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NATIONAL PARKS VISITORS HIT HIGH NATION PAGE 8 TURKEY ATTACK MAN WHO KILLED 39 IN ISTANBUL

TURKEY ATTACK

MAN WHO KILLED 39 IN ISTANBUL ARRESTED

WORLD PAGE 28

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CEDENO SPARKS BIG COMEBACK

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017 XVII, Edition 131

www.smdailyjournal.com

Flight noise in holding pattern

Airplane route evaluation underway after six-month Bayside test for San Carlos Airport

By Anna Schuessler

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

San Mateo County residents along Peninsula flight routes must hold their breath as a pilot pro- gram to ease the impact of increased air traffic from Surf Air flights on Peninsula cities draws to a close. Evaluations are being conducted

of a six-month trial of a flight

route directing Surf Air flights in

and out of the San Carlos Airport over the Bay instead of Peninsula neighborhoods. The trial, which started in July and ended in early January, follows regional efforts to address resident complaints of disruptive noise as San Carlos- bound flights from the small-air- craft, members-only airline

increased in number over the last four years. Gretchen Kelly, the San Carlos Airport’s division manager, has been working to address resident complaints since the airline began routing an average of three flights a day in and out of the airport in 2013. Just south of Redwood Shores and east of Highway 101, the general aviation airport had

primarily been used by charter and instructional aircraft before the airline began sending Pilatus PZ 12 planes holding nine passen- gers or fewer to San Carlos. Kelly said the airline has since ramped up its service to the tune of 15 flights a day on average. As early as August 2013, Kelly said the airport detected an increase in complaints from resi-

dents affected by increased noise along the airline’s flight path through the Peninsula, which largely follows a straight line between El Camino Real and Highway 101 in the area falling within Mountain View and San Carlos. Residents in Menlo Park, Atherton and parts of Redwood

See NOISE, Page 19

NATIONAL PARKS VISITORS HIT HIGH NATION PAGE 8 TURKEY ATTACK MAN WHO KILLED 39 IN ISTANBUL

AUSTIN WALSH/DAILY JOURNAL

Shirley Lamarr, director of Cameo House, receives recognition as honorary chairperson of the 18th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration in downtown San Mateo. Below, Marie Davis performs an original poem honoring the work of the late civil rights leader with her son Garrick Davis accompanying her on guitar.

A testament of hope

Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy honored in downtown San Mateo

By Austin Walsh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

With the inauguration of a divi- sive president looming on the horizon, San Mateo County resi- dents braved cold morning weather to unify and bask under the glow of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy of fighting for equality. Community members, elected officials, church leaders, educators and others came together Monday, Jan. 16, to celebrate the holiday honoring the civil rights leader outside the downtown San Mateo train station.

See MLK, Page 17

NATIONAL PARKS VISITORS HIT HIGH NATION PAGE 8 TURKEY ATTACK MAN WHO KILLED 39 IN ISTANBUL

County seeks out most vulnerable

Officials using census data to map at-risk communities, inform policy

By Samantha Weigel

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

In looking to target resources to help the most vulnerable commu- nities educate their children, stay healthy and break the cycle of poverty, San Mateo County is compiling census data to map out which residents are most in need. A team of policy advisors, ana- lysts and data gurus teamed up to create the county’s first Community Vulnerability Index. Using census-track data, the coun- ty has pinpointed — often down to the neighborhood — exactly where the most at-risk people reside.

The index currently looks at

seven indicators including rates of

health insurance coverage, educa- tion, unemployment, poverty, how much of a household’s income is spent on rent, disability and who is on Supplemental Security Income. In the coming months, the coun- ty plans to create an easy-to-navi- gate online system where people can see how various regions rank on the index — which Deputy County Manager Reyna Farrales said would ideally be used by the Board of Supervisors, nonprofit leaders and the public.

See INDEX, Page 20

YouTube eyes further growth in San Bruno

Officials, company representatives to collaborate on study examining new and dramatic expansion

By Austin Walsh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Internet video titan YouTube plans on expanding its San Bruno headquarters so s ignificantly that city officials believe a special study is in order to examine how future development may transform the company’s surroundings. YouTube expects to bring 300 new workers to the city annually, requiring an enhanced presence at the BayHill Office Center, accord-

ing to video of the San Bruno City

Council meeting Tuesday, Jan. 10.

The need for additional space caused the company to consider constructing more office buildings on surface parking lots at its prop- erty near the intersection of Interstate 380 and El Camino Real, said the city’s Community Development Director David Woltering. Though the exact amount of

See YOUTUBE, Page 20

NATIONAL PARKS VISITORS HIT HIGH NATION PAGE 8 TURKEY ATTACK MAN WHO KILLED 39 IN ISTANBUL
NATIONAL PARKS VISITORS HIT HIGH NATION PAGE 8 TURKEY ATTACK MAN WHO KILLED 39 IN ISTANBUL
NATIONAL PARKS VISITORS HIT HIGH NATION PAGE 8 TURKEY ATTACK MAN WHO KILLED 39 IN ISTANBUL
NATIONAL PARKS VISITORS HIT HIGH NATION PAGE 8 TURKEY ATTACK MAN WHO KILLED 39 IN ISTANBUL
  • 2 Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day

“Whether it is the best of times or the worst of times, it is the only time we have.”

— Art Buchwald (1925-2007).

This Day in History

  • 1893 the 19th president of the United States, Rutherford B. Hayes, died in Fremont, Ohio, at age 70. Hawaii’s monarchy was overthrown as a group of businessmen and sugar planters forced Queen Lili’uokalani (lee-LEE’- oo-oh-kah-LAH’-nee) to abdicate.

In 1929, the cartoon character Popeye the Sailor made his debut in the “Thimble Theatre” comic strip.

In 1945, Soviet and Polish forces liberated Warsaw during World War II; Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg, credited with saving tens of thousands of Jews, disappeared in Hungary while in Soviet custody.

In 1946, the United Nations Security Council held its first meeting, in London.

In 1950, the Great Brink’s Robbery took pl ace as seven masked men held up a Brink’s garage in Boston, stealing $1.2 million in cash and $1.5 million in checks and money orders. (Although the entire gang was caught, only part of the loot was recovered.)

In 1961, President Dwight D. Eisenhower delivered his farewell address in which he warned against “the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex.”

In 1966, a U.S. Air Force B-52 carrying four unarmed hydrogen bombs crashed on the Spanish coast. (Three of the bombs were quickly recovered, but the fourth wasn’t recov- ered until April.) The Simon & Garfunkel album “Sounds of Silence” was released by Columbia Records.

Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

Actress Betty White is 93.

Birthdays

Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

First Lady Michelle Obama is 53.

Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

Actress/singer Zoe Deschanel is 37.

Former FCC chairman Newton N. Minow is 91. Actor James Earl Jones is 86. Talk show host Maury Povich is 78. Pop singer Chris Montez is 75. Rhythm-and-blues singer William Hart (The Delfonics) is 72. Actress Joanna David is 70. Actress Jane Elliot is 70. Rock musician Mick Taylor is 69. Rhythm-and-blues singer Sheila Hutchinson (The Emotions)

is 64. Singer Steve Earle is 62. Singer Paul Young is 61. Actor- comedian Steve Harvey is 60. Singer Susanna Hoffs (The Bangles) is 58. Movie director/screenwriter Brian Helgeland is 56. Actor-comedian Jim Carrey is 55. Actor Denis O’Hare is

  • 55. Actor Joshua Malina is 51. Singer Shabba Ranks is 51.

Rock musician Jon Wysocki is 49. Actor Naveen Andrews is

  • 48. Electronic music DJ Tiesto is 48. Rapper Kid Rock is 46.

Actor Freddy Rodriguez is 42. Actor-writer Leigh Whannel is

  • 40. Professional dancer Maksim Chmerkovskiy (TV:

“Dancing with the Stars”) is 37. Singer Ray J is 36. Actor

Diogo Morgado is 36. Country singer Amanda Wilkinson is

  • 35. NBA player Dwyane Wade is 35.

Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

SERGIO PEREZ/REUTERS

A man rides a horse through the flames during the ‘Luminarias’ annual religious celebration on the eve of Saint Anthony’s day, Spain’s patron saint of animals, in the village of San Bartolome de Pinares, northwest of Madrid, Spain.

