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DIABETOLOGY

Macrovascular and Microvascular Complications in


Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
DEEPA DV*, KIRAN BR, GADWALKAR SRIKANT R

ABSTRACT
Objectives: To study the prevalence and clinical profile of microvascular and macrovascular complications in newly diagnosed
type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in and around Bellary, Karnataka. Study design: The study was an observational cross-sectional
study of 100 newly detected type 2 diabetics attending Dept. of Medicine (outpatient/inpatient), VIMS combined hospitals, Bellary,
from October 2012 to June 2013 (9 months) who matched the inclusion criteria. Material and methods: Cases were screened for
vascular complications as per ADA criteria, data tabulated and analyzed. Statistical analysis: SPSS software package was used
for analysis. Statistical significance was defined as a p value <0.05. Results: The mean age of presentation was 54.05 13.24 with
male:female ratio of 1.6:1. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and
peripheral vascular disease was 20%, 37%, 16%, 26%, 8% and 11%, respectively; retinopathy, nephropathy and coronary artery
disease screening being significant (p < 0.05). Conclusion: There was a significant correlation between prevalence of diabetes and
increased waist circumference and body mass index. There was high prevalence of coronary artery disease, nephropathy
and retinopathy in South Indian population at diagnosis. Screening for all cases of diabetes at diagnosis for complications is
recommended.

Keywords: Type 2 diabetes mellitus, microvascular complications, macrovascular complications

iabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder


and is associated with development of chronic
complications leading to significant morbidity
and mortality. The onset of type 2 diabetes (T2DM)
is often silent and insidious. Pathogenic processes
causing T2DM range from autoimmune destruction of
cells of pancreas with consequent insulin deficiency to
abnormalities that result in resistance to insulin action.
The asymptomatic phase of hyperglycemia accounts
for the relatively high prevalence of complications at
initial presentation.1 Majority of Indias population is
in the villages and the rural population is ignorant
about the disease and its complications. It is therefore,
essential to device cost-effective and simple screening

*Senior Resident
Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute, Bangalore, Karnataka
Senior Resident
Rajarajeshwari Medical College, Bangalore, Karnataka
Professor and Head
Dept. of General Medicine
Vijayanagara Institute of Medical Sciences, Bellary, Karnataka
Address for correspondence
Dr Deepa DV
No. 82, 5th Main, Maruthi HBCS, BTM I Stage, Bangalore - 560 029, Karnataka
E-mail: drdeepa.dv@gmail.com, brkiranin@gmail.com

644

Indian Journal of Clinical Practice, Vol. 25, No. 7, December 2014

tests to detect complications. The term diabetes was


first coined by Araetaeus of Cappodocia (81-133AD).
Mellitus (honey sweet) was added by Thomas Willis
(Britain) in 1675, when he detected sweetness in urine.
It is said that it was first noticed by the ancient Indians;
Shushrutha had named it as Madhumeha.2
According to Diabetes Atlas (5th edition) in 2011,
the global prevalence of diabetes was estimated at
366 million; this figure is predicted to reach 552 million
by 2030. Eighty percent people live in low and middle
income countries. Diabetes caused 4.6 million deaths
in 2011. China leads the world with largest number
of diabetic subjects followed by India. According to
the Diabetes Atlas 2011 published by the International
Diabetes Federation, the number of people with diabetes
in India currently around 61.3 million is expected to
rise to 101.2 million by 2030.
MATERIAL AND METHODS

Source of Data
Newly detected patients with T2DM attending Dept. of
Medicine (outpatient/inpatient), Vijayanagara Institute
of Medical Sciences (VIMS) combined hospital, Bellary,
form the subjects.

DIABETOLOGY
Design of the Study

Method of Data Collection

Cross-sectional observational study.

Patients newly detected of T2DM attending Dept.


of Medicine (outpatient/inpatient), VIMS combined
hospital, Bellary were included for the study.

