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Modelling migration and mutation- Active model

scenario
Set the scenario:
(Use a model scenario about a trait that shows complete dominance
inheritance pattern. Write this onto the board.)
e.g. You are a group of wild alpacas. Wild alpacas are known to be
dominant for wide necks and recessive for thin necks.
W= Wide neck (dominant)
W= Thin neck (recessive)
e.g. You are a group of wild sheep. Wild sheep are known to be dominant
for grey wool colour and recessive for black wool colour.
G= Grey wool (dominant)
g= Black wool (recessive)
Hand out a post-it note to each student
Students choose their own genotype (i.e. GG, Gg, gg), write it in large
letters on the card and they stick it to their fronts.
Choose a large group of students to form the main (original) population
of sheep.
The other students (around four- five) sit out the first round (they can be
on the outside of the main group).
Calculate the allele frequencies for the original population with the
students and record the results on the board.
Ask students put up one hand for each G allele they have in their
genotype. Write down the number on the board and then work out allele
frequency (no. G/ total alleles)
Then students put up one hand for each g allele they have in their
genotype. Write down the number on the board and then work out allele
frequency (no. g/ total alleles)
E.g. the board should look like:
Allele frequencies in Original population
Frequency of G allele= (no. G alleles/ total no. of alleles)
Frequency of g allele= (no. G alleles/ total no. of alleles)
Then get the other students to immigrate into the population- These new
individuals are entering the population because they are a smaller herd
joining a larger herd.
Write down the new allele frequencies for the population on the
board under the heading Allele frequencies after immigration.

Then get two individuals to migrate out of the population. These


individuals were roaming around looking for food (leaves or grass) and
accidentally got lost from their pack.
Calculate the allele frequency for a third time, under the heading
Allele frequencies after emigration.
Then add a new person to the population (could be the teacher).
This person is going to model what happens when a mutation arises in
an individual.
This person has a mutation- W* allele which produces a long neck. This
mutation is beneficial because the alpaca can reach leaves which are
further up on trees.
This person has a mutation- G* allele which produces a white coat (new
novel trait). This mutation is neither beneficial nor detrimental to the
organism.
Calculate the new allele frequencies for the three different
alleles.
The mutation occurred in the sex cell of the organism, meaning that it
can be passed on to offspring. What do you predict will happen to the
frequency of the mutated allele in future generations?