feature
their recipes for legislators at the Vermont Statehouse Cafeteria
in April, 2017.
Jr Iron Chef VT is hosted by Vermont FEED, a collaborative Farm to School Project of NOFA-VT and Shelburne
Farms. From the start, the event has been committed to providing middle and high school students with a hands-on experience cooking nutritious, farm-fresh foods. When the event
began in 2008, 35 teams participated. Last year, 236 students
from every corner of the state competed on 58 teams.

Spaulding High School recognizes students who are good school citizens with the Robert M Burdett Memorial Award, in honor of our former principal. Students must have good attendance, be respectful,
and show effort, accountability and perseverance in their studies. The following students were honored at a PrincipalsBreakfastin the Spaulding Cafeteria on Thursday, January 5for the second quarter of
this school year: Grade 12 Kaitlyn Chaffee, Sara Dickinson, Nathan Gueidon, Alexandrea Holland, Ryan John, Mads Klausen, Brittany Laskowski, Gaspar Michel, Savanna Ouellette, Anna Ryan, Erica White.
Grade 11 Katelyn Alger, Zachary Bullock, Kayla Crowningshield, Jessica Hepinstall, Baylee Lawrence, Monica Longchamp, Zandrew Morse, Cassidy Whitley. Grade 10 Aubrey Benoit, Makayla Boisvert,
Anthony Castellaneta, Emily Cetin, Natasha Chase, Lillian Dryer, Aidan Gilwee, Gabriel Little, Zoe Macdonald, Kyle Proteau, Lillian Riddle, Chyenne Rielly, Makenna Taylor. Grade 9 Ethan Asselin, Dylan
Benson, Iris Carter, Taylor DAgostino, Camryn Fewer, Jenna Hallstrom, Destiny Isabelle, Morgan Mast, Madelyn Mayfield, Grant Otis, Steven Perreault, Elizabeth Poirier, Rebekah Russel

Funding Available from the Vermont


Community Foundation

Funding is now available from several


grant programs of the Vermont Community
Foundation for 2017 projects. A full list of
available grants with updated deadlines and
guidelines for each program is available at
www.vermontcf.org/AvailableGrants. The
following competitive grant round have
online applications open now:
The Small and Inspiring program awards
grants of $500 to $2,500 to support work that
builds community. With this program, the
Community Foundation wants to find and
fund projects in every town in Vermont where
a small grant can make a big difference. This
program will fund projects that connect people to one another in meaningful ways, connect people to the environment in ways that
encourage stewardship and a greater sense of
place and belonging, or connect people with
opportunities for positive social interaction
and benefit. Applications for the first round of
2017 are due at 5 p.m. on February 1. Visit
www.vermontcf.org/SI to learn more.
The Innovations and Collaborations program awards grants of $10,000 to $20,000 to
support projects that help nonprofits from
across sectors and regions work together
closely on shared solutions to critical community needs. Typically, applications are

accepted from one lead organization in partnership with one or more additional collaborating organizations. Letters of Interest for the
first round of 2017 are due at 5 p.m. on
February 1. Visit www.vermontcf.org/IC to
learn more.
Nonprofit Capacity Building grants of no
more than $2,500 each are available to help
nonprofits with the cost of consultants to
facilitate discussions related to strategic planning, development of an organizational fundraising strategy, or orchestrating a merger.
Applications for 2017 will be reviewed on a
rolling basis starting January 1. Visit www.
vermontcf.org/NCB to learn more.
Funding continues to be available from the
Special and Urgent Needs (SUN) program,
which helps Vermont nonprofits with unexpected expenses that impact their ability to
meet their mission. A SUN grant of up to
$5,000 can help an organization manage an
unbudgeted, unforeseen, and time-sensitive
emergency or take advantage of an unanticipated opportunity that will enhance its work.
Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis.
Organizations are encouraged to contact the
Community Foundation with questions after
reading the full guidelines at www.vermontcf.
org/SUN.

Call for Poems Poem City 2017

The
KelloggHubbard Library is
putting out a call for
poetry submissions
for PoemCity 2017.
Submissions will be
accepted through February 1, 2017. During
the month of April, selected poems will be
displayed in shop windows throughout downtown Montpelier. More than just a text display, PoemCity is a month long celebration
featuring poetry/art installations, as well

poetry-related workshops and readings.


PoemCity 2017 is a presentation by the
Kellogg-Hubbard Library.
Poetry submissions are open to Vermonters
of all ages.
Submission Guidelines Below:
1. Deadline: February 1, 2017
2. Please send 1 to 3 poems as MS Word
attachments.
3. Each poem must not exceed 24 lines.
Submit poems at https://kellogghubbardlibrary.submittable.com/submit.

Students in the News

The State University of New York at


Potsdam recently named 869 students to the
Presidents List, including Rebecca Hamel
of Waitsfield, VT; Chantilly Larose of
Danville, VT; and Emily Milne of Northfield,
VT.
Laura Lyford of Waterbury was named to
the Fall 2016 Presidents List at Hudson
Valley Community College.

Taylor Yandow of Waterbury; Chloe


Boyce of Montpelier; and Katherine Elderd
of Tunbridge were named to Lasell Colleges
Deans List during the Fall semester of the
2016-17 academic year.
Jaime Marsh and Mark Page of Barre
and Shannon Thibeault of Berlin were
named to Keene State Colleges Fall 2016
Deans List.

January 11, 2017

The WORLD

page 5

All calendar submissions should be sent to editor@vt-world.


com or mailed to The WORLD, Attn: Calendar, 403 U.S.
Route 302, Barre, Vt. 05641. The deadline is 5:00 p.m.,
Thursday preceding publication. The Ongoing section is for
free/low cost community events, which should be verified
monthly. We are no longer able to include ongoing classes.

St., Suite 200, 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month. Call 4790531 to register.
Celebrate Recovery. Recovery for all your hurts/habits/hangups. Christ Community Church, 43 Berlin St. across from R&L
Archery, Monday, 6-8 p.m. 476-3221.
Wheelchair Basketball. Barre Evangelical Free Church, 17 So.
Main St., Every other Tuesday, 5:30-7 p.m. Info 498-3030
(David) or 249-7931 (Sandy).
Aldrich Public Library Activities. 6 Washington St., 4767550. Story Hour, Mondays & Tuesdays starting 9/22, 10:30
a.m. Reading Circle Book Club, 3rd Wednesdays, 6:30 p.m.
Living & Learning Series, 1st Sundays, 1 p.m. Senior Day,
1st Wednesdays, 1 p.m.
Central Vermont Business Builders. Community National
Bank, 1st & 3rd Tuesdays, 8-9 a.m. Info. 777-5419.
Weekly Storytime. Next Chapter Bookstore, 158 North Main
St., Saturdays, 10:30 a.m. Info. 476-3114.
Overeaters Anonymous. Church of the Good Shepherd,
Tuesdays 5:30-6:30 p.m. and Saturdays 8:30-9:30 a.m. Info:
Valerie, 279-0385.
Greater Barre Democrats. Town & City residents welcome.
Aldrich Public Library, last Wednesdays, 5:15-6:15 p.m. Info
476-4185.
Play Group. St. Monicas Church, lower level, Thursdays during school year, 9:30-11 a.m.
American Legion Auxiliary Unit 10. Meets at the post, first
Thursday of each month (not Jan. or July), 6:30 p.m.
Vermont Modelers Club. Building & flying model airplanes
year-round, visitors welcome. Info. 485-7144.
Community Breakfast. First Presbyterian Church, 78 Summer
St., 3rd Sunday of month, FREE, 7:30-9 a.m. 476-3966.
Grandparents Raising Their Childrens Children. Support
group. 23 Summer St., 1st & 3rd Weds., 10 a.m.-noon. 4761480.
Friends of Aldrich Public Library. Aldrich Library, 2nd floor
boardroom, 4th Tuesday of month, 6:30 p.m. Info. 476-7550.
Circle of Parents. Confidential support group for parents and
caregivers. Meets Tuesday evenings. Info. 229-5724 or
1-800-CHILDREN.
Mothers of Preschoolers. Monthly get-togethers for crafts,

Ongoing Events

BARRE - Central VT Adult Basic Education. Free classes.


Pre-GED and high school diploma prep classes at Barre
Learning Center, 46 Washington St. Info./pre-register 4764588.
PAWS. Support for those grieving the loss of a beloved pet.
Universalist Church. 1st Thursday of month. 7 p.m. Info.
beyondthedog97@gmail.com
Rainbow Umbrella of Central Vermont, an adult LGBTQ
group, bowls at Twin City Lanes on Sunday afternoons twice a
month. For dates and times: RUCVTAdmin@PrideCenterVT.
org
Central Vermont Woodcarving Group. Free instruction projects for all abilities. Barre Congregational Church, Mondays
1-4 p.m. 479-9563
Rock & Soul Chorus. 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Church of the Good
Shepherd on 39 Washington St. Sing songs from the Sixties and
beyond. Ability to read music is not required. No audition, but
singers should be able to accurately sing back whats been sung
to them. All ages are welcome. Children under 13 should come
with a parent.
Step n Time Line Dancers of Central Vermont. Fall Session:
Thursdays at The Old Labor Hall, 46 Granite St. 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Playgroup. Universalist Church, Tuesdays 9:30-11 a.m., while
school is in session. Sponsored by Building Bright Futures.
Info. 279-0993.
Additional Recyclables Collection Center. Open for collection
Mon., Wed., Friday noon 6 p.m., 3rd Saturdays 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
540 N. Main St., Barre. Visit www.cvswmd.org for list of acceptable items.
Prayer Meeting. 8 Daniel Dr. 6:30-8 p.m. 1st & 3rd Thursdays.
Info: 479-0302
Medicare and You. New to Medicare? Have questions? We
have answers. Central Vermont Council on Aging, 59 N. Main

Pump & Pantry


SPECIALS GOOD THROUGH SUNDAY, JANUARY 15
Attention Snowmobilers: We are located
directly on the VAST trail and offer
non-ethanol premium gasoline at all our pumps!
Stop in, fill up your sled and then fill up yourself
with tasty food from our deli!

LegenDairy Maple Syrup

WHILE IT LASTS......................... $48.99/gallon


GREAT PRICE! Green Mountain
Coffee K-Cups 24ct all flavors............ $14.99

Coca-Cola Brand

24-PK 12-OZ. CANS .............. $6.99 + dep

Williamstowns Own

Chappelles Potatoes 10lb bag ........... $4.99


NEW! Chappelles 20lb Bag
Unclassified Potatoes ..................... $4.99

Cape Cod Chips assorted flavors


1 @$3.79 or ................................. 2

for $6.00

Canada Dry or Schweppes Seltzers


12pk 12-oz cans
1@ REG PRICE OR ......... 2

for $6.00 + dep

Shurfine English Muffins,


Hot Dog, Hamburger Rolls
& White Bread (14 oz) .............. 2 for $3.00
PARTY DEAL! Lays Chips or Doritos
Family Size
1 @REG. PRICE or ..................... 2

for $6.00

Shurfine Milk Skim,


1%, 2% gallon ........................................ $2.99
Coke or Pepsi Sodas 2 liter bottles
single @ reg price or ................... 2

for $3.00

Hood Ice Cream

ASSORTED FLAVORS 48oz .................... $3.39

This Weeks Meat Specials...


Fill Your Freezer With Great Meat Buys
This Month!

Beef Cube Steak or Stew Meat $3.99/lb

Pork Tenderloin

Whole Boneless .......................... $2.19/lb

Chicken Thighs Boneless ......... $1.99/lb


Hillshire Litl Smokies or
Weiners 14oz .............................. $2.99/pkg
Fresh Chicken Thighs or
Drumsticks Family Pk ......................$.99/lb
Beef Sirloin Steak .......................$5.99/lb

Check out our


Fresh Meats &
Produce

Pork Boneless Spareribs or


Pork Chops Family Pk .................. $2.99/lb
GREAT VALUE!

Chicken Breasts Boneless...... $1.99/lb

SPECIAL!

Shurfine Bacon 1 lb. pkg. ......... $3.99/pkg


Beef Ground Chuck Family Pk. .. $3.99/lb
McKenzie Natural Casing
Franks ............................ $14.98/2.5lb Box

PROUD TO SELL VP RACING


FUELS GASOLINE

EBT/SNAP
Cards Welcome

Our 91 Octane Premium at the


pump is non-ethanol.
We also have specialty fuels available in 5-gallon cans.
Stop by and check our great selection
of VP Merchandise!

Meat Dept.
Manager
Mike Ziter
Serving
Central VT
for 50 Years

OPEN EVERYDAY: Mon.-Thurs. 5a-9p, Fri. 5a-10p, Sat. 6a-10p, Sun. 6a-9p

Rt. 14, Williamstown 802 433-1038


Most Cards Accepted
page 6

The WORLD

January 11, 2017

DEBIT

refreshments, etc. Christian Alliance Church, 476-3221.


Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings in Barre, daily; call 802229-5100 for latest times & locations; www.aavt.org.
Hedding United Methodist Activities & Meetings. 40
Washington Street, 476-8156. Choir, Thursdays 7 p.m; Free
Community Supper, Fridays 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Community
Service & Food Shelf Hours: Weds & Thurs. 3-5 p.m.
Turning Point Recovery Center. 489 N. Main St., Barre. Safe
& supportive place for individuals/families in or seeking substance abuse recovery. Recovery coaching and other support
programs; recreational facilities (pool, ping pong, games). Open
Mon.-Wed. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thurs. 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri. 10 a.m.-11
p.m., Sat. 6-11 p.m. Making Recovery Easier, Tuesdays at 6
p.m.; Wits End parent support group, Wednesdays at 6 p.m.;
All Recovery support group Fridays at 6 p.m. Alcoholics
Anonymous: Sane & Sober group, Saturdays at 7:30 a.m.;
Living Sober group, Sundays at 8:30 a.m. Narcotics
Anonymous: When Enough is Enough group, Thursdays at
6:30 p.m. & Sundays at 5:30 p.m. Al-Anon: Courage to
Change group, Saturdays at 5 p.m. (childcare provided). For
help, or Info on special programs, call 479-7373.
Green Mountain Spirit Chapter. National women bikers
club. 2nd Wed. of month; info grnmtnspirit@hotmail.com.
BERLIN - Drop-in Meditation Sitting Group. W/Sherry
Rhynard. CVMC, conf. room #2, Thursdays, 6-7 p.m. sherry@
easeofflow.com or 272-2736.
Barre Tones Womens A Capella Chorus. Capital City Grange
6612 Rt 12. Mondays, 6:30-9 p.m. www.barretonesvt.com 2232039.
Survivors of Suicide Loss Support. For family and friends
who lost someone to suicide. CVMC, conf. room #1, 3rd
Tuesdays, 6-7:30 p.m. Info. 223-0924.
Bereavement/Grief Support Group. CVHHH Conference
Center, 600 Granger Rd. Open to anyone who has experienced
the death of a loved one. No fee. Group 1: 10-11:30 a.m. every
other Wednesday starting Jan. 4. Group 2: 6-7:30 p.m. every
other Monday starting Jan. 9. Info: Jean or Silke at 802-2231878
NAMI-VT Support Group. For families & friends of those
living w/mental illness. CVMC, Room 3, 4th Mondays, 7 p.m.
800-639-6480.
continued on next page

Aldrich Public Library Bookmarks


Second
Saturday
Classic Film Series
Saturday, Jan. 14 at 1:30
p.m., Milne Room
Spencer Tracy and
Katharine
Hepburn
teamed up in seven
films, and this 1952
comedy about a star athlete and her shady sports promoter is one of
their best. It was written by the team of Garson
Kanin and Ruth Gordon, and was directed by
George Cukor. Film expert Rick Winston leads
a lively discussion after each showing. Free
popcorn! Call the library at 476-7550 for film
title and more information.

Job Hunt Helper Returns Jan. 25


Wednesdays 4-7 p.m. and Fridays 1-4 p.m.
Our Job Hunt Helper will be back the last
week of January, ready to help you learn the
ropes of online job searches, figure out that
tablet someone gave you for Christmas, or
finally set up your first Facebook account.
Call 476-7550 to schedule a one-on-one
appointment with CCV intern Eryn
Christian.
Poetry Slam
Friday, Jan. 27 at 6 p.m., Milne Room
This Anything Goes! slam features a 5-minute time limit for poets and performers, with
music allowed and covers okay if identified
as such. Even group performances are encouraged. This is an all-ages event, so discretion
is required. Can the single voice of an impassioned poet outscore a harp solo? Come early
and enjoy free pizza at 6 p.m.
Teen anime club brainstorm session
Monday, Jan. 23 at 4:30 p.m., Teen Room
Would you be interested in an anime club?
Join us for this brainstorm session to discuss
the creation of a club and find out what its all
about.
Drone Photography Show
Through January in the Milne Room
Come see stunning aerial images of central
Vermont captured via drone by Travis Oakes
of Fly High Photography. See Barre from a
truly new perspective!

Infant Owners Manual


Monday, Jan. 23, 10 a.m. to noon, 2nd floor
conference room
What every new parent should know about
newborn babies! Topics include: newborn
appearance, jaundice, breathing, umbilical
care, diapering, taking babys temperature,
sleep crying, bathing, clothing, newborn
senses, safety, and more. This class covers the
new baby basics for newbie parents and is a
comprehensive review for parents expecting
again. To register for this class and see the
entire Birthing Years Workshop Schedule
please go to http://www.goodbeginningscentralvt.org/the-birthing-year.html or call 802595-7953.

Ainsworth Public Library


Storytime:
Storytime is changing
to 11:30 a.m. on
Wednesdays in order to
accommodate more
participants. Join us for
stories, a craft and
songs with Ms. Snow,
our librarian. No need to register, just come.
Homeschool Meet and Greet:
Are you a homeschooling family in Central
VT? Join us for our meet and greet on Friday,
January 13 at 6 p.m. Tell us what you would
like for monthly meetings, how we can help
you, and meet other families with a similar
interest. FREE. You do not need to be a
Williamstown resident to attend. We offer
free library cards to out of town residents and
we have no fines. Please call or email to register so we know how to arrange our space.
All ages welcome.
Quilt Applique Class:
Join us on Saturday, January 14 at 10 a.m. to
learn how to make an applique square. Bring
a sharp needle and sharp scissors if you have
them, we provide the rest. Hands-on demonstration. This class is geared for adults but
youth 10 and up are welcome to attend with a

guardian. FREE. Please register by calling or


emailing the library.
Happy Martin Luther King Jr. Day:
The library is CLOSED on Monday, January
19. We will re-open for regular hours on
Tuesday.
Art Bus:
The Art Bus is coming to our town! Well, not
the bus itself because of the weather but the
people who run the bus will be here. Open to
all ages from any town. Friday, January 20 at
6:30 p.m. Please call or email to register. The
craft will be about book binding. Free.
Tech Day:
Our clerk Tim Betts, can help you with your
electronic device. No question is too small.
Saturday, January 21 at 10:30 a.m. No need to
register. Bring your device and questions or
use one of ours.
Library Hours:
2:00 to 6:00 Mon, Thurs, Fri.
2 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, 9:00 to 6:00 Wednesday,
9:00 to 1:00 Saturday
Look for us on Facebook: Ainsworth Public
Library, 802-433-5887, library@williamstownvt.org, www.ainsworthpubliclibrary.org

Cancer Support Group. With potluck. Second Wednesday of


each month, 6 p.m. Info. 229-5931.
Living w/ Advanced or Metastatic Cancer: Lunch provided,
2nd Tuesday of month, noon-1 p.m. Writing to Enrich Your
Life: For anyone touched by cancer, 3rd Tuesday of each
month, noon-1 p.m. Both held at CVMC Cancer Center
resource room. Info. 225-5449.
Central Vermont Rotary Club. Visitors & potential members
welcome. Steakhouse Restaurant, Mondays, 6:15 p.m. 2290235.
Parkinsons Support Group. Woodbridge Nursing Home, 142
Woodridge Rd, third Thursdays, 10 a.m. Info. 439-5554.
Diabetes Support Program. CVMC, conf. rooms, first
Thursday of month, 7-8 p.m., free. Info. 371-4152.
Civil Air Patrol. At the airport (blue hangar), Tuesdays, 6-8:30
p.m. Info at 229-5193.
Pregnancy & Newborn Loss Support Group. CVMC conference room #3, 4th Monday of month, 6:30-8:30 p.m. 371-4304
or -4376.
Partners for Prevention-Alcohol & Drug Abuse Coalition.
CVH, 2nd Weds. of month, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Info 4794250.
Savvy Speakers Toastmasters Club. BC/BS conf. room,
Industrial Ln., 1st & 3rd Tuesdays, 5:30-7 p.m. Info. 883-2313
or officers-1770@toastmastersclubs.org
Birthing Center Open House. For parents, sibs, grandparents,
etc. CVMC, 1st Wed. of month, 5:30-7 p.m. RSVP/Info. 3714613.
Knee/Hip Replacement Orientation Class. CVMC, conf.
room #3, free, 1st Thurs. of each month, 2-3 p.m. Info 3714188.
Breastfeeding Support Group. CVMC Garden Path Birthing
Center, 1st Monday of month, 5:30-7 p.m. Info. 371-4415.
Infant & Child Car Seat Inspections. Berlin Fire Station,
free, first Friday of month, 12-4 p.m. Appointments required,
371-4198.
BROOKFIELD - MOPS - Mothers of Preschoolers. Moms
of kids birth through kindergarten welcome. Meal & childcare
provided. New Covenant Church, 2252 Ridge Rd., 3rd Fridays,
6 p.m. 276-3022.
Health-focused Group. Learn to cope w/ lifes passages.
Weds, 7-8 p.m.; Info 276-3142; Dr. Alice Kempe.
CABOT - Fiddle Lessons with Katie Trautz: Monday afternoons, call 279-2236; Dungeons & Dragons, Fridays 3-5:30

p.m. All at Cabot Library, 563-2721.


CALAIS - Mens and Womens Bible Study Groups. County
Road, Wednesdays, 7 p.m. 485-7577 or www.thefishermenministry.org.
Open Mic night at Whammy Bar every Wednesday. Upcoming
events: TBA. Music Thursdays starts at 7 p.m., Fri/Sat at 7:30.
All events are Free.
CHELSEA - Story Time. Songs, stories & crafts for children
birth to 5 years. Chelsea Public Library, Wednesdays, 1:15 p.m.
685-2188.
TOPS Take Off Pounds Sensibly. Nonprofit support grp. United
Church of Chelsea, North Common, Wednesdays, 5:45 p.m. 6852271/685-4429.
Giffords Chronic Conditions Support Group. Join a discussion and educational group for people with chronic illnesses on
Fridays 8:30-11 a.m. at the Chelsea Senior Center (in the United
Church of Chelsea, 13 North Common. Free. Info/register:
Megan at 802-728-7714.
EAST BARRE - Story Hour. Aldrich Library York Branch,
Tuesdays, ages 0-3 10 a.m., ages 3-5 10:30 a.m. Info. 476-5118.
EAST HARDWICK - Touch of Grace Assembly of God
Church, corner Rts. 15 &16, Pastor Matt Preston, 472-5550.
Sunday a.m. worship 10:00 (incl. 11:20 childrens church); adult
Sunday School 9:00 (Sep. thru June). Tue. evening Bible study
(call for info). Wed. youth group: 5:00 dinner, 6:00 activity.
EAST MONTPELIER - Crossroads Christian Church. Mens
Ministry: For Men Only group. Monday nights 7-9 p.m. Mens
Breakfast, 2nd Sat., 8 a.m. 272-7185. Sunday Service 9:30-11
a.m. Pastor Thorsten Evans 476-8536. Church Office hours Tues
& Fri 9 a.m. to noon. 476-4843
Twin Valley Senior Center. 4583 U.S. Rte 2. Open Mon.-Weds.Fri., 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sign up for Meal-on-Wheels Program or join
us for an On-site meal at 12:15 p.m. Seniors/$5, under 60/$6.
Nobody turned away. Free bus service for seniors & disabled in
six towns served. Many classes offered from bone strengthening
to art. Donations welcomed. Info: 802-223-3322 or email info.
twinvalleyseniors@myfairpoint.net
Bone Builders Class. Osteoporosis exercise and prevention
class. Twin Valley Senior Center, Rt. 2, Blueberry Hill Commons
(next to Plainfield Hardware). Every Monday, Wednesday,, 7:30,
9:15, 10:40 a.m. and Fridays 7:30 and 10:40 a.m. All ages.
Free.
FREE Tai Chi classes at Twin Valley Senior Center, Route 2,
Blueberry Commons, East Montpelier. Monday and Fridays 1-2
p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. All ages welcome. Free

or by donation/ Contact Rita at 223-3322 for more information.


Tuesday Night Bingo. Twin Valley Senior Center, 4583 Route 2,
Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Games start and snack bar opens at 6 p.m.
Call 802-223-3322 or email info.twinvalleyseniors@myfairpoint.
net
GROTON - YA Book Club: 3rd Mondays, 6:30 p.m.; Book
Discussion Group: 4th Mondays, 7 p.m.; Crafts & Conversation,
Wednesdays, 1-3 p.m. Round Robin Storytime, for kids age 0-5
& their caregivers: Tuesdays, 10 a.m. All at Groton Public
Library, 584-3358.
MARSHFIELD - Playgroup. Twinfield Preschool, Mondays,
11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (except when school not in session).
Jaquith Public Library Activities. Old Schoolhouse Common,
426-3581. Story & Play Group, Wednesdays, 10-11:30 a.m.
Book Group for Adults, stop by for copy of the book, 4th
Mondays, 7 p.m.
MIDDLESEX - Food Shelf. United Methodist Church,
Saturdays, 9-10:30 a.m.
MONTPELIER - Central VT Adult Basic Education. Free
classes. Intermediate Level Reading for Adults: Thurs. 9-10
a.m.; Learning English: Tues. or Weds. 9-10 a.m.; English
Conversation: Tues. 4-5 p.m. Montpelier Learning Center, 100
State St. Info/register 223-3403.
Sunday School. For children (up to 20) to study the Bible and
teachings of Jesus. Christian Science Church, 145 State St.,
Sundays, 10:30 a.m.
Forest Preschool: Winter Whispers session. North Branch
Nature Center, 713 Elm St. For children ages 4-6. 10 weeks:
Thursday or Friday. December 8 to February 24, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Winter Whispers is a program that supports childrens innate curiosity and individual learning process through play, art, and exploration of natural world. Children will spend a portion of every
morning outdoors discovering winters many wonders. In addition, our program offers time to cozy up indoors for winter related
stories, songs, art as well as exploration of Vermont wildlifes
winter habits.
Vermont Association for the Blind PALS Group meets on 2nd
and 4th Weds. at Division for the Blind Conference room at the
Capital Plaza Hotel. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The PALS Group is a program
for visually impaired Vermonters to support their independence
within home, families, and communities. Info: Harriet Hall at 3233055 or Vermont Association of the Blind office at 505-4006
Onion River Exchange Tool Library. Over 85 tools including:
power tools, all sorts of hand tools including wrench kits, caulk
continued on next page

Honoring Doctor Martin Luther King Jr.


in Barre

In honor of Martin Luther King Day, the


acclaimed 2014 film Selma, will be shown
at 4 p.m, on January 15 at the Old Labor Hall
in Barre. The showing is sponsored by the
Barre Historical Society.
Selma chronicles the events surrounding the historic 1965 civil rights marches
from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama led by
Dr. King, John Lewis, and others protesting
the denial of voting rights to black voters.
The marches are credited with leading to the
passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.
On the first march, on what would be
known as Bloody Sunday, March 7, the
unarmed protesters were violently attack by
local police and Alabama state troopers at
the Edmund Pettus Bridge outside Selma.
Two days later, Dr. King turned a second
march around when it again encountered

police and troopers at the bridge. For the


third march, President Johnson ordered
2,000 U.S. Army soldiers and 1,900 members of the Alabama National Guard, along
with FBI agents and federal marshals, to
protect the marchers, who completed the
54-mile trek to Montgomery three days
later.
Directed by Ava DuVernay and starring
Golden Globe nominee David Oyelowo as
Dr Martin Luther King Jr., Selma was
widely acclaimed by the critics. It received a
Best Picture Oscar nomination and won Best
Original Song at the Academy Awards.
Admission to the Labor Hall showing is
by donation. Light refreshments will be
available. The Hall is at 46 Granite St. in
Barre.

Norm Trepanier
Body Shop Manager

Boot
Boot
Hill
Hill
Winter Sale
Sale
Winter
20% off
off
20%

Dave Simpson

COLLISION CENTER
Welcomes Norm Trepanier

WE REPAIR
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AND MODELS

Norm brings 40+ years


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received a 100% customer
satisfaction rating and a
100% of respondents saying they
would return and would
recommend the facility to others!
CALL NORM AT THE COLLISION CENTER 802-613-3017

S AT I S FA

CTION

TaxFree
FreeFootwear
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andClothing
Clothing
Tax
286Waits
WaitsRiver
RiverRoad
RoadBradford,
Bradford,Vt
Vt800-222-9316
800-222-9316
286
Monday-Saturday
Saturday8:30-5:30
8:30-5:30Friday
Fridaynight
nighttill
till88PM
PM
MondayclosedSunday
Sunday
closed
January 11, 2017

The WORLD

page 7

PUZZLES ON PAGE 16

EVEN
EXCHANGE

CRYPTO QUIP

STICKLERS

GO FIGURE

SNOWFLAKES

MAGIC MAZE

SUDOKU

KAKURO

FEAR KNOT

PUZZLES ON
24
ing guns, sawzall, tall treePAGE
branch cutter,
belt sander, wet vac,

Randolph Senior Center


SUPER CROSSWORD

The Randolph Senior Center at 6


Hale St. is open for the public from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Lunch is served at
the Centers Fork and Spoon
Caf Monday through Thursday at
noon. A list of on-going activities
can be found on the Calendar of
Events section of this paper.

Wednesday, January 18, at 12:45 p.m. Learn about what


happens to our recycling and find out the answer to other
questions like should we leave the caps on the plastic bottles,
or not? Are plastic bags good for recycling? Ray Dube,
Sustainability Manager of Northern New England Coca-Cola
Bottling Co., has a very impressive display to help us understand fully recycling and what happens to our recycling when
it leaves local transfer stations. Ray is responsible for testifying before legislative committees and is well-known throughout the state. Since we all have some involvement with recycling, we think this is a presentation you dont want to miss!
Open for the community. Please call 728-9324 if you need
further info.
Thursday, January 19, at 12:30 p.m. Megan Sault,
Regional Coordinator of the Randolph Health Service Area,
will tell us about what classes are being offered at Gifford

page 8

The WORLD

January 11, 2017

p.m.; Tuesdays: Bethany Church, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Wednesdays:


Christ Church, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Thursdays: Trinity Church,
11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Fridays: St. Augustine Church, 11 a.m.-12:30
p.m.; Last Sundays, Bethany Church, 4:30-6:30 p.m.
Grandparents Raising Their Childrens Children. Support
group, childcare provided. Resurrection Baptist Church, 144 Elm
St., 2nd Thursday of the month, 6-8 p.m. Info. 476-1480.
Calico County Quilters. All skill levels welcome. Bethany
Church, Red Room, 2nd Saturday of month, 1-3 p.m. (NOT Oct.
or May).
Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA). Bethany Church basement, Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. Info. 229-9036.
The Vermont Association for Mental Health & Addiction
Recovery Advocates Weekly Breakfast. We are inviting a small
group of advocates to join us each Tuesday morning from 8:309:30 a.m. during the legislative session. Capitol Plaza Hotel
Conference Room 232. Coffee, Tea, Scones, Fruit, and more!
RSVP encouraged to info@vamhar.org but never required. Just
drop-in!
Kellogg-Hubbard Library Activities. 135 Main St., 223-3338.
Story Time: Tues/Fri, 10:30 a.m.; Sit N Knit: for young knitters
age 6 & up, Mondays, 3:30-4 p.m.; Read to Coco: Wednesdays,
3:30-4:30 p.m.; Origami Club: Thursdays, 3-4 p.m.; Read with
Arlo: Thursdays 4-5 p.m.
CHADD ADHD Parent Support Group. Childcare not available, please make plans for your child. Woodbury College, second Tuesday of month, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Info. 498-5928.
Resurrection Baptist Church Weekly Events. 144 Elm St.
Sunday, 9:45 a.m. Bible Study for all Ages; 11 a.m. Worship
Service; Wednesday, 7 p.m. Prayer Meeting.
Overeaters Anonymous. Bethany Church basement, Mondays
5:30-6:30 p.m. 223-3079.
Good Beginnings of Central VT. 174 River St. 595-7953. DropIn Hours at the Nest. 1st floor Weds, Thurs, Fri 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Babywearers of Central Vermont meet up. Upstairs 4th
Monday 5:45-7:45 p.m. and 2nd Thursdays 9:30-11:30 a.m. Check
Facebook for last-minute schedule changes. La Leche League
Meetup. Breastfeeding info and support. 3rd Thursdays, 9:3011:30 a.m. Info: 802-879-3000. Nursing Beyond a Year Meetup.
3rd Fridays, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info: 802-879-3000. Come join
other nursing parents in a warm, supportive environment to discuss the joys and challenges of an older nursling.
Bible Study. Christian Alliance Church, Weds., 7 p.m. 4763221.
Al-Anon. Trinity Methodist Church, Main St., Sun., 6:15-7:30
p.m. Info. 1-866-972-5266.
Al-Anon. Bethany Church basement, 115 Main St., Tuesdays &
continued on next page
Thursdays noon-1 p.m.,

drop cloths, have a heart traps, bulb planter, and tool boxes to be
used for easy carry. Plus safety gear. 46 Barre St. Open during
office hours: T 9-4, W 9-4, TH 9-4.
Rainbow Umbrella of Central Vermont, an adult LGBTQ
group, meets third Tuesdays of the month, 5:30-7 p.m., at
Montpelier Senior Center, 58 Barre St. Info: RUCVTAdmin@
PrideCenterVT.org
Friday Night Group. Open to all LGBTQ youth ages 13-22.
Pizza & social time, facilitated by adults from Outright VT.
Unitarian Church, 2nd & 4th Fridays, 6:30-8 p.m. 223-7035 or
Erika@OutrightVT.org
Meditation, Mondays at 1 p.m.; Intro to Yoga, Tuesdays 4 p.m.;
Consults, Fridays 11 a.m. Free classes, some limits apply. All at
Fusion Studio, 56 East State St. 272-8923 or www.fusionstudio.
org
Open Library. Open to all, books and DVDs for all ages.
Resurrection Baptist Church, open Sundays 12:30 p.m.-2 p.m.
Central VT Roller Derbys Wrecking Doll Society. Intro to
roller derby, gear supplied, bring a mouth guard. First time is
free. Montpelier Rec. Center, Barre St., Saturdays 5-6:30 p.m.
www.twincityriot.com
Celiac Support Group. Tulsi Tea Room, 34 Elm St., 2nd
Wednesdays, 4-5 p.m. Info. 598-9206.
MSAC Public Activities: FEAST Together (communal meal),
suggested donation for seniors 60+ is $7, under 60 price is $9.
FEAST Together is always available for takeout, with the same
donation and pricing. Tuesdays and Fridays from 12-1 p.m.,
RSVP 262-6288. Piano Workshop, informal time to play & listen, Thursdays, 4-6 p.m. Living Strong, group loves to sing while
exercising, Mondays 2:30-3:30 p.m. & Fridays 2-3 p.m. Crafters
Group, Thursdays 10-11:30 a.m. All at Montpelier Senior
Activity Center, 58 Barre St., 223-2518.
A Course In Miracles study group. Everyone is welcome and
there is no charge. Christ Church, Tuesdays, 7 p.m. Info. 2295253.
Parents Group and Meet-Up. Connect with local parents to
share advice & information, kids welcome. Kellogg-Hubbard
Library, Hayes Rm, first Mondays, 10-11:30 a.m. Info: mamasayszine@gmail.com
Families Anonymous. For families or friends of those who have
issues with addiction, alcohol and/or mental illness. Bethany
Church, 2nd floor youth room, Mondays, 7-8 p.m. 229-6219.
Freeride Montpelier Open Shop Nights. Need help w/a bike
repair? Come to the volunteer-run community bike shop. 89 Barre
St., Wednesdays 4-6 p.m., other days seasonal, donations. Info:
freeridemontpelier.org
Free Community Meals. Mondays: Unitarian Church, 11 a.m.-1

Medical Center for self-managing of certain health conditions


like Chronic Disease or Pain, Diabetes and Diabetes
Prevention, Wellness Recovery Action Planning or Fresh Start
Tobacco Cessation. She will discuss each class and what
you may expect to get out of it and will answer all of your
questions. We may offer classes here at the senior center, if
you would like to do so. Please plan to sit in and learn the
specifics. Attendance to the classes is free and incentives provided to encourage your motivation. The support you receive
in attending classes with a group of people experiencing
similar conditions goes a long way in helping you to overcome hurdles you may encounter. Please call the office at
728-9324 for further information.
January Closings:
The Senior Center will be closed on Mon., Jan. 18, Martin
Luther King Jr. Day and we will also be closed if the Randolph
schools are closed or delayed, due to bad weather. Please
monitor your TV or local radio station (WCVR 1320) for the
latest weather update. (Our schools are Orange Southwest
Supervisory Union.)
Fork and Spoon Caf Menu for the next two weeks is as
follows:
Thursday, 1/12: Baked Fish, Brown rice, Brussels sprouts,
Whole Wheat Bread, Peaches,
Monday, 1/16: CLOSED MARTIN
LUTHER KING DAY
Tuesday, 1/17: Chicken Divan,
Roasted Cauliflower, Tossed Salad,
Muffins, Tapioca Pudding
Wednesday, 1/18: Shepards Pie,
California Blend Veggies, Pumpkin
Bread, Jello cake & topping
Thursday, 1/19: Open Face Turkey,
Sandwiches on whole wheat bread,
Mashed Potatoes, Yams, Carrots,
Cranberry Sauce, Apple Crisp & topping
Monday, 1/23: Meatloaf w/gravy,
Mashed Potatoes, Broccoli, Muffins,
Brownies
Tuesday, 1/24: Ranch Chicken,
Parsley Potatoes, Stewed Tomatoes,
Whole Wheat Bread, Tropical Fruit
Wednesday, 1/25: BBQ Beans, Grilled
Hotdogs on Buns, Potato Salad,
Coleslaw, Ice Cream
Thursday, 1/26: Beef Stew, Cottage
Cheese w/ mandarin oranges, Biscuits,
Chocolate Pudding
Donations are welcome from those 60
and older. For those under 60, the cost is
$5. All donations are voluntary and
anonymous. Coffee, tea, water and lowfat milk are served with each meal.
Call 728-9324 to confirm activities or
for additional information.