Duration of Study
October 2012 to June 2013 (9 months).

Inclusion Criteria
Newly diagnosed T2DM adult patients >20 years of age
were included in the study. (Laboratory diagnosis of
diabetes mellitus was confirmed by latest criteria laid
by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Blood
glucose levels were checked on two separate occasions
before the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus was made.)
According to ADA,1 criteria for diagnosis are:
Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) 6.5%. The
test should be performed in a laboratory using a
method that is NGSP (National Glycohemoglobin
Standardization
Program)
certified
and
standardized to the DCCT (Diabetes Control and
Complications Trial) assay.*

Detailed history such as age and sex, family history


of diabetes was recorded. Symptoms suggestive of
diabetes or of related complications were noted. Past
history of hypertension and complications of diabetes
was documented. Any previous treatment for these
complications taken was recorded. Smoking or alcohol
history was noted.
General physical examination, vital parameters such as
pulse, blood pressure (in sitting and standing position)
temperature and respiratory rate were recorded.
Anthropometric measurements:

Weight (in kilograms) and height (in centimeters)


was recorded.

The body mass index (BMI) was determined by


dividing the weight (in kilograms) by height
(in meters2).

Measurement of waist circumference (cm): It


was measured just above the uppermost lateral
border of the right iliac crest, a horizontal mark
was drawn, and then crossed with a vertical mark
on the midaxillary line. The measuring tape was
placed in a horizontal plane around the abdomen
at the level of this marked point on the right side
of the trunk.

OR
Fasting plasma glucose 126 mg/dL (7.0 mmol/L).
Fasting is defined as no caloric intake for at least
8 hours*

OR
2-hour plasma glucose 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L)
during an OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test)

OR

In a patient with classic symptoms of hyperglycemia


or hyperglycemic crisis, a random plasma glucose
200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L).

*In the absence of unequivocal hyperglycemia, criteria 1-3


should be confirmed by repeat testing.
The

test should be performed as described by the World


Health Organization, using a glucose load containing the
equivalent of 75 g anhydrous glucose dissolved in water.

Exclusion Criteria

Type 1 diabetes mellitus

Any other severe illness

Patients already diagnosed of diabetes mellitus


and on treatment

Refusal to be a part of the study

Pregnancy

Sample Size
Hundred cases of newly diagnosed T2DM were
included in this study.

Presence of skin infections, gangrene and ulcers was


noted.
Systemic examination was carried out in all patients.
Presence of sensory neuropathy was defined4 by
symptoms of tingling and numbness over the
extremities (bilaterally symmetrical) with or without
impaired touch, vibration sense or joint position sense.
Presence of motor neuropathy was noted. Autonomic
dysfunction in the form of resting tachycardia,
orthostatic hypotension, gastroparesis/diarrhea or
abnormal sweating was noted. Ten gram monofilament
was used to note any reduced sensation due to
neuropathy. Dilated pupil fundoscopy was carried out
in all patients by an ophthalmologist and retinopathy
was defined and graded as nonproliferative diabetic
retinopathy and proliferative retinopathy.5 Proliferative
retinopathy was described by the presence of any
retinal or optic disc neovascularization, or the presence
of preretinal or vitreous hemorrhage, whereas the
presence of microaneurysms, exudates (lipid exudates
or cotton-wool spots) and/or retinal hemorrhages only

Indian Journal of Clinical Practice, Vol. 25, No. 7, December 2014

645

DIABETOLOGY
t-test and Chi-square test was used to calculate the
significance between the variables.