Zebra found dead, skinned

near California’s Hearst Castle

SAN SIMEON — A zebra from a herd that roams the ranch around Hearst

Castle was found dead and partly skinned on a b each on California’s central coast, authorities said.

The zebra died of natural causes and no foul play is suspected, the San Luis Obispo County Sheriff’s Department said. Officials gave no explanation for the skinning.

The zebra had most likely washed

down Pico Creek from Hearst Ranch to a rocky section of b each where it was found Saturday, Sheriff’s Sgt. Nate Paul told the Tribune newspaper and the San Francisco Chronicle.

Powerful storms in the area last week might have been behind the death, Paul said.

“Everything was swollen and run- ning very, very fast so the storm absolutely could have explained how this zebra died or washed out,” Paul told the Chronicle.

The zebras are the private property of the ranch, which can decide whether to launch an investigation and has opted not to, Paul told the Tribune.

Over 100 zebras roam the ranch area. They are descendants of zebras brought to the San Simeon estate of William

In other news ...

Randolph Hearst in 1923 as part of the publishing tycoon’s private zoo, which also included African antelope, camels, llamas and kangaroos. The zebras are the only remnant of

the more exotic animals in Hearst’s collection. In 2011, neighboring ranchers shot and killed three of the zebras, saying they were threatening their horses and cattle.

OKC firefighters rescue

cow stuck in swimming pool

OKLAHOMA CITY — Think it’s hard for firefighters to rescue a cat in a tree? Try a cow in a swimming pool. Firefighters in Oklahoma City were summoned Sunday morning after a homeowner reported hearing some sort of “snorting” coming from his swim- ming pool area. Emergency responders arrived and discovered a hole in the swimming pool’s liner and a cow trapped in the water. Oklahoma City Fire Department Battalion Chief Benny Fulkerson says firefighters used their pumps to remove about 5 feet of water from the pool so the cow wouldn’t experience hypothermia. Crews then brought in a wrecker to hoist the nearly 1,500- pound animal from the pool and to safety.

Fulkerson says the cow appeared to be uninjured after its ordeal.

Contra Costa County deputy arrested for firing gun at party

SACRAMENTO — Police say a Contra Costa County Sheriff’s deputy was arrested for firing a gun inside a house party in Sacramento. Sacramento Police Department spokesman Matthew McPhail said Sunday 23-year-old Kyle Rowland, of Sacramento, was charged with attempt- ed murder after he allegedly fired a gun Friday after a confrontation with party-goers. No one was injured in the shooting. McPhail says Rowland left the party but returned with a gun. Two firearms were recovered from the scene. He says that when police arrived Rowland was being held by several party-goers. A booking photo shows Roland with a bloody right eye. The Contra Costa County Sheriff’s Department said Rowland joined as a deputy in October but was let go after his arrest. The Sacramento Bee reports Rowland is also a prominent blues musician who plays the harmonica and sings for the Kyle Rowland Blues Band, a popular band in the Sacramento area.

Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. VAROB ©2017
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
VAROB
©2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
BUDTO
NIYTEN
GOLUNE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
Ans.
here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles:
CRIMP ANNOY POLLEN
BUCKET
Yesterday’s
Answer:
She grew and harvested her own food
because she was a — PICKY EATER
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

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Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

The Daily Derby race winners are Winning Spirit, No. 9, in first place; Hot Shot, No. 3, in second place; and Gold Rush, No. 1, in third place. The race time was clocked at 1:45.09.

Local Weather Forecast

Tues day : Mostly cloudy in the morning

then becoming partly cloudy. Highs in the

upper 50s. East winds up to 5

Tues day : Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming partly cloudy. Highs in the upper

mph

Becoming

northwest around 5 mph

Tues day ni g ht: Partly cloudy in the

evening then becoming mostly cloudy. A

slight chance of rain after midnight. Lows

 

in the 40s. North winds around 5 mph

Becoming

south-

east after midnight.

 

Wednes day : Breezy. A s light chance of rain in the morn-

ing

...

Then rain in the afternoon. Highs in the upper 50s.

Southeast winds 10 to 20 mph increasing to 20 to 30 mph

in the afternoon.

 

Wednes day ni g ht: Breezy. Rain in the evening ...

Then

a

chance of showers after midnight. Rain may be heavy at

times in the evening. Lows in the upper 40s.

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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing. To submit obituaries, email information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed more than once, longer than 200 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017

3

Battle brews over Lefty O’Doul’s

Name, memorabilia disputed as iconic restaurant set to close

By Sara Gaiser

BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

The property owners and managers of Lefty O’Douls, a well-known San Francisco restau- rant named after a famous local ballplayer, are embroiled in a dispute over who owns the rights to the name and to the memorabilia the business has collected over the years. Restaurant manager Nick Bovis announced last week that the restaurant, which has been at 333 Geary St. since 1958, would be moving to a new location in Union Square after its lease was terminated by the property owners. The new location has not been announced, but the family hopes to reopen before the end of the year. On Monday, however, a spokesman for the Handlery family, which owns the building and neighboring properties, said the property owners are the owners of the restaurant and hold the legal rights to both the name “Lefty O’Doul’s” and to all the memorabilia and prop- erty inside. They plan to close for renovations Feb. 3 and reopen under the Lefty O’Doul’s name with all the same décor, spokesman Adam Alberti said. “The current operator is a tenant, he is a man- ager of the restaurant,” Alberti said. “Since 1958 the restaurant has been operated by the Handlery family under a number of different managers.” Bovis, however, said he holds the trademark to the restaurant’s name and most of the mem- orabilia was given to his family personally. Much of that memorabilia has already been removed from the walls of the restaurant as it prepares for closure. Bovis, who spoke Monday at a press confer- ence flanked by Mayor Willie Brown and well- known attorney Joe Cotchett, as well as by Pat O’Doul, a cousin of Lefty’s, said his father had been in negotiations to buy the restaurant in the 1960s before Lefty O’Doul’s death.

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 3 Battle brews over Lefty O’Doul’s Name,

SARA GAISER

Lefty O’Doul’s off Union Square in San Francisco is the center of a dispute over its name, memorabilia.

The family eventually took over manage- ment in the 1990s, and has worked to maintain its reputation as a local institution since that time, with events including an annual Christmas toy drive and a breakfast for sur- vivors of the 1906 earthquake. “I will not let Lefty’s be handed over to cor- porate greed nor will I let it die,” Bovis said today, saying he planned to keep all restaurant employees on the payroll until he reopened at the new location.

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Police reports

Shady mechanics

Two catalytic convertors valued at approximately $1,500 to $2,000 were taken on Sea Horse Court in Foster City before 9:29 p.m. Friday, Jan. 6.

BURLINGAME

  • Di s turbance. Someone was harassing an

employee at a business on Broadway before 4:02 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 4. Theft. Money and paperwork were stolen from an unlocked vehicle on Rollins Road before 2:08 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 4. Vandal i s m. A vehicle’s window was smashed on Airport Boulevard before 8:17 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 4. Traffi c hazard. Two garbage bins were in the road on Old Bayshore Boulevard before 6:18 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 3. Burg l ary. A vehicle was broken into and a briefcase, laptop and garment bag were stolen on El Camino Real before 3:11 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 3. Sus pi ci o us ci rcums tances . Someone

was arrested after running through a back- yard on Walnut Avenue before 12:42 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 3.

FOSTER CITY

  • Di s o rderl y co nduct. A 26-year-old San

Mateo resident was arrested for public intox- ication on East Third Avenue before 12:54 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 7. Reckl es s dri v i ng . A driver ran a stop sign near Shell and Beach Park boulevards before 12:29 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 7. Traffi c hazard. A vehicle was parked in

the middle of the street on Cornwalis Lane

before 1:23 a.m. Friday, Jan. 6.

Warrant. A 49-year-old Palo Alto man was arrested on a $7,500 warrant out of San Mateo on East Hillsdale Boulevard before 11:08 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 4.

Sus pi ci o us ci rcums tances . A woman woke up to a knock on her window on Constitution Drive before 1:10 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 4.

MILLBRAE

Di s turbance. Someone threw a Slurpee at someone on the 400 block of El Camino Real before 1:19 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 5.

Arres t. A

21-year-old Millbrae man was

arrested for shoplifting and possession of a

loaded methamphetamine pipe on the 600 block of Broadway before 1:05 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 5.