Water
46

12:30 p.m. in Kingwood Health Center (lower level Conference


Room), 1422 VT Route 66. This free six week program for people diagnosed with type-2 diabetes offers support to help them
better manage their diabetes and prevent more serious health
problems. Info/register: Megan at 802-728-7714.
New Business Forum. Vermont Tech Enterprise Center, 1540
VT Rte 66, 2nd Wednesdays, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. 728-9101.
Yoga Classes. All ages & levels, donations benefit Safeline. VTC
Campus Center, last Sunday of month, 2-3:30 p.m.
Step n Time Line Dancers of Central Vermont. Fall Session:
Wednesdays at Chandler Center. 6:45-8:45 p.m.
Randolph Senior Ctr., 6 Hale Street, 728-9324. Lift for Life
Exercises, 8:30 a.m. Tu/Th and Weds/Fri; Cribbage, 10 a.m.
Mondays; Bingo, 10:30 a.m. Mondays; Bridge, 2:15 p.m. at the
Joslyn House Mondays; Tai Chi (intermediate), 9:45 a.m.
Tuesdays; Mahjongg, 10 a.m. Tuesdays; Crafts, 10:30 a.m.
Wednesdays; Knit-Wits, 10 a.m. Thursdays; Tai Chi (beginner)
9:45 a.m. Thursdays; Bingo, 10 a.m. Fridays; Foot Clinics, 1st
Weds, call to sign up; Book Club 12:45 p.m. 1st Wednesday of
month.
Cancer Support Group. For survivors, sufferers & family.
Gifford Conference Ctr, 2nd Tuesdays, 9:30-11 a.m. 728-2270.
Storytime. Kimball Library, Wed., 11 a.m., ages 2-5; Toddlertime,
Fri., 10:30 a.m.; Gathering for hand work, 2nd & 4th Mon., 6
p.m.
WASHINGTON - Central VT ATV Club. Washington Fire
Station, 3rd Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. 224-6889.
Art and Adventure with April, 3rd Saturdays at 11 a.m.;
Storytime, Mondays at 11 a.m.; Tech Help Drop-In, Saturdays
10 a.m.-2 p.m. All at Calef Memorial Library. Info. 883-2343.
WEBSTERVILLE - Fire District #3, Prudential Committee.
Monthly meeting, 105 Main St., 2nd Tuesdays, 6 p.m.
WILLIAMSTOWN - Bible Study. Christian Alliance Church,
Sun., 6 p.m. Info. 476-3221.
Free Community Supper. The Williamstown United Federated
Church offers a community supper at 6 p.m. on the third
Thursday of each month. Free and open to all. Please come share
a meal with your friends and neighbors.
WOODBURY - Woodbury Community Library winter
hours. 1-5 p.m. Mondays & Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to noon
Saturdays. Valley Lake Road. Info: 472-5710. Knitting/
Handworkers Circle, Saturdays, 10 a.m. to noon, all ages and
abilities
WORCESTER - Knitting Night. The Wool Shed, Tuesdays,
6:30-8:30 p.m.

is Vermont Fish and Wildlife Free Ice Fishing Day, so you


dont even need a fishing license! Ice fishing is a great winter
pastime, one that can be enjoyed by the whole family and can
result in a tasty dinner. Cant get much more local than that!
Jaquith Library Open House
Invasive Plants
Saturday, February 4 from 9 to 1 p.m.
Thursday, January 19 at 7 p.m.
Come and celebrate the Jaquith Library with music,
County Forester, Dan Singleton, will talk about invasive refreshments and kids friendly activities. Enjoy the company
plants.
of your friends and neighbors. All welcome: community
Natural Marshfield: Medicinal Uses of Invasive Plants
members, patrons, volunteers, and family.
Thursday, February 16 at 7 p.m.
Betsy Bancroft, VCIH Herbalist, will talk about the medicFilm: A Tribute to David Budbill
inal uses of invasive plants.
Friday, February 17 at 7 p.m.
Thanks to a small group of David Budbills friends, includPop-in for Pop-ups with Ellen Bressler
ing poet Jody Gladding, poetry organizer Lisa von Kann, and
Wednesday, January 25 at 7 p.m.
painter Susan Walp, a sold-out tribute to one of Vermonts
Join Ellen Bresler to make cards for Valentines Day or any most beloved poets and playwrights took place on June 13,
other occasion. Ellen has been a practitioner, student and 2016--just three months before David died. The tribute
teacher of paper engineering since the 1980s. Its such a kick which features a dozen poets, actors, and friends reading
to start with a flat piece of paper and bring it to life with a few Davids poetry, plays, and essayswas hosted by Montpeliers
folds and cuts.
Lost Nation Theater and filmed by Susan Bettmann. Join
David Budbills daughter and literary executor, Nadine
Ice Fishing for Local Fun and Food!
Budbill, and videographer, Susan Bettmann, to view the film
Thursday, January 26 at 6:30 p.m. at the Jaquith Library
of the tribute, followed by refreshments and sharing.
Saturday January 28 at 8 a.m. at a lake to be determined.
Come to the Jaquith for a two-part program to learn about
Monthly Book Group for Adults
ice fishing on area lakes and ponds with local angler, Jim
Fourth Mondays at 7 p.m.
Barlow. On Thursday evening, Jim will discuss simple, effecJoin us for the Jaquith book group. For copies of the book,
tive techniques that will help you catch fish without traveling please stop by the library. New members are always welcome,
far or spending a lot on equipment. On Saturday morning, and its only one hour a month! ;
dress warmly and try your new skills (and luck) by heading
Januarys Book: Gilead by Marilynne Robinson
out with Jim to a lake to catch some fish. Saturday, January 28
Februarys Book: H is for Hawk by Helen MacDonald

Moving Toward Racial Justice: Dismantling Institutional


Racism - An Event Series at MSAC
MSAC will host an art show, artist reception and panel
discussion to call attention to and deepen understanding of
issues related to racism and racial justice. This series is being
presented for the benefit of those who want to learn more and
talk about racism, justice and the well-being of our community. It is organized and hosted by three departments of the
City of Montpelier: MSAC, Montpelier Community Justice
Center, and Montpelier Police Department, and also by
Justice for All, a Vermont-based racial justice non-profit organization.
Black Lives Matter Art Show: Beginning Wednesday,
January 4 through February
Artist Reception: Friday, January 13, 4-5 p.m.

starting at $899

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the most of your retirement assets.
Call us. We will do the paperwork.
RETIREMENT INSURANCE INVESTMENTS

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Berlin, VT 05602

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Winter Classes
Were offering more than 60 affordable weekly classes this
winter everything from foreign language to yoga to pastels.
Winter classes begin this week, but its not too late to sign up
and more than three dozen classes still have space available!
Many classes are open to people of all ages, regardless of
MSAC membership. Learn more online at www.montpeliervt.org/msac or visit us at 58 Barre Street in Montpelier.

Celebrating 50 Years
2017 marks the 50th anniversary of MSAC! Do you, or
someone you know, have special memories or photos to
share? Want to help us celebrate and commemorate our history? Stop by the office and talk to us about joining our 50th
Anniversary Task Force!

$299

Locally Owned & Operated By Mike & Amanda P.


97 US Rt. 302 Barre-Montpelier Rd 802-479-0671

Panel Discussion: Friday, January 13, 5-7 p.m.

Armchair Travel Talk: Newfoundland


Tuesday, January 17, 6:30-8 p.m.
Join us for a presentation of photos from Barbara
Thompsons trip to Newfoundland. Known as The Rock,
the island of Newfoundland showcases a magnificent rugged
coast with picturesque peninsulas where some of the worlds
rarest land formations can be experienced and 5,000 years of
human settlement can be witnessed. Free and open to the
public

starting
at

LIFT CHAIRS

Montpelier Senior Activity Center


The Montpelier Senior Activity Center is
your home for healthy aging and lifelong
learning. We are an active community, and
theres always something to do, no matter
your interest. If youre 50 or older, wed
love to welcome you as a member of the
Montpelier Senior Activity Center! Read
on to learn about our latest updates and our upcoming events,
many of which are free and open to the public. If youd like
to learn more, call us at 223-2518 or stop by at 58 Barre St. in
Montpelier.

RECLINERS

S
OK
O
B

Wednesdays 7-8 p.m. Info. 1-866-972-5266.


SL AA. 12-step recovery group for sex/relationship problems.
Bethany Church, Wed., 5 p.m. Info. 802-249-6825.
Survivors of Incest Anonymous. Bethany Church parlor, 115
Main St., Mondays, 5 p.m. Please call first: 229-9036 or 4548402.
Brain Injury Support Group. Unitarian Church, third Thursday
of the month, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Info. 1-877-856-1772
Playgroups: Dads & Kids Playgroup, Thursdays, 6-7:30 p.m.
and Playgroup, Saturdays, 9:30-11 a.m., both at Family Center
of Washington County. All held during school year only.
Kindred Connections Peer to Peer Cancer Support for
Patients and Caregivers. Info 1-800-652-5064 email info@vcsn.
net
Christian Meditation. Christ Church, Mondays, 12-1 p.m.
MARSHFIELD - Story Time and Playgroup. Jaquith Public
Library. Wednesdays from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Join Sylvia Smith for
story time, and follow up with playgroup with Cassie Bickford.
For children birth to age six and their grown-ups. We do not hold
the program the days Twinfield Union is closed.
NORTHFIELD - Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program. For ages
12-18. Readiness & Regional Technology Center, Norwich campus, Tuesdays, 6-8:30 p.m. Info. capitalcomposite@yahoo.com
Clogging & Irish Step Lessons. W/Green Mountain Cloggers,
ages 8-78, donations. Sundays 5-8 p.m. 522-2935.
Playgroup. United Church of Northfield, Wednesdays, 9:30-11
a.m. Held only when school is in session. Info. 262-3292 x113.
ORANGE - Sunday morning service at Christ Community
Alliance Church at 10:30 a.m. off Route 302 near the Elementary
School in Orange.
PLAINFIELD - Cutler Memorial Library Activities: Classic
Book Club: 1st Mondays, 6 p.m; Food for Thought Book Club:
2nd Mondays, 6:30 p.m. Plainfield Book Club: 3rd Mondays, 7
p.m. Call 454-8504. Story Time for Kids, ages 2-5. Thursdays,
10:30 a.m.
Diabetes Discussion & Support Group. Everyone welcome.
The Health Center conf. room, 3rd Thursdays, 1:30 p.m. Info.
322-6600.
RANDOLPH - Ongoing Health Support Groups at Gifford Quit in Person Group. Giffords Tobacco Cessation Program
regularly offers four-week Quit in Person group sessions in the
Maple Leaf Room at Gifford Medical Center and Kingwood
Health Center. Free gum, patches and lozenges are available for
participants. Call 802-728-7714, to learn more or to sign up for
the next series of classes.
Diabetes Management Program. Thursdays from 10 a.m. to

(excluding food products)

Its a great time to shop!


We ship Vermont Gift Baskets
for any occasion.
Maple Creemes all winter
OPEN EVERY DAY 8:30-5:00 PM

Vermont
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802-223-5757

1 mile north of E. Montpelier Village on Rt. 14N (follow signs)

January 11, 2017

The WORLD

page 9

Edward E. Sweeney

Bernard E. Clark

Bernard Bernie E. Clark, 81,


of Barre, passed away on
Saturday, December 31, 2016, at his
home.
Bernard was born on May 10, 1935 at
Heaton Hospital in Montpelier, the son of
Irving G. and Ruth (Maxham) Clark.
He lived in the Shady Rill section of
Middlesex until he was nine years old
when the family moved to Barre where he
attended Lincoln and Mathewson Graded Schools and graduated from Spaulding High School in the Class of 1953.
In April of 1956, he joined the United States Army. He took
his basic training at Fort Carson, Colorado followed by serving sixteen months in Heilbronn, Germany. While in the service, he toured Italy, France, Austria, and Switzerland as well
as several German cities. He was discharged in February of
1958. Following his discharge, he worked for the former Flint
Lumber Company in Barre for two years. He went on to attend
the Northeast Broadcasting School in Boston where he graduated in 1960. After graduation, he worked for Radio Station
WSNO for two years as an announcer.
On July 20, 1963, Bernard married Shirley A. Mason of
Washington. They made their home in Barre all of their married life. In 1963, he went to work at the Lacillade Lumber
Company in Williamstown as a truck driver. He went on to
become their shipping dispatcher and in later years worked in
sales as a window and door specialist retiring in 1997 after
being employed for 34 years. Upon his retirement, he worked
at Howards Market and Hannafords Grocery Store in South
Barre as a parcel attendant.
Bernie was an avid baseball fan. He was very proud of his
baseball and sport card collection. One of the highlights for
him occurred on July 20, 1958. It was Vermont Day at Fenway
Park in Boston. In the first game of the doubleheader, (yes
they did actually play two games for the price of one back
then) Jim Bunning of the visiting Detroit Tigers pitched a nohit, no run game against the home town Red Sox, 3-0. Bernie
made many other trips to Boston to watch the Red Sox play as
well as trips to see the Montreal Expos, the New York
Yankees, the Washington Senators, and the Portland Sea
Dogs. Locally, he attended many games of the old Industrial
League with his father in the 1940s and 1950s. In later years,
he became a fan of the Burlington Baseball teams and more
recently the Vermont Mountaineers in Montpelier. He made a
trip to the Baseball Hall of Fame. He was also a fan of the
former Vermont Frost Heaves basketball team.
Bernie loved to travel and attend concerts. Among his most
memorable trips were to Branson, MO, the Grand Canyon,
and visits to Disney World in Florida. His favorite concerts
were gospel music and country music.
He was a follower of television nightly newscasts, both
local and national. He enjoyed serving on his class reunion
committee and was a life member of the Canadian Club in
Barre. Bernie was active in the First Baptist Church of Barre
where he sang in the choir, attended the Mens Fellowship,
had served as the church school superintendent, was a church
schoolteacher, and had served on the churchs Property
Committee. He also had been a volunteer usher at the Barre
Opera House.
Survivors include his wife of 53 years, Shirley Clark of
Barre; his two daughters, Karen Rielly and her husband,
Patrick of Williamstown and Marilyn Pearson and her husband, Craig of Berlin; two grandsons, Dylan Rielly and Joshua
Pearson; a great-granddaughter, Raelynn Rielly; his sister,
Lorraine Glidden of Northfield; and several nieces, nephews
and cousins.
He was predeceased by his parents and two brothers-in-law,
Howard Glidden and Ronald Mason.
A memorial service celebrating and honoring his life was
held at the First Baptist Church in Barre at 2:00 p.m. on
Saturday, January 7, 2017. Following the service, family and
friends are invited to gather in the churchs fellowship hall for
a time of sharing and refreshments. Additional parking can be
used next door at the Hedding United Methodist Church parking lot.
Family and friends may call at the Hooker and Whitcomb
Funeral Home, 7 Academy Street, Barre on Friday from 6:00
to 8:00 p.m.
A private burial will take place in the Hope Cemetery in
Barre at the convenience of his family.
In lieu of flowers, donations in his memory may be made to
the American Diabetes Association, 77 Hegeman Avenue,
Colchester, VT 05446 or to the First Baptist Church, PO Box
98, Barre, VT 05641.
The Hooker and Whitcomb Funeral Home, 7 Academy
Street, Barre, is in charge of arrangements.
For a memorial guestbook, visit www.hookerwhitcomb.
com.

PRUNEAU-POLLI
FUNERAL HOME
Serving All Faiths

Family Owned & Operated


58 Summer Street Barre, Vermont

d Member
Prou

National Funeral Directors


Association

page 10

802-476-4621
Handicap Accessible

The WORLD

January 11, 2017

To honor Als legacy and help bring his final dream full
circle, memorial contributions may be made to a St. Monica
Edward E. Sweeney, 79, died Parish Rectory Fund, 79 Summer St., Barre, VT.
Wednesday, December 21,
For a memorial guestbook, visit www.hookerwhitcomb.
2016 at Veterans Affairs Medical Center com
in White River Junction, VT.
Ed was born June 14, 1937 in Berlin,
Madeline Rose Greninger
VT a son of Wilfred Eugene and Donalda
Josephine (Millette) Sweeney. He attendJanuary 10, 1920 December 12, 2016
ed Little Valley School in Berlin and
Madeline Rose Greninger of Plainfield
Saint Michaels in Montpellier. Ed served
passed away peacefully at Woodridge
his country during the Korean War in the
Nursing and Rehab on December 12,
US Air Force where he was stationed in Alaska. He worked as
2016, in the presence of loving family at
a laborer on several area farms, on road construction, as a pit
the age of 96. She was born in Brooklyn,
worker at Rock of Ages and several Rubbish routes. He was
New York to Matthew and Clara Horlick.
married to Brenda Lea Walbridge on October 31, 1968 she
She was an active member of Grace
died in 1971, he was latter remarried to Maryln Colburn,
English Lutheran Evangelical Church in
December 7, 1974 she passed in 2001. Remarried Norma
the Bushwick section of Brooklyn and
Manning of Berlin Convalescent Center, July 17, 2002.
attended local schools. She married
You could always find Ed working on a word search puzzle George John Rappold in 1943 and upon his return from serat home, or at his door while he was in the VA. He loved to vice during World War II, raised three sons Steven, Paul and
help set up and play Saturday night Bingo with his friends at Mark. She later lived in Glendale, Queens and then moved to
Tilton House. In his younger years you could find him out Fairfax, Virginia where she married the Rev. Reed Greninger.
fishing.
In 2010, she moved to Vermont with son Steven and family.
Ed is predeceased by four sisters, Lois Fordham, Theresa
Survivors include son Steve and Emily Rappold of
Tessier, Jane Lemieux, Alene Cassy.
Plainfield, daughter-in-law Rosemary Rappold of Wading
He is survived by a daughter Rose Sweeney of Essex River, NY, grandchildren, Laura, Matthew, Benjamin,
Junction; two Grandchildren Brenda Lea Sweeney of Bristol, Nicholas and Ashley, and great-grandchildren, Henry, Lily,
RI, Brian William Sweeney of Montpellier, three great-grand- and Madeline.
children Jakob Bousquet, Brian Sweeney, and Emma Sweeney;
Burial will be at Quantico National Cemetery on January
and two sisters, Edith Fordham of Northfield, VT Gertrude 13, 2017. A memorial service will be held on January 28,
Prevost and her husband Wayne of Montpellier, VT
2017, at 1:00 p.m. at Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church,
The family would like to thank Dave and Jody with Sash, 115 Northfield St., Montpelier. In lieu of flowers, donations
Carla with Home Health, Barre Housing, VA and all others may be made to the Twin Valley Seniors, Inc., P.O. Box 152,
involved with his care.
East Montpelier, VT 05651.
A memorial service was held Saturday, January 7, 2017 at
the Tilton House in Barre at 2:00 p.m. Knight Funeral Home Other passings
in White River Junction assisted with arrangements.
JANE W. BICKFORD, 83, passed away
Condolences may be expressed to his family in an online
Sunday, Jan. 1, 2017, at the home of Timothy
guestbook at www.knightfuneralhomes.com
and Raylene Codling in Berlin, where she had
been lovingly taken care of the last years of her
Alfred R. Monty
life. Jane was born on May 12, 1933, in
Montpelier, the daughter of John D. and Neva
Alfred R. (Al) Monty passed peacefully
(Amidon) Welch. She made her home in
into the loving hands of God on Monday,
January 2, 2017 surrounded by his devot- Worcester with her younger sister, Ellen, until the family
moved to Indiana and later Maryland, her father managing
ed wife and children.
Al was born in Northfield, VT, June farms in those two states. After her mother died, the family
29, 1934 to Charles and Valeda (Bedard) returned to Vermont and Jane attended school in Northfield
Monty. He grew up in Washington, VT. while living with her grandparents, and graduated from
He graduated Class of 1952 from Northfield High School. She then attended the University of
Vermont for further schooling where she met Harry Bickford.
Spaulding High School in Barre.
On April 16, 1955, he married the love They were later married in Burlington. After their marriage
of his life, Anita (Cano), who survives him. Al and Anita were they moved to Orange, Connecticut, where she ultimately
the parents of four children; Susan (Skip) Poczobut, David took a job with Enthone and was with the company for over
(Cristy), Edward (Robin) and Alan (Lauren). He was particu- 25 years. Jane and her husband took great enjoyment in camplarly proud of his grandchildren; Michael (Sandra) and David ing and spent the occasional weekend or week traveling to
Poczobut, Kathryn and Allison Monty, Andy and Rob various campgrounds in and around Connecticut. Jane continMarcotte, Nicole (Kyle) and Luke Caron; Emily and Heather ued camping after the death of her husband in 1982.
Monty, and Jacqueline, Paige, Alexis and Anthony Monty.
JEAN CLAUDE BONIN, 86, of Summer
There was always a youthful spark from him when he interStreet, passed away on Thursday, Dec. 29, 2016,
acted with his three great grandchildren, Alexander, Emilia
at the Woodridge Nursing Home & Rehab in
and Jackson Poczobut. He is survived by several nieces, nephBerlin, Vermont, with his loving family at his
ews and other extended family including a special sister-inbedside. Born in Kingscoft, Quebec, on Jan. 21,
law, Therese Monty.
1930, he was the son of the late Wilfred and
Al is survived by one sister, Lise Leary. He was predeRosa (Dauphin) Bonin. Jean Claude attended
ceased by his parents, five siblings and their spouses, and all
school in Canada. In 1959, he married Ghislaine Maheux in
of Anitas sisters and spouses.
Al began his full-time career with Montgomery Ward in Ste. Marc Catholic Church in Coaticook, Quebec. In 1960, the
couple moved to Barre where they made their home and
Barre, retiring after 35 years.
Although Montgomery Ward dominated his life from 9-5, raised their family, and he worked for Roland Lajeunesse. He
his passion for square dancing consumed his after-work later learned the trade of a sawyer in the granite industry, and
hours. Growing up, Al would sing as he milked cows on the worked for Bianchi and Beck & Beck Granite Co. He and his
family farm. Discovering a talent for music early on, he wife owned and operated Bonins Rest Home on Summer
attended local barn dances where he began his square dance Street in Barre for many years. Among his interests were
calling career. It was at one of these dances that he met his woodworking, spending time with family and friends at his
camp, and riding his pontoon boat on Greenwood Lake. He
future wife.
In early years, Al taught square dancing to students of all was a member of St. Monica Catholic Church in Barre, St.
ages in almost every town in Washington County. For many Jean the Baptist and the Barre Canadian Club.
years, Square Dance Class was mandatory in the PE programs
DENNIS P. CARVER, 69, of Sibley Road, died
in Montpelier. Each school year would culminate with festion Dec. 31, 2016, at his home with his family by
vals at both the Barre Auditorium and Plumley Armory at
his side after a 10-year battle with cancer. He
Norwich. In later years, Al traveled throughout the state teachwas born in Burlington, Vermont, on Oct. 9,
ing adults to dance. He taught his last class in December. The
1947, the son of Robert and Francis (Emmons)
friendships that Al and Anita forged with all the people they
Carver. He attended the Cathedral Graded
met throughout the many years were cherished by both of
School and Rice Memorial High School, graduthem.
In 1976, Vermont Life featured Al in an article titled King ating in 1965. He later received his bachelors degree in secof the Callers. For many years, Al, along with dancers were ondary education from the University of Vermont in 1969. On
guests on WCAXs Across The Fence. Al was honored as Feb. 17, 1973, he married Sherry Spaulding, the love of his
one of WCAXs Super Seniors in 2015. He also attended life, and as he jokes, the pick of the litter, at the Bethany
Auctioneer School and presided over many local auctions. Church in Montpelier. Work comprised the backbone of
Als accomplishments were also profiled on Chronicle, a Denniss life. Before graduating from college, he did some
undercover narcotics work and then joined the Burlington
Boston news program.
Although not formally trained, Al had a gift for building Police Department. Next, Dennis decided it was time to purand design. He never wasted a square inch of space in his sue his lifelong dream of owning a dairy farm and purchased
designs. His rudimentary scratching on a sheet of graph paper, a farm in West Addison in 1973. He quickly discovered just
along with keen negotiation and management skills resulted how hard he could work but also that there was more to life
in the successful completion of many building projects, than work. He sold the farm and moved to central Vermont
including homes for himself and all his children. Al designed with his wife to start a business, Northern Vermont Snax
the Granite Hills Credit Union building in Barre and served as Sales, which was a distributor of Toms Foods. With this busithe General Contractor for a large infrastructure project at St. ness, Dennis was able to provide a good life for his family and
Monica Parish. His last unfinished project was for a new also to model to his children a good and proper work ethic,
two of his top priorities.
Parish rectory.
Al was a spiritual man and was a life-long member of St.
JOYCE V. COUTURE, 77, passed away at the
Monica Parish serving on the building and grounds & finance
Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin on
committees. For many years Al and his sons served together
Thursday morning, Dec. 29, 2016. Born in
as ushers at Mass. Al continued to serve as an usher every
Burlington on Oct. 22, 1939, she was the daughSaturday evening.
ter of the late Dwaine C. and Shirley M. (Keith)
Calling hours were from 4-7 p.m., Sunday, January 8 at
Marshall. On Dec. 20, 1997, Joyce married
Hooker Whitcomb Funeral Home, Academy St., Barre. The
Douglas E. Couture in Pepperell, Massachusetts.
funeral Mass was celebrated at St. Monica on Monday,
January 9 at 11 a.m.
continued on next page

continued from previous page

Joyce was a 1958 graduate of Waterbury High School and was


a proud member of the state champion girls basketball team.
She continued her education at the former Burdett College in
Boston, receiving her associate degree in 1960. She then
embarked on a four-decade career, starting as a bank teller and
working her way up to head teller for the Waltham
(Massachusetts) Savings Bank, Bay Bank in Littleton,
Massachusetts, Bank of Boston and then Fleet Bank, from
which she retired in 1999. Athletically active throughout her
life, Joyce loved the outdoors and particularly enjoyed hiking,
cross-country skiing, camping and sea kayaking. An avid
bicyclist, she and her husband logged over 12,000 miles touring Ireland, Scotland, the Canadian Rockies, New Zealand,
the Oregon coast, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia.
MARGUERITE L. DODGE, 97, died Friday,
on her birthday, Dec. 30, 2016, at Rowan Court
Health Care in Barre. She was born Dec. 30,
1919, in Randolph Center, the daughter of Roy
and Emma (Chadwick) Gilman. She graduated
in 1938 from Randolph High School and attended Vermont Junior College. She married
Raymond E. Dodge in 1940. Mr. Dodge died in 1986. Mrs.
Dodge was bookkeeper for Dodge Oil Co. (later known as
Sanborn Oil), Johnson & Dix and Randolph Auto Parts. She
was a member of First Congregational Church of Randolph
Center and Gifford Medical Center Auxiliary, where she volunteered in the thrift shop. She was active in 4-H in her youth,
and a member of the North Randolph Grange and the
Randolph Grange. She bowled in the Randolph Senior
Bowling League and led the longest-running New England
chapter of T.O.P.S. She also enjoyed bird watching.
CHARLES H. CHUCK DUCAS, 56, died Thursday, Dec.
29, 2016, at his home. He was born July 2, 1960, in New
Brunswick, Canada, the son of Philippe and Germaine
(Clavette) Ducas. He married Laura Baker April 1, 2007, in
Northfield Falls. Mr. Ducas worked as a chef for MJ Fridays
and the Brown Derby, both of Montpelier. He later was
employed by GW Plastics, Vermont Tree Service and, most
recently, Huntington Homes. He enjoyed deer hunting and
remodeling his home.
PHYLLIS HUTCHINSON FOSTER, 95, formerly of Barre, passed away at Fawcett Hospital
in Port Charlotte, Florida, on Christmas Eve, a
coincidence that reminded her extended family
of the many memorable Christmas Eve dinners
and gift exchanges that she hosted at her home
in Barre. She was born in Hartford, Connecticut.
Her family moved to Maine and then to Vermont where her
dad started Hutchinson Gardens. She attended Goddard
College and became their dietician. She married Bernard C.
Foster, of Montpelier, and homesteaded in Barre, raising a
family of four children. In the summer, Phyllis managed the
many moves to lakeside cottages near road projects where
Bernie worked as a resident engineer for the state of Vermont.
Active in the Barre Universalist Church, Phyllis was president
of the church womens group and successfully lobbied for
state legislation for mental illness family assistance. She pursued her hobby in ceramics at her home studio and at the
Montpelier and Barre senior citizens centers. She became an
award-winning entrant at hobby shows and enjoyed ceramics
seminars. She developed stoneware jewelry and copyrighted
them in 1977 as Puddles. In 1985, Phyllis and Bernie
retired, enjoying the best of two worlds, North Port, Florida,
and Greenwood Lake in Woodbury.

BERNARD R. BO GOODELL, 63, passed


away at his home in Butte, Montana, on Dec. 8,
2016, after a battle with cancer. Bo was born
April 19, 1953, in Montpelier, Vermont. He was
the son of Bernard and Pauline (Bolduc) Goodell.
In 1972, he was awarded class clown and was a
graduate of Montpelier High School. Bo had a
passion for football and was a member of the Montpelier High
School football team all four years. After high school, he
worked for the city of Montpelier. Bo was best remembered
by his friends and family as being a kind-hearted, fun-loving
soul who led a simple life; he loved laughing and having fun.
Bo easily made friends and was admired for his honesty and
easygoing ways. Bo and his best friend, Dave DeForge, started
their next adventure and traveled west together. They worked
their way through Colorado for a few years and eventually
landed in Missoula, Montana. In 1985, Bo married the love of
his life, Patricia Angie Mitchell, in Missoula. In 1987, they
settled in Butte, Montana. Bo was a sports enthusiast. He was
a diehard Green Bay Packers and a lifelong Boston Red Sox
fan. His basement is a man-cave dedicated to the Packers. He
loved the outdoors, fishing and hunting, as well as passing the
time storytelling with his friends and family.