was defined as nonproliferative retinopathy. Fasting


and postprandial blood sugars (venous blood samples
drawn) on two separate occasions were determined
using glucose oxidase-peroxidase method. Renal
function tests included blood urea, serum creatinine
and urine analysis. Urine was analyzed for glucose,
ketone bodies and protein. Microalbuminuria was
estimated by nephelometry. Microalbuminuria is
defined as the mean urine albumin concentration
of 30-300 mg/mL detected by nephelometry on
three consecutive days. Macroalbuminuria is
defined as urine albumin >300 mg/dL.6 Fasting
lipid profile included serum cholesterol, serum
triglycerides,
serum
high-density
lipoprotein
(HDL) and serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL).
Patient was termed to have dyslipidemia if LDL
was >100 mg/dL, serum cholesterol >200 mg/dL,
serum HDL <40 or serum triglycerides >150 mg/dL.
A 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and 2Dechocardiography was done to note the presence of
ischemia or infarction to indicate coronary artery
disease (CAD).6 Carotid Doppler was done to note
for presence of stenosis. Ankle-brachial index (ABI)
was determined using arterial Doppler. A value <0.9
was considered significant to have peripheral arterial
disease.7

RESULTS
In this study, 62 were males and 38 were females.
The mean age was 54.05 13.24 years. The maximum
incidence of diabetics was seen between 52-62 years.
Table 1 shows various metabolic parameters in the
study population. The patients presenting with
complaints correlated with diabetic complications of
CAD, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral artery disease,
retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy was 15%,
7%, 7%, 2%, 9% 7%, respectively. Fundus examination
revealed that 19 cases had nonproliferative diabetic
retinopathy and one case had proliferative retinopathy.
It was statistically significant. Microalbuminuria was
seen in 30 cases, macroalbuminuria seen in four cases
was statistically significant. ECG findings were normal
in 74 cases, myocardial infarction (MI), left bundle
branch block, left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH)
in three cases each, old MI in seven cases, ischemic
heart disease in six cases and arrhythmias in two
cases. 2D-echocardiography showed regional wall
motion abnormality in 23 cases, hypertensive heart
disease in eight cases, concentric LVH and ischemic
dilated cardiomyopathy in one case each. Carotid
Doppler showed atherosclerosis in five cases and was
statistically insignificant. ABI showed limb ischemia in
19 cases among which seven cases showed critical limb
ischemia which was statistically insignificant. Twentyeight cases were detected on routine investigations,

Statistical Analysis
SPSS software package was used for the analysis.
Statistical significance was defined as a p value <0.05
(two-sided). Mean standard deviation (SD) and
confidence interval (CI) was calculated. Students

Table 1. Mean and Standard Deviation of the Metabolic Parameters


Parameters
Age

Diabetics
(n = 100)

CAD
(n = 25)

CVD
(n = 8)

PVD
(n = 11)

DR
(n = 20)

DN
(n = 34)

DNe
(n = 16)

54.05 13.24

57

61

55

55

56

59

Weight (kg)

74 13

78

79

84.36

75.8

76.94

77.33

Height (cm)

165 6.3

166

167.25

166

167

166

164

BMI

27.02 12.8

28.04

30.10

30.6

27.28

27.85

28.81

Waist circumference

90.14 9.43

93

96.25

95.54

88.75

90.6

93.73

208 73.7

220

229

277

226

232

246

FBS
PPBS

304 95

326

344

426

334

344

338

Blood urea

29.6 15.5

36.5

37.4

34.5

31.4

33.8

31.1

Serum creatinine

1.04 0.39

1.24

1.275

1.9

1.24

1.203

1.129

HbA1C

8.65 1.8

9.016

9.15

10.5

9.24

9.23

9.4

Total cholesterol

156 49.9

170

183

196

168

160

176

BMI = Body mass index; CAD = Coronary artery disease; CVD = Cerebrovascular disease; DN = Diabetic nephropathy; DNe = Diabetic
neuropathy; DR = Diabetic retinopathy; FBS = Fasting blood sugar; PPBS = Postprandial blood sugar; PVD = Peripheral vascular disease.