Arres t. A 32-year-old San Francisco man was arrested after driving with a suspended license and being found to have an active misdemeanor warrant on the 400 block of El Camino Real before 10:47 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 5.

Possession. A 26-year-old Millbrae man was arrested for possession of methamphet- amine and paraphernalia on the 300 block of Beverly Avenue before 8:30 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 5.

SAN CARLOS

Arres t. A

45-year-old Madera man was

arrested on a felony warrant on the 1100

block of Industrial Road before 4:50 p.m. Friday, Jan. 5.

Warrant. A 36-year-old San Mateo resident was arrested on a misdemeanor warrant near El Camino Real and San Carlos Avenue before 11:53 a.m. Friday, Jan. 5.

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 3 Battle brews over Lefty O’Doul’s Name,
  • 4 Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Young writer, artists recognized for MLK works

4 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL Young writer, artists recognized for MLK

TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL

Young poets, essayists and artists were honored at the 33rd annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Annual Essay, Poetry and Art Contest held at the Martin Luther King Jr. Center in San Mateo Saturday, Jan. 14. Winners include, from left to right: Moriah Shih, Kalyn Chang, Sofia Ruiz, Khaliah White, Krystal Black, Lilly Loghmani, Misheel Sukhchuluun, Josh De Witt, Sabrina Jacobo, Jack Warren, William Lin, Grace Gao, Christina Lin and Rumi Loghmani.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Essay/Poetry and Art Contest 2017 winners

GRADE 1, ESSAY: First place, Liliana Mejia and Ryder Tuakoi. GRADE 1, POET- RY: First place, Gisselle Ortiz; Second place, Cesar Orellana. GRADE 2, ESSAY: First place, Nathan De Souza; Second place; Christopher Ortiz; Third pl ace, Liliana Herrera. GRADE 3, ESSAY: First place, David R. Salas; Second place, Misjeel Sukhehulvan; Third place, Sabrina Jacobo. GRADE 4, ESSAY: First place, Krystal Black; Second place, Bos ton C. Williams; Third place, Jadelyn Calleja. GRADE 4, POETRY: First place, Khaliah White; Second place, Peter Moy; Third pl ace, Chris Monterros; GRADE 5, ESSAY: First place, Sofia Ruie; Second place, Liza McGilpin; Third place, Maya Efron and Vincent Palala. GRADE 5, POETRY: First place, Diya Mehta; Second place, Daniel Morgan; Third place, Isabella Guerara. GRADE 6, ESSAY:

First place, Kara Black. GRADE 6, POET- RY: First place, Evelyn Monterroso.

GRADE 7 , ESSAY : First place, Meher Banik; Second pl ace, Gabriella Oaks; Third place, Lilly Loghmani. GRADE 7, POET- RY: First place, Grace Xia. GRADE 8 , ESSAY: First place, Rumi Loghmani; Second place, Kai Deardorff; Third place, James Moy. GRADE 9, ESSAY: First place, Michael McVey; Second place, Nyela Walter; Third place, Sarah Chang. GRADE 9, POETRY:

First place, Kalyn Chang; Second pl ace, Grace Gao; Third place, Chris tina Lin. GRADE 10, ESSAY: First place, Jack Warren; Second place, Moriah Shih. GRADE 11, ESSAY:

First place: William Lin; Second pl ace, Khylah Ragler. GRADE 11, POETRY: First place, Eliana Grant. GRADE 12, ESSAY:

First place, Samantha Rozal; Second place Josh De Witt. GRADE 12, POETRY: First place, Zion Shih. ART, GRADE 6

THROUGH

1 2 TH: First place, Anna

Charnyshou; Second place, Ruiz Borlongan;

Third place, Laen Chan.

4 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL Young writer, artists recognized for MLK
     
 

Obituary

 
Frieda Weickum Fritzler Gress

Frieda Weickum Fritzler Gress

February 14, 1915 – December 15, 2016

Frieda Weikum was born February 14, 1915 in Sutton, Nebraska. One of 13 children in the close-knit Weikum family, she lived much of her childhood in Sutton, Greeley, CO and Cheyenne, WY.

At 19 years old, Frieda married August “Gus” Fritzler on May 30, 1934. When his job was transferred to San Francisco Airport in 1941, they moved to San Carlos, CA and raised their three

children, Gary, Carolyn, and James. After Gus passed on February 14, 1964, Frieda married John L. Gress on November 22, 1969, who passed on October 31, 2010. She helped care for and raise John’s sons, Ronald and Robert, from his previous marriage. In addition to her five children, Frieda is survived by her nine grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

Later in life, Frieda traveled extensively to visit her siblings and their families, keeping close ties with them and her heritage as an immigrant family of Germans from Russia. Also interested in exploring the world, Frieda and John visited Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia multiple times.

She lived an incredibly loving life for over 101 years. While her health began to fail somewhat suddenly, she never complained about anything other than to say, “she was just lazy.” We lost a great lady but we are comforted to know that her faith will lead her to heaven where she will watch over us with a keen eye and a loving heart.

Funeral services to be held on January 21, 2017 at 1:00 PM;

 

Redeemer Lutheran Church, 468 Grand Street, Redwood City, CA 94062

Reception to follow services at; Redwood City Elks Lodge, 938 Wilmington Way, Emerald Hills, CA94062

4 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL Young writer, artists recognized for MLK

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/NATION

Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017

5

King Day highlights the Obama to Trump transition

By Bill Barrow

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ATLANTA — As Americans celebrate the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr., civil rights leaders and activists are trying to reconcile the transition from the nation’s first black pres- ident to a president-elect still struggling to connect with most non-white voters. In more than one venue Monday, speakers and attendees expressed reservations about President-elect Donald Trump and his incoming administration, some even raising the specter of the Ku Klux Klan. “When men no better than Klansmen dressed in suits are being sworn in to office, we cannot be silent,” said Opal Tometi, a Black Lives Matter co-founder, told a crowd in Brooklyn.

King’s daughter offered a less direct message, encouraging 2,000 people at her father’s Atlanta church to work for his vision of love and justice “no matter who is in the White House.” Bernice King spoke at Eben ezer Baptist hours before her brother, Martin Luther King III, met privately with the pres- ident-elect at Trump Tower in New York. The younger King described the meeting as “productive.” Trump won fewer than 1 out of 10 black voters in November after a campaign of racially charged rhetoric, and tensions have flared anew with his recent criticism of civil rights icon John Lewis, whom the president-elect called “all talk” and “no action.” Bernice King avoided a detailed critique of Trump, but said the nation has a choice between “chaos and community,” a dichotomy her father preached about. “At the end of the day, the Donald Trumps come and go,” she said, later adding, “We

still have to find a way to create

the beloved community.”

... The current Ebenezer pastor, the Rev. Raphael Warnock, did not call Trump by name, but praised his predecessor. “Thank you, Barack Obama,” he said. “I’m sad to see you go.” In South Carolina, speakers at a state Capitol rally said minority voting power has never been more important and some attendees expressed unease about Trump joining forces with Republican congressional majorities. “It’s going to be

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL/NATION Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 5 King Day highlights the Obama to

REUTERS

Dr. Bernice King, Martin Luther King Jr.’s daughter, and Rev. Michael Louis Pfleger attend a commerative service.

different, that’s for sure,” said Diamond Moore, a Benedict College senior who came to the Capitol. “I’m going to give Trump a chance. But I’m also ready to march.” In New York, Martin Luther King III told reporters that Trump pledged to be a president for all Americans, but King III added “we also have to consistently engage with pres- sure, public pressure” b ecause “it doesn’t happen automati- cally.” Trump did not participate publicly in any Martin Luther King Jr. Day observances. President Barack Obama and Michelle Obama took part in a service project at a shelter in Washington. Back in Atlanta, Sen. Bernie Sanders brought the Eben ezer assembly to its feet with his reminder that King was not just an advocate for racial equality, but a radical proponent for economic justice — a mission that put him at odds with the political establishment.

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL/NATION Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 5 King Day highlights the Obama to
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THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL/NATION Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 5 King Day highlights the Obama to

Around the nation

Gene Cernan, last astronaut on the moon, dies at 82

Former astronaut Gene Cernan, the last person to walk on the moon who returned to Earth with a message of “p eace

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL/NATION Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 5 King Day highlights the Obama to

and hope for all mankind,” died on Monday in Texas following ongoing heath issues, his family said. He was 82. Cernan was surrounded by relatives when he died at a Houston hospital, fam- ily spokeswoman Melissa Wren told The Associated Press. His family said his passion for lunar exploration never waned.