GROW

SAVE
THESE
LOGO
TheALL
Benefit
Shop
15 Cottage
Barre 479-4309
ADD
ASSt.,NECESSARY!
Closed
forclasses
Renovations
Spring
at
COPYCommunity
AND
PASTE
INTO A
College of Vermont

BEATRICE KIMSEY PHALEN, 88, of


Montpelier, Vermont, died peacefully at home in
Montpelier on Dec. 31, 2016, of heart failure.
She was surrounded by her loving family.
Beatrice Ann Kimsey was born on Feb. 10,
1928, in Gastonia, North Carolina, the daughter
of Ray B. and Lee (Rodgers) Kimsey. Bea was
educated in the Gastonia schools, graduating in 1946 from
Gastonia High School. She then attended the University of
North Carolina. On July 1, 1950, Bea married John Richard
Phalen of West Rutland, Vermont. Their marriage was in the
Cathedral of Belmont Abbey, Belmont, North Carolina. In
1953 they settled in Montpelier, Vermont. Later, they lived for
short periods of time in Brattleboro and Bennington before
resettling in Montpelier. When their youngest started school,
Bea continued her education, graduating from the University
of Vermont magna cum laude with a bachelor of science
degree in education in 1971. In 1970, Bea was asked to form
and coach the first girls tennis team at Montpelier High
School. She taught junior high school language arts in both the
Bennington and Montpelier school systems. She especially
enjoyed playing in the weekly Vermont Ladies State Day
competition. Bea was past president of the St. Vincent de Paul
Society at St. Augustines, a former member of the Montpelier
Mothers Club and a very active member of the Montpelier
Ladies Golf Club.
EARL A. RICK STOWE II, 52, of
Waterbury, passed away unexpectedly at
the University of Vermont Medical
Center in Burlington on Saturday, Dec.
17, 2016. Born in Decatur, Alabama, on
Nov. 4, 1964, he was the son of Rodney and Marjorie (Payton)
Montgomery. On Dec. 5, 2007, Rick married the former
Barbara Krainski in Waterbury. Rick was raised from infancy
by his mother and Earl Stowe and when he turned 18, legally
changed his name to Earl A. Stowe II. He was a 1985 graduate
of Middlebury Union High School and then went on to work
in production at the Richmond Creamery. He later was
employed as a metal fabricator for New England Air Systems
before working for many years at Green Mountain Coffee
Roasters as a quality control technician. Currently, he was a
delivery driver for Upper Valley Produce in Waterbury. In his
leisure time, Rick enjoyed hunting and fishing, cribbage,
watching NASCAR and the New England Patriots, and was a
longtime Star Trek fan.

The CVMC Auxiliary Bene-Fit Shop will be closed

October 29th through November 6th.

REGISTER NOW AT CCV.EDU/SPRING

New Shop Hours

We will reopen Wednesday, November 7th with new shop hours:

Wednesday through Friday 10am-4pm


Saturday 9am-2pm.

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NEWSHOP O
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your patronage.

15 Cottage St., Barre 479-4309


Shop Hours:

Wednesday through Friday 10am-4pm


Saturday 9am-2pm

Donations Needed

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SPEAKING OUT

What recommendations do you have


for Gov. Phil Scott?

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Glad you asked...


#1 - Lets shift the revenue
from the sales tax to a different
tax such as gas tax, etc., and
compete with N.H. for business.
#2 - Abolish the BRINE on the
roads.
#3 - Imbalance of the use tax for
cars. Theres a cap of $40,000
which means the people who
can afford (the rich) dont have
to pay tax over $40K plus on
their vehicles.

I hope that he will use his


chance to appoint a Supreme
Court Justice that will be the
best for Vermont and not just
some political appointment.

My Dad, Bob S., would have


plenty of things to say, but Im
a junior at Colby-Sawyer and
after graduation I just want
to be able to come back and
live here!

Ive known Gov. Scott for


a long time and know he is
a very nice man and will do
good if he can.

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January 11, 2017

The WORLD

page 11

So

PUBLIC NOTICE
BULLETIN BOARD

STATE OF VERMONT
SUPERIOR COURT
WASHINGTON UNIT
PROBATE DIVISION
DOCKET NO. 599-10-16Wnpr
IN RE THE ESTATE OF:

STATE OF VERMONT
SUPERIOR COURT
WASHINGTON UNIT
PROBATE DIVISION
DOCKET NO. 272-5-16Wnpr
IN RE THE ESTATE OF:

LATE OF:

LATE OF:

CHRISTOPHER A.
LAMSON

IOLE I. CARUSI

BARRE, VERMONT

Notice To Creditors

To the creditors of IOLE I. CARUSI,


late of Barre, Vermont.
I have been appointed to administer
this estate. All creditors having
claims against the decedent or the
estate must present their claims in
writing within four (4) months of
the rst publication of this notice.
The claim must be presented to
me at the address listed below
with a copy sent to the Court. The
claim may be barred forever if it
is not presented within the four
(4) month period.
Dated: 1/3/2017
Signed: Leighton C. Detora,
Fiduciary
P.O. Box 625
Barre, VT 05641
Phone: 802-476-4181
Email: vdmlaw@vdmlaw.com
Name of Publication: The WORLD
Publication Date: Jan. 11, 2017
Vermont Superior Court Washington Probate Division
65 State Street
Montpelier, VT 05602

NORTHFIELD,
VERMONT

Notice To Creditors

To the creditors of CHRISTOPHER


A. LAMSON, late of Northeld,
Vermont.
I have been appointed to administer
this estate. All creditors having
claims against the decedent or the
estate must present their claims in
writing within four (4) months of
the rst publication of this notice.
The claim must be presented to
me at the address listed below
with a copy sent to the Court. The
claim may be barred forever if it
is not presented within the four
(4) month period.
Dated: 1/3/2017
Signed: Charlene Bohl, Fiduciary
34 Chase Road
North Middlesex, VT 05682
Phone: 802-229-9908
Email: charlenebohl@comcast.net
Name of Publication: The WORLD
Publication Date: January 11 &
18, 2017
Vermont Superior Court Washington Probate Division
65 State Street
Montpelier, VT 05602

Contacting Congress
U.S. Rep. Peter Welch

Mailing address:
128 Lakeside Ave, Suite 235
Burlington, VT 05401
Web site: www.welch.house.gov
Phone: (888) 605-7270 or (802) 652-2450

U.S. Sen. Bernard Sanders

Mailing address:
1 Church St., Third Floor,
Burlington, VT 05401
Web site: www.sanders.senate.gov
Phone: (802) 862-0697

U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy

Mailing address:
199 Main St., Fourth Floor,
Burlington, VT 05401
Web site: www.leahy.senate.gov
Phone: (802) 863-2525

Central Vermonts Newspaper


403 Route 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641
Tel.: (802)479-2582 or 1-800-639-9753
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The WORLD
January 11, 2017

Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce


By William D. Moore,
President & CEO
The dawn of a new year brings with
it the hopes and expectations of success that a clean slate always presents.
Concern about the future is always
around us, no more so than at the
changing of the calendar. Success,
however is based upon past experiences and actions.
On January 18th, The Central Vermont Chamber of
Commerce will convene our Annual Meeting at the Capitol
Plaza Hotel in Montpelier. We are honored that our breakfast
meeting (7:30am) will feature an address by Governor Phil
Scott. Governor Scott will be presenting his plan to make
Vermont an appealing place to live and do business in.
The theme of our Annual Meeting is Your Governor,
Your Business, Your Economic Future. Tickets are $35
each for Chamber members, $45 for non-members. Tables of
eight are available for $350, $450 for non-members. Our
Premier Sponsor for the Annual Meeting is Casella Waste
Management. Additional sponsorship opportunities are
available. Call The Chamber at 229-5711 for ticket information or for additional sponsorship information.
Following Governor Scotts remarks, I will be joining a
panel moderated by Chamber Chair, Lindel James from The
Center for Leadership Skills. The panel, including Bonnie
Waninger from the Central Vermont Regional Planning
Commission and Jamie Stewart, Executive Director of the
Central Vermont Economic Development Corporation will
present our thoughts on the regions economy and opportunities for growth.
We will be reviewing some of the achievements The
Chamber accomplished in 2016 and look forward to what

Passion for Parks

By Helen Hossley
Looking through the lens of history
of our parks seems glamorous; conjuring up nostalgia 0for the way they were
in their heyday. We yearn to experience our parks as the pioneers of nature
conservancy did; to be on the cutting
edge of saving special places for future
generations. How fabulous it would
have been to be part of the conversation that John Muir had with Teddy Roosevelt? What about
standing with Ansel Adams while he snapped his magical
photos? We are fortunate to have his exquisite works of art
that capture the essence so completely that it is hard not to fall
in love with the places. How can anyone look at any of his
photos and not vow to protect those vistas as fiercely as a
mother bear protects her cubs?
In December 2016, President Obama used the power
within the Antiquities Act to create two new national monuments expanding the Park System to 416 sites. They are Bear
Ears Buttes in Utah and Gold Butte in Nevada. This executive
order will help preserve sensitive areas from development.
Although some areas within our treasures have been sacrificed to development, in large part the backcountry remains as
wild as nature intended.
For the last 100 years the National Park Service has done the
best they could with what they have. Some would argue that
their best isnt good enough. That there should not be over a
billion dollars in backlogged maintenance, or visitation limits
or compromises with concession companies. Or, or, or
There are numerous non-profit organizations that partner
with the National Park Service that picks up the slack where

2017 presents. We will be saying Good-bye and Thank


You to our retiring Directors, Sue Kruthers, our Past Chair;
Cody Patno from Noyle W. Johnson; and Mike Donovan
from Broadcast Advertising.
Chamber members will be asked to elect the following
nominees to our Board of Directors: Steve Cormier from
Radio Vermont Group; Cheyenne Holland from the
University of Vermont Health Network - Central Vermont
Medical Center; Jessica Jaggars from Norwich University;
and Curtis Ostler from Vermont Technical College.
New Officers for the year will then be elected by the
Board of Directors. Those nominated to be Officers for 2017
include Lindel James, Chair; Ed Larson (Larson Forestry &
Legislative Consulting) Secretary/Treasurer; Kim Bolduc
(Bolduc Metal Recycling), Vice Chair Events; Joe Choquette
(Downs Rachlin Martin), Vice Chair Public Policy; Leslie
Sanborn (R&L Archery), Immediate Past Chair; John
Underwood (The Inn at Montpelier), Vice Chair Tourism;
and Amy White (Peoples United Bank), Vice Chair
Membership.
In addition to reviewing highlights of the Chamber Year,
we will also be presenting our Strategic Plan to the membership. Between May and October, our Board of Directors met
in several sessions and developed a comprehensive threeyear Strategic Plan. The Strategic Plan is the result of serious consideration given to all aspects of The Chambers
operation.
It has been an exciting year, a year of change for The
Chamber. I do hope that you can join us at our Annual
Meeting and celebrate with us our many successes.
As we face that clean slate of the New Year, on behalf of
the membership, the Officers, the Board of Directors and the
staff of the Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce, I wish
you all happiness and success in 2017. Happy New Year!

the government falls short.


The official charitable partner to our National Park System
is the National Park Foundation. Aided by lobbying efforts of
Lady Bird Johnson and philanthropist Lawrence Rockefeller,
it was charted by Congress in 1967. The Foundation is a way
for private citizens to directly support our parks. The
Foundation focuses on promoting programs and projects that
protect precious landscapes and wilderness, historical sites,
and places of cultural significance.
The National Parks Conservation Association was created
in 1919 whose main focus is lobbying Congress on issues that
either enhance or threaten our parks.
A relatively young organization established in 2003, The
Coalition to Protect Americas National Parks is one of my
favorites. The Coalition brings together over 1,100 former or
retired National Park employees that represent every discipline within the agency. Using their collective, boots on the
ground working knowledge of our park system, they voice
concerns about legislative and policy decisions that diminish
the values and purposes for which the National Park System
was established.
When visiting a park whether its a local, state or National
Park keep in mind:
Someone was passionate and cared enough to lead a
movement to conserve and protect the land for your discovery
and enjoyment.
Volunteers continue to be the heart of day-to-day operations, say thank you once in a while.
Park staff do the best they can with what they have.
Helen Hossley is the author of Do I Get to Wear That Neat
Hat? To find out more about her book visit her website at
www.helenhossley.com

A Good Start For Governor Scott

By Tom Hughes
This week, Governor Phil Scott took the oath of office and
issued his first executive order. Its a good one. He directed
every state agency and department to focus on three strategic
priorities:
* strengthening the economy;
* making Vermont more affordable;
* And protecting the most vulnerable.
Thats exactly what cutting carbon pollution would do.
The nations and states that price carbon emissions in order
to reduce pollution have stronger economies than their neighbors that dont.
Since Californias carbon pricing program went into effect
in January 2013, the state has created over 1.5 million new
jobs. Thats twice as many new jobs in California as there are
people in Vermont.
In British Columbia, Canada, the center-right political
party passed North Americas first carbon pollution tax in
2008, and growth in British Columbias gross provincial
product has outpaced every other Canadian province the last
three years running. The model has been so successful that
all of Canada will implement a
carbon price next year.
Denmark, Sweden, Norway,
the UK and many more price
carbon pollution and all have
vibrant economies.
But its not just distant states
and countries that price carbon
pollution.
Vermont has a carbon pollution
price. Thanks to Gov. Jim Douglas
leadership joining the Regional
Greenhouse Gas Initiative,
Vermont has charged for carbon
pollution emitted from electricity
generation since 2008. In that
time, RGGI states have seen 3.6%
more economic growth than states
outside the compact.
Carbon pricing also makes
Vermont more affordable.
When it comes to energy, we
have to acknowledge that fossil
fuels make Vermont more expensive.
As the Vermont
Comprehensive Energy Plan
notes, All petroleum products consumed in Vermont are
imported; the state has no known petroleum reserves. In
2013, the state spent nearly $2.3 billion annually about 8%
of Vermonts GDP on petroleum products that are extracted and refined elsewhere. this is a significant flow of financial resources away from the states economy.
Carbon pricing helps reverse the economic drain fossil
fuels cost Vermont, incentivize locally-generated clean energy and spur job creation and jobs are essential to affordability.
Vermonts energy efficiency programs funded by RGGI
will save Vermonters at least $100 million in energy bills.
Our utilities have largely made the transition to low-carbon
energy while holding rates steady. Residential electric rates in
Vermont are among the lowest in the northeast and lower than

all of our neighboring states.


And RGGI is spurring demand for renewable power in
southern New England, which will benefit Vermonters in the
years ahead. Payments from the Clean Power Link project
that will carry renewable energy from Canada to points south
will start in 2018 and add up to over $400 million over the
next 40 years. These funds will keep electric rates down and
help clean up Lake Champlain.
Finally, carbon pricing, done right, protects and prioritizes
the most vulnerable.
The current situation, where many low-income Vermonters
are dependent on fossil fuels for heating and transportation, is
terribly regressive.
On average, low-income Vermonters use less energy -because many drive smaller cars, dont drive lots of discretionary miles, have smaller homes to heat and keep the thermostat down but they pay a higher percentage of their
income on energy than wealthy Vermonters.
A Vermont Law School study released in 2013 found that
the 10% of Vermonters with the lowest household incomes
spend $2,431 on energy a year or 27.7% of their annual
income. The top 10% spend
$4,042 on energy, but because
their household incomes are so
much higher their energy burden is just 1.9% of their
income.
As Governor Scott knows
from his leadership launching
Wheels for Warmth, when the
energy burden is 15 times higher for some Vermonters than
others it is a huge roadblock for
those working to escape poverty.
Carbon pricing can help
bridge that gap, because it can
fund much-needed low-income
weatherization, public transportation, and the transition to
lower cost, low-carbon solutions for home heating and
transportation.
As Governor Scott noted in
his inaugural address, Doing
things the way weve always
done them and hoping for a different result, will not bring about the change we need. True.
And, If we want a system that draws people to Vermont, we
cant be paralyzed by fear of change. True again. Those
sentiments are a good place to start.
Energy Independent Vermont looks forward to working
with Governor Scott, the General Assembly, and all Vermonters
to build on those sentiments and find new ways to clean our
environment, strengthen our economy, make our state more
affordable, and protect the most vulnerable Vermonters.
Tom Hughes is the campaign director of Energy Independent
Vermont a coalition of Vermont businesses, non-profits,
low-income service providers, students, clergy and academics
working together to price carbon pollution and strengthen the
Vermont economy.

All petroleum products


consumed in Vermont are
imported; the state has no
known petroleum reserves.
In 2013, the state spent
nearly $2.3 billion annually
about 8% of Vermonts
GDP on petroleum
products that are extracted
and refined elsewhere. this
is a significant flow of
financial resources away
from the states economy.

Central Vermont RPC Seeks Transportation


Planning and Study Ideas

The public is invited to offer suggestions to the Central


Vermont Regional Planning Commission (CVRPC) for transportation planning projects that would benefit Washington
County and the towns of Orange, Washington, and
Williamstown. Help us make getting around easier, safer, and
more convenient for everyone by contributing your transportation planning and study ideas.
CVRPC will complete up to $70,000 in transportation special projects and studies using funding from the Vermont
Agency of Transportations Transportation Planning Initiative.
We would appreciate your ideas for projects that would benefit Central Vermont. While our funds cannot be used for
construction, our planning helps shape projects for future
construction.
Projects might benefit any transportation system, such as
rail, transit, aviation, roads, bicycle or pedestrian. Ideas can
vary from specific intersection improvements to multi-town
road improvement plans to applying green infrastructure to
neighborhood streets.
Project ideas should be submitted in writing to Bonnie

Waninger, Executive Director, Waninger@cvregion.com, by


January 27, 2017. Please describe the type and location of the
project. Residents are strongly encouraged to discuss project
ideas with their municipal staff and officials as local support
and involvement are typically required for a project. Projects
will be reviewed and prioritized by CVRPCs Transportation
Advisory Committee.
The CVRPC provides planning and technical assistance
in the areas of community development, transportation,
natural resources, housing, economic development, and
emergency management to 23 municipalities in Central
Vermont, including all of Washington County and Orange,
Washington, and Williamstown in Orange County. The
collaboration between CVRPC, Central Vermont municipalities, and other related resource agencies results in the
development and implementation of plans that support
sustainable development and improve the regions economy, environment, and quality of life. For more information
about the CVRPC, please visit www.centralvtplanning.
org.

Yes! WE DOoo
Diagnostic Work!
Along with most all automotive maintenance services

Senior Citizens

10% OFF All Parts

MORE THAN JUST A MUFFLER SHOP

MU F F L E R
& R E PA I R
COLES802-479-0230

71 MAIN ST, BARRE, VT

THANK YOU FOR SAYING


I SAW IT IN
SUPERIOR COURT
WASHINGTON UNIT

STATE OF VERMONT
CIVIL DIVISION
Docket Number 456-7-15 Wncv

VERMONT HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY,


Plaintiff
v.
PAMELA SLAYTON
F/K/A PAMELA BANKS,
SIDNEY SLAYTON, III
DOWNSTREET HOUSING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, INC.
F/K/A CENTRAL VERMONT COMMUNITY LAND TRUST, INC., AND
VERMONT HOUSING AND CONSERVATION BOARD
Defendants
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
By virtue of the Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure by Judicial Sale
(Foreclosure Judgment) filed May 27, 2016 and the Power of Sale contained in
a certain mortgage granted by Pamela Slayton, f/k/a Pamela Banks and Sidney
Slayton III (Mortgagor), to Northfield Savings Bank dated September 18, 1996
and recorded in Book 144 at Pages 802-808 of the Town of Barre Land Records,
of which mortgage Vermont Housing Finance Agency is the present holder under
an Assignment of Mortgage dated December 10, 1996 of record in Book 145 at
Page 485 of the Town of Barre Land Records, for breach of the conditions of the
mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same, the undersigned will cause
to be sold at public auction (Sale) at 11:00 AM on February 8, 2017, the premises
known as 310 Middle Road, Graniteville, Vermont (Mortgaged Property) more
particularly described as follows:
Being all and the same premises, consisting of the Improvements only,
conveyed to Sidney Slayton, III and Pamela Banks, as joint tenants with right
of survivorship, by warranty deed of the Central Vermont Community Land
Trust, Inc., dated September 18, 1996 and recorded in Book 144 at Pages
782-784 of the Town of Barre, Vermont Land Records.
Being all and the same premises conveyed to the Central Vermont Community
Land Trust, Inc. by warranty deed of Donald P. Benway and Denise M. Benway,
dated September 18, 1996 and recorded in Book 144 at Page 778-779 of the
Town of Barre, Vermont Land Records.
Being part of all and the same land and premises conveyed to Donald P.
Benway and Denise M. Benway by special warranty deed of The Northfield
Savings Bank, dated September 27, 1995 and recorded in Book 141 at
Pages 884-885 of the Town of Barre, Vermont Land Records. Being the
IMPROVEMENTS ONLY situated on land and premises commonly known
and designated as 310 Middle Road in Graniteville (Barre Town} in the County
of Washington and State of Vermont, ownership of the land only, absent
buildings situated thereon, having been severed from the improvements and
conveyed to the Central Vermont Community Land Trust, Inc. by warranty
deed of Donald P. Benway and Denise M. Benway, dated September 27, 1995
and recorded in Book 141 at Pages 900-901 of the Town of Barre, Vermont
Land Records.
Also conveyed hereby is all of the Mortgagors right, title and interest in and
to a certain 99 year Central Vermont Community Land Trust Single Family
Ground Lease by and between the Central Vermont Community Land Trust,
Inc., Lessor, and Sidney Slayton, III and Pamela Banks, Lessees, a synopsis
of which, entitled Short Form Ground Lease, was executed on September
18, 1996 and is recorded in Book 144 at Pages 793-795 of the Town of Barre,
Vermont Land Records.
This conveyance is made subject to Subdivision Permit No. EC-5-1994
recorded at Book 123, Page 514 of the Town of Barre, Vermont Land Records,
Land Use Permit No. 5W1073 recorded at Book 124, Page 974 of the Town
of Barre, Vermont Land Records and to a sewer easement, driveway rights
and a certain reservation of rights as reserved from a warranty deed of Miller
Building Company, Inc. to Brian A. Miller and Robin D. Miller, dated November
1, 1991 and recorded in Book 127 at Pages 224-226 of the Town of Barre,
Vermont land Records.
Reference is made to a Quitclaim Deed from Sidney Slayton III and Pamela
Slayton to Pamela Slayton, f/k/a Pamela Banks, dated June 22, 2004 and of
record in Book 200 at Pages 415-416 of the Town of Barre Land Records.
This conveyance is subject to and with the benefit of any utility easements,
spring rights, easements for ingress and egress, and rights incidental to each
of the same as may appear of record, provided that this paragraph shall not
reinstate any such encumbrances previously extinguished by the Marketable
Record Title Act, Chapter 5, Subchapter 7, Title 27, Vermont Statutes
Annotated.
Reference is hereby made to the above-mentioned instruments, the records
thereof, the references therein made, and their respective records and
references, in further aid of this description.
TERMS OF SALE: The Sale will be held at the Mortgaged Property. The
Mortgaged Property will be sold AS IS, WHERE IS, WITH ALL FAULTS, WITH NO
REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, subject to easements,
rights of way, covenants, permits, reservations and restrictions of record, superior
liens, if any, encumbrances that are not extinguished by the sale, title defects,
environmental hazards, unpaid real estate taxes (delinquent and current, including
penalty and interest), and municipal liens, to the highest bidder.
The successful bidder shall pay a deposit of at least $5,000 of the purchase price
in cash or bank treasurers/cashiers check at the time of Sale. The balance of the
purchase price shall be paid within ten days after entry of a confirmation order.
The successful bidder will be required to sign a purchase and sale contract with
NO CONTINGENCIES except confirmation of the sale by the court. Title will be
transferred by Confirmation Order. The Sale may be postponed one or more times
for a total time of up to thirty (30) days, by announcing the new sale date to those
present at each adjournment or by posting notice at a conspicuous location at the
place of the Sale. Notice of the new sale date shall also be sent by first class mail,
postage prepaid, to the mortgagor at the mortgagors last known address at least
five days before the new sale date.
Other terms to be announced at the Sale or contact the Thomas Hirchak
Company at 1-800-634-7653 or www.thcauction.com.
The Mortgagors, or their personal representatives or assigns, may redeem
the Mortgaged Property at any time prior to the Sale by paying the full amount
due under the mortgage, including post-judgment expenses and the costs and
expenses of sale.
Dated at Cabot, Vermont, this 21st day of December, 2016.
Vermont Housing Finance Agency
By: Steckel Law Office
By:/s/ Susan J. Steckel
By: Susan J. Steckel, Esq.
P. O. Box 247
Marshfield, Vermont 05658-0247
802-563-4400

January 11, 2017

The WORLD

page 13

80TH Birthday
Card Shower
for

George Savigni

January 15
Mail Birthday Wishes To:
George Savigni
P.O. Box 2594
Port Aransas, TX 78373

DONT PUT OFF TIL


TOMORROW WHAT YOU
CAN SELL TODAY!
479-2582
Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753
Central Vermonts Newspaper

CLASSIFIEDS
403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin Barre, Vermont 05641

BIRTH

ANNOUNCEMENTS
The following birth announcements were submitted by Central Vermont Medical Center
on January 5, 2017. Any questions or concerns should be addressed directly to CVMC.

Twins! Justin Jameson Asher Case and Althea B Case, were born on
December 16 to Kayle Case (Shepherd) and Justin Case-Brinkley from
Waterbury.
A girl, Brynie Marie Ruggles, was born on December 16 to Alexis Maxwell
and John Ruggles of W. Topsham.
A boy, Amsden Charles Tabor, was born on December 19 to Lindsay Grant
and Jon Tabor of Woodsville, NH.
A girl, Freya Mairi Rowe Clark, was born on December 20 to Ashley Clark
(Creighton) and Kyle Clark of Berlin.
A boy, Parker John Morey, was born on December 20 to Maureen Morey
(Driscoll) and Richard Morey of Barre City.
A boy, Sutter Willem Miles, was born on December 28 to Cepi and
Matthew Miles of Northfield.

2x4.25

Happy Birthday!
FROM

BARRE-MONTPELIER RD.

Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone
special a Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. Well publish the
names in this space each week. Plus, well draw one (1) winner each week for a FREE
BIRTHDAY CAKE from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Just
send birthday names two (2) weeks prior to birthdate, to: The WORLD, c/o BIRTHDAY
CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your name, address
& phone number for prize notification.

JANUARY 13
Tina Miller, 55, Berlin
Samantha Scribner, 24, Moretown
JANUARY 14
Brandon McLeon, 25, Hardwick
Logan Coon, Williamstown
Beth Hallstrom, 39, Barre

JANUARY 15

John M. Duprey, 21, Randolph


Shawn Kasulka, East Montpelier
Peg Zurla, Mayaez, PR

This Weeks Cake Winner:

On JANUARY 16, COLBY HUDSON


of PLAINFIELD will be 15 YEARS OLD!

et to
s

CAKE WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) at 479-9078 and
ask for Julie Fandino (Bakery Manager) or Beverlee Hutchins (Cake
Decorator) by Thursday, January 12th to arrange for cake pick-up.

after
...

BIRTHDAY DRAWING

PRICE CHOPPER

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD c/o Birthday Cake

403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin


Barre, VT 05641

Open to people of all ages. Just send in the entry blank below, and we will
publish it in this space each week. Plus, we will draw one (1) name each week
for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from the Price Chopper Super Center (Berlin,
VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior
to birthdate. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

BIRTHDATE______________________________
NAME___________________________________
AGE (this birthday)_________________________
ADDRESS________________________________
________________________________________
PHONE__________________________________
page 14

The WORLD

January 11, 2017

Vermont Brewers Association Welcomes 50th Member

The Vermont Brewers Association (VBA) is pleased to


welcome Red Barn Brewing out of Danville, VT as the 50th
member of the Association. In 2016, the VBA welcomed 11
new breweries as members.
After home brewing for a number of years, owners and
brewers Peter McAlenney and Jeremy McMullen and their
wives Judi and Erin, opened their doors to the public in June
of 2016. Their brewery and tasting room was built by the
owners in an 1840s barn. They are currently serving up a
range of beer styles including an IPA, Double IPA, American
Pale Ale, English Ale, a Porter, a Vienna Lager, and a Kolsch.
The brewery currently operates on a 1-barrel system, but has
plans for beer distribution and expanding to brewing on a
5-barrel system.
Owner Peter McAlenney says, Being a part of the VBA

will allow us access to knowledge and experiences from a


group of extremely talented brewers from some of the most
respected breweries in the world. That has significant value,
and we are excited to be included!
VBA Executive Director Melissa Corbin added, We are
thrilled to have Red Barn Brewing as the 50th member of our
Association. They are putting out quality products in a quintessential Vermont location. I look forward to seeing how their
business grows now that they are part of our Brewery
Challenge passport program.
Beer lovers can find Red Barn Brewing at 2170 Oneida Rd
in Danville. The tasting room is open Fridays 5-8 p.m. and
Saturdays 3-7 p.m. For more information, visit redbarnbrewingvt.com.

Vermont Dog Boarding & Behavior Offers


Free Workshop on Dog Behavior

On Saturday and Sunday, January 28 and 29 from 9 a.m. to


4 p.m., Vermont Dog Boarding & Behavior is offering a free
Complicated Canines Workshop to be held at the Hyde Park
VFW Post 7779 and will be taught by Ian Grant.
Dogs can be complicated on many levels and these two
days will help remove the complication that dogs can sometimes create. This will be an interactive workshop with lecture, video, demonstrations, and materials.
The VFW can seat about 300 people. Grant has tried to host
seminars like this in the past, but ended up with little to no
interest because he was charging for it. He hopes that with the
free workshops, at least 100 people will come.
My goal is to educate as many people about dogs as possible and for fewer dogs to show up in shelters, he said. My
Please leave your dogs at home. This workshop is for
hope for this workshop is that dog owners can go home and humans. There will be food available at the VFW.
look at their dogs through a different set of eyes, and to have
To find out more about the workshop please visit www.
the relationship they have always wanted with their dogs.
vermontdogtrainer.com.

SAVE $$$$!

Classified
Deadline Is

Curt's Drop-Off

MONDAY

SATURDAYS

JONES BROS. WAY

near VT Granite Museum &


Faith Community Church
in Barre

3.00

3.25

per 30 gal. and/or


25 lb. rubbish bag
for 2 or more at
a time

per 30 gal. and/or


25 lb. rubbish bag

Free Recycling ~ Limits Apply

See You 7:30AM to 1PM!

Before 10AM

Whoever said being


a parent is easy?
For help call
Circle of ParentsTM
1-800-CHILDREN
1-800-244-5373

Happivyersary
Ann

Dont forget...

7-7 Marti Elliott, Barre


7-9 Pierce Salvas, 32, Barre
1-19 Kevn Sare, 35, Cabot
7-11 Joslyn Richardson, 29,
(no i)
The
WORLD would
VT like to help you wish a
1-25Quarry
TWINSKitchen
Madalyn&&Spirits
Evelynand The Waterbury,
special
couple
a Happy Anniversary.
sendHass,
their 28
name, address & wed7-11Just
Marcus
Gonet,
2, Charlestown,
NH
Rappold,
Plainfield
1-27 anniversary
Caitlyn Couture,
25,Each week7-12
ding
date.
we Emily
publish
the names,
plus well have
7-18 Mike Jacques, So. Barre
Barre
a1-31
monthly
winner for a Gift Certificate for lunch or dinner at The Quarry
Joyce LaMountain (The
Kitchen
Spirits
Barre. No obligation,
8-8 Gary nothing to buy. Just send anPlant&Lady),
84,in
Adamant
8-8 Shirley
Combs, Randolph
1-31 Lindanames
Couture,
niversary
twoBarre
(2) weeks prior
to anniversary
date, to: The WORLD,
8-9 Bob
63,Barre,
Woodstock
1-31
Wayne
Michaud,
69,
c/o HAPPY ANNIVERSARY, 403 U.S.Rt.
302Evans,
- Berlin,
VT 05641. Please
8-16 Charlotte Edwards, Barre
Bristol
provide name, address & phone number
for prize notification.
Town
8-20 Rachel Salvas, 23, Barre
2-1 Nancy Prescott, Barre
8-21 Chriiis
2-6 Bob Edwards, 74
8-24 Terry Spaulding,
2-8 Warren Lanigan
Lewiston, ME
2-12 Joe Richardson,
8-26 Joshua McLeon, 27,
Waterbury
Hartford, CT
2-13 Sandy Salvas, Barre
8-29 Connie Spaulding, Minot,
2-14 Laura Rappold, E.
ME
Montpelier
2-16 Aaron Retherford
9-5 Sally Fontaine, Walden
2-19 Kevin 210
Lawson,
48,
W.
North Main St.
802-479-7002
9-8Barre
Arlo Benjamin
Lefcourt, 7
Topsham
9-15 Deborah Phillips
2-23 Pauline Nelson,
JANUARY
11
9-26
Aeletha
Kelly,
Barre
Waterbury
Jessica McLeon,27
28,YEARS
GAIL
& JERRY
BEAN,9-28
NORTHFIELD,
2-25 Meah
& Mya
Couture, 8,
Hardwick
Barre

Please Send Us Your10-5January


Anniversaries
Lisa Companion,
3-5 Rebecca Lefcourt, 37
Waterbury
Automatically
Registered To Win A
3-17 PatAnd
Wieja,Be
Baltimore,
MD
10-6 Steven Lefcourt, 33,
3-19
RuthCertificate
Weeks, Barre From The
Gift
Quarry Kitchen
& Spirits
Hollywood,
CA
3-22 Nicholas Salvas, 24,
10-18 Kay Santamore,
Barre
Plainfield
3-25 Zarek Michael Gonet, 9,
10-29 Eric Evans, 33,
Charlestown, NH
Proctorsville
4-1 Adam
37 to: The WORLD
MailLefcourt,
this coupon
11-7 Karen Evans, 63,
4-12 Meredith Page, 61,
Plymouth
c/o Happy Anniversary
Croyden, NH
11-15 Jessup
MaxVT
Lefcourt,
4-19 Elliott 403
Ackerman,
U.S. 28,
Rt. 302 - Berlin,
Barre,
056414
11-15
Bobpublish
Spaulding,
Minot,
Just Barre
send in the entry blank below, and we
will
it
in
this
space each week.
ME
4-20 we
Jessie
Phillips,
Plus,
will draw
one 25,
(1) E.
couple each11-19
monthHenry
for a Kasulka,
gift certificate
13, E.from The Quarry
Mplr.
Kitchen & Spirits in Barre. No obligation, nothing
Mplr to buy. Entries must be mailed two
4-21
Kathyprior
Churchill,
61,
(2)
weeks
to anniversary
date. Telephone
to The
WORLD will not be
11-22 Ruthcalls
Pearce,
Chelsea
Woodstock
accepted.
11-23 Jason Lowe, 28, Wby
4-30 Lillian Kasulka, 7, E.
11-28 Neil, 28, Waterbury
Montpelier
4-30 Darlene Callahan, 55,
12-3 Peter Lefcourt, 44, Barre
Barre
12-3 DOT! 64, Calais
12-7 Armour Moodie, 63,
5-6 Gary Villa, Washington
Stannard
5-6 Jim Elliott, 50, Barre
12-14 Jaime Clark, Barre
5-13 Kristen Lee Deleandro,
12-25 Jenna Companion, 19,
28, Mentor, OH
Waterbury Ctr.
5-14 John, Chelsea
12-31 Chelsea Phillips, 29,
5-14 Snook Downing, Chelsea
Manassas, VA
5-20 Bill Boyce, Chelsea
5-20 Mary Lefcourt, Essex Jct.
1-4 Betsy Cody, 61, Barre
5-22 Ruth Madigan P., 73,
1-14 Brandon McLeon, 26,
Bethel
Hardwick
5-27 Candy McLeon, 70,
1-15 Peggy Zurla, 54, Mayaez,
Hardwick
Puerto Rico

THE QUARRY KITCHEN & SPIRITS

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY

ANNIVERSARY
DATE_______________________# YEARS______
NAMES___________________________________
ADDRESS_________________________________
_________________________________________
PHONE___________________________________

Birth Announcement

Loki William Thomas was


born on December 16, 2016
at Fletcher Allen in
Burlington, VT to Joseph
Thomas and Ashley Hedges
of East Montpelier, VT.