646

Indian Journal of Clinical Practice, Vol. 25, No. 7, December 2014

DIABETOLOGY
28 were incidentally detected when they attended the
hospital for other illnesses and rest of the 44 cases
presented with multiple complications due to diabetes.
The metabolic parameters are described in Table 1.
Common complications which they presented were
CAD (15%), infection (12%), stroke (6%), ulcers (4%),
neuropathy (4%) and diabetic ketoacidosis (1%). The
prevalence of macrovascular complications CAD,

Table 3 shows correlation of HbA1C with diabetic


complications. In our study, correlation coefficient
of fasting blood sugar (FBS) and postprandial blood
sugar (PPBS) in relation to HbA1C was 0.56 and 0.57,
respectively.

Table 2. Prevalence of Complications at Diagnosis


Complications

Percentage (%)

P value

CAD

26

0.011*

CVD

08

0.334

PVD

11

0.477

DR

20

0.018*

DN

34

0.003*

DN

16

0.368

cerebrovascular disease and peripheral arterial


disease was 26.0%, 8.0% and 11.0%, respectively
and
microvascular
complications
retinopathy,
nephropathy and neuropathy was 20.0%, 34.0% and
16.0%, respectively. Table 2 shows p values of the
vascular complications. Smoking and hypertension
are confounding factors which influence CAD. High
incidence of complications especially microvascular
and CAD occur with HbA1C of range >6.5.

DISCUSSION
This is a study done over a period of 24 months in
cases of newly detected T2DM attending the inpatient
and outpatient department of VIMS combined

*Significant p <0.05.

Table 3. HbA1C in Correlation with Diabetic Complications


HbA1C (%)

Mean SD

CAD

CVD

PVD

DR

DN

DNe

P value

<6.5

02

5.95 0.77

P-01
A-01

P-01
A-01

P-00
A-02

P-00
A-02

P-01
A-01

P-00
A-02

0.8602*

6.51-7.5

37

7.16 0.22

P-08
A-29

P-02
A-35

P-01
A-36

P-05
A-32

P-06
A-31

P-03
A-34

0.0301**

7.51-8.5

20

7.94 0.31

P-03
A-17

P-01
A-19

P-02
A-18

P-04
A-16

P-07
A-13

P-04
A-16

0.0021**

8.51-9.5

13

9.16 1.9

P-04
A-09

P-00
A-13

P-00
A-13

P-03
A-10

P-08
A-05

P-02
A-11

0.0040**

>9.51

38

11.16 1.23

P-10
A-28

P-04
A-34

P-08
A-30

P-08
A-30

P-12
A-26

P-06
A-32

0.0026**

P-26
A-74

P-08
A-92

P-11
A-89

P-20
A-80

P-34
A-66

P-15
A-85

Pool
*Nonsignificant; **Significant p <0.05.
A = Absent; N = Number; P = Present.

Table 4. Comparison of Prevalence of Complications with Other Studies


Complications (%)

CAD

Mohan et al13
(n = 4,471)

Hoorn study12
(n = 255)

7.9

CVD
PVD

2.3

DR

34.2

Weerasuriya et al9
(n = 597)

Drivsholm et al8
(n = 1,137)

Our study
(n = 100)

26.9

28.4

27.9

26

5.1

3.4

2.4

08

4.6

16.1

17.5

11

1.9

15.2

5.4

20

DN

26.7

29

48.1

37.4

34

DN

48.3

25.2

19.1

19.1

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Indian Journal of Clinical Practice, Vol. 25, No. 7, December 2014

647

DIABETOLOGY
hospital. In our study, 28 cases were detected on
routine investigations out which 18 had symptoms of
polydipsia, polyuria. Twenty-eight were incidentally
detected when they attended the hospital for other
illnesses and rest of the 44 cases presented with
multiple complications due to diabetes.

REFERENCES

Total of about 43 cases had symptoms of polydipsia,


polyuria. Present study correlates with findings seen
in Drivsholm et al8 study. In T2DM, at diagnosis
there is a high prevalence of complications. Our study
showed similar results as Weerasuriya et al,9 which is
a Sri Lankan study. In Western studies, there is low
incidence of retinopathy. Drivsholm study8 showed
higher prevalence of nephropathy in males. Table 4
shows prevalence of complications at diagnosis of
various studies.