Cernan was commander of NASA’s

Gene Cernan

Apollo 17 mission and on his third space flight when set foot on the lunar surface in December 1972. He b ecame the last of only a dozen men to walk on the moon on Dec. 14, 1972 — tracing his only

child’s initials in the dust before climbing the ladder of the lunar module the last time. It was a moment that forever defined him in both the public eye and his own.

Obituary

Frank J. George

Frank J. George, born Aug. 8, 1921, died Jan. 4, 2017.

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL/NATION Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 5 King Day highlights the Obama to

Frank George

He was a resident of San Mateo for 66 years. He will be remembered for his love or cars and mechanics, dancing, ingenuity, boats, cameras, travel, family and friends and reading his daily newspapers. A proud veteran of the U.S. Airforce serving World War II. Survived by his wife of 73 years Evelyn E. George, daughters Karen

Richards and Kathy Sutton of Livermore,

California, grandchildren Heather Szopa,

Dublin, California, and Zach Richards, of Livermore, and great-grandchildren Makenzie and Jacob Szopa, Dublin. A memorial service is being held Saturday, Jan. 21.

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL/NATION Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 5 King Day highlights the Obama to
THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL/NATION Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 5 King Day highlights the Obama to
  • 6 Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017

LOCAL/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 LOCAL/NATION THE DAILY JOURNAL Kindergarten and transitional kinder- garten enrollment

Kindergarten and

transitional kinder- garten enrollment begins Feb. 6, 2017, in the Burlingame El ementary

School District for the 2017-2018 school year. Kindergarten stu- dents must be 5 years old on or before Sept. 1, 2017 for the 2017- 2018 school year. Transitional kindergarten is available to students whose fifth birthday is between Sept. 2 and Dec. 2. Go to burlingameschools.org for more enrollment information.

*** Menlo School won the Pro v i dence Cup To urnament Mo ck Tri al Competition , hosted last month in Denver, Colorado.

*** The Oracle Education Foundation host- ed a steel signing ceremony Monday, Nov. 7, for the new Design Tech High School being built on the Oracle Corporation headquarters in Redwood Shores . Construction of the school focusing on sci- ence, technology, engineering and math curricu- lum will be financed and built by the company and open for free to students in the San Mateo Union and Sequoia Union high school dis- tricts. The school is slated to open January 2018. *** Serendipity School in Belmont will host a run to raise money for the Special Olympics . The 2K and 5K runs for all ages and abilities will be hosted at 1757 J. Hart Clinton Drive in San Mateo, Saturday, Jan. 21 from 8:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. Visit eventbrite.com/e/serendipity-charity- run-5k-2k-tickets-29995995831?aff=eac2 for more information and to purchase a $35 ticket.

Class notes is a column dedicated to school news. It is compiled by education reporter Austin Walsh. You can contact him at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at austin@smdailyjournal.com. You can contact him at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at austin@smdailyjournal.com.

Officials: FBI arrests widow of Orlando nightclub shooter

By Eric Tucker

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The wife of the Orlando nightclub shooter, who was extensively questioned by federal agents in the days after the massacre, has been arrested by the FBI in connection with the attack, authori- ties said Monday. Noor Salman was taken into custody Monday morning in the San Francisco Bay area and is facing charges in Florida includ- ing obstruction of justice. A Twitter post from the United States attorney’s office in Orlando said Salman will make her initial court appearance Tuesday morning in Oakland, California. Noor Salman moved to California after her husband, Omar Mateen, was killed in a shootout with SWAT team members during the June 12 massacre at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando. FBI agents repeatedly questioned Salman in the aftermath of the shooting about whether she had advance knowledge of her husband’s plans. Salman told The New York Times in an interview published last fall that she knew her husband had watched jihadist videos but that she was “unaware of

Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 LOCAL/NATION THE DAILY JOURNAL Kindergarten and transitional kinder- garten enrollment

Noor Salman

everything” regarding his intent to shoot up the club. She also said he had physically abused her. “Noor Salman had no foreknowledge nor could she predict what Omar Mateen intended to do

that tragic night,” her

attorney, Linda Moreno,

said in a statement. “Noor has told her story of abuse at his hands. We believe it is misguided and wrong to prosecute her and that it dishonors the memories of the victims to punish an inno- cent person,” Moreno said. Mateen was the only shooter, and by the time a three-hour standoff with law enforce- ment had ended, 49 patrons were killed and another 53 people required hospitalization. Mateen pledged allegiance to the Islamic State group in a 911 call to emergency offi- cials during the standoff. He also made a series of Facebook posts and searches before and during the attack. Salman, who grew up northeast of San Francisco, wed Mateen in 2011 after the two met online. They lived in Fort Pierce, Florida, at the time of the shooting. Last

month, Salman filed a petition in a California court to change the name of the son she had with Mateen.

“We said from the beginning, we were going to look at every aspect of this, of every aspect of this shooter’s life to deter- mine not just why did he take these actions — but who else knew about them? Was any-

one else involved?” Attorney General

Loretta Lynch said in an MSNBC interview on Monday.

The Times first reported on the arrest.

Orlando Police Chief John Mina said in a statement that Salman was facing accusa- tions of obstruction of justice and “aiding and abetting by providing material support to a foreign terrorist organization.”

“Nothing can erase the pain we all feel about the senseless and brutal murders of 49 of our neighbors, friends, family members and loved ones,” Mina said. “But today, there is some relief in knowing that some- one will be held accountable for that horrif- ic crime.”

Florida Gov. Rick Scott said he hoped the arrest “provides some comfort to the fami- lies who are mourning their loved ones,” he added.

Ice threat lingers for some Midwest states

DES MOINES, Iowa — A few states in the

Midwest again are on alert for icy conditions. Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa and Michigan are expected to see a mix of rain and freezing rain Monday, with the precipitation pushing into southern Minnesota and much of Wisconsin during the evening.

Around the nation

While the weekend’s storm caused travel issues in parts of Oklahoma and Kansas, some meteorologists acknowledged it fell short of dire forecasts. Strong storms moved through Houston on Monday morning, following a night of storms in Texas.

U.S. extradites man to Dutch Caribbean in killing of student

MIAMI — A U.S. resident has been extradit- ed to the Dutch Caribbean island of Saba to face charges in the April 2015 killing of a California medical student. Dutch Caribbean law enforcement officials said Sunday that the suspect will face charges that include murder, rape and possession of child pornography. The Dutch announcement identified the sus- pect only by his initials. But U.S. officials previously identified him as 31-year-old Senad Cejvan, a citizen of Bosnia and Herzegovina

and a legal permanent resident of Missouri.

Cejvan was a student at the Saba University School of Medicine with the victim, 24-year- old Kavya Guda of Fremont, a native of India.

Eight people shot in Miami park

MIAMI — Miami-Dade police say eight peo- ple — five of them juveniles — have been wounded in a shooting at Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Park.

Police Department spokesman Detective Daniel Ferrin says in a news release that two sus- pects are being questioned about the Monday afternoon shooting. He says two firearms were recovered and the active investigation is con- tinuing.

The Miami Herald reports that hundreds of people had gathered in the park after the annual MLK Day parade in the Liberty City neighbor- hood in northwest Miami-Dade.

Ferrin says the victims range in age from 11 to 30, with five listed in stable condition and one critical. He says two juveniles grazed by bullets were treated and released on the scene.

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Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 LOCAL/NATION THE DAILY JOURNAL Kindergarten and transitional kinder- garten enrollment

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NATION

Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017

7

Parties, protests to take over DC for Trump’s inauguration

By Jessica Gresko

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Hundreds of thousands of people are expected to clog the nation’s capital for Donald Trump’s inauguration and a major demonstration the day after. How many will

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 7 Parties, protests to take over DC

Donald Trump

actually arrive to party or protest is an open ques- tion. Officials estimate that 800,000 to 900,000 peo- ple will be present Friday for the inauguration, a cel- ebration that takes over the city, closing roads,

taxing the city’s Metro

transit system and making

getting around difficult. Trump himself has promised “massive crowds,” but just what that will mean is unclear. Hundreds of thousands of others are expected

Saturday

for

the

Women’s

March on

would have anticipated for a first-term presi-

Washington.