ARIES (March 21 to April


19) Your batteries should be
fully recharged by now, making you more than eager to get
back into the swing of things
full time. Try to stay focused so that you dont dissipate
your energies.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Youre eager to charge
straight ahead into your new responsibilities. But youll
have to paw the ground a little longer, until a surprise complication is worked out.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Rival factions are pressuring
you to take a stand favoring one side or the other. But this
isnt the time to play judge. Bow out as gracefully as possible, without committing yourself to any position.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Reassure a longtime, trusted
condante that you appreciate his or her words of advice.
But at this time, you need to act on what you perceive to be
your own sense of self-interest.
LEO (July 23 to August 22) You need to let your warm
Leonine heart re up that new relationship if you hope to
see it move from the just friends level to one that will be
as romantic as you could hope for.
VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Theres still time to
repair a misunderstanding with an honest explanation and
a heartfelt
apology.
The2.7
sooner
do, theSt.
sooner
you can
On County
Rd.
milesyou
up Main
Montpelier
get on with other matters.
Open Every Day 223-2740
LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Expect a temporary
setback as you progress toward your goal. Use this time to
re-examine your plans and see where you might need to
make some signicant changes.
SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Some missteps
LAST
WEEK
OFofTHE
are
revealed
as the cause
current problems in a personal
orMONTH:
professional partnership. Make the necessary adjustments and then move on.
LUCKY WINNING COUPLE
SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Jupiters
inuence helps youFOR
workTHIS
throughMONTH:
a pesky problem, allowDECEMBER
ROBERT
& GINGER
BEAUREGARD
ingOnyour
naturally 30,
jovial
attitude
to re-emerge
stronger
WORCESTER
thanofever.
Enjoy your celebrate
success. their 35th ANNIVERSARY!
CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Set aside your
usual reluctance to change, and consider reassessing your
nancial situation so that you can build on its strengths and
minimize its weaknesses.
AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Some recently
acquired information helps open up a dark part of the past.
Resolve to put what youve learned to good use. Travel
plans continue to be favored.
PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Act on your own keen
instincts. Your strong Piscean backbone will support you
as someone attempts to pressure you into a decision youre
not ready to make.
BORN THIS WEEK: You embody a love for traditional
values combined with an appreciation of whats new and
challenging. (c) 2017 King Features Synd., Inc.

Red Cross Issues an Emergency Call for Blood and


Platelet Donations during Severe Winter Blood Shortage

The American Red Cross has a severe winter blood shortage and is issuing an emergency call for blood and platelet
donors to make a donation appointment now and help save
patient lives.
Hectic holiday schedules for many regular blood donors
contributed to about 37,000 fewer donations in November and
December than what was needed. Snowstorms and severe
weather have also impacted donations. Nearly 100 blood
drives were forced to cancel in December, resulting in more
than 3,100 blood donations going uncollected.
Blood and platelet donations are critically needed in the
coming days so that patients can continue to receive the lifesaving treatments they are counting on, said Mary Brant,
external communications manager for the Northern New
England Region. We encourage donors to invite a family
member or friend to donate with them to help meet patient
needs. Right now, blood and platelet donations are being distributed to hospitals faster than they are coming in.
How to help
Find a blood donation opportunity and schedule an appointment to donate by using the free Blood Donor App, visiting
redcrossblood.org or calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-7332767). The Red Cross is extending hours at many donation
sites for more donors to give blood or platelets. Overall, the

Red Cross has added nearly 200 hours to blood donation centers and community blood drives across the country over the
next few weeks. Donation appointments and completion of a
RapidPass online health history questionnaire are encouraged
to help speed up the donation process.
In about an hour, you can help save someones life. This
simple act can have a profound impact on another human
being, said Brant.
Who blood donations help
Every two seconds, someone in the U.S. needs blood.
Accident and burn victims, heart surgery and organ transplant
patients, and patients receiving treatment for leukemia, cancer
or sickle cell disease may all require blood to save their
lives.
The treatments high school freshman Payton Kannarr
receives to fight leukemia cause her blood counts to drop. She
currently receives platelet transfusions weekly and red blood
cells about every two weeks.
We have seen firsthand the incredible need for blood products as we have been on this four-year roller coaster journey,
said Amy Kannarr, Paytons mom. Through the care and
compassion of donors, Payton has been able to enjoy life as a
teenager.

Lifesaving Facts about Teen Suicide

Parents have been asking me


some tough questions recently
about their teenagers being stressed
to the point that they might try to
hurt themselves or even try to commit suicide. Rather than stress out
parents on a topic few people want
to discuss, let me try to provide
some helpful information.
It is important for parents to be aware that
suicide is now the second leading cause of
death for 15- to 24-year-olds (surpassed by
accidents). The risk of teen suicide is 4 to 10
times higher if teens have access to firearms
in the home.
So who is at risk for thinking about suicide? Usually its the teen who feels disconnected and isolated from family and friends,
or who might have an underlying and undetected psychological disorder like depression.
Often a stressful event such as failure at
school, a breakup with a boyfriend or girlfriend, or a major family conflict can trigger
thoughts of suicide in a teen.
So what can parents do?
First, be aware of some warning signs,
such as when your teen appears to pull away
from family and friends, is no longer eating or
sleeping well, and suddenly starts showing
signs of self-destructive behavior like drinking and taking drugs, especially when they
have never done this type of behavior before.
If you do see any of these signs in your

teen, dont be afraid to use the


word suicide in a conversation with
your teen, since getting the word
out in the open may help your teenager understand that someone has
heard his or her cries for help. This
does not plant the idea into their
head, but enables you to get them
help before something bad happens.
There is also a national suicide hotline
number, 1-800-SUICIDE, that can help get
your teen the emergency help they need. Of
course, your older child or teens health care
professional is always poised to help if you
are worried about your teen thinking about
suicide. If you do own a gun and think your
teen is depressed or having mood swings,
store your gun outside your home for the time
being until your teen gets the help he or she
needs.
While suicide prevention is not an easy
topic to think about, hopefully raising your
awareness about this topic may allow you to
be a lifesaver for someone you love.
Lewis First, MD, is chief of Pediatrics at
The University of Vermont Childrens Hospital
and chair of the Department of Pediatrics at
the University of Vermont College of Medicine.
You can also catch First with Kids weekly
on WOKO 98.9FM and WPTZ Channel 5, or
visit the First with Kids video archives at
w w w. U V M H e a l t h . o r g / M e d C e n t e r
FirstWithKids.

The Yankee Chef

TM

My name is James Bailey and I AM THE YANKEE CHEF! I have been cooking since the
age of 14 years, when my Dad opened his third restaurant in Maine. I currently write
food columns for several New England newspapers, The Maine Edge (found online at
themaineedge.com) and the Villager Newspaper (found online at villagernewspaper.
net). I have written several cookbooks and I blog at theyankeechef.blogspot.com. Find
me on Twitter and check out my youtube videos. I am also a Yankee Food Historian and
a professional genealogist. Visit my website at www.theyankeechef.com

NutellaTM Cookie
Crunch Cake

I am hesitant about using the name Nutella


because it IS a brand, and with all the issues
that I faced about registering The Yankee Chef,
it simply rubs me the wrong way. But one taste
of that deliciously creamy spread and I was
hooked. It wasnt long before I made one of the
best coffeecake-like desserts using this hazelnut
spread. This recipe is a sugar cookie dough with
an additional egg. You will adore the crispy
topping, as will the super easy preparation.
Cake:
Nonstick cooking spray
1 stick(1/2-cup) butter or margarine,
softened
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla
1 cup our
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 cup hazelnut spread
Topping:
3 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon melted butter or margarine
Nutella Cookie Crunch Cake Directions
Grease a 9-inch cake pan with nonstick cooking
spray; set aside. Preheat oven to 350-degrees F.
In a large bowl, beat butter and sugar until very
smooth with an electric mixer. Add eggs and
vanilla, continuing to beat until smooth once
again.

AFSP Support
Group Update

The American Foundation


of Suicide Prevention sponsors a number of support
groups across Vermont for
survivors of suicide loss.
Starting this year, the location
of the local group has
changed. The Central Vermont
Survivors of Suicide Loss
chapter now meets, for 90
minutes, at the Central
Vermont Medical Center,
downstairs in conference
room #3 instead of conference room #1. The meetings
take place on the third
Tuesday of the month at 6
p.m. All survivors of suicide
loss are encouraged to come,
listen, and share. Folks seeking further information can
call Bill Kelly at 223-0924.

call 1-800-439-5996 or visit

DOWNLOAD OUR APP!


World Publications

FREE

9th Chakra Activation Technique Workshop:

Healing Arts Questions and Answers


January 16th, 2017 4-6 pm
at Many Words Herbs in the First In Fitness Building
Do you have neck, back, hips, knees, ankles, arms and joint pain?
Does any of your joints become frozen? Do you have swelling,
pinched nerves, bulging disks? Do you suffer from planters
fasciitis? Do suffer from anxiety or a sensitive stomach? Do
you have TMJ or jaw pressure? Have you every suffered from
concussion or head trauma? Are your leg lengths different?

If you answered yes to any of those questions than this


workshop may be for you.
We will be talking about the 9th Chakra Activation Technique. Because this is a
new/ancient technique I will be answering questions like what exactly is the 9th
Chakra Activation Technique. Is it Spiritual? Is it Reiki? Is it physical? Is there
science behind it? How can it help you in your healing?
Also, Carey Kimball from Professional Massage and Skin Care Studio will be
on locations offering 10-15 minute chair massages by donation.

In another bowl, blend the our with the baking


powder and baking soda. Add to butter mixture
and beat until well mixed. It will be thick.
Transfer dough to prepared cake pan.
Microwave hazelnut spread for about 30 seconds,
removing to stir until creamy and thinned out. If
more time is needed for it to completely melt,
heat in 15 second increments.
Heavily drizzle over the top, running a butter
knife into the batter, creating a somewhat
marbling effect and slightly combining the
nutella with batter.
Meanwhile for the topping, mix sugar, cinnamon
and melted butter with a fork until evenly
blended. Sprinkle over the top of the cake and
bake 24 minutes. The center will feel very
doughy and undone, but that is the effect we
want.
Remove from oven to cool before serving. Add
additional melted hazelnut spread over the top
if desired.

You and your friends are invited to come and learn more about this ancient
technique. This is a free workshop. All who attend will receive a $100 discount
for them and loved one. Plus I will be drawing a lucky winner to receive the 9th
Chakra Activation Technique for FREE!
Please come and join Carey & myself for a night of massage and a chance to
WIN a free 9th Chakra Treatment.

Therapeutic Practice & Apothecary


Rosalene Bussiere, Certified in Herbalism & Reiki III
652 Granger Rd., Berlin, VT 05641

802-793-9371 manywordsherbs1.weebly.com
January 11, 2017

The WORLD

page 15

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE WORLD | JANUARY 2017

Healthy
New
Year
Tips For Your
Resolution To Get Fit

FOTOLIA

Best Of 2016: Four Major Stories Youll Want To Remember In 2017

ur feature articles usually go into


depth about issues youve told
us are of primary importance to
you. Thats why weve chosen a
quick review of four popular features as we
head into 2017: Keeping Lost Weight Lost!
Discovering Foods Hidden Superpowers!
Amping Up Sperm Potency! Redefining
Addiction!

NO. 1: KEEPING LOST WEIGHT LOST


Recent studies on metabolism and weight loss could help you succeed at a task thats even tougher than losing weight: keeping it off.
Heres what to do:
Pamper muscle mass: The smart move is to lose weight slowly,
preserving more muscle mass than extreme weight-loss programs
allow.
Feed and flex your muscles: As youre losing weight and afterward, build muscle with strength training two to three days weekly,
and eat enough protein to feed those lean, sexy muscles. (If you
dont, youll gain weight unless you slash calories.)
Give yourself a year to let your new weight become your new
normal: A University of Copenhagen study found that levels of the
feed me! hormone ghrelin rise during weight loss, but normalize
about a year later.
NO. 2: DISCOVERING FOODS HIDDEN SUPERPOWERS
You know fruits and veggies are good for you, but did you remember that they can convey these benefits?
They help you breathe easy: In one study, 68 percent of folks who
ate 17.5 grams of fiber or more daily had normal lung function compared to just 50 percent of those who got 10 grams of fiber or less!
Stay slim: A Harvard study found that eating more fruits and veg-

gies (blueberries, pears and peppers) rich in plant compounds called


flavonoids makes you less likely to gain weight.
Feed good gut bugs: Spinach, kale, lettuce and collards feed goodfor-you intestinal bacteria that keep your digestive system healthy
and help shut out bad bacteria.
NO. 3: AMPING UP SPERM POTENCY
A Harris Poll revealed that two out of three men dont do much
to support healthy male fertility. For those couples wanting to start a
family, heres how to increase your chances.
Wear boxers during the day, sleep naked at night: In a yearlong
study, guys who did that had 25 percent less DNA damage to their
sperm than men who wore snug briefs around the clock.
Use a mineral-based zinc or titanium-dioxide sunscreen: Other
ingredients found in sunscreens (such as avobenzone, homosalate,
octinoxate and more) may impair sperms ability to fertilize a human
egg!
Up the vites: Protect yourself by taking a daily multivitamin
several months before you two try to conceive. DHA omega-3 (900

mg daily) is important for both of you.


Relax: According to a Rutgers University study, feeling stressed
out could reduce sperm concentration and leave more sperm deformed or unable to complete their great race to the egg.
Skip the drinks and smokes: Tobacco use can slash sperm count.
And having more than one drink per day could mess with the shape
of sperm.
Move it: Getting plenty of vigorous exercise could increase sperm
counts by as much as 73 (thats right, 73) percent!
NO. 4: REDEFINING ADDICTION
Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon Generals Report on
Alcohol, Drugs and Health stresses that too many people consider
addiction a moral failing, when in reality its a chronic disease of the
brain.
Attitude adjustment: If you know someone struggling with addiction, its important to tell them and yourself: Its not something to
be ashamed of. Its a disease like any other, and it can be treated.
Help your kids dodge the threat: To help your children understand
the dangers of recreational drugs, The Dr. Oz Show worked with
the governments Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services
Administration to create a guide based on the findings of the Surgeon
Generals report, called Facing Addiction Over Dinner. It takes
the leading science on what causes addiction and how to prevent and
treat it, and puts it into a format that can help you turn this knowledge into action in your own dining room! Download it for free at:
www.doctoroz.com/page/facing-addiction-discussion-guide.
***
Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of The Dr. Oz Show, and Mike Roizen,
M.D. is Chief Wellness Officer and Chair of Wellness Institute at
Cleveland Clinic. To live your healthiest, tune into The Dr. Oz
Show or visit www.sharecare.com.
(c) 2017 Michael Roizen, M.D. and Mehmet Oz, M.D.
Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
January 11, 2017

The WORLD

page 17

HEALTHY NEW YEAR | HEALTHY GOALS

Get Fit

reating a health-inspired resolution for


the New Year is a great way to start on
a positive note. A reasonable place to start is
by promising yourself to get fit this year.
Maybe you overindulged
during the holiday season or
have been meaning to get in
shape for some time. Either
way, the New Year is a great
time to improve your
health-related decision-making. Join millions of
Americans this year and create a resolution that will benefit your health and put you
on the path to sustainable
well-being.

value for the membership


that fits your needs. Most
gyms offer reduced fees if you
purchase annually rather
than monthly.
Putting up a good chunk of
change at once could be a
good way to ensure that you
will stay with your new gym
commitment as the weather
warms.

CONSULT WITH A
DOCTOR

Getting fit will benefit you


physically and mentally. Once
you get in a solid rhythm in
your new, active lifestyle, you
will notice a higher level of
endurance, which makes
exercise easier to complete.
You also will notice higher
self-esteem. Regular physical
activity has been proven to
improve your confidence,
especially when it is associated with more energy and
accelerated weight loss.
Exercise will increase the
number of calories you are
able to burn and will raise
your resting metabolism. That
means youre even burning
calories while you rest. There
also are great improvements
going on inside your body.
Although you may not be able
to physically see the changes,
regular exercise is reducing
your blood pressure and risk
of heart disease.

This may seem a little


counter intuitive. After all,
youre planning to begin an
exercise and diet program so
you can avoid trips to the
doctor. This is a crucial step,
however, as certain conditions can be aggravated by
strenuous activity such as
exercise.
Before you begin a new
exercise or diet program, The
Mayo Clinic recommends
consulting with your doctor
to check for signs of heart disease, diabetes or even arthritis. People with these conditions may need to follow a
special exercise program.

JOIN A GYM
The beginning of the year is
a good time to begin a new
gym membership. Check with
local gyms to find the best

HEALTH BENEFITS
OF GETTING FIT

FOTOLIA

All-New HealthVermont.gov Website Goes Public

fter 12 months of preparation,


the Vermont Department of
Health today launched a newly
redesigned and reorganized
website at healthvermont.gov.

81 River Street, Suite 201, Montpelier


(802) 262-1500
Movement heals.
So does laughter, compassion,
and guided knowledgeable instruction.

www.essentialptp.com
page 18

The WORLD

January 11, 2017

Its our mission to protect and promote the best health for
all Vermonters, and our website supports every aspect of our
work, said Health Commissioner Harry Chen, MD. But for
the needs of 21st Century users, our 3,000-plus page website
was no longer ready for prime time. It had grown old and
outdated, difficult to manage, difficult to navigate, and was
not mobile-friendly. This effort was a year-long labor of love
for all of us here at the Health Department. Im very excited
about it.
The new website includes responsive design for mobile
and tablet users, and features intelligent navigation offering
visitors several ways to find information. Much like a shopping site, healthvermont.gov will serve up related content to
users that they might not have thought to check out. Content
is categorized and tagged in a way that collects relevant
information from across subject areas, and presents it in an
easy to find format.
On the home page, the left-hand navigation bar prominently displays content organized into 13 subject areas from Alcohol and Drug Abuse, to Public Health Laboratory, to News
and Information Resources. The top navigation bar has links
to Get Help Now information lines, a powerful search engine, websites and alerts, as well as the departments Twitter
feed. Other features of the new site include an audio/visual

library, easily accessible resources translated in a number of


languages, and Performance Scorecards to see how well the
department is doing to meet its public health goals.
Visitors to the home page will quickly see feature items
like January is Radon Action Month, popular topics, upcoming events, and Interest Groups. Interest Groups are another way people can explore content relevant to the interests
of parents, youth, older adults, LGBTQ, town health officers
and local officials, caregivers, new arrivals to Vermont...and
more. Health professionals will find easier access to the tools,
registries and information needed to support top-level care.
While most of our content and documents have been
migrated into the new system, the site is an ongoing work
in progress, said Dr. Chen. Visitors will find the pages
continue to build content over the coming days and weeks,
as we streamline information and enliven our website with
photos of public health in action. We welcome comments and
feedback about how the site is working for you just go to
Contact Us and send us an email.

HEALTHY NEW YEAR | MENTAL HEALTH

Reconnect With Family


M

any families fall victim to lifes busy requirements. Some use an eventful
lifestyle as an excuse for not being seriously active in their familys lives.
This year, make a resolution to make your family stronger by reconnecting.

Having tension within your


family can lead to disorders
such as anxiety or depression.
It is important to stay close
with your family members
even if the situation causes discomfort.

SIGNS OF MENTAL HEALTH


DISORDERS
The National Alliance on
Mental Illness reports that 43.8
million adults in America will
suffer from some form of mental illness each year. Here are
some warning signs the organization reports could be connected to mental health issues:
Suddenly becoming high
risk and making out-of-control
decisions;
Significant changes in
weight (large gains or losses);
Excessive use of drugs or
alcohol; and
Sad or unmotivated feelings that last longer than two
weeks.
If you notice any of these
warning signs, contact your
doctor and discuss your feelings and concerns about mental health.

FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS
Having a strong family bond
will lower your risk of mental
illnesses. A robust relationship
gives you a sense of belonging
and purpose and will even
boost your confidence and
lower stress.
It may seem like a challenge

FOTOLIA

to reconnect with family members with whom you have lost


touch. Be it due to disagreements, long distances or even
just disconnecting due to a
busy schedule, rebuilding your

relationship will give you a


sense of contentment and happiness. Strong family bonds
can even cause an improvement in blood pressure and
increase life expectancy.

REBUILDING THE BOND


To rebuild a relationship
with a family member, it is
crucial that both parties are
on board with reconnecting.
If the feeling and effort is

mutual, participating in short,


direct conversations can be a
great start. Once you regain
familiarity and trust, longer
conversations will soon follow.

Caring for your kids after that


moment of Look Mom, no hands!
For all your health care needs,
theres a Gifford clinic near you.
Gifford Health Center at Berlin, Berlin.... 229-2325
(specialty care, physical therapy, radiology)

Gifford Health Center at Berlin, Berlin.... 224-3200

(primary care, behavioral health)

Gifford Primary Care, Randolph ................. 728-7000


(family/internal medicine, ob/gyn-midwifery, pediatrics)
Gifford Specialty Care, Randolph .............. 728-2430
(general surgery, neurology, orthopedics, podiatry,
urology)

Learn more:
www.GiffordHealthCare.org

Gifford Health Care


Caring for you... for life.
January 11, 2017

The WORLD

page 19

HEALTHY NEW YEAR | STAY ON TRACK

Tips for realizing goals in the year ahead

he dawn of a new year represents


a chance to start anew and set
goals for the months ahead. New
Years resolutions are often made
to provide the motivation people need to
improve their lives and make a new year as
productive and happy as possible.
While people who make New Years resolutions
fully intend to realize those goals, few actually stick to
the game plan. According to researchers at the University of Scranton, just 8 percent of people who make
their New Years resolutions actually achieve those
resolutions. While that might make it seem like the
odds are against men and women who have resolved to
improve their lives in the year ahead, the following tips
can help adults realize their goals for the new year and
beyond.
Emphasize time management. Hectic schedules
can quickly derail resolutions. Many people want to
eat healthier and exercise more but find their time is
stretched pretty thin, which can make it difficult to get
to the gym or prepare healthy meals at home. Finding ways to manage time more effectively can make
it easier to stay committed to New Years resolutions.
Right down your daily schedule and look for ways to
free up time. If you routinely take an hour for lunch
each day, use that time to exercise and eat at your desk
when you return from your walk, workout or jog. Try
to wake up 30 to 60 minutes earlier each morning to
exercise, and make use of time before bed by preparing
a healthy lunch for the following day.
Make your goals public. By publicly declaring your
intention to improve your life, youre putting some
positive pressure on yourself to fully commit to your
goal. Friends and loved ones can be great sources of
support, and once theyre aware of your efforts, you
likely wont want to let them down. Once you have
decided on a resolution, post your short-term and
long-term goals to your Facebook page or let your immediate family and closest friends know of your goals
in person. Their encouragement can help you stay on
track, and they may even offer to help you realize your
goals.
Keep track of your progress. Keep a resolutions

journal or start a blog that allows you to write about


your efforts. If your goal is to pay down debt, make
a spreadsheet that tracks your progress. That spreadsheet might be more motivational than simply seeing
a loan or credit card balance gradually reduce on your
monthly statement. Writing about your trials and errors
can help others and also provide a great way for you to
explore your approach and tinker with it to ensure your
ultimate success.
Expect setbacks. If realizing resolutions was easy,
the success rate would be greater than 8 percent. Setbacks are inevitable, so dont allow them to derail your

efforts. Even if setbacks occur when youre well on


your way to success, regroup and get back on track
without getting down on yourself.
Reward yourself. Dont hesitate to reward
yourself as you realize your short-term goals and
draw closer to making your long-term goal a reality.
For example, if weight loss is your goal and youve
adhered to your diet and lost some weight, reward
yourself with a favorite meal eaten in moderation.
New Years resolutions may be difficult to realize,
but a few simple strategies can help you achieve your
goals and enjoy the fruits of your hard work.

How to adjust to a healthier diet

hange often requires an adjustment period. Men and women


who switch jobs may need a few weeks before they feel fully
comfortable in a new office, while students changing schools
may also need some time to adapt to their new surroundings.

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The WORLD

January 11, 2017

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An adjustment period is also common


when people decide to adopt healthier diets.
Diet is often habit-forming, and men and
women will need some time to adjust as
they kick some bad dietary habits in favor
of healthier fare. The following are some
simple ways to make that adjustment period
a little easier to swallow.
Go slowly. Some people are capable of
going cold turkey when adjusting to a new
diet, while others must take a more gradual
approach. Unless a health condition that
requires immediate change is driving your
dietary changes, take things slowly so your
body acclimates to its new diet over time.
Such an approach may make your efforts
more successful over the long haul than
making more sudden, drastic changes.
Explain your motivation to loved ones.
Adults, especially married men and women
and parents, may find adjusting to a new diet
especially difficult unless their spouses and/
or families are making similar adjustments.
If you are the only member of your household who will be adjusting to a new diet,
explain your efforts and motivation to your
loved ones. Such an explanation will make
them less likely to bring unhealthy foods
into your home.

Embrace positive results, even if they are


initially underwhelming. Just because you
have adopted a new diet does not mean you
will see immediate results. Fad diets meant
to last just a few weeks may produce immediate results, but such results likely will not
withstand the test of time, and you may even
gain weight when you revert to some of your
old eating habits. The right diet will produce
long-lasting results, but you must allow for
some time before such diets lead to significant weight loss. In the meantime, place
more emphasis on how you feel than the
figure that shows up on your bathroom scale
each morning. Upon adopting a healthier
diet, you will start to notice how much better
you feel than you felt when eating a diet
filled with fatty, unhealthy foods.
Dont give up. Your adjustment period
will require some discipline, and there may
be moments when you backslide into bad
habits. If that happens, dont allow it to derail all of the progress you have made since
switching to a healthier diet. Just accept that
you had a setback and resolve to do your
best to avoid having another one. The sooner
you get back on a healthier track, the better
you will feel.

HEALTHY NEW YEAR | BREAKING BAD HABITS

Quit Smoking
E

ach year more


than 160 million
Americans make
New Years
resolutions. The
American Lung
Association reports
that quitting
smoking is the most
common resolution.
And according to the
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, there are 50
million more former smokers
than current smokers. Those
successful quitters have utilized high levels of determination and developed a quit plan
to kick the habit. Engage in
some of these helpful tips to be
smoke-free for the New Year.

EFFECTIVE QUIT PLAN


Many smokers who decide
to use the cold turkey method
giving up cigarettes all at
once often fail. Quitting
cold turkey will cause nicotine
withdrawal symptoms that
may include insomnia, irritability, poor concentration and
headaches.
If you think these withdrawals are too much for you, there
are still effective ways to go
about quitting. According to
the CDC, a quit plan should
include:
Picking a quit date. Plan to
cut down on your level of nicotine so you can meet your goal.

FOTOLIA

A support group. Telling


family and friends about your
decision will give them reason
to help keep you motivated.
A list of reasons. Make a
physical list of the reasons you
want to quit smoking. Put this
list in places where you tend to
smoke more.

FREE RESOURCES
A support system is crucial

in a fight against nicotine withdrawal. The CDC has listed a


few helpful resources to use
when youre up against a craving. 1-800-QUIT-NOW is a
great service to offer coaching,
assist in a quit plan and provide you educational materials.
Smokefree TXT is a text message service that will give you
advice and motivation. Get in
the habit of sending this ser-

Aging with

ve received inquiries regarding how to


know when youre loved one should go
into a long term care facility, instead of
being cared for at home. There are many
deciding factors in making this decision, many
of which depend on what the situation is.
Below are a couple of the emails/letters, I
recently received followed by some suggestions/recommendations:
Dear Grace,
Im caring for my husband who had a stroke several years
ago. He was left with some loss of function on his right side
and has difficulty talking. Ive noticed recently that he is
falling more often and I dont feel I can keep him safe any
longer. I feel guilty for even asking this but Im wondering
if he would be better cared for in a nursing home. How do I
make that decision?
Any advice would be helpful,
Cara
Dear Grace,
My mother has Alzheimers. Im the main caregiver and
she is currently living with me and my family. How do I
know when her care is beyond my ability?
Thanks,
Sherri

vice a text when you feel a


craving come on.

MEDICAL ASSISTANCE

There are many different


medications available to assist
in quitting smoking. The downside to some over-the-counter
medicines is that you will still
rely on nicotine. Products such
as patches or gums will release
levels of nicotine in your
bloodstream to relieve the

race

Dear Cara & Sherri,


Making this decision is extremely challenging and complex. My first recommendation is that you reach out to family, friends and your loved ones health care team to assist
you in the process. You dont have to navigate this territory
alone. Below are some questions that may help guide you in
this process and help you to realistically assess how the home
situation is working.
Is your loved ones health stable?
Do you have adequate help and financial resources to care
for him/her?
Is your loved one safe at home?
Is your loved one content at home?
Do you have necessary time apart from your loved one?
Are you physically and emotionally able to continue caring for your loved one at home?
If you can answer yes to the above questions, then you
can rest assured that you have time to make this decision
and immediate placement is not indicated. Use this time to
research the options available and begin visiting facilities
and reaching out to community agencies such as your local
council on aging. Examine the financial situation and explore
what assistance may be available to assist with funding long
term care placement.
When the stress level of caring for your loved one at home
has reached an intense level which puts your own health and/
or their health in jeopardy, it may be time to push forward

continued on page 24

craving without the dangerous


chemicals that come from
burning cigarettes.
Consult with your doctor to
determine which product will
work best for you. There are
other prescription medications
available that you can choose.
Talk to your doctor about the
risks and benefits of each
before you begin your journey
to become smoke-free.

P E O P L E S H E A LT H
P E O P L E S H E A LT H
& WELLNESS CLINIC
& WELLNESS CLINIC
Health Care for the Uninsured
Health Care for the Uninsured

553 North Main Street, Barre, VT 05641


(802) 479-1229 (by appointment only)

Dont Have Health Insurance?


Doesnt Matter
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Note: Open Enrollment ends 1/31.
The last day to sign up for coverage starting 2/1 is 1/15.

January 11, 2017

The WORLD

page 21

HEALTHY NEW YEAR | MAKING TIME FOR YOURSELF

A Vacation from Stress


S

tress is sometimes unavoidable. Among deadlines, financial issues and


family responsibilities, it might feel like you cant get caught up emotionally.
There are several crucial reasons to learn to cut the stress out this New Year.

Low levels of stress can be


good for you, even causing
hormones to overload your
body that will increase your
heart rate and give an energy
boost. When stress begins
interfering with your ability to
lead a normal life, it becomes
dangerous. This January, plan
a vacation to reset your stress
levels.

DONT STRESS
ABOUT PLANNING
The whole point of taking a
stress-free vacation is to avoid
the pressures of your everyday
life. Planning a vacation can
get stressful if youre attempting to do it alone. Instead,
enlist the help of your local
travel agency.
Professional agents can take
control by booking hotel
rooms and flight tickets, and
can even provide an itinerary
of attractions at your destination.

CHOOSING A DESTINATION
When planning your vacation spot, decide on your getaway goals. For instance, if
long lines or big crowds arent
your idea of relaxing, you may
benefit from booking a trip to
a less popular vacation destination. America is full of beautiful places that arent considered tourist hotspots.
The time of year can also
play a major role in how busy
a destination will be. Do some

FOTOLIA

research to find out when your


dream destination is busiest.
Planning around their slow
times may save you money
and will cut down on the
crowds.

SECURE YOUR HOME


Leaving your home for a
long period of time can be
stressful. The last thing you
want to do on your vacation is
worry about your house being

taken care of. Find a reliable


house sitter to check in on
your home or even stay while
you are gone.
In addition to a house sitter,
it is a good idea to talk to a

Introducing... The Beautyrest

Rachel Kling
Pre-Licensed
Psychotherapist

Black Line By Simmons

Simmons
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$2000

home security agency. They


can send alerts to your smartphone or even let you tune in
to your security cameras. This
peace of mind will add to your
stress-free state of mind.

Please contact me to set up an appointment. I look forward to


hearing from you.
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page 22

Like us on Facebook!
http://www.facebook.com/
DonnaShermanCruisePlanners?ref=hl

The WORLD

Monday-Friday 10-6
Saturday 10-4
January 11, 2017

Ask about the new Honeymoon Registry!

802-223-6838

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Travel Consultant,
Franchise Owner

VACATIONS DESIGNED WITH THE


PERSONAL TOUCH YOU DESERVE

Cruises, Disney, Hawaii, Alaska, Escorted Tours,


All-Inclusive Packages, and much more!
*Rates and availability are subject to change

Visit www.yourvoyageplanner.com and sign up for weekly specials.

HEALTHY NEW YEAR | GIVING BACK

Sign Up to Volunteer
V

olunteering for a cause that is important to you will give you a


sense of purpose. Start your New Year off with a promise to put
others before you and notice great benefits to your overall health.

Committing to volunteering
is a worthy responsibility with
a great payoff. By solving
problems and improving
lives, you can expect to feel a
large sense of pride and
accomplishment. Sharing
your time to help a cause that
you feel strongly about can
help you transform your own
life.

HOW TO CHOOSE
AN ACTIVITY
When choosing an organization to support, be sure you
can fully commit.
Volunteering means you wont
be financially compensated
for your efforts. Instead, youll
receive a greater feeling of
self-worth, an opportunity to
expand your social presence
and a way to give back to your
community.
Do research on causes that
are important to you to find
the right group to join. Once
you have decided on a cause
that can benefit from your
assistance, head to your local
volunteer center to see how
you can offer your services.

HEALTH BENEFITS
OF VOLUNTEERING
The AARP reports that
many mental and physical
benefits are gained by
Americans aged over 65 who
volunteer. Some of these benefits include:
A lower risk of depres-

FOTOLIA

sion. Increased social interaction builds a solid system of


commitment and interest.
These two traits have been
shown to decrease depression.
Keeps you active. Staying
active as you age is a great
way to increase brain func-

tion.
Reduces stress. Helping
others gives you a sense of
calm and meaning.
Longer lifespan. Studies
show that volunteers over 65
have less than half the risk of
death compared to non-volunteers.

TAX BENEFITS OF
VOLUNTEERING

claim out-of-pocket expenses.


This includes vehicle mileage
If youre on a fixed budget,
and supplies. Keep receipts
feel comforted that your phil- handy when you visit your tax
anthropic efforts will help you office this year. Work with
out when it comes time to pay your local tax preparer to
taxes. While you cannot
make sure you are keeping
deduct the cost out of your
the correct information for a
time, you may still be able to
deduction come tax time.

Let Us Quote
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January 11, 2017

The WORLD

page 23

HEALTHY NEW YEAR | STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS

Achieve Your Resolution


N

ew Years
resolutions are
easy to make but
can be challenging
to achieve. The trick
is to not make a
resolution that is
overly challenging
but one that is
within your grasp.
Resolutions can range from
behavior changes to new
goals depending on your lifestyle and goals. Perhaps you
want to spend this New Year
becoming healthy or you have
made a goal to reach the next
level in your career. Either
way, there are tips you can
use to be certain that your
goal is achieved.