3. Longo DL, Fauci AS, Kasper DL, Hauser SL, Jameson JL,
Loscalzo J. Harrisons Principles of Internal Medicine.
18th edition, Vol. 2. McGraw-Hill: USA 2012;344:
p. 2968-3002.

In our study, correlation coefficient of FBS and PPBS


in relation to HbA1C was 0.56 and 0.57, respectively.
In DCCT10 it was 0.82 and in a study conducted by
Nathan et al11 it was 0.89. The relative contribution
of postprandial PG decreased progressively from the
lowest to the highest quintile of HbA1C. By contrast, the
relative contribution of fasting PG showed a gradual
increase with increasing levels of HbA1C.
CONCLUSION
Large proportion of population presented because of
complications occurring due to diabetes- a silent killer.
Screening for CAD, retinopathy and nephropathy at
diagnosis was statistically significant. There is high
prevalence of CAD (26%), retinopathy (20%) and
nephropathy (34%) at diagnosis, which is statistically
significant. Prevalence of cerebrovascular disease,
peripheral vascular disease and neuropathy is 8%, 11%
and 16%, which is statistically insignificant.
Nephropathy in our study defined by microalbuminuria
has a high prevalence whereas overt kidney disease
was negligible. This shows importance of screening at
diagnosis and to treat and delay progression. HbA1C
levels predict the prevalence of complications and there
is moderate correlation between HbA1C and blood
glucose levels. Screening with simple tests such as
ECG, Echo, fundoscopy and urine microalbuminuria at
diagnosis for all cases of diabetes is essential to identify
the complications at an early reversible stage.

1. American Diabetes Association. Diagnosis and


classification of diabetes mellitus. Diabetes Care 2006;29
Suppl 1:S43-8.
2. Ahmed AM. History of diabetes mellitus. Saudi Med J
2002;23(4):373-8.

4. American Diabetes Association American Academy


of Neurology. Consensus statement: Report and
recommendations of the San Antonio conference on
diabetic neuropathy. Diabetes Care 1988;11(7):592-7.
5. Wilkinson CP, Ferris FL 3rd, Klein RE, Lee PP, Agardh CD,
Davis M, et al; Global Diabetic Retinopathy Project Group.
Proposed international clinical diabetic retinopathy
and diabetic macular edema disease severity scales.
Ophthalmology 2003;110(9):1677-82.
6. American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical
care in diabetes. Diabetes Care 2005;28 Suppl 1:S4-S36.
7. American Diabetes Association. Peripheral arterial
disease in people with diabetes. Diabetes Care 2003;26(12):
3333-41.
8. Drivsholm T, de Fine Olivarius N, Nielsen AB, Siersma V.
Symptoms, signs and complications in newly diagnosed
type 2 diabetic patients, and their relationship to
glycaemia, blood pressure and weight. Diabetologia
2005;48(2):210-4.
9. Weerasuriya N, Siribaddana S, Dissanayake A, Subasinghe
Z, Wariyapola D, Fernando DJ. Long-term complications
in newly diagnosed Sri Lankan patients with type 2
diabetes mellitus. QJM 1998;91(6):439-43.
10. Monnier L, Lapinski H, Colette C. Contributions of fasting
and postprandial plasma glucose increments to the
overall diurnal hyperglycemia of type 2 diabetic patients:
variations with increasing levels of HbA(1c). Diabetes
Care 2003;26(3):881-5.
11. Nathan DM, Turgeon H, Regan S. Relationship between
glycated haemoglobin levels and mean glucose levels
over time. Diabetologia 2007;50(11):2239-44.
12. Spijkerman AM, Dekker JM, Nijpels G, Adriaanse MC,
Kostense PJ, Ruwaard D, et al. Microvascular complications
at time of diagnosis of type 2 diabetes are similar among
diabetic patients detected by targeted screening and
patients newly diagnosed in general practice: the Hoorn
screening study. Diabetes Care 2003;26(9):2604-8.
13. Premlatha G, Rema M, Mohan V. Complications of
diabetes mellitus at diagnosis in South Indian type 2
diabetic patients. Int J Diab Dev Ctries 1998;18:1-4.