 

dent,” he said.

Trump showed he could draw crowds during the campaign, but his supporters weren’t so quick to make plans to be in Washington for his inauguration. Elliott Ferguson, the president of

Destination DC, the city’s convention and tourism bureau, said that before Election Day hotels had more events tentatively planned for a Hillary Clinton victory than a Donald Trump one. And when Trump won, the “level of enthu- siasm” and demand for hotel rooms did not immediately reach that of past recent inaugura- tions, he said. “No one’s phones were ringing” on the day

after the election, he said. Things started to pick up after New Year’s, but some hotels have cut back minimum-night stays from four nights to two. Some hotels are only 50 percent full, though higher-end hotels apparently have more bookings, he said. “It’s been much, much slower than anyone

Saturday’s march has helped drive more reservations, he said.

“The moment it was confirmed it was hap- pening in the city our hotels were seeing reser- vations take pl ace,” he said.

City planners are betting that Trump’s inau- guration is more like President Barack Obama’s second inauguration in 2013, which drew more than 800,000, rather than Obama’s first in 2009, which drew 1.8 million people. But while officials have experience and histor- ical data to draw on to estimate crowds for Friday, guessing how many people will show up for Saturday’s demonstration is harder. Women’s March on Washington organizers said in applying for a demonstration permit that they expected 200,000 people.

Christopher

Geldart,

the

District

of

Columbia’s homeland security director, thinks the march will draw more than that. Some 1,800 buses have registered to park in the city

on Saturday, which would mean nearly 100,000 people coming in just by bus, Geldart said. Amtrak trains into and out of the city are also fully booked on that day, Geldart said.

“Usually when I look at things like that, that tells me we’ve got a pretty substantial crowd coming in. That leads me to believe we’re defi- nitely above the 200,000-person mark,” Geldart said.

In contrast, approximately 400 buses have registered to park in the city on Inauguration Day, said Terry Owens, a spokesman for the District Department of Transportation, though he said that number is growing daily.

For their part, march organizers are trying to get a headcount by asking people who plan to participate to fill out a questionnaire on their website. That will help ensure they have the right number of things like portable toilets, medical tents and food trucks, said Janaye Ingram, who is handling march logistics. More than 100,000 people have already regis- tered using the form, Ingram said.

DeVos to face questions over schools, conservative activism

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Charter school advocate Betsy DeVos is widely expected to push for expanding school choice programs if con- firmed as education secretary, prompting pushback from teachers unions. But Democrats and activists also are raising con- cerns about how her conservative Christian beliefs and advocacy for family values might impact minority and LGBT students. The wealthy Republican donor’s financial and political clout will be on display on Tuesday as she goes before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, which has members who have benefited from her largesse. Committee

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 7 Parties, protests to take over DC

Betsy DeVos

Chairman Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., said

in a statement that DeVos “will work tire- lessly to ensure every

access high quality education.”

a

child has

to

Critics say the choice

of DeVos belies

President-elect Donald

Trump’s

promises

to

“drain the swamp” and bring new faces to politics and policy in Washington. “He is basically proposing a bunch of people to be in the Cabinet that are politi- cal insiders with lots of money and have used that money to buy politicians and

DeVos definitely fits that description,” said Carmel Martin, executive vice president of the Center for American Progress, a liberal think-tank. DeVos has long taken pride in her politi- cal and financial activity. “I have decided . to stop taking offense at the suggestion that we are buying influ-

ence,” DeVos wrote in a 1997 column in

Roll Call. “Now I simply concede the point. They are right. We do expect something in return.” She said wants to foster a conserva- tive governing philosophy and respect for traditional values. DeVos, a former Michigan Republican Party chairwoman, heads the American Federation for Children, an advo cacy group

that promotes school choice and voucher programs. She and members of her family have given millions of dollars to Republican candidates over nearly three decades, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.

She grew up in Holland, Michigan, one of four children of Edgar Prince, an engineer who made a fortune in an auto parts company. She met her husband Dick DeVos, an heir to the Amway marketing empire, while attending a Christian liberal arts college. Dick DeVos unsuccessfully ran for governor of Michigan in 2006. During that campaign he suggested that schools should t each intelligent design, a theory that holds that life was created by a higher force, along with evolution.

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 7 Parties, protests to take over DC
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THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 7 Parties, protests to take over DC
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THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 7 Parties, protests to take over DC
  • 8 Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

National park visits hits record high again

By Brady McCombs

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SALT LAKE CITY — Visits to U.S. national parks set a record in 2016 for the third con- secutive year as landmarks such Zion, Yellowstone and Rocky Mountain experi- enced historic levels of popularity that brought collateral headaches stemming from overcrowded roads and trails and increasing visitor misbehavior. At many parks, visitors waited an hour or more in cars to get through entrance gates and then spent the day trying to outmaneuver fel- low visitors for parking spots and room on popular trails. They left behind enormous amounts of trash and sometimes, human waste. Encountering a crowded, Disneyland-like situation when people were expecting p eace- ful serenity can lead to aggression and bad decisions, park officials said. “The level of frustration, we’ve certainly seen an increase in that,” said Kyle Patterson,

Rocky Mountain National park spokes-

woman. “Sometimes they take it out on each

other and sometimes they take it out on park. It created a good news-bad news story for park managers. They praise the increased interest but are struggling to preserve iconic mountains, slot canyons and wildlife habitat for future generations. The National Park Service budget has remained basically the flat, leaving parks to grapple with the problems without higher staffing levels. “We love having people come to the park,” said John Marciano, Zion National Park spokesman. “But our No. 1 goal, our mandate, is to preserve the park into perpetuity and to ensure our visitors have a best of kind and safe experience.” Overall visitation to national parks is on track to surpass 325 million in 2016, break- ing last year’s all-time high of 307 million, federal figures show. The record-breaking three-year stretch came after parks visitation ebbed and flowed between 255-287 million for nearly three decades.

8 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 NATION THE DAILY JOURNAL National park visits hits record high

REUTERS

Visitors take photos at the Grand Canyon. For the third straight year, attendance was up at national parks.

The National Park Service launched a major marketing campaign to celebrate its 100th birthday in 2016, including free passes for every fourth-grader and their families. That renewed attention coupled with reasonable gas prices and an improved economy likely

fueled the increase, said National Parks Service spokesman Jeffrey Olson. The agency’s “Find Your park “ campaign will continue this year and officials expect to surpass 300 million visitors again even if there’s no record, Olson said. Absent December totals, the Grand Canyon in northern Arizona hit 5.9 million visits. Yellowstone, which stretches into Wyoming, Montana and Idaho, had 4.3 million visits. The final year tally for Rocky Mountain in Colorado was 4.5 million. Zion in southern Utah had 4.3 million visitors — nearly double

the 2010 total. Cramming all those people into the narrow confines of Zion where most visitors want to see the same iconic slot canyons and trails has led many days to hour-long waits to get in the park, lots that fill up by 9 a.m. and crowded shuttles, Marciano said. “Then, you hike like ducks in a row up the trail because there are so many going up the same trail,” Marciano said. “That’s not what we want.”

Easing of public lands transfer has some concerned

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOISE, Idaho — A change in U.S. House rules making it easier to transfer millions of acres of federal public lands to states is worry- ing hunters and other outdoor enthusiasts across the West who fear losing access. Lawmakers earlier this month passed a rule eliminating a significant budget hurdle and written so broadly that it includes national parks. President-elect Donald Trump’s pick for Interior secretary, Montana Rep. Ryan Zinke, voted for the rule change as did many other Republicans. The Senate would have to weigh in on public land transfers as well. “Anybody who uses them for any kind of outdoor activity — snowmobiling, mountain

8 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 NATION THE DAILY JOURNAL National park visits hits record high

Ryan Zinke

biking, hunters, all that — they’re very alarmed by all this,” said Boise State University professor and public lands policy expert John Freemuth. “The loss of access that this could lead to.”

The rule passed by the

House defines federal land

that could be given to states as “any land owned by the United States, including the surface estate, the subsurface estate, or any improvements thereon.” About a million square miles of public land is managed by the federal government, mostly in 12 Western states, according to the Congressional Research Service. Some state

8 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 NATION THE DAILY JOURNAL National park visits hits record high

lawmakers in recent years have made failed efforts to wrest control of those lands, mainly to reduce obstacles to access ing resources such as timber, natural gas and oil, Freemuth noted. U.S. lawmakers have the authority to trans- fer those lands to states. Outdoor recreationists fear states would then sell the land to private entities that would end public access.