PLAN YOUR RESOLUTION


A resolution should not be
made in the spur of the
moment as the holiday
approaches. Take a few
months leading up to the
New Year to create a resolution and a plan how you will
achieve it.
While you should sprinkle
in different goals for yourself
throughout the year, only
choose one resolution each
year. This should be your
main focus. Be sure to choose
one that is extremely important to you and one you can
put the majority of your
efforts into achieving.

FOTOLIA

MOVING FORWARD
Define sub-goals that will
eventually guide you in completing your main resolution.
These sub-goals should be
limited by certain dates
throughout the year.
Set small rewards for yourself as these sub-goals are

MONTPELIER
PHARMACY
69 Main Street
Montpelier, VT 05602
802-223-4633

Locally owned
and proud of
our independence
page 24

The WORLD

January 11, 2017

achieved. These will be used to


regain motivation and also
show that progress is being
made.
Keep a journal for different
milestones you achieve during
your journey. These notes also
can be used as helpful reminders if you feel that you are slip-

Montpelier, VT
802-223-7723

ping away from your goal.

DONT GET DISCOURAGED


Its important to remember
that you are human. You will
likely stray from your New
Years resolution from time to
time. The important thing to
remember is that any setback

St. Johnsbury, VT
(802)-748-3536

DONT FORGET ABOUT YOUR EYES!

1) Eating Foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, lutein,


zinc and vitamins C and E can help fight off agerelated vision problems like macular degeneration and
cataracts.
2) Stop Smoking! Smoking makes you more susceptible
to many ocular diseases. QUIT in 2017!
3) Wear Sunglasses! Too much UV exposure can cause
damage to your eye health.
4) Take breaks from electronics - Computer Vision
Syndrome can cause eye strain, blurry vision, trouble
focusing, dry eyes, headaches, and even neck and
shoulder pain. Remember the 20/20/20 Rule!
5) Visit your Eye care professional! At Shippee
Family Eye Care, we are devoted to helping our
patients achieve complete vision wellness through
medical eye examination and treatment
and advanced optical solutions.
Call us today to
set up your Eye Health
Examination!

is not permanent and is no


reason to give up.
Find family members or
friends who also are committing to a resolution and use
each other as a support system. Kind words can be great
motivation to stay on the right
path.

Aging with Grace


continued from page 21

with long term care placement. Below are some indicators to


watch for.
Caregivers physical and/or emotional health is in decline
A health emergency arises for you or your loved one
Caregivers significant relationships are suffering
Your loved ones challenging behaviors are aggressive
and are putting you or them in danger
Your loved ones safety is at risk within the home
Either your healthcare team or your loved ones healthcare team is suggesting long term care placement
It is normal to feel guilty when it comes time for facility placement. This will pass as you begin to adjust to the
change. Your role of caregiver is not coming to an end but it
will change. Often placement allows families to have more
relaxed and enjoyable time to spend with their loved one. I
hope this information is helpful.
If you have questions or are looking for information
related to caring for an elder loved one or other individual
with disabilities or health issues, please email me, deargrace@pibarre.giffordhealthcare.org or write to Dear Grace,
c/o Project Independence, 81 N. Main St. Ste. 1, Barre, VT
05641-4283

2017

The Vermont Legislature presents

FREE CONCERT SERIES

All performances are Wednesday evenings at 7:30 pm


in the House Chamber, Vermont State House, Montpelier

January 18th VERMONT SYMPHONY


ORCHESTRA

March 22nd AN EVENING of WORDS


and MUSIC

David M. Wilson Memorial Farmers Night Concert


Jaime Laredo, conductor
Winds take center stage for the VSOs annual musical thank you
to the State. Music Director Jaime Laredo leads the orchestra in
an arrangement of Rachmaninoffs popular Vocalise for ute and
strings; Mozarts Concert-Rondo, which features the French horn;
and an excerpt from Wolf Ferraris Idillio Concertino for solo oboe.
The program concludes with Haydns wonderful Symphony No. 49,
La Passione.

March 29th VERMONT CHORAL UNION

January 25th 40th ARMY BAND


This year the 40th Army Band will feature traditional patriotic
American tunes, as well as musical selections from David
Holsinger and Gustav Holst.

February 1st DAVID MILLS as MARTIN


LUTHER KING, JR.
Presented by the Vermont Humanities Council
Poet/performer David Mills portrays Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.,
providing biographical details of the civil rights leaders life,
and presenting his I Have a Dream speech and Letter from a
Birmingham Jail.

Presented by the Vermont College of the Fine Arts.


VCFA will present an hour of music and readings featuring
alumni artists from its Writing for Children & Young Adult &
Adult and Music Composition programs.
Celebrating its 50th year, the VCU includes 36 members from
Chittenden, Franklin, and Addison counties, performing a
repertoire inspired by more than ten centuries of classical a
cappella choral music from timeless works of the past to
contemporary compositions.

Bragg Farm
Maple Creemees
Just Gotta
Have One!
802-223-5757
1 mile north of
E. Montpelier Village
on Rt. 14 (follow signs)

April 5th THE MOONLIGHTERS BIG BAND


The Moonlighters Big Band, based in Hartland, is comprised of
14 accomplished musicians who have been playing Swing-to-Soft
Rock and much more for over 23 years.

April 12th STATE HOUSE STORYTELLING


Presented by the Friends of the Vermont State House
The State House has borne witness to much of our states
history. This evening features rst-hand accounts told by political
and journalistic gures of the recent past our own extempo
or Moth-like storytelling session!

Your Local

February 8th VERMONT YOUTH ORCHESTRA


Hear some of Vermonts nest young musicians as the Vermont
Youth Chorus and members of the Vermont Youth Orchestra
string section perform works from yesterday and today.

Dealer

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East Randolph 728-5453
champlainvalleyequipment.com

February 15th the BARRE CITY ROCK


CHORUS

You Are Never Too Far Away To Get A Great Deal!

Presented by the Vermont Historical Society


Join the Vermont Historical Society for an evening celebrating the
music of the 1970s with the Barre City Rock Chorus. Youll denitely
want to sing along with this rock and soul chorus in an evening
of songs drawn from popular culture and counterculture from the
late 1960s and early 1970s. This program is part of the ongoing
celebration of VHSs new exhibit, Freaks, Radicals, and Hippies:
Counterculture in 1970s Vermont.

VERMONTS

TRUCKSTORE

WE'VE GOT THE PERFECT SILVERADO FOR YOU!

February 22nd KINGDOM COUNTY


ALL STARS

2009 Dodge Caliber SXT

This unique jazz band brings star high school musicians from the
entire Northeast Kingdom to play and perform togetheras well as
to provide music to the NE Kingdom, the state of Vermont and
the whole wide world!

Air Conditioning
Power Windows
Power Locks

BARRE-MONTPELIER
RD 802-223-6337
Satellite Radio
Cruise Control
17 Aluminum Wheels
Tilt Steering Wheel
Chill Zone Cooler
& a Whole Lot More!!!

13,995

Photo by Jeb Wallace-Brodeur

March 1st STILL HILL

Still Hill is a newgrass, folk, and old-time string band based in the
Upper Valley of Vermont & New Hampshire.

* includes $2000 in rebates

or
just

Special Deals available on select units


purchased from closing Dodge Dealers.

March 15th VERMONT FIDDLE ORCHESTRA


The Vermont Fiddle Orchestra is a community orchestra
dedicated to the preservation and performance of traditional
and contemporary ddle tunes.

2009 Dodge Nitro 4X4


Air Conditioning
Power Windows
Power Locks
Satellite Radio
Cruise Control
16 Aluminum Wheels
Tilt Steering Wheel
Keyless Remote Entry
& a Whole Lot More!!!

Corner of State & Main

Your Local Diner


For Over Half A Century

19,995

* includes $3500 in rebates

$
~Breakfast
& Lunch Served
All Day~
or
just 229-9060
83 Main St Montpelier
www.coffeecorner.com

Guy
Boucher,
Proprietor

Affordable Hair
Styling for Men
and Children

223-7361
100 State Street
Montpelier
at The Masters Edge
NEW HOURS
Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. starting at 7AM
(Closed Wednesdays)

Stop in and register for a chance to win a New 2009 Dodge,


Chrysler or Jeep vehicle during our Appreciation Event.
Appreciation Event Ends June 17, 2009!!!

VERMONT TIRE
& SERVICE

OPEN
Sundays

Serving up Healthy
Maple Syrup Products
for over 200 years

2 Convenient Locations
MONTPELIER 229-4941
90 River Street

OPEN DAILY
YEAR-ROUND

1-800-639-1900
SOUTH BURLINGTON
658-1333
1877 Williston Rd.

1-800-639-1901

119 River St. P.O. Box 279 Montpelier


Ph. 223-7735 Fax 223-7515
83 Washington St. Barre
Ph. 479-3366
nwjinsurance.com

Now Selling Local


Beers & Wine
Just 2.7 miles up
Montpeliers Main Street
www.morsefarm.com
802/223-2740

Toll Free 866-410-3541 www.midstatedodge.com

MONTPELIER
PHARMACY
69 Main Street
Montpelier, VT 05602
802-223-4633

Locally owned and proud


of our independence
January 11, 2017

Tax, title and Registration extra. All rebates to dealer. Please present ad to receive special pricing. Pictures may vary from actual vehicle
available. Cash Price/Finance Amnt. = advertised price @ 6.9% for 72 mos. Rebates include Customer cash, $1000 owner loyalty rebate and
$500 customer appreciation bonus. Customers who do not currently own a Dodge, Chrysler or Jeep will not qualify for $1000 loyalty rebate
and must add $1000 back to sales price. No purchase necessary to enter contest. Chance of winning depend on how many entries are
received from all Dodge Chrysler and Jeep dealers entrys. Only 1 winner from all entries. See contest for official rules.

US Route 302

Barre-Montpelier Rd.
Toll Free:
1-866-410-3541

The WORLD

page 25

Wednesday, January 11

BARRE - Keeping the Books & Tax Planning For Small


Businesses presented by Joe Hicks. Capstone, 20 Gable Place.
6-8 p.m. Free. What to keep track of? How long to keep it? What
expenses can I deduct? How can I keep track of things easier &
better. Register: 802-477-5214, mferguson@capstonevt.org
MONTPELIER - Boost Sales with Low-Cost Marketing.
Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main St. 12-1:30 p.m. Free workshop will teach proven systems for attracting clients and increasing sales. RSVP: Space is limited, so please pre-register for this
workshop by calling Jo Romano, (802) 522-8498.
Character and Being with Robert Kest, Ph.D. Hunger Mountain
Coop. 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Character is the organizing dynamic that
shapes our relationship to being and lies at the core of psychological and spiritual unfolding. Understanding its nature is essential to finding and cultivating ones way in the world.
Winter Tea Tasting with Matthew of Little Tree Tea. Grian
Herbs Apothecary, 34 Elm St. Noon to 2 p.m. Learn about the
origins, production methods, brewing techniques, and history of
some of the worlds finest teas. Little Tree Tea will take you on a

ART EXHIBITS

BARRE - And Somewhere Else Theres a Beach. This show


by local artist Pria Cambio includes work over her lifetime that
shares her connection to the seacoast. Eleven paintings on
exhibit from Dec. 1, 2016 - April 8, 2017, at the Morse Block
Deli, 260 N. Main St. 100% sales benefit Studio Place Arts
programs.
BERLIN - Shedding Light on the Working Forest. Gallery
at the Central Vermont Medical Center. This exhibition celebrates the landscape of the working forest and the voices of
those who have honed skills into a livelihood there. Shedding
Light draws on the artistic friendship of painter Kathleen Kolb
and poet Verandah Porche and
their commitment to subjects
We Banjo 3
been largely overlooked
by11 the
arts.
SAT, MAR
@ 7:30PM
Leothat
Kottke have
& Keller Williams
Barre
Opera House
- Barre, VT contemporary
FRI,MONTPELIER
JAN 13 @ 8:00PM
Sculpture
Exhibit.
Featuring
Paramount Theatre - Rutland, VT
created by VermontGrounded
artists.
Vermont
Arts Council
WED,
MAR 15 - SUN,
APR 2
Pat sculpture
Metheny
SAT,Sculpture
JAN 14 @ 7:30PM
Garden, ongoing. Barrette Center for the Arts - White River Jct, VT
Barre Opera House - Barre, VT
Murder on the Nile
FRI, MARGallery
17 @ 7:00PMpresents works by
Trick--or The
Treat Vermont Supreme Court
Fuller Hall - March
St. Johnsbury,
VT 2017.
WED,
JAN 18 Upson.
- SUN, FEB 5111 State St. Through
Lark
31,
Barrette Center for the Arts - White River Jct, VT
The Lumineers / Kaleo
The Vermont Governors
Gallery
presents works by
SAT, MAR
18 @ 8:00PM
Love--Alone
up- Montreal,
until QC
March 31, 2017.
Bell be
Centre
THU,Steve
JAN 19 -Schaub.
SUN, FEB 5 The exhibit will
Shaker Bridge Theatre - Enfield, NH
Anais Mitchell / Sam Amidon
-- Vermont
Artist
Michael
Strauss:
SAT, APR 1 Making
@ 7:30PM Thought Visible.
An Acoustic
Evening with
Lyle Lovett
& John
Gallery, 46 Barre Chandler
St. Nov.
January
13,
Center 15
for thethrough
Arts - Randolph,
VT
HiattT.W.
{{SOLD Wood
OUT}}
SAT,2017.
JAN 21 @Gallery
7:30PM
Bla Fleck & Abigail Washburn
hours are Tuesday-Saturday,
noon to 4 p.m. and
Lebanon Opera House - Lebanon, NH
FRI, APR 14 @ 7:30PM
byRogers
appointment.
Chandler Center for the Arts - Randolph, VT
Maggie
MON,
JAN
23 @Front
7:30PM Gallerys 14th Mamma
Mia!
-The
Art Show
will present the latest
Higher Ground - South Burlington, VT
WED,growing
APR 19 - SUN,membership
MAY 21
works of the collective gallerys
of local,
Barrette Center for the Arts - White River Jct, VT
An Acoustic Evening with Lyle Lovett & John
runs from December 2,
Hiattcontemporary artists. The show
Bumper Jacksons
FRI,2016-January
JAN 27 @ 7:30PM 28, 2017. Gallery
FRI, hours
APR 21 @are
7:30PM
Friday 5-8 p.m., Sat.
Paramount Theatre - Rutland, VT
UVM Recital
Hall public.
- Burlington, Limited
VT
11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Free and open
to the
edition
Livingston Taylor, Tom Chapin & EVA
This
several of the gallerys
artists
will
be
available for
FRI,prints
JAN 27 @by
7:30PM
THU, APR 27 - SUN, MAY 14
UVMsale.
RecitalLocated
Hall - Burlington,
atVT6 Barre St. Shaker Bridge Theatre - Enfield, NH
Los Lobos
Gilkyson, Mary Gauthier & Gretchen Peters
- In Praise ofEliza
Water.
SAT,PLAINFIELD
JAN 28 @ 7:30PM
FRI,
APR 28 @Eliot
7:30PM Pratt Art Gallery at
Barre
Opera House - Barre,
VT
Recital Hall - Burlington,
VT
Goddard
College.
Features UVMartwork
by Goddard
artists,
Blind
Pilot
Uprightfrom
Citizens multiple
Brigade
approaching the theme of Water
perspectives
TUE, JAN 31 @ 8:00PM
SAT, APR 29 @ 7:00PM
aesthetic,
ecological,
and contemplaHigher
Ground - South
Burlington, VT social, political,
Twilight Theatrespiritual,
- Lyndonville, VT
Thetive.
Wood Brothers
On display through AprilBarenaked
9, 2017.
Ladies Gallery
{{SOLD OUT}}hours are 9-4,
MON,
FEB 6 @ 7:30PM
SAT, APR 29 @ 8:00PM
MonFri.
Higher Ground - South Burlington, VT
Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT
LastWAITSFIELD
of the Red Hot Lovers
- John Dempcy
Kris Kristofferson exhibit at Walker
WED,
FEB 15 - SUN, MAR 5 4403 Main St. FRI,
MAY 5 @ 8:00PM
Contemporary,
December
17, 2016 - January 21,
Barrette Center for the Arts - White River Jct, VT
Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT
2017. Gallery Hours: Fri & Sat
, 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Adding
Momix
Storm Large
FRI,the
FEB 17
@ 7:00PMhand back into theSUN,
human
work,
MAY 14Dempcy
@ 7:00PM reveals the even
Lyndon
Institute
- Lyndonenergies
Center, VT and interconnectedness
St. Johnsbury School - St. Johnsbury,
VT basic life
more
subtle
of these
4000 Miles
An
Evening
with
the Avett
Brothers
as ifMARtrying
to understand
the
source
of
the
very
cellular
THU,forms,
FEB 23 - SUN,
12
THU, JUN 1 @ 8:00PM
Shaker
Bridge Theatrehe
- Enfield,
structures
wasNHbefore creating,
revealing
the - very
compliBank of New
Hampshire Pavilion
Gilford, NH
Thecated
Chieftainsnature of life, particularly
its most basic expression.
Deadat
& Company

guided tasting tour of Green, Oolong, and Black teas from China,
Japan, and Taiwan.

Thursday, January 12

MONTPELIER - Womens Spirituality and Intuitive Training


with Mary Lee Wilschak. Hunger Mountain Coop. 6-7 p.m. Free.
An introduction to uncovering your gifts through meditation,
creative visualization, psychometry and different metaphysical
and cultural belief systems.

Friday, January 13

MONTPELIER - Stories in the Stars: Astronomy and Myth


with Kelley Hunter, PhD. Hunger Mountain Coop. 5:30-7 p.m.
Free. Newly discovered planetoids in our outer solar system are
being named for indigenous creator gods from around the world.
Using images from the Planetary Gods & Goddesses coloring book,
well get up to date with our expanding solar system and stories.
Americas Snake Naturalist Journeys Lecture Series. The Rise
and Fall of the Timber Rattlesnake. Unitarian Church of
Montpelier. 7 p.m. Author and Naturalist, Ted Levin will discuss
a six-year inquiry into the natural and not-so-natural history of the
timber rattlesnake. Ted looks at the biology and the conservation
efforts in New England, to protect timber rattlesnakes, as well as
the misguided attempts to destroy them or to take them home as a
pet. Admission by donation.
Moving Toward Racial Justice Artist Reception/Panel Discussion.
Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 58 Barre St. Free and open to the
public. Opening reception for an art show in the MSAC Community
Room titled Black Lives Matter, featuring work by Alex Bottinelli,
Cheryl Daye Dick, Jane Pincus, Jack Rowell, and Anne Sarcka, and
curated by Janet Van Fleet. Light refresments will be served. 4-5 p.m.
Panel Discussion follows from 5-7 p.m.

Saturday, January 14

BARRE - Looking for a community where you can practice


Tai Chi? Barre Area Senior Center. 10 a.m. Take a deep breath
and step away from your busy world to explore the ancient art of

Leo Kottke & Keller Williams


FRI, JAN 13 @ 8:00PM
Paramount Theatre - Rutland, VT
Pat Metheny
SAT, JAN 14 @ 7:30PM
Barre Opera House - Barre, VT
Trick or Treat
WED, JAN 18 - SUN, FEB 5
Barrette Center for the Arts - White River Jct, VT
Love Alone
THU, JAN 19 - SUN, FEB 5
Shaker Bridge Theatre - Enfield, NH
Lyle Lovett & John Hiatt {{SOLD OUT}}
SAT, JAN 21 @ 7:30PM
Lebanon Opera House - Lebanon, NH
Maggie Rogers
MON, JAN 23 @ 7:30PM
Higher Ground - South Burlington, VT
An Acoustic Evening with Lyle Lovett & John Hiatt
FRI, JAN 27 @ 7:30PM
Paramount Theatre - Rutland, VT
Livingston Taylor, Tom Chapin & EVA
FRI, JAN 27 @ 7:30PM
UVM Recital Hall - Burlington, VT
Los Lobos
SAT, JAN 28 @ 7:30PM
Barre Opera House - Barre, VT
Blind Pilot
TUE, JAN 31 @ 8:00PM
Higher Ground - South Burlington, VT
The Wood Brothers
MON, FEB 6 @ 7:30PM
Higher Ground - South Burlington, VT

oncert
onnections

Last of the Red Hot Lovers


WED, FEB 15 - SUN, MAR 5
Barrette Center for the Arts - White River Jct, VT
Momix
FRI, FEB 17 @ 7:00PM
Lyndon Institute - Lyndon Center, VT
4000 Miles
THU, FEB 23 - SUN, MAR 12
Shaker Bridge Theatre - Enfield, NH
The Chieftains
MON, FEB 27 @ 7:30PM
Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT
Jenny Scheinman - Kannapolis: A Moving Portrait
FRI, MAR 3 @ 7:30PM
UVM Recital Hall - Burlington, VT
The Head and the Heart
SUN, MAR 5 @ 8:00PM
Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT
We Banjo 3
SAT, MAR 11 @ 7:30PM
Barre Opera House - Barre, VT
Grounded
WED, MAR 15 - SUN, APR 2
Barrette Center for the Arts - White River Jct, VT
Murder on the Nile
FRI, MAR 17 @ 7:00PM
Fuller Hall - St. Johnsbury, VT
The Lumineers / Kaleo
SAT, MAR 18 @ 8:00PM
Bell Centre - Montreal, QC
Anais Mitchell / Sam Amidon
SAT, APR 1 @ 7:30PM
Chandler Center for the Arts - Randolph, VT

For venue phone numbers, call

The Point at 223-2396 9:00 to 5:00

Mon.-Fri., or visit our web site at pointfm.com


MON, FEB 27 @ 7:30PM
TUE, JUN 20 @ 7:00PM
Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT
Saratoga Performing Arts Center - Saratoga, NY
Jenny Scheinman - Kannapolis: A Moving
Portrait
FRI, MARONION
3 @ 7:30PM
RIVER COMMUNITY ACCESS MEDIA CHANNELS 15, 16, 17
UVM Recital Hall - Burlington, VT
Bethel
Braintree Montpelier Randolph Rochester U-32 District Towns Waterbury Schedules subject to change without notice.
The Head
and the Heart
SUN, MAR 5 @ 8:00PM
1:00p The Thom Hartmann Program
9:00a Vote for Vermont
7:00p Montpelier School Board LIVE Meeting
Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT

ORCA Media Channel 15


Public Access
Weekly Program Schedule

Wednesday, January 11

6:00a Mad River Chorale


7:30a Water Protectors Victory
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a Community Forum on Tobacco
11:30a Big Picture Numerology
12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program
1:00p Ending Homelessness
2:30p Net Zero
3:00p Democracy Now!
4:00p Green Mountain Veterans for
Peace
5:00p Kellogg Hubbard Library
7:00p Vote for Vermont
8:00p Talking About Movies
8:30p Karmatude
9:00p Senior Moments
10:30p Mad River Chorale

2:00p Big Picture Numerology


2:30p The Truth of the Matter
3:00p Democracy Now!
4:00p Gay USA
5:00p Senior Moments
6:30p Kellogg Hubbard Library
8:30p Talking About Movies
9:00p Gay USA
10:00p Ending Homelessness

Saturday, January 14

6:00a Climate Solutions Summit


9:00a Vermont Interfaith Action
9:30a Karmatude
10:00a T.W. Wood Art Lecture
11:30a Burning Books
1:30p Cuban Bridge
4:00p Holiday Harmonies
4:30p Roman Catholic Mass
5:00p Washington Baptist Church
6:00p Talking About Movies
7:00p Gay USA
Thursday, January 12
6:00a Hunger Mountain Coop Workshop 8:00p All Things LGBTQ
9:00p Spotlight on Vermont Issues
Series
11:00p Energy Week
8:00a Democracy Now!
Sunday, January 15
9:00a Ending Well Conference
12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program 6:00a Energy Week
1:00p Montpelier Construction Project 7:00a Gay USA
8:00a Washington Baptist Church
2:30p Vermont Interfaith Action
9:00a Public Meeting for Rail Feasibility
3:00p Democracy Now!
Study
4:00p Spotlight on Vermont Issues
10:30a Roman Catholic Mass
6:00p Salaam Shalom
11:00a Montpelier Construction Project
7:00p Goddard College Haybarn
12:30p Winter Festival Parade
Theatre
1:00p Gay USA
9:00p Vote for Vermont
10:00p Hunger Mountain Coop Work- 2:00p Ending Well Conference
4:00p Vote for Vermont
shop Series
5:00p T.W. Wood Art Lecture
Friday, January 13
6:30p Water Protectors Victory
6:00a Salaam Shalom
7:00p Gay USA
7:00a The Struggle
8:00p Extempo
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00p Burning Books
9:00a Extempo
11:00p Talking About Movies
10:00a All Things LGBTQ
11:00a Green Mountain Veterans for Monday, January 16
6:00a Senior Moments
Peace
12:00p Brunch With Bernie
8:00a Democracy Now!

10:00a Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday


Celebration
12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program
1:00p Salaam Shalom
2:00p The Struggle
2:30p Karmatude
3:00p Democracy Now!
4:00p Goddard College Haybarn
Theatre
6:00p Affirming Traditions
7:00p Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday
Celebration
9:00p Montpelier Construction Project
10:30p Extempo

Tuesday, January 17

6:00a Ending Homelessness


8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a The Truth of the Matter
10:00a Goddard College Haybarn
Theatre
12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program
1:00p All Things LGBTQ
2:00p Water Protectors Victory
3:00p Democracy Now!
4:00p Extempo
5:00p Burning Books
7:00p The Struggle
7:30p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
8:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
9:00p Big Picture Numerology
9:30p T.W. Wood Art Lecture
10:00p Affirming Traditions
11:00p Green Mountain Veterans for
Peace

ORCA Media Channel 16


Education Access
Weekly Program Schedule

Wednesday, January 11

12:00p CVTS Game of the Week


2:00p OSHER Lifelong Learning
Institute
4:00p The Tempest U-32 Students
6:00p Vermont Floor Hockey

Community Media (802) 224-9901

page 26

The WORLD

Thursday, January 12

12:00p Bethel School Board


4:00p Berlin School Board
7:00p Orange Southwest Supervisory
Union
10:00p First Wednesdays

Thu, January 12

7:00a Randolph Selectboard


11:30a Green Mountain Care Board
3:00p Vermont State House
Friday, January 13
12:00p Washington Central Supervisory 7:00p Waterbury Selectboard
Union
10:00p VT Legislative Briefing Session
4:00p Randolph Union H.S. School
Fri, January 13
Board
7:00a Bethel Selectboard
6:00p First Wednesdays
12:00p Moretown Selectboard
8:00p U-32 School Board
4:00p Berlin Selectboard
Saurday, January 14
8:00p Montpelier Planning Commission
12:00p VT State Board of Education
Sat,
January 14
4:30p Washington Central Supervisory
7:00a Central Vermont Regional PlanUnion
ning Commission
8:00p East Montpelier School Board
10:00a Randolph Selectboard
10:00p Vermont Youth Orchestra
3:00p Vermont State House
Sunday, January 15
8:00p Vermont Fish & Wildlife Board
12:00p U-32 School Board
Meeting
3:30p Montpelier School Board
Sun, January 15
7:30p VT State Board of Education
7:00a Waterbury Trustees
Monday, January 16
10:30a Waterbury Selectboard
12:00p Rumney Memorial School
3:00p Montpelier Development Review
2:00p East Montpelier School Board
4:00p Orange Southwest Supervisory Board
6:00p Montpelier Design Review
Union
Committee
8:00p Randolph Union H.S. School
9:00p Montpelier City Council
Board
Mon, January 16
10:00p CVTS Game of the Week
7:00a Vermont State House
Tuesday, January 17
11:00a Bethel Selectboard
12:00p Berlin School Board
2:00p Berlin Selectboard
4:00p Bethel School Board
5:30p Montpelier Planning Commission
8:00p Rumney Memorial School
10:00p The Tempest U-32 Students Tue, January 17
7:00a Vermont State House
2:00p VT Legislative Briefing Session
ORCA Media Channel 17 4:00p Vermont State House
Government Access
5:30p Montpelier Design Review ComWeekly Program Schedule mittee LIVE
7:00p Montpelier Development Review
Wed, January 11
6:00a Vermont Fish & Wildlife Board
Board LIVE

Check out our Web page at

January 11, 2017

10:00a Green Mountain Care Board


3:00p Waterbury Trustees
6:30p Montpelier City Council LIVE

www.orcamedia.net

Tai Chi. Experience the balance of the calming energy within


you. Come with friends, meet new people, and together enjoy the
benefits of Tai Chi. Members, free; nonmembers, $3.
Elvis will be in the house at BASC. 6-10 p.m. Emile Gosselin
brings a special blend of dancing, karaoke, 50s and 60s music and
Elvis trivia. To add to the fun, come dressed as Elvis! Must RSVP
by Thursday, Jan. 12 at 3 p.m.; $5, snacks provided. In case of
inclement weather, this program will be rescheduled to Jan. 21.
Jazzyaoke at Espresso Bueno. 248 N. Main St. 7:30 p.m. $5
MONTPELIER - Full Moon Snowshoe Hike. North Branch nature
Center. 7-8:30 p.m. Members $5, nonmembers $10.
Under a full moon and surrounded by sparkling snow, lets snowshoe
by lunar light! Night activities will illuminate how wildlife survives
the long nights of winter. Snowshoes and hot chocolate provided.
Memory Caf. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 58 Barre St.
10-11:30 a.m. Free and open to the public. The Montpelier Memory
Caf celebrates its 3rd anniversary with music and song by Danny
Coane of the Starline Rhythm Boys and Colin McCaffery of the
Stone Cold Rooster. The Memory Cafe is where people with
memory loss disorders and their care partners can come together to
connect and support one another.
PLAINFIELD - EarthWalk Village Nature Skills: Fire by
Friction Workshop. Goddard College Campus. 1-4 p.m. This
workshop will teach how to make to tools to start and maintain a
fire using a bow or hand drill. Pre-registration required, limited
spaces available. $25/adult, teen or elder; $10/accompanied child
(ages 6-12). Group rates available. Info: email anika@earthwalkvermont or call 454-8500.
RANDOLPH - Bill McKibben & Amy Goodman. Chandler
Music Hall, 71-73 Main St. 7:30 p.m. Bestselling author and
environmental activist, Bill McKibben, will join Amy Goodman,
host and executive producer of Democracy Now! for an evening
of motivating and provocative discussion. Reserved seating:
adults $28 advance, $30 day of, $50 for VIP seating; students $10;
kids 5 and under free. Tickets: 802-728-6464 or online at www.
chandler-arts.org
WILLIAMSTOWN - Learn to quilt applique. Williamstown
Academy at Ainsworth Public Library, 2338 Vt Rt 14. 10 a.m. to
noon. Quilter with over 35 years experience will help get you started
or improve your skills. Bring sharp scissors. Class is free and open to
public. Register: 433-5887 or library@williamstownvt.org

Sunday, January 15

BARRE - Glenn Roth and Voyager 1 live at Espresso Bueno, 248


N. Main St. 7 p.m. Free/by donation. Info: 479-0896 or events@
espressobueno.com.
Film: Selma. Old Labor Hall, 46 Granite St. 4 p.m. Selma
chronicles the events surrounding the historic 1965 civil rights
marches from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama led by Dr. King,
John Lewis, and others protesting the denial of voting rights to
black voters. Admission by donation. Light refreshments will be
available.
info@oldlaborhall.org, or
Bla FleckInfo:
& Abigailhttp://oldlaborhall.org/,
Washburn
APR 14 @ 7:30PM
(802)FRI,479-5600
Chandler Center for the Arts - Randolph, VT
RANDOLPH
- Film: Life of Pi. Chandlers Upper Gallery,
Mamma Mia!
WED,
APR 19St.
- SUN,
MAY 21
71-73
Main
6:30
p.m. Ang Lees Oscar-winning film is based
Barrette Center for the Arts - White River Jct, VT
continued on next page
Bumper Jacksons
FRI, APR 21 @ 7:30PM
UVM Recital Hall - Burlington, VT
Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also
This
be viewed online at cvtv723.org
THU, APR 27 - SUN, MAY 14
Shaker Bridge Theatre - Enfield,6NH
Wednesday
PM Barre Congregational Church 4:30 PM Rice TV Mass
Community
Bulletin Board
Eliza Gilkyson,
Mary1aGauthier &7:30
Gretchen
Peters
PM Lutheran
5 PM Calvary Life
FRI,Council
APR 289a,12p,3p
@ 7:30PM
Barre City
9 PM Calvary Life
6 PM Washington Baptist Church
UVM Now
Recital
Democracy
6p Hall - Burlington, VT
10 PM Rice TV Mass
7 PM Faith Community Church
Williamstown
7p,Brigade
10p
Sunday
UprightSelect
Citizens
8 PM Barre Congregational Church
Thursday
Community Bulletin Board 1a
SAT, APR 29 @ 7:00PM
Community
Bulletin
Board
1a
Twilight
Theatre
- Lyndonville,
VT2 AM Barre Congregational Church 9:30 PM Lutheran
10 PM St. Monicas Mass
Williamstown
Select
6a, 9a,{{SOLD
12p OUT}}
3:30 AM St. Monicas Mass
Barenaked
Ladies
Democracy
Now 6p
4:30 AM Washington Baptist Church 11 PM Calvary Life
SAT, APR
29 @ 8:00PM
Monday
Barre Supervisory
Union
3p,7p,10pVT 6:30 AM Barre Congregational
Flynn Theater
- Burlington,
Friday Kris Kristofferson
Church
Community Bulletin Board 1a
Community
Bulletin
Board
1a
8
AM
Calvary
Life
Statehouse Programming 6a,9a,12p
FRI, MAY 5 @ 8:00PM
Barre Supervisory
Union
6a,9a,12pVT 9 AM Washington Baptist Church
Flynn Theater
- Burlington,
Democracy Now 6p
Democracy Now 6p
10 AM 1st Presbyterian Church
Barre Act 46 3, 7, 10p
Storm Large
Barre Town
Select
3p,7p,10p
11
AM
Barre
Congregational
SUN, MAY 14 @ 7:00PM
Tuesday
Saturday
ChurchVT
St. Johnsbury School - St. Johnsbury,
Barre Act 46 6a,9a,12p
Community Bulletin Board 1a
12:30 PM Rice TV Mass
An Evening
with9a,the
Statehouse Programming 3-5pm
Barre Town
Select 6a,
12pAvett Brothers
1 PM St. Monicas Mass
THU,
JUN
1
@
8:00PM
4 PM Washington Baptist Church
2 PM Barre Congregational Church Democracy Now 6p
Bank
of
New
Hampshire
Pavilion
Gilford,
NH
5 PM 1st Presbyterian Church
3:30 PM Washington Baptist
Barre City Council Live 7pm
Dead & Company
TUE, JUN
20 @ 7:00PM COMMUNICATIONS OF BARRE
CHARTER
ALL
PROGRAMING
SUBJECT
TO
CHANGE
WITHOUT
NOTICE
Saratoga Performing Arts Center - Saratoga, NY

CVTV CHANNEL 194

CVTV Channel 192 BARRE, VT

All schedules are subject to


change, please call us
with questions - 479-1075.