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Indian Journal of Clinical Practice, Vol. 25, No. 7, December 2014

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PRANCO - ltmlAN

PHARMACEUTICALS PVT. LID.


20, Dr. E. MoaN IGlll, t.\Jn'Dll - 400 011

Every citizen of India should have the right to accessible, affordable, quality and safe heart care irrespective of his/her economical background

Sameer Malik Heart Care Foundation Fund


An Initiative of Heart Care Foundation of India

E-219, Greater Kailash, Part I, New Delhi - 110048 E-mail: heartcarefoundationfund@gmail.com Helpline Number: +91 - 9958771177

No one should die of heart disease just because he/she cannot afford it
About Sameer Malik Heart Care Foundation Fund

Who is Eligible?

Sameer Malik Heart Care Foundation Fund it is an initiative of the


Heart Care Foundation of India created with an objective to cater to the
heart care needs of people.

Objectives
Assist heart patients belonging to economically weaker sections of
the society in getting affordable and quality treatment.
Raise awareness about the fundamental right of individuals to medical
treatment irrespective of their religion or economical background.
Sensitize the central and state government about the need for a National
Cardiovascular Disease Control Program.
Encourage and involve key stakeholders such as other NGOs, private
institutions and individual to help reduce the number of deaths due
to heart disease in the country.
To promote heart care research in India.

All heart patients who need pacemakers, valve replacement, bypass


surgery, surgery for congenital heart diseases, etc. are eligible to apply for
assistance from the Fund. The Application form can be downloaded from
the website of the Fund. http://heartcarefoundationfund.heartcarefoundation.
org and submitted in the HCFI Fund office.

Important Notes
The patient must be a citizen of India with valid Voter ID Card/
Aadhaar Card/Driving License.
The patient must be needy and underprivileged, to be assessed
by Fund Committee.
The HCFI Fund reserves the right to accept/reject any application
for financial assistance without assigning any reasons thereof.
The review of applications may take 4-6 weeks.
All applications are judged on merit by a Medical Advisory Board
who meet every Tuesday and decide on the acceptance/rejection
of applications.
The HCFI Fund is not responsible for failure of treatment/death
of patient during or after the treatment has been rendered to the
patient at designated hospitals.

To promote and train hands-only CPR.

Activities of the Fund


Financial Assistance

The HCFI Fund reserves the right to advise/direct the beneficiary


to the designated hospital for the treatment.

Financial assistance is given to eligible non emergent heart patients.


Apart from its own resources, the fund raises money through donations,
aid from individuals, organizations, professional bodies, associations
and other philanthropic organizations, etc.

The financial assistance granted will be given directly to the


treating hospital/medical center.

After the sanction of grant, the fund members facilitate the patient in
getting his/her heart intervention done at state of art heart hospitals in
Delhi NCR like Medanta The Medicity, National Heart Institute, All
India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), RML Hospital, GB Pant
Hospital, Jaipur Golden Hospital, etc. The money is transferred
directly to the concerned hospital where surgery is to be done.

Drug Subsidy

The HCFI Fund has the right to print/publish/webcast/web post


details of the patient including photos, and other details. (Under
taking needs to be given to the HCFI Fund to publish the medical
details so that more people can be benefitted).
The HCFI Fund does not provide assistance for any emergent heart
interventions.