Zinke, whose confirmation hearing to

become Interior secretary is Tuesday, has a track record of opposing public land transfers. Last summer, he resigned as a delegate to the Republican National Convention, which favors such transfers. “The congressman has never voted to sell or transfer federal lands and he maintains his position against the sale or transfer of federal lands,” Heather Swift, a Zinke spokeswoman,

said in an email. Whit Fosburgh, CEO of the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, which works to guarantee places to hunt and fish, said he’s inclined to excuse Zinke on his House vote favoring transfers b ecause of his record being “very solid on these public lands issues.” Still, Fosburgh was irked that the House approved a rule that he said essentially allows federal public land to be given away as if it had no value. Rep. Mike Simpson, R-Idaho, also voted for the rule easing transfers. But Simpson was also the driver of a 2015 bill that created three wilderness areas in Idaho after he got ranchers, recreationists and environmental groups to back the plan after a 15-year effort.

mind you have the easy option to just say “forget it” without anyone knowing. It
  • mind you have the easy option to just say

“forget it” without anyone knowing. It can

mind you have the easy option to just say “forget it” without anyone knowing. It

MILLBRAE – A new beginning for a New Year. How many times have you heard those around you talking about their New Years resolutions and how

they plan to make a “fresh start”? How many times have you made New Years resolutions? Have you promised yourself to be strong enough to keep those resolutions? Have you ever told yourself that you’ll have a great year by just following through with your New Years promise? Were these promises hard to keep or easy to ignore? Have you ever broken a promise to yourself? New Years Eve is a time when promises are made in the excitement of the moment, but sometimes are forgotten or cast aside when laziness takes over. Keeping a promise to yourself should be considered no different than keeping a promise to someone else, and followed through with accordingly. It takes a sense of responsibility to be committed to a promise, and also a slight sense of potential embarrassment. By not following through with your commitments you have a good possibility of being judged poorly by those who are relying on you, in turn causing embarrassment for yourself. Nobody wants to be told they should be ashamed of themselves. It is much easier to follow through with your commitments. Avoiding being shamed all together can lead to a positive outcome for everyone involved. It is a little more complicated, though, when you are the one that you’re making a promise to. Since making a commitment to yourself is done privately within in your

be a psychological struggle and a matter of

strong will-power to keep yourself committed to your resolution. The temptation to just give up can be too hard for many to resist. Picture the old cartoon with that poor schmuck being pulled in two directions by his conscience, an angel on one shoulder and a devil on the other, giving him conflicting orders. This is a very real

dilemma for someone who is having trouble between doing the right thing for themselves or falling back into old engrained bad habits. Trying to better yourself can be hard. It is much easier when you “want” to make a commitment than when you “have” to make a commitment. Still, the key idea is to make yourself “better”. Since you are in charge of your own situation, though, you can make the rules. Take baby steps and lead up to your self commitments gradually. Starting small may work better than a big grandiose commitment that may not be realistic. Perhaps you can keep your resolution every Monday, and then work your way up to a second day and so on. Everyone handles their commitments differently and you will have to adjust your rules to what works best for your type of resolution. Responsibility is an important quality that should not be taken lightly. A promise to yourself can be a struggle, but if pulled off with will-power a resolution can be a liberating and freeing experience. If you ever wish to discuss cremation, funeral matters or want to make pre- planning arrangements please feel free to call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650) 588-5116 and we will be glad to guide you in a kind and helpful manner. For more info you may also visit us on the internet at:

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

OPINION

Tuesday Jan. 17, 2016

9

Why I’m marching

By Adella Harris

O n Jan 21, I will be hitting the

streets at the Women’s March

on Sacramento. At nearly 74,

I am about to participate in my first demonstration ever. All over the United States, women and their fami- lies and friends will be stepping into the streets of Washington, D.C., New York, Boston, Denver, Chicago, San Francisco, Oakland and beyond to deliver a simple but forceful message to Donald Trump and the new admin- istration: Respect our civil rights, our reproductive rights, our fragile planet. After a prolonged and ugly presiden- tial campaign, the United States will soon be inaugurating a secretive and divisive man with no record of public service. If we take Trump at his word, he will build walls on our southern border and close our doors to Muslims. As a climate change denier, he has promised to toss out environmental regulations and promote the burning of coal and other fossil fuels. He has stated his plans to appoint Supreme Court justices who are against abor- tion rights and has already chosen for attorney general a man who called Roe v. Wade “one of the worst Supreme Court decisions ever.” Trump’s nomi- nee for secretary of Health and Human Services has a record of extremist anti- choice activism in the U.S. Congress. He co-sponsored a so-called “person-

hood” bill which would define human life as beginning at the moment of con- ception, thereby
hood” bill which
would define human
life as beginning at
the moment of con-
ception, thereby
making certain
forms of birth con-
trol illegal and out-
lawing virtually all

abortions. Already, the new Republican-dominated Congress is taking steps to defund Planned Parenthood, sending an early but chilling message about what is to come. As an older woman who came of age in the terrifying days before Roe v. Wade, I am particularly concerned about the looming threat to women’s health care rights. I knew women who had back alley abortions and women who fled to Mexico for an easily arranged but illegal abortion. One of them was arrested and thrown in jail in Tijuana with no medical care. I also knew women who were sent away in shame to a home for unwed mothers. I have read the gruesome statistics from the Guttmacher Institute on maternal mortality caused by unsafe, illegal abortions in the days before Roe v. Wade. Later in my life, I became an RN and learned firsthand that women and families do not thrive when the gov- ernment inserts itself into private health care decisions. It is apparent our new leaders do not trust American women to make person- al decisions about their own bodies and their own lives. They presume to

Guest

perspective

know what is best for women and they

think they should be the ones in charge. On Jan. 21, I will be marching because I want the new president and his party to know that women will not silently relinquish the right to domin- ion over our own bodies. The march I will be attending is just one of dozens that will be held all across the country. More than 200,000 people are expected to attend the main march in Washington, D.C. Some citizens will be marching for a woman’s right to choose, but many others will be marching out of con- cern for climate change or voting rights or religious freedom or any of our many civil and human rights that are now under serious threat. If you are concerned about the path ahead and want to send a message to the new administration, please consider join- ing one of these marches. Why not come into the streets on Jan. 21 and speak your mind, speak your aspira- tions? If I can do it, so can you.

Adella Harris is a longtime resident of San Mateo, retired registered nurse and community volunteer.

Letters to the editor

New leaders should protect health care coverage

Editor,

Thanks to national health care reform,

3.7 million children, seniors and work-

ing families now have access to health

care. And with expanded Medi-Cal fund-

ing, a third of California’s population

can now receive the affordable care

they need.

More children have access to preven-

tative care, improving their health and

increasing their school attendance.

More adults are able to get the coverage

and medication they need for condi-

tions like asthma, creating a stronger

and more efficient workforce. Access to

preventative care has also created

stronger support for seniors, helping

to diagnose and treat diseases early,

minimizing expensive emergency

room visits, and improving their qual-

ity of life.

We’ve come so far in recent years in

expanding health care coverage for

millions of vulnerable Californians,

and we must continue to defend our

progress. Our new leaders in Sacra-

mento and Washington D.C. should

protect this progress for healthier com-

munities and a stronger economy.

It all boils down to a sad commentary

on what we have become, to ourselves

and the rest of the world. It’s disgust-

ing. Personally, I’m thankful for any

help that we got in keeping the devil’s

wife from gaining the White House.

Jimmy Kayastha

Daniel Peet East Palo Alto

Menlo Park

Russian hacking scandal

Editor,

The media’s feast on the hacking of

the Democratic National Committee

emails by Vladimir Putin is indicative

of their political leanings.

They quickly switch from the porous

security of the DNC and revelations of

the Democrats chicanery to focus on

President Trump’s election. In other

words, the outcome was influenced by a

foreign power.

Thank you, Daily Journal

Editor,

You do a super job and the Daily Jour-

nal is a true rare gem in our local area. I

truly appreciate all the hard work in-

volved in putting out a quality paper

daily and even on holidays. I feel lucky

and grateful to be able to read it each

day. Thank you and the rest of the Daily

Journal staff for all you do.