5:30 AM Talking About Movies


Opening
Wednesday
4:30 PM Holiday Fun
6:00 AM City Room with Steven
1:00 AM The Artful Word
1:30 AM Hendersons Herb Tinctures 5:00 PM Ghost Chronicles
Pappas
6:00 PM 13 Most Haunted - MA
3:00 AM Health Talk
6:30 AM Ghost Chronicles
3:30 AM New England Music Awards 6:30 PM Understanding PTSD
7:30 AM Gory Storytime
8:00 PM Hunger Mountain Co-op
5:30 AM The Better Part
8:00 AM Sidewalks Entertainment
10:30 PM Issues of Aging
6:00 AM The Better Part
8:30 AM Energy Conservation
Saturday
6:30 AM CVTSport.net
10:00 AM Ethan Allen Homestead
8:00 AM Poetry Outloud - live broad- 2:30 AM Moose & Bears in NH
11:30 AM Will the Constitution
4:00 AM Burlington Bookfest Preview 12:30 PM Lego Chat
cast
4:30 AM Sustainable Living Series
4:00 PM The Better Part
1:00 PM Community Producers
6:00 AM Floor Hockey
4:30 PM The Better Part
1:30 PM Talking About Movies
7:00 AM Upper Valley Humane Society 2:00 PM City Room with Steven
5:00 PM CVTSport.net
7:30 AM SlowLiving
6:32 PM 1st Wednesdays
Pappas
8:00 PM 30 Minutes with Bill Schmick 9:00 AM Montpelier Brown Bag Series 2:30 PM Ghost Chronicles
12:00 PM Moose & Bears in NH
8:30 PM Conversations with Kay
3:30 PM Gory Storytime
9:00 PM Vermont Historical Society 1:30 PM Burlington Bookfest Preview 4:00 PM Sidewalks Entertainment
2:00 PM Sustainable Living Series
10:00 PM The Artful Word
4:30 PM Energy Conservation
10:30 PM Hendersons Herb Tinctures 3:30 PM Floor Hockey
6:00 PM Ethan Allen Homestead
4:30 PM Upper Valley Humane Society 7:30 PM Will the Constitution
Thursday
5:00 PM SlowLiving
2:00 AM The State of Marriage
8:30 PM Lego Chat
3:00 AM Yestermorrow Lecture Series 6:30 PM Montpelier Brown Bag Series 9:00 PM Community Producers
9:30 PM Moose & Bears in NH
4:00 AM Taste for Life
9:30 PM Talking About Movies
11:00 PM Burlington Bookfest Preview 10:00 PM City Room with Steven
4:30 AM On the Waterfront
11:30 PM Sustainable Living Series
5:00 AM 2015 Cornish Fair
Pappas
Sunday
5:30 AM Salaam/Shalom
10:30 PM Ghost Chronicles
1:30 AM Lego Chat
6:30 AM Yoga To Go
11:30 PM Gory Storytime
2:00 AM Community Producers
7:30 AM RagFest Concerts
Tuesday
2:30 AM Talking About Movies
8:30 AM Judge Ben
3:00 AM Ethan Allen Homestead
3:00 AM Vaccine Mandates
9:30 AM Ethan Allen Homestead
4:00 AM Ragtime - All Tha Jazz
3:30 AM Ghost Chronicles
10:30 AM Its News to Us
5:00 AM Talking About Movies
4:30 AM Gory Storytime
11:30 AM The Y Connection
6:00 AM Lifelines
5:00 AM Green Mountain Vets for
12:00 PM Vermont Today
6:30 AM For the Animals
Peace
1:30 PM The State of Marriage
7:00 AM Authors at the Aldrich
2:30 PM Yestermorrow Lecture Series 6:00 AM Holistically Speaking
8:00 AM Sidewalks Entertainment
6:30 AM Mountain Man Adventures
3:30 PM Taste for Life
8:30 AM Green Mountain Vets for
7:00 AM Cuban Bridge
4:00 PM On the Waterfront
Peace
8:31 AM Car Stories
4:30 PM 2015 Cornish Fair
9:30 AM Holistically Speaking
9:00 AM Health Talk
5:00 PM Salaam/Shalom
10:00 AM Mountain Man Adventures
9:30 AM Ethan Allen Homestead
6:00 PM Yoga To Go
10:30 AM Cuban Bridge
10:30 AM Ragtime - All Tha Jazz
7:00 PM RagFest Concerts
11:00 AM Hometown Storytellers
11:30 AM Talking About Movies
8:00 PM Judge Ben
12:00 PM Car Stories
12:30 PM Lifelines
9:00 PM Ethan Allen Homestead
12:30 PM Health Talk
1:00 PM For the Animals
10:00 PM Its News to Us
1:00 PM Ethan Allen Homestead
1:30 PM Authors at the Aldrich
11:00 PM The Y Connection
2:00 PM Ragtime - All Tha Jazz
2:30 PM CVTSport.net
11:30 PM Vermont Today
3:00 PM Talking About Movies
4:02 PM Truck Pull 2015
Friday
4:00 PM Lifelines
1:00 AM Green Mountain Care Board 5:00 PM Cuban Bridge
4:30 PM For the Animals
2:30 AM Twin St vs Granite St Derby 6:00 PM Conversations with Kay
5:00 PM Authors at the Aldrich
6:30 PM Vermont Historical Society
4:00 AM WRJ Vet Center Grand
6:00 PM Sidewalks Entertainment
7:30 PM Its News to Us
Opening
6:30 PM Green Mountain Vets for
8:30 PM The Y Connection
5:00 AM Holiday Fun
Peace
9:00 PM Vermont Today
5:30 AM Ghost Chronicles
7:30 PM Holistically Speaking
10:30 PM The State of Marriage
6:30 AM 13 Most Haunted - MA
11:30 PM Yestermorrow Lecture Series 8:00 PM Mountain Man Adventures
7:00 AM Understanding PTSD
8:30 PM Cuban Bridge
Monday
8:30 AM Hunger Mountain Co-op
9:00 PM Hometown Storytellers
2:00 AM Ethan Allen Homestead
11:00 AM Issues of Aging
10:00 PM Car Stories
12:30 PM Green Mountain Care Board 3:30 AM Will the Constitution
10:30 PM Health Talk
4:30 AM Lego Chat
3:00 PM High on the Hog
11:00 PM Talking About Movies
5:00 AM Community Producers
3:30 PM WRJ Vet Center Grand
Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also be viewed online at cvtv723.org

on a best-seller by Yann Martel in which its teenage hero spends


227 days drifting across the Pacific in a lifeboat with only a
Bengal tiger for company. As days turn into weeks and weeks
drag into months, Pi and the tiger must learn to trust each other if
both are to survive. General admission: $9 walk-in
WAITSFIELD - Open Auditions for Winter Musical. The Valley
Players Theater, Main Street. 1 p.m. Seeking performers for a songcycle musical Between the Earth and the Sky, a musical consisting of a series of interconnected, character driven vignettes concerning superstition, religion and fantasy. Must be ready to learn
original music and close harmonies (music literacy preferred, but
not required). Prepare a musical number that showcases your vocal
and acting abilities, an accompanist will be provided.

Friday, January 20

MONTPELIER - Starry, Starry Night. North Branch Nature


Center. 7-9 p.m. (cloud date - Saturday, Jan. 21) Fee: $10 for members, $12 for nonmembers. Come explore the planets and the moon,
seek out nebulas and galaxies, and learn the constellations of winter. Dress warmly, bring the whole family, and be prepared to be
dazzled by the winter night sky. Pre-registration is not required.
RANDOLPH - Biscuit. Chandler Music Hall, 71-73 Main St. 10
a.m. ArtsPowers newest musical features a frolicking little puppy
named Biscuit who loves exploring, making new friends, and
even stirring up some mischief. Along the way, Biscuit learns
about the joys of having a family. Reserved seating: all seats $6
Tickets: 802-728-6464 or outreach@chandler-arts.org
TUNBRIDGE - Vermont Archaeology Talk. Tunbridge Public
BERLIN - Barre-Tones Guest Night. Capital City Grange at 6612 Library, 289 VT 110. 7 p.m. Free. Vermont State Archaeologist Jess
VT Route 12. 7-9 p.m. Women of all ages and musical ability are Robinson will give an Overview of the Archaeological History of
welcome to join in on the fun. Carpools may be available upon Vermont. Info: 889-9404, tunbridgelibrary@yahoo.com
request. Attending a guest night is a great opportunity to meet
women from across central Vermont and learn about this unique
style of performing. Music-reading ability is not necessary, though EAST MONTPELIER - Morning Garden Parent/Child Class.
a good singing voice is required. Info: 802-552-3489
Orchard Valley Waldorf School East Montpelier Campus, 2290 VT
Red Cross Blood Donation. Central Vermont Medical Center, Route 14N. 9-11 a.m. Share a rhythmic morning in a home-like
setting in our Early Childhood Farmhouse. Songs and stories, time
130 Fisher Rd. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
to share questions and ideas about your growing children, and outside time on our beautiful campus. For beginning walkers up to age
MARSHFIELD - Civilian Conservation Corps Federal Program 3, with a caregiver. Info/register: Lynn Novak at lynn.n@ovws.org;
during the Depression - A Marshfield Historical Society pro- 802-456-7400. This is a 10-week class running on Saturdays.
gram. Old Schoolhouse Common. 7 p.m. Free and all are welcome. MONTPELIER - Capital City Winter Market. Montpelier
More than 350 young men worked on three sites in the Groton State City Hall. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Featuring seasonal produce, local
Forest. Short video program and an illustrated talk. A memoir by one meats and cheeses, hot food, and handmade crafts from central
of the family members will be presented. People who have actual Vermont. Info: Ashton Kirol, 793-8347 or manager@montpeliermemories of the time are urged to attend and share. Info: 454-7767. farmersmarket.com.
MONTPELIER - Healthy Eating in the New Year with Lisa 2017 Clarke Dinner and Slide Show Series. Unitarian Church
Mas, food as medicine educator and owner, Harmonized Cookery. of Montpelier. 6 p.m. Dinner $15. Reservations: Nancy Schulz,
Hunger Mountain Coop. 5-6 p.m. Learn ways to develop a healthy SaddleShoes2@gmail.com. Slide show: Natures Inherent
relationship with food and savor delicious meals that help keep you Intelligence: Why Paying Attention Matters So Much free and
healthy. From high protein breakfasts and metabolism-boosting open to public. This presentation on the exciting field of biomimlunches to healthy snacks and make-ahead dinners, you will leave icry will focus on the brilliant cycles and balances in nature that
with recipes and delicious inspiration. $3 members/$5 nonmembers. can inspire us toward a new way of being.
Armchair Travel Talk: Newfoundland. Montpelier Senior Activity RANDOLPH - Pianist Simone Dinnerstein. Chandler Music
Center, 58 Barre St. 6:30-8 p.m. Free and open to the public. Join us Hall, 71-73 Main St. 7:30 p.m. Simone Dinnerstein is a critically
for a presentation of photos from Barbara Thompsons trip to lauded pianist whose thoughtful and compelling interpretations
Newfoundland. Known as The Rock, the island of Newfoundland have captivated audiences all over the world. She returns to the
showcases a magnificent rugged coast with picturesque peninsulas Chandler stage with a program by Franz Schubert with response
where some of the worlds rarest land formations can be experienced works by Philip Glass. Reserved seating: Adults $33-$35; students $10; kids 5 and under free. Tickets: 802-728-6464 or online
and 5,000 years of human settlement can be witnessed.
at www.chandler-arts.org
WATERBURY - Hour of Code. Waterbury Public Library. 3-4 WILLIAMSTOWN - Make Reservations for Annual Chicken
p.m. Kids will learn how to make their own interactive stories and Pie Supper. Seatings at 5 and 6:30 p.m. on Jan. 28 at Williamstown
animations using code from Scratch Jr. and Hopscotch computer Masonic Lodge. Adults/$12, Children/$6. Make reservations by
programs. For ages 8-11. Please call to register.
Jan. 21: 433-5440
Project Circle. Williamstown Academy at Ainsworth Public Library,
2338 Vt Rt 14. 10 a.m. Are you working on a fiber arts project? Join
BARRE - Are Heat Pumps Right for You? Aldrich Public our group as we all work together. Free and open to public. Register:
Library Milne Room. This workshop will cover the latest in heat 433-5887 or library@williamstownvt.org
pump technologies, the relative economics of using heat pumps
versus other fuel sources, successful case studies, and resources to
help you. Heat pump distributors will be on-site to share information. A light dinner will be provided starting at 5:30 p.m., with the BERLIN - Family Fun Day. Capital City Grange. 3-3:30 p.m.
Balloon Artistry, Face Painting & other Kid-Friendly Fun; 3:30-5
workshop scheduled for 6-7:30 p.m.
p.m. Guided Family Dancing; VT Fiddle Orchestra with Dave
CHELSEA - Red Cross Blood Donation. United Church of Kaynor calling; 5 p.m. Vermont MacnCheese Supper; 5:15 p.m.
Chelsea, 13 North Common. Noon to 5 p.m.
Kids Film Shorts. $5/Kids under 4 Free/$20 per family. Info: 802EAST MONTPELIER - Foot Clinic. Twin Valley Senior Center 477-3951
Rte 2. 8:30 a.m. to noon. Schedule appointment: 802-223-3322
Sing-a-long. Twin Valley Senior Center, Rte 2. Come join us for
lunch and stay for the singing! All ages welcome. Free of charge. ELMORE - Cross-country Ski with GMC. Moderate. 6 miles
Donations welcomed. PianistPat Mayhew.
round trip. Start at Rte. 12 south of Elmore village and ski north
MONTPELIER - Exploring the Music Devoted to Brigid: The to Little Elmore Pond, following an old woods road which is also
Pre-Christian Celtic Goddess and Saint, in preparation for used by dogsledders on weekends. If the weather is cold enough,
Imbolc with Amy Panetta, MA. Grian Herbs Apothecary, 34 Elm we will also ski around the pond. Contact: Steve and Heather
St. 7-8:30 p.m. We will explore the music that has been written in Bailey 1-609-424-9238 or stevecbailey@gmail.com for meeting
devotion to her and engage in participatory singing and music to time and place.
connect us to her aspects during Imbolc. All musical skill levels
are welcome. $15/person. Register: 862-324-5254.
John Lackard Blues Jam at Sweet Melissas, 4 Langdon St. 7:30 MONTPELIER - Need Some Stress Relief? with Shona R
MacDougall Registered Herbalist (AHG). Hunger Mountain
p.m.
Fueling Your Brain for Health and Longevity with Marie Coop. 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Learn how stress affects your body. We
Frolich, Health Coach and Herbalist. Hunger Mountain Coop. 6-7 will talk about herbs and supplements to help with both long term
p.m. Learn about superfoods, adaptogens and whole food recipes and immediate stress. We will also discuss some stress relieving
and herbs to support brain health and cellular energy. Join Marie techniques.
Frohlich to taste recipes and learn more. $10 members/$12 non- WATERBURY - Lego Challenge: Winter City. Waterbury
Public Library. 3-4 p.m. Drop in after school and use your creativmembers.
Farmers Night Free Concert Series: Vermont Sympony ity and imagination to build a Winter City scene with loads of
Lego bricks. For ages 8-11. No registration required
Orchestra. House Chamber of Vermont Statehouse. 7:30 p.m.

Monday, January 16

Saturday, January 21

Tuesday, January 17

Wednesday, January 18

Sunday, January 22

Monday, January 23

Tuesday, January 24

Thursday, January 19

BOLTON - Cross-country Ski/Snowshoe with GMC. Various


distances. All abilities. Bolton Touring Center. Trail fee. Bring
lunch. Contact Mary Garcia, 622-0585 or Mary Smith, 505-0603
for meeting time and place.

CAT SHOW
January 14th- 15th, 2017
at the

Sheraton Hotel & Conference Center

CANADIAN CLUB

870 Williston Rd, Burlington Vt. 05403

BINGO

Flash Ball 1: $1,000.


Flash Ball 2: $500
Mini Jackpot 51#'s: $3,200.
Jackpot 55#'s: $2,300.

Thursday Night
Doors Open at 4:00 PM
Premies at 6:00 PM
Regular Games at 7:00 PM

CANADIAN CLUB
ROUTE 14 479-9090
Just outside of Barre

THIS WEEK'S
SPECIAL

CHICKEN &
BISCUIT

&

Admission: Adults
$7.00
Seniors
Admission:
Adults $7.00
Seniors 6060+
+ and and
ChildrenChildren
6 to 12 $5.00 6 to 12 $5.00
Open to the
public 10 am to 4 pm both days.
Open to the public 10 am to 4 pm both days.
Plan to attend the Saturday Evening Auction.
Plan to attend the Saturday Evening Auction.
All the proceeds of the auction will benet the
All the proceeds
of the auction
will benefit
the FranklinSociety
County Humane Society.
Franklin
County
Humane
Good for $1.00 Discount

CAPITOL MONTPELIER 229-0343


PARAMOUNT BARRE 479-9621
Y

24-Hr Movie Line 229-0343 BKUETS


or www.fgbtheaters.com TOICNLINE
CALL OR LOG ON FOR CURRENT SHOW TIMES AND LOCATIONS!

SAMBELS! SAMBELS!

Book Your Get-togethers, BBQs,


Weddings, Anniversaries, etc.
Sambels Catering 249-7758

www.facebook.com/vtworld.news

AMERICAN
LEGION
BARRE POST 10
THE

320 NORTH MAIN ST.


BARRE, VT

1. Rogue One: A Star Wars


Story (PG-13) Felicity Jones
2. Sing (PG) animated
3. Passengers (PG-13)
Jennifer Lawrence
4. Why Him (R) Zoey
Deutch, James Franco
5. Assassins Creed (R) 6.
Moana (PG) animated
7. Fences (PG-13) Denzel
Washington, Viola Davis
8. La La Land (PG-13) Ryan
Gosling, Emma Stone
9. Office Christmas Party (R)
Jason Bateman, Olivia Munn
10. Collateral Beauty (PG13) Will Smith

Fri., Jan. 13 ~ 7-11 pm


Sherri Lambertons

KARAOKE SHOW
$3 Cover

Sat., Jan. 14 ~ 7-11 pm


Enjoy The Band

Killin Time
$5 Cover

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC


21 & OVER
For information, call
the Post at 479-9058

(c) 2017 King Features Synd., Inc.

Annual Chicken Pie Supper


Saturday, January 28, 2017
Seatings at 5:00 & 6:30PM

Adults $12.00 Children $6.00


Williamstown Masonic Lodge
(across from elementary school)

Reservations 433-5440
by Jan. 21

Sponsored by Charity Chapter #57, OES


Summit Lodge #104 F&AM

Now Open for Dinner

with new homemade specialties weekly

ONLY $10.99!

includes dinner with dessert

choice of homemae tiramisu, peanut butter cup blondie, or ice cream

kids meals $6.99

~ TAKE OUT AVAILABLE ~


menu selections for the week of 1/11 - 1/14
* Baked Meat Lasagna
served with garlic bread
* Slow Roasted BBQ Beef
tender slices of bbq beef brisket served with rice pilaf
and grilled vegetables
*Coconut Shrimp
crispy coconut shrimp with a tangy orange dipping sauce,
served with rice pilaf and grilled vegetables
*Baked Italian Chicken
marinated in italian seasoning and baked to perfection,
served with rice pilaf and grilled veetables
*Pasta
Choose from Cheese Tortellini or Linguini topped with your
choice of homemade sauce - Marinara, pesto, or white clam
sauce - Served with garlic bread
*BBQ Beef Sandwich
delicious BBQ beef brisket on a bulkie roll with coleslaw
and hot sauce, served with fresh cut french fries and a pickle
each entree includes choice of side

Dinner Served Wednesday - Saturday 4:00 - 7:30


On 1 Admission fee

240 North Main Street, Barre, VT 802-622-0706

January 11, 2017

The WORLD

page 27

WORLD SPORTS & OUTDOORS

Northfields Carson Smit (right, #12 in white) fires up a shot over


the Twinfield defense in the fourth quarter of last Thursday nights
middle school game in Northfield. Instead of a JV game, the
Northfield-Twinfield middle school game was played just prior to a
Northfield varsity contest and the miniature Twinfield Trojans
defeated the little Northfield Marauders, 30-12. Photo by Bill
Croney

Chelseas Jake Colby (right, #2 in red) earns a much-deserved trip to the free throw line as Northfields Trevor Page (left, #21 in white)
brings the hammer down in the second quarter of last Thursday nights game, in Northfield. Colby led the Red Devils in scoring with
17 points, but Chelsea fell to the Marauders, 52-45. Photo by Bill Croney

Support SHS Winter


Sports Teams, Help
Create World with Less
Cancer and More
Birthdays

Anyone who wants to honor a loved one or friend who


has or had cancer can attend one of the Spaulding home
games below. A minimum donation of $2 allows you the
chance to create a luminaria bag in their honor.
Leave the bag with one of the representatives at the
game or drop it off in the main office by Wednesday, Jan.
25 in order to be part of the community display.
Support SHSs winter sports teams as they suit up for a
bigger fight.
Schedule:
Tuesday, January 17, wrestling
Saturday, January 21, indoor track at Norwich
For game times, go to
http://www.shsbtc.org/athletics/athletics.htm

Montpeliers Maggie Barbero-Menzel


(left,
#5 Hockey
in green) Broadcast
goes aroundSchedule
Maggie Barbero-Menzel (left, #5 in green) gets her shot off
2016
- 17
Northfields Fanny Arvidsson (right, in white) on her way to the against the much taller Katie Lafaille of Northfield (right, #22 in
hoop in the second half of last Friday nights game in Northfield. white) during last Friday nights game in Northfield. The
The Montpelier girls fell to the 7-1 Northfield girls, 37-15. Photo by Northfield girls picked up their seventh win of the season by
Bill Croney
downing the Solons, 37-15. Photo by Bill Croney

2/1
Wednesday
at
U32
2/4
Saturday 4:15pm
U32
2/8
Wednesday
at
Northfield
2/11
Saturday 3:30pm
Spaulding
2/15
Wednesday
+Appl.
at
Spaulding
Tax
2/18
Saturday 5:00pm
2/18
Saturday 7:00pm
2/22
Wednesday
at
U32

5:00pm Girls Hockey

PATRIOTS WIN,
YOU WIN!
Boys Hockey

BFA St. Albans

1/21 Saturday 5:30pm


Boys Hockey U32 at Spaulding
1/25 Wednesday 7:30pm
Boys Hockey BFA St. Albans at Spaulding
Available free at www.thebeatvermont.com
On Mobile Phone from The Beat App or TuneIn Radio

page 28

The WORLD

January 11, 2017

at

8:45pm Girls Hockey

Spaulding

Boys Hockey

at

Essex

HOT
87 MEDIUM
OR ICED COFFEE

LIVE HIGH SCHOOL HOCKEY

Woodstock

5:30pm Girls Hockey

BFA St. Albans

Boys Hockey
Rutland at
U32
Girls Hockey
Rice
at
U32
7:00pm Boys Hockey
Woodstock

LIVE HIGH SCHOOL HOCKEY


12/17
Saturday 6:30pm
Boys Hockey U32 at Stowe

12/21 Wednesday 5:30pm


Girls Hockey Northfield at Spaulding

12/16 Friday 7:00pm


Boys
Basketball Williamstown
at U32
B-M Road-Berlin
Barre
DRIVE
12/17 Saturday 6:30pm
UP
622-0250
479-0629
Boys Hockey U32 at Stowe
12/19 Monday 7:00pm
Girls Basketball BFA Fairfax at Williamstown
12/20 Tuesday 7:00pm

Montpelier
223-0928

DRIVE
UP

WORLD SPORTS & OUTDOORS

Vt Fish & Wildlife Initiates Moose Study

The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department is initiating


a multi-year study to better understand the states moose
herd.
Moose across the Northeast are increasingly under
stress from a parasite known as winter ticks. The ticks
are becoming more prolific as spring and fall weather
has warmed in recent years, causing some moose to collapse from blood loss or die from hypothermia after
rubbing their insulating hair off in an attempt to rid
themselves of the parasite.
Beginning in January 2017, researchers with the Fish
& Wildlife Department will start placing radio-collars
on up to 60 wild moose to follow their movements and
determine causes of mortality. Moose will be captured
by expert wildlife capture contractors using nets from
helicopters via well-established techniques that minimize stress and harm to the animal. Department staff
will then track these moose for several years using the
GPS points gathered by the collars, and by visiting
moose directly in the field to record observations.
Vermont is the fourth northeastern state to partake in
such a study state fish and wildlife agencies in New
Hampshire, Maine, and New York are currently using
the same methods to examine their moose herds.
Biologists hope to better understand whether
Vermonts moose calves are surviving to adulthood.
They want to know what is causing the death of any
moose that die during the study period, including those
that are killed by predators such as coyotes or bears, and
those that die from brainworm infections or stress
caused by winter tick parasites. Biologists will also
examine whether female moose are successfully reproducing and where their young go after they leave their
mothers side.
Moose face a variety of potential threats in the northeast, from warmer temperatures to dramatically increased
parasite loads and habitat fragmentation, said Cedric
Alexander, Vermont Fish & Wildlifes lead moose biologist. It is important that we understand how much these
factors are affecting our moose population in Vermont.
Our moose conservation efforts must be based on a
strong foundation of science if we are to understand and
address these threats in the long term.
Vermonts moose herd has decreased from an estimated high of over 5,000 individuals in the state in the
early 2000s to roughly 2,200 today. The majority of the
reduction in the number of moose was a deliberate effort
by biologists to bring the herd into better balance with
available habitat at a time they were considered overabundant. A single moose can eat over 25 pounds of
food a day and their browsing was damaging forest eco-

If you are looking at this space so are

29,999* other people

*According to the nationally known audit rm


Circulation Verication Council (CVC)
The WORLD has an average readership of 30,000 per issue
Audited numbers are numbers you can trust.

DONT PUT OFF TIL


TOMORROW WHAT YOU
CAN SELL TODAY!
479-2582
Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753
Central Vermonts Newspaper

Vermont will soon begin a three-year study of the states moose herd
by capturing the animals and placing radio-collars on them. Photo
courtesy of Maine Department of Inland Fisheries & Wildlife

systems, harming not only their own habitat but habitats for
many other animals.
According to Alexander, this deliberate reduction in the herd
through hunting may have also helped Vermonts moose stave
off the worst effects of winter ticks as they have increasingly
become a problem in recent years.
Winter ticks spread more rapidly when moose are overabundant, said Alexander. Although we decreased Vermonts
moose herdto reduce the impactsatof moose on the landscape, it
contributed to the much
at lower rates of winter ticks
may have also
on Vermonts
moose than biologists
at observe on moose in New
Hampshire or
Maine.
at
The studywill run through 2019.
at For more information, go to

at
www.vtfishandwildlife.com.

at
at
at
at

Vermont Hunters had Successful 2016 Deer Seasons

nity and to limit population growth in


The Vermont Fish & Wildlife
some parts of the state.
Department says preliminary
The primary
goal of Vermonts deer
numbers show 16,160 deer were

at
management strategy is to keep the deer
taken during Vermonts 2016
herd stable, healthy and in balance with
deer hunting seasons.
available habitat. Maintaining an
Reports from big game check
appropriate number of deer on the landstations indicate hunters had
scape ensures deer and the habitats that
successful deer seasons in 2016,
support them remain in good condition
taking 3,447 deer in archery
and productive, said Fortin. This
season, 1,438 in youth season,
years harvest clearly demonstrates how
7,725 in rifle season, and 3,550
productive our deer herd can be.
in muzzleloader season. The
Each year the department operates
16,160 deer brought home by
biological check stations during deer
hunters yielded more than 3
hunting seasons to gather information
million meals of local nutritious
on the age, sex, field dressed weight,
venison.
antler characteristics, and overall health
The legal buck harvest of
of Vermonts deer herd. In 2016, bio9,968 was 19 percent more than
Houston
logical data
were collected from 1,830
the previous three-year average
deer examined during the two-day youth
of 8,372, and the highest buck
season and November rifle season.
harvest since 2002, said deer
To provide additional data, hunters
project leader Nick Fortin.
submitted more than 2,700 teeth from
Harvest numbers increased
bucks harvested during the rifle season.
during all four seasons, and the
Fortin adds, The effort made by hunters
total harvest of 16,160 is the
and many of our big game reporting stasecond-highest since 2002.
The increased harvest was Josh Dufresne of Springfield, VT with the impres- tions to collect teeth during rifle season
primarily due to the exception- sive 8-point buck he took in Vermonts 2016 will greatly improve our understanding
deer season. Hunters took 9,968 bucks of Vermonts buck population.
ally mild winter of 2016 which November
in all of the states different 2016 deer seasons.
The 2016 report on deer hunting seaallowed more deer to survive. Photo courtesy of VT Fish & Wildlife
sons with final numbers will be on
Additionally, the department
issued nearly twice as many muzzleloader antlerless Vermont Fish & Wildlifes website (www.vtfishandwildlife.com)
deer permits this year to provide more harvest opportu- in early February.

Domino's

FOOTBALL CONTEST

1 BIG WINNER EVERY WEEK

1 LARGE, 1-ITEM PIZZA


No cash or carry-overs.

- RULES -

1. One winning entry per eligible person per household.


2. Mail or bring your entry to The WORLD, 403 Rte. 302, Barre, VT 05641 by Friday,
5 p.m. before Sunday's game.
3. In case of a tie, the winner will be determined by a tie-breaker. Any further
tie-breaker will be determined by a drawing.
4. Must be 18 years and older to play.
5. Contest not open to World employees or their immediate families.
6. Prizes will be mailed to your address as filled out on entry form.

403 US Route 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641


NAME __________________________________________
ADDRESS _______________________________________
CITY _________________________________ AGE _____
PHONE _________________________________________
SIGNATURE _____________________________________
SELECT YOUR WINNERS

SATURDAY, JAN. 14
NFC Divisional Playoffs 4:35 p.m. FOX
Seattle at Atlanta
SCORE___________

lead mitigation, such as recycling, reducing range floor surface drainage or liming range property.
An estimated $75,000 in grant funds will be available this
year. These funds are derived through the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service Wildlife Restoration Program which is
based on federal excise taxes on hunting and shooting
equipment.
Ranges that receive one of these grants must provide at
least 20 hours of public use per month when in operation and
be open at reasonable times for hunter education courses.
For further information or to download an application
packet, visit the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department website at www.vtfishandwildlife.com. Click on Hunting and
Trapping, and then on Shooting Ranges in Vermont.

SCORE __________

AFC Divisional Playoffs 8:15 p.m. CBS


Houston at New England
SCORE___________

SCORE __________

SUNDAY, JAN. 15
AFC Divisional Playoffs 1:05 p.m. NBC
Pittsburgh at Kansas City
SCORE___________

SCORE __________

NFC Divisional Playoffs 4:40 p.m. FOX


Green Bay at Dallas

Vermont Fish & Wildlife Grants Available to Improve Shooting Ranges

Vermont Fish & Wildlife is offering shooting range


improvement grants to create more access to safe places to
shoot.
Developed to encourage upgrades of shooting ranges to
enhance their safety and operation, the Shooting Range
Improvement Grant Program seeks grant applications from
shooting clubs, sportsmens groups and government agencies involved in the operation of shooting ranges, including
archery ranges until 4:30 p.m. on March 15. The grant
period begins July 1, 2017.
Eligible projects include shooting range re-development,
noise abatement structures, safety berms, shooting pads and
stations, and the construction or improvement of access
roads and parking lots. Grant money can be also used for

CLASSIFIEDS
403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin Barre, Vermont 05641

SCORE___________

___

SCORE __________

1-4 WINNER Joyce Jacek, Montpelier


1-11 WINNER no winner due to early press schedule

2 LARGE

DINE
IN OR
CARRY
OUT

3 TOPPING

Domino's

322 North Main Street, Barre


January 11, 2017

$10

EACH
PIZZA
Plus tax. With this coupon.
CODE 5393

479-2222

The WORLD

page 29

Et

INTERESTED
IN CDL?

Looking for a
Beauty Shop?

Classes
ongoing in Barre
Information:

476-4679
249-2886

Booth Rental

Part- or full-time. Established


hairdresser. Reasonable rent.
Lots of FREE PARKING.
Contact Tom 479-0855

Visit Our Website:


www.cdlschoolinvt.com

WORLD
CLASSIFIEDS
Deadline: Monday 10:00AM Display Ads Thursday at 5:00PM

BARBERSHOP &
HAIR SALON

802-479-2582 1-800-639-9753 Fax 802-479-7916 sales@vt-world.com www.vt-world.com

325 Main St., Barre

JOB OPPS

Domino's
Now Accepting
Applications For

Part-Time
Closing Shift Manager

H&R Block is seeking a

Customer Service Representative

to work in a fast-paced team-oriented environment.


For more information, please contact
Penny at 802-479-9100
or penny.farrell@HRBlock.com

Must be 18 years old


Nights & Weekends

www.facebook.com/vtworld.news

Must Also Be Reliable


& Responsible
Apply In Person

322 No. Main St., Barre

Classied
Deadline Is
Monday
Before 10AM

DRIVERS TRAINEES NEEDED! Learn to driver for Stevens Transport! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! New drivers
earn $900+ per week! PAID
CDL TRAINING! Stevens covers all costs! 1-888-734-6714
drive4stevens.com

For
Classified
Advertising
That Works

Call 479-2582
or
1-800-639-9753

AIRLINE
MECHANIC
TRAINING

Get FAA Technician certification. Approved for


military benefits. Financial Aid if qualified.
Job placement assistance.
Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance

866-453-6204

Best Place to Work

Environmental Services
Technicians Needed
The University of Vermont Health Network - Central
Vermont Medical Center is seeking Environmental Services
(EVS) Technicians to join our team! EVS Technicians work
together with the most advanced technology to make sure
that the hospital is maintained at the highest standards for
cleanliness and infection prevention. CVMC is proud to have
won the Avatar Innovation Award for an outstanding
score in hospital cleanliness.
New higher starting wage and shift differentials! Interested
in joining our team? Learn more and apply online today:
UVMHealth.org/CVMC/Jobs

Equal Opportunity Employer

page 30

The WORLD

January 11, 2017

Vermont Association for


the Blind and Visually
Impaired

DriVer neeDeD

Driver needed to work with a visually


impaired employee in our Berlin office
four days per week. Must have reliable
vehicle, clean driving record and flexible
schedule. Hourly rate plus mileage.
Please call Cathie Peller at 802-505-4006
for an application or e-mail resume to
cpeller@vabvi.org.
EOE

CLIENT SERVICES
COORDINATOR

Make a difference by helping Vermont individuals &


families with their housing needs. Join the professional
team at the Vermont State Housing Authority, a statewide
affordable housing provider. Immediate opening for an
organized, reliable individual to perform a variety of
administrative & technical support to the overall dayto-day program division operations. Position involves
telephone communication & public contact work &
is based in Montpelier. Must be able to multi-task &
work in a fast-paced environment, independently or as
part of a team. For position details,
requirements & qualifications, visit our
web site: www.vsha.org. Cover letter &
resume to: HR, VSHA, 1 Prospect St.,
Montpelier, VT 05602-3556. VSHA is
an Equal Opportunity Employer.