Check List of Documents to be Submitted with Application Form


Passport size photo of the patient and the family
A copy of medical records
Identity proof with proof of residence
Income proof (preferably given by SDM)

The HCFI Fund has tied up with Helpline Pharmacy in Delhi to facilitate

BPL Card (If Card holder)

patients with medicines at highly discounted rates (up to 50%) post surgery.

Details of financial assistance taken/applied from other sources (Prime


Ministers Relief Fund, National Illness Assistance Fund Ministry of
Health Govt of India, Rotary Relief Fund, Delhi Arogya Kosh, Delhi
Arogya Nidhi), etc., if anyone.

The HCFI Fund has also tied up for providing up to 50% discount
on imaging (CT, MR, CT angiography, etc.)

Free Diagnostic Facility

Free Education and Employment Facility

The Fund has installed the latest State-of-the-Art 3 D Color Doppler EPIQ
7C Philips at E 219, Greater Kailash, Part 1, New Delhi.

HCFI has tied up with a leading educational institution and an export house in
Delhi NCR to adopt and to provide free education and employment opportunities
to needy heart patients post surgery. Girls and women will be preferred.

This machine is used to screen children and adult patients for any heart disease.

Laboratory Subsidy
HCFI has also tied up with leading laboratories in Delhi to give up to 50% discounts on all pathological lab tests.

About Heart Care Foundation of India

Help Us to Save Lives


The Foundation
seeks support,
donations
and
contributions from individuals, organizations
and establishments both private and governmental
in its endeavor to reduce the number of deaths
due to heart disease in the country. All donations
made towards the Heart Care Foundation Fund are
exempted from tax under Section 80 G of the IT Act
(1961) within India. The Fund is also eligible for
overseas donations under FCRA Registration
(Reg. No 231650979). The objectives and
activities of the trust are charitable
within the meaning of 2 (15)
of the IT Act 1961.

Heart Care Foundation of India was founded in 1986 as a National


Charitable Trust with the basic objective of creating awareness about
all aspects of health for people from all walks of life incorporating all
pathies using low-cost infotainment modules under one roof.
HCFI is the only NGO in the country on whose community-based
health awareness events, the Government of India has released two
commemorative national stamps (Rs 1 in 1991 on Run For The Heart
and Rs 6.50 in 1993 on Heart Care Festival- First Perfect Health
Mela). In February 2012, Government of Rajasthan also released one
Cancellation stamp for organizing the first mega health camp at Ajmer.

Objectives
Preventive Health Care Education
Perfect Health Mela
Providing Financial Support for Heart Care Interventions
Reversal of Sudden Cardiac Death Through CPR-10 Training Workshops
Research in Heart Care

Donate Now...
Heart Care Foundation Blood Donation Camps
The Heart Care Foundation organizes regular blood donation camps. The blood collected is used for patients undergoing heart
surgeries in various institutions across Delhi.

Committee Members

Chief Patron

President

Raghu Kataria

Dr KK Aggarwal

Entrepreneur

Padma Shri, Dr BC Roy National & DST National Science


Communication Awardee

Governing Council Members


Sumi Malik
Vivek Kumar
Karna Chopra
Dr Veena Aggarwal
Veena Jaju
Naina Aggarwal
Nilesh Aggarwal
H M Bangur

Advisors
Mukul Rohtagi
Ashok Chakradhar

Executive Council Members


Deep Malik
Geeta Anand
Dr Uday Kakroo
Harish Malik
Aarti Upadhyay
Raj Kumar Daga
Shalin Kataria
Anisha Kataria
Vishnu Sureka

This Fund is dedicated to the memory of


Sameer Malik who was an unfortunate victim of
sudden cardiac death at a young age.

Rishab Soni

HCFI has associated with Shree Cement Ltd. for newspaper and outdoor publicity campaign
HCFI also provides Free ambulance services for adopted heart patients
HCFI has also tied up with Manav Ashray to provide free/highly subsidized accommodation to heart patients & their families visiting
Delhi for treatment.

http://heartcarefoundationfund.heartcarefoundation.org