Brenda Litwin

San Mateo

Jerry Lee , Publisher Jon Mays, Editor in Chief Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor Erik Oeverndiek, Copy

Jerry Lee, Publisher Jon Mays, Editor in Chief Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events Samantha Weigel, Senior Reporter

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Terry Bernal, Anna Schuessler, Austin Walsh

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A spending problem

M y first credit card taught me the value in responsibly managing my debts and, more importantly, the consequences of failing to

do so. As a new college student in Washington, D.C., I was compelled to explore and enjoy our nation’s capital

with a very small budget. That was until I was offered a

credit card at my banking institution. The very idea of a credit card was intriguing. From one small plastic card, I had the power to pay for vir- tually anything I wanted — all with money I did not have. Mindful of stories I heard about credit card spending addictions, high interest rates and bank- ruptcies, I nevertheless had faith in my ability to manage my spending. After all, its purpose was intended for educational course books, materials and emergencies. Within one month, I managed to max out my credit

card on superfluous materials. I bought shoes I did not need and clothing I could not afford. I even managed to take the first girl I met in college (now my wife) on a date to two of the most expensive restau- rants in the city. Of course, I do not regret that investment. Nevertheless, I spent far more money than I actually had. By the time my credit card bill arrived, I was in shock. After requesting that my par-

Jonathan Madison
Jonathan Madison

ents or siblings pay the bill, I was told by each to obtain a job to make payments on the bill myself. At that time, I was greatly distressed. Today, I am thankful that I worked a part-time job to pay off the bill as I can now appreciate the value in managing my debts. Life has many ways of teaching us the value in man- aging our debts. Some lessons are far more impactful than others. Being behind on mortgage payments, fil- ing for bankruptcy or having a wage that only affords the possibility of living paycheck to paycheck, are common lessons in fiscal responsibility. I was certainly not the first to be consumed by the illusion of limitless credit or harshly taught the impor- tance of fiscal responsibility. In fact, history t eaches us that, time and again, the human race has fallen prey to the illusion. The Roman Empire collapsed in large part due to the government’s increasing deficits and the effects those debts weighed on the Roman economy. Also, consider the fall of the British Empire due to massive war debts it could not afford. Our country witnessed its largest loss of household income as the result of one event following the devas- tating stock market crash of 1929 and the Great Depression that followed. The panic was fueled in large part by people investing beyond their means in an illu- sive stock market that society viewed as one that could never fail. The crisis subsequently brought our country to its knees over the next decade. Time and again, we are reminded of the risk that comes with spending money we do not have. Time and again, our government willingly turns a blind eye to it. Do not take my word for it. Consider the fact that just last week, Gov. Jerry Brown predicted that a $1.6 bil- lion deficit would result from his proposed 2017 state budget of $179.5 billion. His announcement comes three years after he assured California residents that the state budget would be balanced moving forward. Beyond that, state revenue is growing far slower than economists predicted, while costs are much higher than expected. The combination of higher costs and lower state revenue suggest that our state lawmakers have approved a budget that exceeds the revenue the state will likely collect. Given that California voters just approved nearly $10 billion in new taxes, we can hard- ly afford to spend money we do not have. Here is a common sense solution. Before enacting legislation or various policies that involve spending, let us ask the following two questions: Can we afford it, and who will pay for it? This should not be difficult. In fact, I am willing to bet that you ask these questions daily. We should hold our government officials accountable for balancing the budget in a responsible way, ensuring that we take on no more debt than we can afford. As his- tory teaches us, the las ting effects of a nation entrenched in debt will not be seen until our future is truly in crisis, which is why we must act swiftly to pre-

vent that day from coming.

A nativ e of Pacifica, Jonathan Madison work ed as profes-

sional policy staff for the U.S. House of Representativ es,

Committee on Financial Serv ices, for two y ears.

Jonathan is an attorney at law at the Law Offices of Mark

Watson. He can be reached v ia email at jonathanemadi-

son@gmail.com.

  • 10 Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

IMF raises U.S’s growth forecast, cites Trump

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The International Monetary Fund on Monday raised its fore- cast for the U.S. economy over the next two years, saying President-elect Donald Trump’s policies should boost economic growth, particularly in 2018. But officials warned that if Trump’s protectionist trade proposals set off a trade war, that could be “quite destructive” for the global economy. The IMF also increased 2017 growth pro- jections for a number of other countries including China, Germany, Japan and Britain, but warned that the global economy faced a number of downside risks from ris- ing protectionism to a jump in interest rates. The 189-nation global lending agency’s latest economic outlook took note of the significant impact Trump’s election has already had in giving a boost to U.S. stock prices, interest rates and the dollar. The new outlook puts U.S. economic growth at 2.3 percent this year and 2.5 percent in 2018. That would be an improvement from lack- luster U.S. growth around 1.6 percent in

2016.

During the campaign, Trump said his economic policies of tax cuts, regulatory reform and boosts in infrastructure spending would lift U.S. growth to annu-

al rates of 4 percent.

The new forecast represents a boost of 0.1 percentage point this year and an increase of 0.4 percentage point for 2018, when Trump’s stimulus plans would be expected to be phased in. That is a half-point higher growth than the IMF was forecas ting in October, before Trump’s election. In contrast, the World Bank last week left its U.S. forecast unchanged at 2.2 percent growth in 2017 and 2.1 percent for 2018, arguing that there was too much uncertainty over the fate of Trump’s proposals to incor- porate them in a forecast. But IMF Chief Economist Maurice Obstfeld told reporters at a briefing Monday that he viewed the IMF’s upgrade for the United States as a moderate increase that took into account the U.S. election results. “We now have the presidency and the leg- islative branch in the same hands. It seems very clear to us that some of the promises will be delivered on,” Obstfeld said. “We know the direction of policies. We don’t know the specifics.” He said that the IMF had chosen not to incorporate Trump’s threats of imposing

higher tariffs on countries such as China and Mexico if their trade policies do not change because of a belief “that at the end of the day, countries will realize these are not in their best interests given the threat of

10 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL IMF raises U.S’s growth forecast, cites

Maurice

Obstfeld

retaliation. ...

The out-

break of a trade war would

be quite destructive.” For the overall global economy, the IMF left its projections unchanged growth of 3.4 percent for this year and 3.6 percent

for 2018, both up from

3.1 percent growth in 2016, a year when glob-

al growth slowed to its weakest performance since the 2008-2009 financial crisis. But the IMF saw better prospects in a number of countries including Germany, Japan, Spain and Britain, thanks in part to a rebound in growth in many parts of the world in the second half of last year that provided momentum going into 2017. “The global economic landscape started to shift in the second half of 2016,” Obstfeld said, helped by a rebound in manu- facturing activity in many countries and the financial market rally that started with Trump’s November election victory. But Obstfeld said there was a wider than usual range of upside and downside risks in part because of the uncertainty over how much of Trump’s program will win congres- sional approval and what the spillover effects will be for the rest of the world.

While Trump’s election victory boosted economic prospects in the United States, the impact has been uneven for the rest of the world. Some countries could see stronger growth from the increase in activi- ty in the United States, the world’s largest economy, but some emerging market coun- tries may face challenges as global interest rates rise.

The new outlook boosted the growth fore- cast for China, the world’s second largest economy, by 0.3 percentage point to 6.5 percent this year. The IMF expects the Chinese government to providing further stimulus to the economy. The outlook also boosted 2017 growth projections for Germany, Japan, Spain and Britain to reflect stronger-than-expected performances in the second half of last year. At the same time, the IMF lowered its fore- casts for Italy, South Korea, India and Brazil, reflecting disappointing perform- ances in the last half of 2016. The IMF said that growth prospects in Latin America were being hurt by rising uncertainty about the outlook in Mexico, given Trump’s statements overhauling trade relations between the United States and Mexico. about The IMF slashed its growth projections for Mexico by 0.6 percentage point in both 2017 and 2018 to 1.7 percent this year and 2 percent next year.

UK’s PM signals EU clean break: no ‘half-in, half-out’

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LONDON — Britain will make a clean break from the European Union and not seek to remain “half-in, half-out,” Prime Minister Theresa May will say Tuesday, dis- appointing businesses and voters who want the country to stay in the bloc’s single mar- ket.