JOB OPPS
continued

FARM WORKERS and


Crop Laborers
Alton, New Hampshire area: 1
temporary position at Sunflower Gardens. Worker needed
to do greenhouse work, field
work, plant, weed, and water
plants. Pack plants to fill orders
and load into vans. Transplant
seedlings into selling containers and place in growing area.
To start approx. 02/02/2017.
Ending 11/15/2017. A great
deal of heavy lifting, standing, bending and kneeling for
long periods of time. Wage is
$12.38 per hour. Work is guaranteed for 75% of contract
period. Tools are provided
without cost. Housing provided at no cost to workers who
resided outside of the normal
commuting distance. Transportation cost reimbursed after 15 days or 50% of contract
period, whichever comes first.
A request can be made for
additional information and/
or to provide contact info for
a referral by calling NHES
Scott Koblich (603)229-4407.
Please specify the employer
and this H-2A agricultural Job
Order Number: 139217.
HOUSEKEEPER; 3 hours
Monday mornings. Change
linens, clean bathrooms, vacuum, dust and polish, Prefer
experienced with references.
802-223-3535
Join a Great Medical Office
Team in Central Vermont* Title: Office Assistant Part-Time:
Flexible Afternoon Hours Primary Job Responsibilities:
Answer Phones, Assist Patients with Questions, Use
Medical Scheduling software,
Put Together paper Charts,
Filing, Office Equipment Use:
Keyboarding Skills, Navigating Software, Fax Machine
and copier, Positive Attitude,
Contact: katrina.payea@mbahealthgroup.com
WORK AT HOME AND EARN
BIG BUCKS!
Earn up to $1,000 a week
at your leisure in your own
home? The probability of gaining big profits from this and
many similar at home jobs is
slim. Promoters of these jobs
usually require a fee to teach
you useless, and unprofitable trades, or to provide you
with futile information. TIP:
If a work-at-home program
is legitimate, your sponsor
should tell you, for free and
in writing, what is involved. If
you question a programs legitimacy, call the ATTORNEY
GENERALS
CONSUMER
ASSISTANCE PROGRAM at
1-800-649-2424.

CHILDCARE
BARRE CITY childcare. 15
years experience. School Age
/Toddler openings. 802-4763565.

continued on next page

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES

HEALTH CARE

LOOKING TO EARN A MILLION$? Watch out for business opportunities that make
outrageous claims about
potential
earnings.
Dont
get fooled into get rich quick
scams. There are legitimate
business opportunities, but
be cautious of any business
that cant reflect in writing
the typical earnings of previous employees. TIP: Investigate earning potential claims
of businesses by requesting
written information from them
before you send any money,
or by calling the ATTORNEYS
GENERAL CONSUMER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM, at
1-800-649-2424.

WANT A CURE-ALL?
Health fraud is a business
that sells false hope. Beware
of unsubstantiated claims for
health products and services.
There are no Quick Cures
no matter what the ad is
claiming. TIP: DO NOT rely
on promises of a money back
guarantee! Watch out for key
words such as exclusive secret, amazing results, or
scientific breakthrough. For
more information on health related products or services, call
the ATTORNEY GENERALS
CONSUMER ASSISTANCE
PROGRAM at 1-800-6492424, or consult a health care
provider.

CLASSES &
WORKSHOPS
AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAININGGet FAA certification.
Approved for military benefits.
Financial Aid if qualified. Job
placement assistance. Call
Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-453-6204

continued

WANTED
OLD
LICENSE
PLATES
WANTED. Pre 1920 by Serious Collector. Cash buyer.
Conrad Hughson
Box 1, Putney, VT 05346
chughson@svcable.net
802-387-4498

OLD
LICENSE
PLATES
WANTED. Pre 1920 by Serious Collector. Cash buyer.
Conrad Hughson
Box 1, Putney, VT 05346
AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAIN- chughson@svcable.net
INGGet FAA certification. 802-387-4498
Approved for military benefits.
WANTS TO purchase minerFinancial Aid if qualified. Job als and other oil and gas interplacement assistance. Call ests. Send details to: PO Box
Aviation Institute of Mainte- 13557, Denver, CO 80201
nance 888-686-1704

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JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
FOR INFO, 802-522-4279.

LOST &
FOUND
REWARD! WEDDING RING
Lost on December 6th at Urgent care, CVS, or Walmart,
Berlin, VT. Please call 802426-3121

HEALTH
CARE
GOT KNEE PAIN? BACK
PAIN? SHOULDER PAIN?
Get a pain-relieving brace at
little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients, Call Health
Hotline Now! 1-800-279-6038
LOOKING FOR A MIRACLE/
Lose 20 pounds in one week?
This is almost impossible!
Weight loss ads must reflect
the typical experiences of the
diet users. Beware of programs that claim you can lose
weight effortlessly. TIP: Clues
to fraudulent ads include
words like: breakthrough,
effortless, and new discovery. When you see words like
these be skeptical. Before you
invest your time and money
call the ATTORNEY GENERALS CONSUMER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM, at 1-800649-2424.
LUNG CANCER? And 60
years old? If so, you and your
family may be entitled to a significant cash award. Call 800364-0517 to learn more. No
risk. No money out of pocket.

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ANTIQUES/
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RESTORATION

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802-249-2525, 8:30-3:30
Mon-Wed-Thurs-Fri; Sat till
noon; Closed Sun & Tues.

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ADVERTISE to 10 Million
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your ad in over 140 community newspapers, with circulation totaling over 10 million
homes. Contact Independent
Free Papers of America IFPA
at danielleburnett-ifpa@live.
com or visit our website cadnetads.com for more information.

continued

Lung Cancer? And Age 60+?


You And Your Family May Be
Entitled To Significant Cash
Award. Call 866-428-1639
for Information. No Risk. No
Money Out of Pocket.

OXYGENAnytime,
Anywhere. No tanks to refill. No
deliveries. The All-New Inogen
One G4 is only 2.8 pounds!
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Now offering a 45 -Day Risk
Free Offer! FREE BATTER- SELL YOUR STRUCTURED
IES for Life! Call to start your SETTLEMENTS or annufree trial! 888-675-5116.
ity payments for CASH NOW.
you dont have to wait for your
DISH NETWORK 2017 SPE- future payments any longer!
CIAL OFFER! $39.99/MO. 2 Call 1-800-938-8092
Year Price Lock. Free Installation, Free HD/DVR. Plus SOCIAL SECURITY Disability
$100 Gift Card. Call 1-855- benefits. Unable to work? De746-2424
nied benefits? We can Help!
Win or pay nothing! Contact
FRESH START AUTO
Bill Gordon & Associates at
SALES
1-800-586-7449 to start your
& Financing, LLC.
application today!
East Montpelier VT
Repossessions, Fore Closure STOP PAYING FOR EXPENSIVE AUTO REPAIRS! Get
Bankruptcies.
discounted warranty coverage
802-229-2888
from the wholesale source,
1-866-528-8084
and dont pay for expensive
FUNERALS CAN BE VERY covered repairs! Start saving
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ones afford it? Protect them
with Final Expense Insurance. SWITCH TO DIRECTV. From
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HBO, SHOWTIME, CINEHARDWOOD
KINDLING, MAX, STARZ. Get a $50 Gift
Meshbags $8.00/ea. Free Card. 888-672-1159
delivery to Seniors. 802-279WE CAN remove bankrupt2595
cies, judgments, liens, and
HARDWOOD
KINDLING, bad loans from your credit file
Meshbags $8.00/ea. Free forever! The Federal Trade
delivery to Seniors. 802-279- Commission says companies
that promise to scrub your
2595
credit report of accurate negaHOTELS FOR HEROESto tive information for a fee are
find out more about how you lying. Under FEDERAL law,
can help our service mem- accurate negative informabers, veterans and their fami- tion can be reported for up to
seven years, and some banklies in their time of need, visit
ruptcies for up to 10 years.
the Fisher House website at
Learn about managing credit
www.fisherhouse.org
and debt at ftc.gov/credit. A
LIFE ALERT. 24/7. One press
of a button sends help FAST!
Medical, Fire, Burglar. Even
if you cant reach a phone!
FREE brochure. CALL 800457-1917

message from The World and


the FTC.

continued on page 32

SCHOOL NURSE LONG TERM SUBSTITUTE

Northfield Middle/High School is looking for a


long term substitute school nurse. 2 to 3 days
a week, now thru the end of the 2016-2017
school year. Interested applicants must hold
an active RN and Educators License with the
State of Vermont. Please send cover letter,
resume, 3 letters of reference, transcripts and
license to:
Washington South Supervisory Union
ATTN: Human Resources
37 Cross Street #1
Northfield, Vt. 05663
EOE

www.WalkerVT.com
Barre-Montpelier, VT

Automotive Technician

Growing New Car Dealership is seeking a quality "A"


Service Technician. We want an individual looking for
a career with an established growing organization.
You may currently be a top producer in the automotive
industry, but unhappy with the opportunities where you
are. Come in and talk to the team at Walker Mazda/
Volkswagen.

We Offer:

*Professional factory
training
*401K
*Health Insurance
*Dental
*Life and Disability
Insurance

*Fun & pleasant working


atmosphere
*Excellent camaraderie
*Paid Vacations and
Holidays
*Monday-Friday work week
*Great Earning Potential

We seek an individual with:

*Positive Attitude
*Good driving record
*Desire to succeed
*Reliable transportation
*A-Technician
*Volkswagen experience preferred, but will train the
right individual
Your call/interview will be held in the strictest
confidence.
Walker Mazda/Volkswagen is an
Equal Opportunity Employer.
To apply, contact Dennis Routhier at
802-223-3434 extension 121.

Unique Opportunity
Although many nursing homes today offer wonderful
care, most of us would prefer to live out our lives in the
comforts of home.
Upper Valley Services is recruiting homes located
across the state of Vermont to provide a variety of
supports to individuals who want to live in the comfort
of a home. The supports may include transportation to
go to church or to visit family, personal shopping and
medication oversight. Some personal care depending
of level of need. If interested in learning more about
being a shared living provider for our Comforts of Home
Program, please contact Laurie Fay, Adult Family Care
Coordinator, at 802-222-9235 for more information.

Pharmacy Technician

Montpelier Pharmacy is seeking a motivated


individual to fill a full-time positions of
Pharmacy Technician. This position will
require the individual to complete certification
training and testing and must be driven to
work closely helping the public. Tasks will
include, but are not limited to, taking refill
orders, filling prescriptions, but will primarily
focus on cashier duties. A competitive benefits
package will be provided after a 90-day trial
period. Please stop in with your cover letter and
resume, or Email it to montpelierpharmacy@
yahoo.com.

CUSTODIANS

Seeking experienced and motivated workers to perform office, classroom, dormitory


cleaning, and other duties in assigned work locations. High school diploma or equivalent
is required as well as one to two years related experience or training. Some overtime and
weekend work may be required.

GROUNDS CREW WORKER

Grounds and general maintenance work, such as planting, mowing, raking, shoveling
and snow removal, athletic field grooming and marking, and room set ups for functions.
Valid drivers license required. Some overtime and weekend work is required.

PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICER

Uniformed patrol on campus: enforce regulations, secure buildings, provide escort,


respond to complaints, maintain log and write incident reports. Direct parking for special
events; light maintenance and delivery work; related duties as required. Duties include
independent patrol shifts on nights and weekends.
To apply: please submit a cover letter, resume,
and Norwich application: https://norwich.interviewexchange.com
Norwich University is an Equal Opportunity Employer and is committed to providing a positive
education and work environment that recognizes and respects the dignity of all students, faculty and staff.
Reasonable accommodations will be made for the known disability of an otherwise qualified applicant.
Please contact the Office of Human Resources at nuhr@norwich.edu for assistance.
All candidates must be authorized to work for any U.S. employer. A post offer, pre-employment background
check and physical examinations are required.
Norwich University offers a comprehensive benefit package that includes medical, dental, vision, group
life and long term disability insurance, flexible-spending accounts for health and dependent care, 403(b)
retirement plan with employer match, employee assistance program, paid time off including parental
leave, and tuition scholarships for eligible employees and their family members.
January 11, 2017

The WORLD

page 31

FURNITURE

MUSICAL

STORAGE

ELECTRONIC
HOSPITAL
Bed excellent condition originally $2000 selling for $200
firm. 802-793-1945

MICHEAL
RICCIARELLI,
Fretted Instrument Repair.
802-229-0952 or
802-272-1875
www.northbranchinstruments.com

BIG ROCK PROPERTIES


Self storage units available,
5x10, 10x10, 10x20. Rte 113
Chelsea. 802-249-2368.
www.bigrockselfstorage.com

www.vt-world.com STORAGE

STOP

CONTAINERS

DELIVERED TO YOUR SITE

NEVER GIVE YOUR:


SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER
CREDIT CARD NUMBER
BANK ACCOUNT NUMBER
Or any other
personal information
To someone you dont know
when answering an advertisement.

PLENTY OF STORAGE TRAILERS


& CONTAINERS AVAILABLE
Call For Prices

1-877-204-3054
LEASING

Exit 3
off I-89

FOR THE MOST CURRENT CLASSIFIED ADS, VISIT OUR WEB PAGE:

FOR LEASE OR SALE...

Royalton, VT
1-877-204-3054 (802) 763-7876

Thank You For Saying


I Saw It In

A public service announcement


presented to you by The WORLD

SPORTING
EQUIPMENT

TOOLS/
MACHINERY

INSULATED ICE SHANTY,


4Wx8Lx6H asking $450.
802-479-2623

Tool Warehouse Outlet, Inc.


Rt. 302 Barre-Montpelier

SNOWSHOESYukon Charlies Womens 8X25 New


Condition $50.00. obo 802223-7555

HUNTING/GUNS/
ARCHERY
BARRE ARMY NAVY STORE
order on line at
www.vtarmynavy.com.
Free shipping on all orders to
Vermont zip codes. Camping,
outdoor military equipment.
LIVE BAIT
OPEN EARLYOPEN LATE
call anytime.
Route 12, Putnamville.
802-229-4246
NEW AND Used guns, muzzle
loaders, accessories, Snowsville Store, E.Braintree 802728-5252
Classied
Deadline Is
Monday
Before 10AM

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING FORM

OVER

A/MC/DISC

403 U.S. RT. 302 - BERLIN BARRE, VT 05641-2274

IS
Use your V
9-2582 or
and call 47
753

1-800-639-9

479-2582 1-800-639-9753 FAX 479-7916

ORD
W
R
E
P 0 MIN.
$3.5er Week
P

d
Per A

4 for 3
SPECIAL

Run The Same


Classified for
3 Consecutive Weeks-

Get 4th Week

FREE!

(Any changes void free week)

LINE RATE 1-3 Words Per Line $1.75/LINE


CAPITALIZATION:

Capitalizing more than the first 2 words, etc. 70/WORD

DEADLINE: For The WORLD is MONDAY by 10:00

AM

CANCELLATIONS: A classified ad cancelled before 10:00 AM


on Monday will receive credit for the remaining paid weeks.

The WORLD asks that you check your ad on its first publication. If you find an error
please notify us immediately so that corrections can be made. The WORLD will not be
responsible for more than one incorrect publication of the ad.

CLIP AND MAIL THIS HANDY FORM TODAY

CHECK HEADING:

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EXACTLY HOW YOU WANT THE AD TO READ
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page 32

The WORLD

January 11, 2017

Animals-Farm ......................500
Animals-Pet .........................430
Antiques/Restorations .........144
Baby/Children Items ............140
Bicycles ...............................220
Boating/Fishing ...................210
Building Materials................300
Business Items....................080
Business Opportunities .......060
Camping ..............................205
Childcare Service ................030
Christmas Trees ..................370
Class & Workshops .............103
Clothing & Accessories .......130
Computers/Electronics ........100
Farm/Garden/Lawn .............410
Free Ads..............................108
Furniture..............................180
Garage Sales/Flea Mkt. ......145
Health ..................................113
Home Appliances ................160
Hunting/Guns/Archery.........305
Insurance/Investments ........090
Job Opportunities................020
Lost and Found ...................110
Miscellaneous .....................150
Musical ................................200
Personals ............................105
Professional Services .........540
Rideshare ............................125
Snow Removal Equip. .........355
Snowmobiles/Access. .........360
Sporting Equipment ............250
Storage................................235
Support Groups ..................107
Tools ....................................330
Wanted ................................120
Wood/Heating Equip............350
Work Wanted .......................040
AUTOMOTIVE
Campers/Motor Homes .......845
Cars & Accessories ............875
Motorcycles/ATVs ...............850
Trucks/Vans/Jeeps Access. .870
Vintage/Classic Vehicles .....873
Work Vehicles/Heavy Equip. ....855
REAL ESTATE
Apts./House for Rent...........630
Camps for Sale ...................650
Comm. Rentals/Sales .........605
Condominiums ....................680
Apt. Blds. for Sale................685
Homes .................................690
Land for Sale.......................670
Mobile Homes .....................600
Vacation Rentals/Sales .......645
Wanted to Rent/Buy ............610

Central Vermont's Best


Selection Of Quality Tools
Discount Prices!

802-479-3363 800-462-7656
TOOLS REPAIRED
Very fast turn around time.
Tool Warehouse Outlet, BarreMontpelier Rd.
802-479-3363,
1-800-462-7656

WOOD/HEATING
EQUIP.
DAVES LOGGING &
FIREWOOD
Green & Seasoned
802-454-1062
DONT NEED a Full Cord
1/3 Cord Seasoned to Dry
16 Delivered $110.00
802-454-8561
DRY FIREWOOD. $250/cord
You, Pickup in Worcester.
802-223-4757.

WOOD/ HEATING
EQUIP.
continued

TOP QUALITY SEASONED


Firewood being cut and split
from 1-year old seasoned
logs. Delivered locally
for $275/cord. 1-1/2 cord
minimum delivery. Single
cord Add $25.00.. Chaloux
Brothers Firewood. Williamstown 802-433-6619

SNOW REMOVAL/
EQUIPMENT
JOHN DEERE snow blower.
Used one season, fits model
318 tractor, $500.
802-454-0124.
SNOWBLOWER 32 SIMPLICITY Signature Pro Series
P2132E used 2 times. Heated
handles, cab, electric start.
Asking $2,300 call 802-4263121

FARM/GARDEN/
LAWN

FOOD GRADE Barrels totes,


FIREWOOD for SALE; cut to We have over 700 in stock
length, split and delivered in from 2 1/2Gal275 Gal totes.
Montpelier and Barre. Green Call for Info; Bicknell Barrels
$215/cord, Seasoned $300/ The Barrel Man. 802-439cord, all Hardwood. 802-485- 5149/802-439-5519.
8525
FIREWOOD,
EXCELLENT
WOOD excellent Supply little
to no wait. $215/CORD Green,
Ash/Black Cherry mix $200/
cord. Dry $325/c ord. Sparrow
Farm 802-229-2347
FIREWOOD, LYNDON Furniture Dry Hardwood Cutoffs,
Pickups loaded $60 small,
$75 Medium, $90 Large. 7:308:30AM Saturdays only, 2/
cord loads $175 plus delivery.
802-535-7295 Dave.
NEED DRY WOOD to help
get your Seasoned or Green
Wood Burning 1/3 cord Dry
wood $110. 802-454-8561

ANIMALS/
PETS

Country
Pampered
Paws
Pet Grooming &
Boarding
East Montpelier

802-229-0114
Radiant Heated Floors For Winter,
Air Conditioning In Summer

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

continued on next page

Indian
Arrowheads
Q: I spend my summer vacations in New Hampshire, where I have found dozens of
excellent Indian artifacts, including arrowheads and an
occasional tool. Can you recommend a good reference
book so I can find out more about the specimens I have?
-- Jon, Atlanta
A: There are several excellent references, but my favorite
is The Official Overstreet Indian Arrowheads: Identification
and Price Guide, by Robert M. Overstreet and published
by House of Collectibles. Overstreets guide features more
than 8,000 actual-size photographs, up-to-date regional
market reports, tips on grading and advice on how to buy
authentic relics. This is the professional standard reference
for Americas oldest collectible. I found several copies at
www.abe.com.
***
Q: I have a plate that my mom purchased during the early
1950s. It is signed Anna Mary Robertson Moses. What can
you tell me about it?
-- Rhonda, Davenport, Iowa
A: Anna Mary Robertson Moses was known throughout
the world as Grandma Moses, a famous folk artist who
began her art career in earnest when she was 78 years old.
She was born in Greenwich, New York, in 1861, and died
in Hoosick Falls, New York, in 1961. Her artwork can be
found in major museums. Her painting The Sugaring Off
sold for $1.2 million in 2006.
In 1950, a registration mark was secured, and soon the
Atlas China Company was issuing plates that featured
some of the designs of Grandma Moses. They are identified with marks that say either A Grandma Moses
Product or Anna Mary Robertson Moses.
***
Q: I am renovating and restoring a house that was built in
1885 and is considered to be a good example of the
Victorian style. My problem is that I would like to wallpaper the downstairs parlors, a hallway, entryway and master
bedroom, but I cant find appropriate designs. Can you help
me?
-- Brad, Gulfport, Mississippi
A: I have restored not one, but two Victorian homes, and I
learned a valuable lesson that if done properly, it isnt
cheap. For wallpaper, I suggest you contact Bradbury &
Bradbury, P.O. Box 155, Benicia, CA 94510; info@bradbury.com; and 707-746-1900. The reproduction papers by
this company, founded in 1979, are stunning and feature
authentic designs.
Write to Larry Cox in care of KFWS, 628 Virginia Drive,
Orlando, FL 32803, or send e-mail to questionsforcox@
aol.com. Due to the large volume of mail he receives, Mr.
Cox cannot personally answer all reader questions, nor
does he do appraisals. Do not send any materials requiring
return mail.
(c) 2017 King Features Synd., Inc.

PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
$ CASH $
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
Paying reasonable amounts
depending on the Fluctuation
of the market for cars and
trucks, FREE Local Scrap
Metal Pick-up. Call Barre,
802-917-2495, 802-476-4815,
Bob.
ALL YOUR
Tree Service Needs Call
Randy Pickels Full Tree Service, Includes Tree Removal,
Trimming, Stump Grinding,
Hedge and Shrub Trimming,
and feeding.
Call Randy at
802-479-3403/802-249-7164
Free Estimate, 35+ years
experience, Fully Insured.
ANTIQUE & VINTAGE
CLOCKS
Professionally Cleaned &
Repaired. Reasonable Prices,
Pickup/Delivery Available,
ClockWork Wayne,
802-431-5416
(Rochester VT)

CARPET AND
UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING
Residential & Commercial

223-6490

Our Reputation Is Clean!


CARPENTRY &
REMODELING WORK
Interior-Exterior
802-595-5105
Justin

DmFURNACE
MAN

Oil Furnace Tune-Ups


Cleanings Repairs
Installations
Fully Licensed & Insured
Reasonable Rates
Call Daryl

802-249-2814

HANDYMAN SERVICE. Reliable, reasonable rates, BarreMontpelier area. 802-5224872.

FOR THE MOST CURRENT


CLASSIFIED ADS, VISIT OUR
WEB PAGE:

www.vt-world.com

JAMIES YARD and TREE


SERVICE. FIREWOOD; Log
length 5 cords a Truck load
$700 delivered within area.
Brush Hogging, Logging, selective cutting, site clearing.
Free Estimate. Fully Insured.
Jamie Benjamin at
jamiesyardandtree@aol.com
or 802-272-0217
.
NEED HELP around home or
office? Handyman services
available. Call Joe. 802-4983692.
PICARDS GENERAL
MAINTENANCE
26 Years
Snow Plowing, Roof Shoveling, Garage
cleaning, Painting & Staining
Free Estimates-Insured
Call 802-229-0694 or
793-2363
ROOF SHOVELING, careful,
reasonable, also walkways,
sanding. Andy 802-223-5409

ROOF SNOW Removal +


Quality Full Tree Services.
Insured. Call Randy @ 802479-3403 or 249-7164.
SERVICES
For Your HOME; I Wash Windows, Vacuuming, Mopping,
Kitchen & Bathrooms.Great
references available. Call
Tammie, 802-249-6539.

SAFES
6 Sizes ~ 29 to 65 Guns
Green Mountain Boyz Logo
1 Hour Fire Rated
All Models On Display
In The Safe Barn At:

Rt. 12, E. Braintree

802-728-5252

HOME DELIVERY AVAILABLE

RANGER

4 Year Old Neutered Male


Ranger is an outgoing boy who
loves to give headbutts and show
off his deep purr, once he gets to
know you! He was originally a stray
cat, but a family took him in off the
streets, and cared for him for the
last 3 years. He has lived with a
quiet child and other felines in the
past, and did great.

When Is It Time to Say Goodbye?


DEAR PAWS CORNER:
As my dog gets older, Ive
been thinking more about
when the time comes that
well lose her. She doesnt
have serious health issues
now, just a little arthritis,
but I wonder what I would
do if she approached the
end of her life and were
suffering. How do you
know when its time? There is always such love and trust
toward us humans, how do we know when the lack of quality of life outweighs our desire to care for and protect
mans best friend?
Lack of control over bowel seems like a good marker, as
does difficulty standing and lethargy. What guidelines do
you suggest?
-- Amy M., via email
DEAR AMY: There are few clear guidelines for when its
time to make that final trip to the veterinarian and say our
goodbyes to a beloved pet. That is always a discussion
youll want to have with the vet and with the other members of your family.
A number of factors come into play when determining
end-of-life care for your pet. Their general physical condition and behavior; the disease(s) theyre suffering from;
their symptoms (and whether theyre treatable); and more.
Ive heard many anecdotes from pet owners about their
dog or cat or Guinea pigs last days. Each loss is different.
And while there are some signs that a dogs time is
approaching, as you outlined, often a pet has many more
days and even years left.
So, I dont have an easy answer. I do have a wish for your
dog, that she has a happy and illness-free senior life for as
long as possible.

Send your questions or tips to ask@pawscorner.com.


(c) 2017 King Features Synd., Inc.

1589 VT Rte 14S East Montpelier 802-476-3811


centralvermonthumane.org
Tues.-Fri. 1pm-5pm, Sat. 10am-4pm

The benefits of hiring professional contractors

he DIY movement has inspired


many homeowners to tackle
home repair and remodeling
projects on their own. DIY
projects can be rewarding, and many
homeowners who have embraced the
DIY movement have discovered talents
they never before knew they had.
But no matter how simple popular home renovation
television shows make remodeling projects appear,
homeowners should know that such undertakings are
far more difficult than they appear on television. Homeowners who overestimate their abilities and the time
they have to complete projects can cost themselves
substantial amounts of money. In fact, there are a variety of reasons homeowners might want to work with
professional contractors when tackling home improvement projects.
Experience
A trial and error approach can work with various
projects and problems. But applying such an approach
to home improvement projects is risky and potentially
dangerous, not to mention costly. Experienced professional contractors with strong track records (seek
recommendations from friends or neighbors) wont
have to go through trial and error and are therefore
more likely than DIYers to complete a project on time
and on budget.

Cost
Conventional wisdom suggests its less expensive
to do something yourself than to hire someone else to
Inspiration
do it for you, but thats not necessarily true of home
One oft-overlooked benefit of working with profesimprovement projects. Labor costs typically account
sional contractors is the likelihood that they can draw
for a substantial amount of professionally contracted
up ideas for projects that homeowners might otherwise
projects, but homeowners can cut those costs by volnever have thought up on their own. Homeowners
unteering to do some of the simpler tasks themselves.
without specific ideas in mind can ask contractors to
In addition, contractors often purchase materials at a
come up with various scenarios before committing to
a particular one. Veteran contractors can draw on years much lower cost than individual homeowners because
contractors buy in bulk. So while labor costs might be
of experience to create designs that DIYers might be
incapable of coming up with and/or incapable of seeing lower on DIY projects, the cost of materials can offset
through to completion.
those savings.

Resale value
Many homeowners renovate their homes with eyes
on improving the resale value of those homes. But
if homeowners want to showcase a newly remodeled kitchen when selling their homes, they should be
prepared for prospective buyers to ask who worked
on the project. Fearing potential problems down the
road, some buyers might be put off by homes that were
remodeled by DIYers and not professional contractors.
Renovating a home on your own can be a rewarding
project for homeowners. But its important that homeowners recognize the many benefits of working with
professional contractors before making any final decisions with regard to who will tackle their next project.

January 11, 2017

The WORLD

page 33

ERVICE DIRECTOR
SERVICES AT A GLANCE

RENTING

The Smart Way To Get Things Done.

Tables & Chairs


Wallpaper Steamers
Tents & Canopies
Chafing Dishes
Mowers & Grass
Coffee Pots
Trimmers
Extensions & Ladders

Sheetrock Jacks
Carpet Cleaners
Floor Sander
Chainsaws

and
Many Items
for Every
Season!

Barre-Montpelier Rd. 476-6580 (across from Fassetts bread store)


Mon.-Fri. 7:30am-4:30pm Closed Saturday
Happy to Help You with your Special Projects!

American Rental
Association Member

psmracing@aol.com

2483 elm street

Pearl Street MotorS


sAles / serVICe / reNtAl
WE RENT
POst HOle DIGGers 3 tO 10
WOOD SPLITTERS
DR FIELD & BRUSH MOWER

AND MORE
TRACKMAKERS CLUB

VAst sNOWmOBIle memBersHIPs

MOTORCYCLE / TRAILERS INSPECTION


#2
Montpelier, VT
DUE SOON
223-3336

DID YOU KNOW?

YOUR APPLE TREES CAN BE


PRUNED IN ANY MONTH
THAT HAS AN R IN IT!

Available Here

Upholstery
FUrnitUre

reupholstering

Black Bear
Biodiesel

Trash & Recycling Drop


SATURDAYS 8AM-NOON

Also doing auto, home, recreation

Also available for


Junk & Debris Removal

WASHinGtOn, VerMOnt

279-3469

802-883-2286

Call Heather @

BUILDING GARAGES
FROM FLOOR TO ROOF
Starting At

9,200

as of 4/15/2017 cost will be $9,900

House Framing & Addition Work

Call 802-296-1522 Ask for Ray

APPLE TREE PRUNING

ARBOR CERTIFIED SINCE 1974 FULLY INSURED


EPDM & TPO RUBBER
STANDING SEAM
ASPHALT SHINGLES
CEDAR SHINGLES
VINYL SIDING
WOOD SIDING

379 So. Barre Rd., South Barre


802-479-2007 Old VT Lottery Building, next to the PO
www.DarwinsSewandVac.com
Email: info@DarwinsSewandVac.com

Open Wed.-Thurs.-Fri. 10AM to 6PM, Sat. 8AM to 1PM

The
Sewing Basket
www.sewingbasketvt.com

(802)-249-2368
Washington, VT
Residential/Commercial
Fully Insured

GreGs
PaintinG & staininG
Metal Roof Painting

Handpaint or Spray
Metal Roof Painting
Interior/Exterior
Guarantee
Call

Free Estimates
Reasonable Low Rates
Neat, Quality Work
References Insured

802-479-2733

gpdpainting@aol.com

EPA, RRP, EMP Certified

A Professional Sewing Service Since 1982

Alterations and Tailoring


Tuxedo Rentals
Dry Cleaning Services
Embroidery and Monograms
325 N. Main St., BARRE - 476-8389
168 River St., MONTPELIER - 778-9311

Blue Ridge ConstRuCtion


Building and Excavation
Site Work Concrete
Driveway Repairs Septic Systems
Custom Homes Modular Homes
Design Build Services
Kitchens Bathrooms
Renovations Additions
Roofing Siding
Land/Home Packages Available

Call 229-1153
for free estimates

page 34

J. Waters

Located at

Garages to your specifications, any size.

Gift Certificates Avilable

802-586-2345

Grants Trash
Removal
(PAULS TRASH)

24 x 24 garage, 6 concrete floors with steel


rebar, (2) 7 x 9 garage doors, one entry door.

We specialize in reclaiming orchards, antique apple


tree restoration and releasing wild apple trees for
wildlife substantiality.
MAKE YOUR WINTER OR
SPRING APPOINTMENT:

Thank You For Saying


I Saw It In

The WORLD

January 11, 2017

Kevins Doors

Garage Doors and Openers


Sales & Service
Offering prompt, professional service and
repair on all residential makes and models

OPENERS

Kevin Rice, Owner

Cell: (802) 839-6318

Troy West
Carpet Cleaning
SEE THE DIFFERENCE!

802-498-3718
Dry Circular Foam
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning

https://www.facebook.com/TroyWestCarpetCleaning/

Gendron
Building

Quality In

Concrete

Concrete business since 1972.


Repairs New floors and walls Decorative concrete
Crane work Consulting ICF foundations
114 Three Mile Bridge Rd., Middlesex, VT
(802) 229-0480 gendronconcrete.com

B&M SAND

FOR YOUR TRUCK SANDER


1/2 INCh SCREENED SAlTED SAND
802-793-0895 cell 802-350-6985 pager
802-456-7049 home 802-477-2371 cell
Contact Donny or Gene

$42.00 cubic yard**


$38.00 cubic yard paid 10 days

vin E. Hudson
e
K 802-249-7112
KHidigforyou@aol.com

Slate/Gravel/Top Soil
Landscaping
Excavation/Loader Work

Cell

Snow Plowing
Sanding
Septic & Mound Systems

Handyman Service / odd Jobs


Fully Insured

if its dirt, we dig it!

Top To BoTTom Chimney ServiCeS


Richard Dickinson
(802) 479-1811

Chimney Building, Repairs, Caps


Stainless Steel Liners and Cleaning
Free Estimates/Insured

December 2016 Weather Statistics BarreMontpelier VT


Highest temperature: 49 degrees on the 18th, and 27th
Coolest daytime high: 4 degrees on the 16th
Lowest temperature: -8 degrees on the 16th
Warmest minimum 34 degrees on the 1st
Monthly average 23.0 which was exactly normal
Heating Degree days 1295 Normal 1302
Cooling degree days 0 Normal 0
Average daytime Sky cover: 7/10ths which is mostly cloudy
Heaviest rainfall: 0.72 on the 18th
Accumulated December precipitation: 2.59 Normal 2.74
Precipitation Percent of normal: 95% of normal
Thunderstorm days: total 0
Strongest winds 46 mph on the 15th from the northwest

December Weather

December 2016, was noted for more or less typical start, followed
by a colder stretch during the middle part of the month and followed
by warmer than normal conditions to end the month. Remarkably it
all balanced out at exactly normal. The warmest day not a record but
close at 49 degrees at the 18th, and 27th, the coldest minimum at 8
degrees below nowhere close to a record.
Snowfall accrued was 25.7 as recorded nearby but not at the E.F.
Knapp Airport. This was significantly more snow than in recent
Decembers. Looking at Mount Mansfield data, the snow depth at the
stake jumped to 42 snow depth at the stake. This amount was suddenly fairly decent amount representing the Green Mountain ski
resorts and was pretty good to play with on the slopes. Ski resorts
had also some fairly good snow making conditions during stretches
of arctic air low wet bulb temperatures that induced man-made powder.

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2)

Mid December measurement for Carbon Dioxide CO2 was


404.48 ppm as measured at the Mauna Loa Observatory. Highestever daily average CO2 at Mauna Loa Observatory 409.44 ppm back
on April 9th, 2016. A stable sustainable climate occurs under 350
ppm with 280 ppm the most desirable early to mid last century.
Fracking may be contributing to larger releases of Methane CH4 gas
which is 26 to 30 times more powerful than CO2 in terms of trapping
heat. Also theres evidence of larger releases of methane CH4 in
Siberia and the Barents-Kara seas in the arctic region north of Russia
which scientists continue to monitor.

marine lifeare experiencing local extinctions due to climate


change. Researchers say its likely to be just the beginning.
As the climate warms, these species, which range from types of
chipmunks to grasses to sea snails, are no longer showing up in the
places they used to call home. The phenomenon isnt isolated to one
particular geographical region or temperature zone, the study found.
Of the 976 species analyzed in the study, which was published
Thursday in the journal PLoS Biology, nearly 50 percent have
already become extinct along the warm edge of their range. Its a
reflection of a known process, by which species are moving pole
ward and to higher altitudes to escape changes to their habitats as
the climate warms. The studys author, John J. Wiens, said local
extinctions are inherent in range shifts.
The species being impacted cant exactly say, Oh, its too hot
here, Im heading north, said Wiens, who is an ecologist and evolutionary biologist at the University of Arizona. The species have
three choices: Adapt to the changing temperature, emigrate or die.
Wiens analyzed other research that assessed range shifts for other
species, looking for patterns. What he found surprised him. The
overall striking pattern is how similar it is, he said, pointing out that
its not just 50 percent of tropical amphibians, or 50 percent of temperate marine species that are going locally extinct. Its about 50
percent all over the world and for all these different groups of organisms.
Since 1880, the worlds climate has warmed 1.7 degrees
Fahrenheit, according to NASA. But that hardly compares to whats
in store. The National Climate Assessment outlines a best-case scenario for global warming that raises temperatures 2.5 degrees
Fahrenheit above the average from 1901-1960 by the end of the
century, and that can only be accomplished with aggressive policies
and regulations. The business-as-usual scenario results in 8 degrees
of warming by the end of the century, and it could go as high as 11
degrees. Though species have adapted throughout history as the climate has shifted, the difference now is the pace of change. Its happening so quickly, species dont have enough time to change along
with their changing habitats. We do a lot of work thats projecting
into the future, said Chad Wilsey, the director of conservation science for the National Audubon Society. But climate change has
been going on certainly in the last 40 years, and we can already
document those impacts.
Though the study found that local extinctions were happening
worldwide and across species, it did find a higher rate of local
extinction among species in tropical and subtropical zones. Wiens
explained this by highlighting a study that contrasted elevations in
Costa Rica and Colorado. In Colorado, its hot in the summer and
cold in the winter. Thus, species are more able to adapt, because they
have evolved to do so. In the tropics, however, temperatures do not
vary much between seasons, so species are less prepared to adapt to
changes. Thats bad news when climate changes rapidly, said
Wiens.
There have been a lot of predictions about extinctions. What I
take away from this is that those are already happening. Theyre
already really widespread all over the world, but the amount of climate change that has happened is actually really small relative to
what were expecting.

Vermont January and early February


Weather Trends

Just as December started with a decent amount of snow in the


higher elevations, January has taken this away despite decent
stretches of arctic air in the vicinity. However the rest of January will
As species struggle to move to adapt to climate change, many are see above normal temperatures on average with the main action out
disappearing from the warmest parts of their usual range, research west. Large temperature fluctuations or roller coasters in temperashows. Hundreds of species around the worldplants, animals, ture, which seem to be the new normal, will only continue the rest of

With just under a 1 degree Celsius Rise in


Temperatures huge effects, Already...

January 2017. The difference between equal warm and cold will be
temperatures spending much more time in the warm column, but
frequently followed by modified batches of arctic air.
Expect more mixed precipitation events(combinations of wet
snow, sleet, freezing rain, and rain) to be the rule rather than the
exception. Many of these storms will actually produce more rain than
snow. There will always be a small possibility of that big illusive
snow storm.

The main weather pattern we have been seeing will continue, until
a pattern change takes places toward the start of February , will be
the west coast and Pacific seeing the main action and occasionally
one or two of these bursts of jet stream energy reaching New
England, strong gusty winds can also be included. Climatology For
this usually is taken off the table, but not so much this year.

February --

There is some hope that parts of coming February may include a


string of Noreasters that could deliver considerable amounts of
snow. A this time a pattern change occurring with decent amounts of
colder air invading the east, and the west calms down and warms up.
This sea change in the larger scale weather pattern could put
Vermont in the sights for bigger snowfalls. All speculation at this
point but the conditions needed: 1. Arctic air, 2. A jet stream and
storm track to our south putting New England on the northern side of
the storms, 3. A locking in of the weather pattern with a Greenland
blocking or Negative North Atlantic Ocean pattern.

Check out Weathering Heights


on Facebook

Snow Blower Safety Tips:

Keep Best Practices in Mind this Winter

ith winter snows arriving,


homeowners, contractors,
and business owners will
again rely on their snow
blowers to clear driveways and walks. The
Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI)
is offering tips for safe and correct use of
snow blowers.

Your indispensable winter friend, the snow blower is


ready to be powered up and its important to keep safety
in mind, says OPEI President and CEO Kris Kiser. Be
sure to prepare and consider the following tips before
you use your equipment:
PREPARE BEFORE IT SNOWS
Review your owners manual and check your equipment. Check your owners manual for safe handling
procedures from your manufacturer. If you forgot to
drain the fuel last winter before storing your snow
blower, drain the tank now. Adjust any cables. Check the
auger (the snow blower should always be completely
powered off when you are checking the equipment).
Know how to operate the controls. You should be able to
shut off your equipment quickly.
Prepare your fuel and handle it properly. Its important
to have the right fuel on hand for your snow blower
movement and fuel availability may be limited during a
snowstorm. Be sure to use the correct fuel, as recommended by your equipments manufacturer (for more
information on fueling properly see www.
LookBeforeYouPump.com). Fill up the fuel tank outside
before you start the engine and while the engine is cold.
Never add fuel to a running or hot engine.
Be sure to clean the area you intend to clear with your

equipment. Snow can sometimes hide objects that if run


over by a snow blower, may harm the machine or people.
Doormats, hoses, balls, toys, boards, wires, and other
debris should be removed from the areas you intend to
clear.
Dress appropriately. Wear safety glasses and footwear
that can handle slippery surfaces.
OPERATE YOUR EQUIPMENT SAFELY
KEY SAFETY TIP: Never put your hands inside the
auger or chute. Use a clean out tool (or stick) to unclog
snow or debris from your snow blower. Your hands should
never go inside the auger or chute. Make sure the snow
blower is in the off position before addressing any clogs.
Turn OFF your snow blower if you need to clear a clog.
If you need to remove debris or unclog snow, always turn

off your snow blower. Wait for all moving parts to come
to a complete stop before clearing any clogs or debris.
Only use your snow blower in visible conditions.
Never operate the snow blower without good visibility or
light.
Aim your snow blower with care. Never throw snow
toward people or cars. Do not allow anyone to stand in
front of your snow blower. Keep children or pets away
from your snow blower when it is operating.
Use extreme caution on slopes and hills. Use caution
when changing directions on slopes. Do not attempt to
clear steep slopes.
Know where your cord is. If you have an electric powered snow blower, be aware of where the power cord is at
all times. Avoid tripping. Do not run over the power
cord.

January 11, 2017

The WORLD

page 35

For
Classified
Advertising
That Works

AUTOMOTIVE
MOTORCYCLES/
ATVS

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text 172Z to 27414

Snowplows

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1998 JEEP WRANGLER


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Clean title, Automatic, 4WD,
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32 BLACKWELL ST., BARRE, VT 05641 1-802-476-4971

WINTER SAVINGS
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19

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Please present
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through 1/31/17.

12

You Dont Have To Purchase Your Vehicle Here To Take Advantage Of Our Quality Service!

CORNER OF
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MONTPELIER, VT

Ser vice & P ar t s

Call toll free: 866-764-7509


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The best service at the best prices. Period.


The WORLD

January 11, 2017

(4) FIRESTONE WINTER


FORCE 235/65R16 TIRES,
used only one winter, good
condition, $185.00 obo. Call
Gary 802-249-0748
1999 VOLVO S70, rust free,
runs good, good tires, inspection ready, $1,000. 802-4793484
2003
HONDA
ACCORD
4DR timing chain, auto, alloy
wheels, summer & winter tires,
196K miles, $4250 obo
802-249-0700
2004 OLDS, Remote start 2
sets tires mounted, runs good,
inspected $2500. 802-4793484
2005 BUICK LESABRE. 158k,
$2.500.00, nearly new goodyear studded snows. Runs
great. 802-454-1157.
2006 CHEV Impala LT
158k runs great new brakes
$2700.00 802-476-4317
2006 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
$2,995 East Barre Auto Sales
866-928-9370 For more Details Text 095Q TO 27414
2006 SUBARU Baja Turbo
5 speed $7000.00 802-2294834
2006 SUBARU OUTBACK
$6,995 East Barre Auto Sales
866-928-9370 For more details test 203X to 27414

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Saturday 8:30-1:00
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WINTERMASTER

CARS &
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2012 KIA FORTE KOUP
$6,200 East Barre Auto Sales
(866) 928-9370 For more details text 094T to 27414
CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!!
All Make/Models 2000-2015!
Any Condition. Running or
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DONATE YOUR CAR to Veterans Today! Help and Support
our Veterans. FastFREE
pick up. 100% tax deductible.
Call 1-800-245-0398.
ERASE BAD CREDIT FOREVER!
Credit repair companies make
false claims and promises to
erase a trail of unpaid bills or
late payments from your credit
report. However, only time can
erase negative, but accurate
credit information. In addition,
federal law forbids credit repair companies from collecting money before they provide
their service. TIP: If you have
questions about your credit
history or you want to know
how to get a free copy of your
credit report call the ATTORNEY GENERALS CONSUMER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
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FRESH START AUTO SALES
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Bad Credit? No Credit:
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1-866-528-8084
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802-229-2888
1-866-528-8084

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Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 7-5


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CARS &
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CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!!
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A L L SI Z ES

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95 INSPECTION
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page 36

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89

Cooper Weather Master S/T 2

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For more details text 1XW9 to
27414

.95

AVAILABLE AT CAPITOL CITY KIA

- synthetics & diesels extra


Most cars & light trucks

2008 SUBARU IMPREZA


$6,595 East Barre Auto Sales
866-928-9370 For more Details Text 0ZE9 TO 27414

Protect Your Vehicle From Winter Grime


- Exterior hand wash & wax
- Vacuum interior
- Dust down the dash
- Wash windows,
inside & out
Reg. Value: $134.95
- May not be combined with any other offer

Please present coupon at vehicle write-up. Offer good through 1/31/17.

YOUR
E
CHOIC

2007 TACOMA; 4X4; 67K;


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Good M&S tires Cruise; New
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NOKIAN

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UNIROYAL

49

THE CLEAN SLATE

2007 FORD FIVE HUNDRED


$6,400 East Barre Auto Sales
(866) 928-9370. For more details text 1XXI to 27414

GENERAL

We Repair All
Snowplow
Brands

2005 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE $8,995 East Barre Auto


Sales (866) 928-9370. For
more details text 1ZQN to
27414

FIRESTONE

Call 479-2582
or
1-800-639-9753

Classied
Deadline Is
Monday
Before 10AM

WINTER FORCE

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ADS

Now Placing Your


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Our E-mail address is

sales@vt-world
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Please include contact


person & payment info
(
Only)

479-2582 or
1-800-639-9753

WORLD AUTOMOTIVE
Classied
Deadline Is
Monday
Before 10AM

JUST296 EastGOOD
AUTOS
Montpelier Rd Rt. 14 North - Barre

We Sell TIRES

802-479-0140

2002 CHEV. BLAZER LS


4x4, 4 dr., auto., PW, PL, low miles

We Service All
Makes & Models
Fleet & Commercial
Accounts Welcome
We Honor All
Extended Warranties

$3,995
1994 JEEP CHEROKEE
LAREDO 4X4
AC, PW, PL, low miles, one owner

$4,995

JUST EAST OF MONTPELIER ON RTE 2 BERLIN, VT

2002 FORD F250 XL 4X4


auto.

$5,495

Jerry Dudley's Auto Connection


395 Washington Street
Barre, VT 05641
Phone: 802.476.8114
30+ Years In Satisfying Customers

Robert Dudley
Jerry Dudley

Find Us Online at dudleyauto.com


CARS

TRUCKS, SUVs & VANS

All Prices Include 6 Month/7500 Mile Powertrain Warranty

We Are Now A

FULL SERVICE SHOP Doing State

Inspections, Tires, Oil & Filter, Mechanical, etc.

98 BUICK PARK AVE.


auto., leather, low miles

$2,495
2009 CHEVROLET COBALT LS
2-door, auto., low miles

$5,995
2006 FORD FOCUS
4-door, auto, PW, PL, AC

$4,995
2006 FORD F150 XCAB XLT 4X4
auto., AC, PW, PL, one owner,
low miles, NY title, warranty

$12,995
2005 BUICK LACROSSE
auto., PW, PL, AC, low miles

$4,995
2005 FORD FOCUS 3 DR.
5 spd., PW, PL, low miles

$3,995
2005 FORD FOCUS SES
loaded, sunroof, 5-spd, low miles, sharp red

Truck Caps & Accessories


Are Available at Luckys Trailer Sales

www.luckystrailers.com

402 VT Rt. 107 (Exit 3, I-89) So. Royalton, VT 05068

1-800-877-5854

Call 802-763-3427 or

E-mail Glenn at
ghatch@luckystrailers.com

$4,995
2004 BUICK LASABRE

auto., leather, one owner, low miles

$4,995
2003 FORD CROWN VICTORIA

auto., loaded, low miles (81K)

$3,495
2003 TOYOTA RAV4

auto., 4WD, loaded, low miles

$6,995
2003 BUICK LASABRE
auto, NY title, low miles

$4,495

EXTENDED WARRANTIES AVAILABLE

JUST GOOD
AUTOS
Trades Welcome
Prices Negotiable

GRABBER ARCTIC P265/70R17XL

Pre-Season Sale

The Grabber Arctic is General Tires Light Truck/SUV


Studdable Winter / Snow tire developed for the drivers of
pickup trucks, sport utility vehicles, and vans looking for
traction on winters slushy, snow-covered and icy roads.
Designed to offer traction in near- and below-freezing
temperatures.

151.50 /TIRE

Plus Tax

Installed

ASK ABOUT A $50 REBATE WHEN YOU BUY 4 TIRES!

IT IS TIME TO WINTERIZE

#12, YOU ARE DUE!

19

19

.95

Vermont State
Inspection

ITS THAT TIME OF YEAR!

Check Anti-Freeze Protection


Check and Top Off Fluids
Check Tire and Brakes
Check Steering and Suspension
Check Wipers and All Lights
Check All Filters, Belts aAd Hoses INCLUDES FREE CAR
Check Battery Performance QUICK WASH & QUICK VACUUM!

95

PLUS TAX

Most Cars & Light Trucks


Pass Or Fail

OFFERS VALID AT THIS DEALERSHIP ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH OTHER OFFERS. TAX & SUPPLIES EXTRA.

Call Toll Free

866-764-7509

MONDAY - FRIDAY 7 - 5 SATURDAY 7 - 12. OFFERS GOOD WITH AD TIL 1-31-17.

Just a Sample of Many

Just Good Autos!

THANK YOU FOR SAYING


I SAW IT IN

FRESH
START
AUTO SALES AND FINANCING

4423 RTE 2, EAST MONTPELIER at KC Performance


TO CALAIS

RT

14

DUDLEYS
STORE
MONTPELIER RT
ROUNDABOUT 2

RT

KC PERFORMANCE

FRESH START
AUTO

RT

TO
ST. JAY

14

Is Your

Low Credit Score

Keeping You from Buying a New or Used Car?

Regardless Of Your Credit...

LOOKING FOR A
NEW OR USED CAR,
TRUCK OR SUV?

SHOP LOCAL DEALERS FOR THE BEST BUYS!

Social Security

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Child Support

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802.229.2888 866.528.8084
January 11, 2017

The WORLD

page 37

REAL ESTATE

WE GET RESULTS! 1-800-639-9753 sales@vt-world.com

Wed., Jan. 11, 2017 DEADLINES: Display Ads Fri. 3 PM Word Ads Mon. 10 AM
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The WORLD

Thomas Hirchak Company


continued
FROM: Terra Keene
MOBILE
HOME LOTS
EXCELLENT OFFICE
Phone:
800-634-7653
FOR RENT
SPACE

COMMERCIAL
RENTALS/SALES WANTED TO RENT/
SHARE/BUY

For Real
Estate
Advertising
That
Works

We have commercial space


available for lease and sale
and businesses for sale
throughout Central Vermont.
For more information, contact:
John Biondolillo
William Raveis BCK Real Estate
(802) 479-3366, ext. 309
JohnB@Raveis.com

Call
You For Saying
1-800-639-9753 Thank
I Saw It In

Immediate Occupancy!

Community Natl

4.125% 4.133%
3.375% 3.389%

30 yr fixed
15 yr fixed

0
0

Exposed hardwood flooring, natural woodwork,


NE Fed CU
4.000% 4.024%
30 yr fixed
0
high ceilings, built-in
storage,
formal
3.250%
3.292% and a 15
yr fixedcentral hallway,
0
as anticipated. Upstairs, rear enclosed porch. Covered
Northfield Savings
4.000% 4.039%
30 yr fixed
0
front porch with Cityscape
views. Unfi
3.250% 3.318%
15nished
yr fixed walk-up attic,
0
too.
The
detached
barn
offers
sheltered
parking
for
up
VSECU
4.000% 4.040%
30 yr fixed
0to 2
15 yr fixed $219,000! 0
vehicles with3.250%
more3.319%
storage overhead!

317 River Street


Montpelier

January 11, 2017

REALTOR

Lori Holt

www.C21Jack.com

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated

WILLIAMSTOWN-TWO BEDROOMS Apartment for rent,


Call 802-476-7902

APARTMENTS
ROOMS/HOUSES
FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE HOUSE FOR
RENT Berlin, 2000sq/ft. 2 full
baths, washer/dryer, utilities
included. $2,000/mo. 802272-5492 could be 2 one bedroom units.
BARRE, HILL St. 2nd oor,
2 bedrooms. $900 includes
heat. Available Feb. 1st. 802229-5702. email sal.b@myfairpoint.net
BARRE, SHARE apartment
w/own room, looking for a
responsible, clean, helpful
person. Call for more information on Rent and set up an appointment. 802-622-0622

5%
5%

Merchants
4.750% 4.811%
30 yr fixed
0
Charismatic
3-BR, 1 bath Montpelier Victorian residence
20%
3.450%
3.552%to Downtown
15 yr fixedamenities. 0
is only a short
distance
20%

Jack Associates

continued

149 State Street


Northfield Falls
Montpelier, VT
Mobile Home Park
Perfect location- 3 minute
COMPANY: The World
walk to Capital.
Beautiful Greek Revival BuildEntrance to Park:
45 Falls
Mobile
Homes
TODAYS
DATE:
01/05 ing. Renovated in and out.
1 Ofce, waiting room, and
Northfi
eld, VT 05663

rest room. Includes; Onsite


DATE(S)
TOBy:RUN: 1/11/17parking, heat/hot water/
Call or Stop
electricity

Village
Homes
Utilities, Ofce cleaning,
1083 US Route 2
Trash & Recycle,
Berlin,
VT 05602-8245
EMAILED
TO: sales@vt-world.com
Snow removal, Landscaping
GoVillageHomes.com
and Full Maintenance. 300 sq
802-229-1592
1C=1.48; 2C=3.1; 3C=4.68; /4C=6.3
ft, $350.00/month.
508-259-7941

Contact Lori Holt 223-6302, Ext. 1

800-634-7653
page 38

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which
makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status or national origin, or an
intention, to make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination.
Additionally, Vermonts Fair Housing and
Public Accomodations Act prohibits
advertising that indicates any preference,
limitation or discrimination based on age,
marital status, sexual orientation or
receipt of public assistance.
This newspaper will not knowingly accept
any advertising for real estate which is in
violation of the law. Our readers are
hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on
an equal opportunity basis.
To file a complaint of discrimination, call
the Vermont Human Rights Commisson
toll-free at 1-800-416-2010 (voice & TTY)
or call HUD toll free at 1-800669-9777 (voice) or 1-800-9279275 (TTY).

APARTMENTS/
ROOMS/HOUSES
WE
FOR
RENTGET
CENTRALLY LOCALLY DUPLEX Apt, 3 bedroom, 1 bath,
washer/dryer hook-up, small
basement, w parking spots,
non-smokers, no pets, $1200
/mo. rubbish only included,
1st month rent, security,
references, credit check. 802476-3087
MOBILE HOME for Rent in
East Topsham, No pets $550
/mo plus deposit. 802-4395859
RULE OF THUMB......
Describe your property,
not the appropriate buyer or
renter, not the landlord,
not the neighbors.
Just describe the property and
youll almost always obey the
law.
SOUTH BARRE Homeshare;
Wanted: Responsible Single
Adult Woman, must have own
transportation and job. No
pets, Storage available. $500
/mo Plus some shared home
expenses. Non-smoking 802272-7764
SOUTH BARRE ONE Bedroom Apartment, second oor,
recently renovated, very nice
neighborhood, near I89 and
Hannafords, $600/mo. deposit
and references required. 802355-2813
TWO BEDROOM Apartment
for rent in East Montpelier.
$950/month rent includes utilities, parking, plowing, trash/
recycling. No pets or smoking,
references required. Security
deposit, rst months rent due
at signing. Contact Michelle at
mebgharper@gmail.com

continued on next page

Updated Weekly

Home Mortgage Rates


LENDER

LAST
UPDATE

RATE

APR

TERM

DOWN
PTS PAYMENT

5%
5%

Community National 2/6/16


Bank 1-800-340-3460

4.125% 4.133%
3.375% 3.389%

30 yr fixed
15 yr fixed

0
0

5%
5%

5%
5%

Merchants Bank
1-800-322-5222

2/6/16

4.750% 4.811%
3.450% 3.552%

30 yr fixed
15 yr fixed

0
0

20%
20%

5%
5%

New England Federal 2/6/16


Credit Union 866-805-6267

4.00% 4.024%
3.250% 3.292%

30 yr fixed
15 yr fixed

0
0

5%
5%

Northfield Savings
Bank (NSB)
802-485-5871

2/6/16

4.000% 4.039%
3.250% 3.318%

30 yr fixed
15 yr fixed

0
0

5%
5%

VT State Employees 2/6/16


Credit Union (VSECU)
1-800-371-5162 X5345

4.000% 4.040%
3.250% 3.319%

30 yr fixed
15 yr fixed

0
0

5%
5%

Rates can change without notice.


***APRs are based on 20% down payment. Some products are available with as little as
5% down, with purchase of Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI). The cost of PMI is not
included in the APR calculations.

We

APARTMENTS/
ROOMS/HOUSES
FOR RENT
continued

WILLIAMSTOWN 1 BEDROOM, Heat & Hot water.


W/D Hook-up, Large Yard.
First & Last Plus Deposit.
$795.00/mo. 802-522-3994
WILLIAMSTOWN
APARTMENT for rent. 3bdrm/2
bath,
$975 per month, plus utilties.
Country setting. No Smoking.
No Pets. Plowing and trash
removal included. Call 802433-1359

VACATION
RENTALS/SALES
CRUISE VACATIONS3,4,5
OR 7 day cruises to the Caribbean. Start planning now to
save $$ on your fall or winter
getaway vacation. Royal Caribbean, Norwegian, Carnival,
Princess and many more.
Great deals for all budgets and
departures ports. To search
for your next cruise vacation
visit NCPtravel.com
WARM WEATHER is Year
Round in Aruba. The water
is safe, and the dining is fantastic. Walk out to the beach.
3-Bedroom weeks available.
Sleeps 8. $3500. email: carolaction@aol.com
for more information.

LAND FOR SALE


MORETOWN:
63
acres
$150,000 802-244-7517
MORRISTOWN: 10 +/- acres
$55.000 802-244-7517
OLD TOWN, FL 2-1/2 acres
$12,000 802-244-7517

HOMES
3 BEDROOM HOME for sale
on 2 acres, located in Norton, VT. Attached garage and
2 car detached garage, large
screened gazebo, lots of perrinals, deck, main floor open
concept living, freshly painted.
Large living room, beautiful
brick fireplace, all newer appliances. 3 zoned heating,
some furniture to be included.
Asking 120,000 for more information call
802-472-2217.

NOW HERES A TIP


By JoAnn Derson

* To keep the ends of shoelaces from fraying, just dip the end in a
bottle of clear nail polish. Hold it up until it gets tacky, then shape it
into a cylinder. It looks like the real thing and wears well.
* To make a door draft baffle for hard floors from a pool noodle, simply cut the pool noodle
in half lengthwise and to the width of your door. Use fabric to cover both halves of the pool
noodle with an inch or two in between to spare. Slip the covered noodles under the door so
that one half rests on either side of the door. The door can open and close, but when you close
it, the noodles block drafts from both sides! -- T.M.A. in New Hampshire
* Cant remember where your spare keys are? Or how many loaners you have out there? It
might be time to change the locks on your house. Experts say changing locks, installing a
home security system, and using deadbolts and sliding glass door bars are the top ways to keep
your home secure!

ABOUT FORECLOSURE?
Having trouble paying your
mortgage? The Federal Trade
Commission says dont pay
any fees in advance to people who promise to protect
your home from foreclosure.
Report them to the FTC, the
nations consumer protection
agency. For more information,
call 1-877-FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A message from
The World and the FTC.

Classied
Deadline
Is Monday
Before
10:00AM

Serving Central Vermont


for over 15 years
338 River St. Montpelier and 26 North Main St. Randolph

toll free: 877.392.5529 or 802.728.9103

TallmanLawVT@gmail.com

* Invest in a refillable water bottle that includes a water filter. It makes it so much easier to
stay well-hydrated.
* Whenever I am going to have company, I start planning a week or two before by doubling
up on recipes that freeze well. Casseroles and soups, as well as bread (I like to bake bread)
and vegetable dishes work great. I make extras and freeze them to make dinnertime a snap.
That way, I get to spend more
time visiting and less time
cooking. -- F.L. in New
York
Send your tips to Now Heres
a Tip, 628 Virginia Drive,
Orlando, FL 32803.

gn

le
xib
e
l
F

si
De

WINDY WOOD

WINDY WOOD BARRE TOWN


A common interest community

Windy Wood Road, Barre Town


SHOWN BY APPOINTMENT ANYTIME - CALL 802-249-8251 OR 802-734-1920
A Common Interest Community
One Level Living: single and duplex units, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, full basement, 1 or 2 car garage option
SHOWN BY APPOINTMENT ANYTIME
Priced from the mid $220,000s
CALL 802-249-8251 OR 802-734-1920

(c) 2017 King Features Synd., Inc.

RT 302,
turnLiving:
onto Hill Street
Elmwood
Cemetery,
on Hill Street, left onto
Directions: FromOne
Level
singleatand
duplex
homes, 2mile
bedrooms,
Windy Wood Road, look for sign on left and turn into Windy Wood.

2 baths, full basement, 1 or 2 car garage option


Priced from the mid $220,000s
Directions: From Rt. 302, turn onto Hill Street at Elmwood Cemetery,
mile on Hill Street, left onto Windy Wood Road,
look for sign on left and turn into Windy Wood.

* On Jan. 22, 1779, famed


Tory outlaw Claudius Smith
meets his end on the gallows
in Goshen, New York. Legend
has it that Smiths skull was
filled with mortar and included in the edifice of the Goshen
Court House.
* On Jan. 17, 1893, on the
Hawaiian Islands, American
sugar planters under Sanford
Ballard Dole overthrow the
Hawaiian monarch and establish a new provincial government with Dole as president.
The coup occurred with the
knowledge of the U.S. minister to Hawaii, and 300 U.S.
Marines were called, allegedly to protect American
lives.

* On Jan. 20, 1909, General


Motors buys into Oakland
Motor Car, which later
becomes GMs Pontiac division. It was founded in 1907
in Pontiac, Michigan, by
Edward Murphy, a manufacturer of horse-drawn carriages.
3Bdrm/

WILLIAMSTOWN:
2bath, 2 story on 5.9 acres.
Master bedroom has on suite
deck and bath. Home also
has single level, attached
3bdrm/2bth apartment, great
for in-law or rental income.
Detached 28x30, 2 story high
bay garage, Huge room upstairs for office/p
lay/exercise.
Minutes from I-89 access and
vast trail. $184,900. 802-4331359

Gerry Tallman, Esq.

* On Jan. 21, 1950, in one of


the most spectacular trials in
U.S. history, former State
Department official Alger
Hiss is convicted of perjury
in testimony about his
involvement in a Soviet spy
ring.
* On Jan. 16, 1970, star centerfielder Curt Flood of the
St. Louis Cardinals files suit
to protest baseballs player
reserve clause, which prevented players from moving
to another team unless they
were traded. The Supreme
Court ruled against him in a
5-3 decision in 1972.
* On Jan. 19, 1983, Klaus
Barbie, the Nazi Gestapo
chief of Lyons, France, during the German occupation,
is arrested in Bolivia for his
crimes against humanity four
decades earlier. Barbie had
sent thousands of French
Jews and French Resistance
members to their deaths in
concentration camps.
* On Jan. 18, 1990, District
of Columbia Mayor Marion
Barry is arrested and charged
with drug possession and the
use of crack cocaine. Barry
was sentenced to six months
in prison, but in 1994 was
again elected mayor for an
unprecedented fourth term.
(c) 2017 King Features Synd., Inc.

FREE

PRE-APPROVAL

E-mail
us!
Now Placing

Patti Shedd

Your Classified
Or Display Ad Is
Even Easier!

sales@vt-world.com
Please include contact person
& payment info
Only

Loan Officer
NMLS#98725
Cell: 802.476.0476
Office: 802.476.7000

We will work with you


to determine which
financing program best
fits your needs and
individual circumstances
Conventional FHA Jumbo
Rural/USDA Housing
Veterans Loans

PShedd@PremiumMortgage.com
105 North Main Street, Suite 102
Barre, VT 05641
Equal Housing Lender |
Licensed Lender State of VT | NMLS#854380

www.PremiumMortgage.com

OPEN HOUSES

Saturday, January 14 10:00AM to 12:00PM

320 Amanicki Trail, Williamstown

30 Smith Farm Road, Barre Town

Country estate on 10 private acres


with majestic views
4 bedroom, 3 bath open concept contemporary
offering over 4,000 square feet of living!
Detached, heated 2-car garage
$449,900

Enjoy one oor living in this well-built home


3 bedroom, 2 bath home with an unnished
walk-out basement with potential for more space,
workshop or storage!
Attached 2-car garage
$289,000

Directions: From I-89 Exit 5 towards Williamstown, take


Directions: Heading south on Washington St. from downtown
second left to Amanicki Trail. Continue to end of cul-de-sac
Barre take a left on Hill St. At Trow Hill take a left on
and bear right to continue to property.
Windywood Rd. Left on Smith Farm Rd. Property is on the left.

WATCH FOR OPEN HOUSE SIGNS!

135 Washington St.


Barre
476-6500

Heney
R E A LT O R S

HeneyRealtors.com 1-800-696-1456
January 11, 2017

81 Main St.
Montpelier
229-0345

The WORLD

page 39

Barre $162,000

3 bedroom 1 bath split level on .4 acres


Renovated bathroom with granite countertops
Updated kitchen with newer appliances and new roof!
MLS# 4610304
Listed by Rich Ibey

Barre Town $165,000

Great commercial building


2 bedroom apartment upstairs
Would make a great retail shop!
MLS# 4511462
Listed by John Biondolillo

Barre $97,000

Multi-unit with new painting throughout


New carpets, new windows and wiring
Very close to downtown!
MLS# 4494832

Barre $279,000

Prime Main Street location in Barre


Has a 1 bedroom apartment in the back
Very bright and sunny!
MLS# 4517131
Listed by Sue Arguin

Barre $195,000

3 bedroom 2 bath raised ranch


Double lot with .60 acres
2 cozy wood replaces
MLS# 4499461
Listed by Kevin Copeland

Barre Town $137,500

Nicely updated 3 bedroom home on .36 acres


Spacious kitchen with large mudroom
Detached two car garage
MLS# 4459225 Listed by Courtney Brummert

Buy of the Week


Barre $139,000

2 bedroom, 1 bath cape


on a quiet street
Great hardwood oors throughout
Stained glass in front windows,
great claw foot tub
MLS# 4611795
Listed by Rich Ibey

Barre Town $115,000

2 bedroom 1 bath cape on .44 acres


Meticulously maintained home
New roof in 2013
MLS# 4609513
Listed by Kevin Copeland

Danville $272,000

4 bedroom, 2 bath cape on 16 acres


Updated kitchen with granite counters
Spacious detached garage with great storage
MLS# 4511349
Listed by Kevin Copeland

Barre Town $230,000

3 bedroom 2 bath home in Barre Town


1.06 acre with great deck
2 car attached garage with another out building
MLS# 4609124
Listed by Butch Churchill

John Biondolillo
Raveis Featured Agent

Tradition runs deep here in Vermont. And when it comes to


buying or selling Vermont real estate, John brings the same
sense of tradition to his work.
For 30 years, William Raveis Real Estate has been locally
owned by people who pride themselves on running a
company that reects the family
values and character of Vermont
communities.
When you have been selling
Real Estate for as long as
John has, it is amazing how many
lives you can touch.
Johnb@Raveis.com
802-479-3366
RaveisVT.com

RaveisVT.com
802.479.3366

REALTOR

Barre Montpelier Essex Jct. Stowe St. Johnsbury Stratton Woodstock


Independently Owned and Operated

page 40

The WORLD

January 11, 2017