In her most detailed speech on the U.K.’s exit strategy, May will promise to forge “a new and equal partnership” with the EU. “Not partial membership of the European Union, associate membership of the European Union, or anything that leaves us half-in, half-out,” she plans to say, accord- ing to excerpts released by her office. “We do not seek to adopt a model already

10 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL IMF raises U.S’s growth forecast, cites

Theresa May

enjoyed by other coun- tries. We do not seek to hold on to bits of mem- bership as we leave.” May’s speech appears to rule out the sort of close ties adopted by non-EU members

Switzerland or Norway.

It’s likely to be another

shock for the beleaguered pound, which hit a three-month low below $1.20 Monday amid hints that May would signal an economy-roiling “hard Brexit.” Sterling has lost about a fifth of its value since Britain voted in June to leave the EU. May has said she rejects both the “hard Brexit” label and its opposite, a compro-

10 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL IMF raises U.S’s growth forecast, cites
10 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL IMF raises U.S’s growth forecast, cites
10 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL IMF raises U.S’s growth forecast, cites
10 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL IMF raises U.S’s growth forecast, cites
10 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL IMF raises U.S’s growth forecast, cites
10 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL IMF raises U.S’s growth forecast, cites
10 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL IMF raises U.S’s growth forecast, cites

mise “soft Brexit” - but wants a new rela- tionship in the interests of both Britain and the EU.

“We want to buy your goods, sell you ours, trade with you as freely as possible, and work with one another to make sure we are all safer, more secure and more prosper- ous through continued friendship,” she’ll

say.

In a bid to alleviate fears that Brexit will mean a more insular Britain, May will say she wants the country to be “stronger, fair- er, more united and more outward-looking than ever before.”

In an attempt to symbolize the U.K.’s out- ward-facing aspirations, May will deliver her speech to an audience of British civil servants and international diplomats at

London’s Lancaster House, a Georgian man- sion that has hosted international summits over the decades.

May’s speech s ignals that Britain will quit the EU’s single market in goods and services in order to gain control over immi- gration - a key issue for many voters who backed Brexit. EU leaders say Britain can’t stay in the single market without allowing free movement of people from the bloc.

The prospect of losing single-market access alarms many in Britain’s huge finan- cial services sector, which relies on an abil- ity to do business seamlessly across the 28- nation bloc.

It also worries the many foreign firms that use London not only as a financial hub but as an entry point into the EU.

10 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL IMF raises U.S’s growth forecast, cites
10 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL IMF raises U.S’s growth forecast, cites
HONOR ROLL: THE WEEK’S BEST PERFORMANCES BY SAN MATEO COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETES >> PAGE 12
HONOR ROLL: THE WEEK’S BEST PERFORMANCES BY SAN MATEO COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETES >> PAGE 12
<<< Page 13, President Obama
honors World Series champions
Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017

Golden State strikes back with rout of Cavs

By Janie McCauley

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Stephen Curry and the Golden State Warriors certainly looked ready to trade some more blows with LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers come June. The two-time reigning MVP hit five 3- pointers and had 20 points while matching his season best with 11 assists in Golden State’s 126-91 rout of the defending champs Monday. Klay Thompson scored 26 points with five

HONOR ROLL: THE WEEK’S BEST PERFORMANCES BY SAN MATEO COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETES >> PAGE 12

Warriors 126, Cavaliers 91

3s, and Draymond Green produced his third triple- double of the season with 11 points, 13 rebounds and 11 assists. He also equaled his career best with

five blocks — and had

the talk once more as their relationship turned even more testy. Kevin Durant added 21 points, six rebounds, five assists and three blocks for the Warriors in a much-hyped matchup mere- ly weeks after Golden State lost 109-108 in

Cleveland on Christmas.

Steph Curry

another dustup with King

James in the process. James had 20 points on 6-of-18 shooting and eight rebounds, and he and Green b ecame

The Warriors squandered a 14-point lead that day in a loss that fueled them going into Monday. They relinquished a 3-1 advantage in the NBA Finals last year, a failure that

motivates them to return to the big stage. And the rivals’ latest holiday game marked the Cavs’ first trip back to Oracle Arena since capturing the title here seven months ago. Kyrie Irving — who hit game-winners against Golden State in the past two matchups, including the championship clincher — scored 17 points on an uncharac- teristic day for the Cavs when they commit- ted 15 turnovers to 11 assists. Cleveland shot just 35.2 percent (31 for 88)

See DUBS, Page 15

Proving a true Warrior

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Brittney Cedeno is as tough as they come. Sometimes that toughness gets the South City girls’ basketball superstar in trouble though. Cedeno, a junior point guard, already has plenty of accolades to build on, including having led the Lady Warriors to the first-ever CIF Northern California regional playoff appearance in program history last season, earning Peninsula Athletic League North Division MVP honors in the process. Through all the goodness Cedeno brought to the court in 2015-16, however, one of her defining moments occurred on her final play of the season when she crashed to the floor following a layup during the second half of the Warriors’ 58-57 elimination loss to Tamalpais-Mill Valley. The resulting concussion cost her three months of basketball activity during the off- season. So, in returning to action this year, Cedeno — always hyper-intense and super- aggressive on the court — got a stern talking to from South City head coach Paul Carion. “She’s definitely staying on her feet this year,” Carion said. “I just told her: ‘You’re not going to last a season. You’ve got to stay on her feet.’” Now Cedeno again has South City off to an epic start. Currently 11-2 overall, the Warriors proved favorites to repeat as PAL North Division champs through last week’s league openers — with wins over their steep- est competition: Half Moon Bay and Oceana — which Cedeno started and finished with a flourish to earn Daily Journal Athlete of the Week honors. “I think it’s huge,” Carion said of the wins. “Going back through the whole week, play- ing Half Moon Bay and Oceana, two of the teams we know are going to be there … it shows no matter how far down we are we’re never out of it.” Carion was referring to Friday’s comeback victory over Oceana, during which South City trailed by 9 with 5:02 remaining in regulation before going on a 16-0 run to win it 56-51. Cedeno finished with a double-double, scoring

See AOTW, Page 12

Athlete of the Week

HONOR ROLL: THE WEEK’S BEST PERFORMANCES BY SAN MATEO COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETES >> PAGE 12

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

Brittney Cedeno scored 25 points in South City’s win over Half Moon Bay in the PAL North Division opener, setting the tone for the early edge toward repeating as league champs.

Justin Thomas leaves Hawaii on a big wave

W inning never gets old, even

for the young. That’s why

Justin Thomas was mildly

annoyed when one of the perks from his victory at the Sony Open vanished before his eyes. Fresh off his sweep of Hawaii, he looked up from his phone and said to his father, “320.” The number wasn’t at all related to any of the scoring records he set at Waialae Country Club. It was the number of text messages that myste- riously got wiped out before he could even read them. It’s a safe bet they all read the

DOUG FERGUSON
DOUG
FERGUSON

same way. Thomas, all of 23, is playing some pret- ty good golf. “Pretty unbeliev- able what he’s doing right now,” said Jordan Spieth, who

has known Thomas since they were 13. “He’s got full control of his game, full confidence, and he’s exe- cuting under pressure. It’s a lot of fun to see — stuff that myself and a lot of our peers have seen going back almost 10 years now.” The last two weeks — really, the last three months — everyone else has started to notice. Thomas won the CIMB Classic in Malaysia for the second straight year. During his short break from golf, he con- centrated on shoring up his accuracy off the tee and his efficiency with the wedge and the putter. He showed up in Hawaii for the new year and swept both PGA Tour events convincingly — a three-shot vic- tory Hideki Matsuyama on Maui, a seven- shot victory over Olympic gold medalist Justin Rose on Oahu. That led one of two questions. Who is

See GOLF, Page 16

Pats face different Steelers team with healthy Ben Roethlisberger

By Kyle Hightower

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — The New England Patriots got a break by not having to f ace Ben Roethlisberger during their regu- lar-season win over the Steelers in October. The Patriots’ coaching staff is expecting to get his best this time around with a trip to the Super Bowl at stake.

The 27-16 home loss to New

England was the only game the

Steelers’ 34-year-old quarterback missed due to injury this season. He was away less than a month after undergoing surgery to repair the meniscus in his left knee Oct. 17. He was also among several Pittsburgh players that sat out the regular-season finale against the Browns to rest.

See AFC, Page 14

HONOR ROLL: THE WEEK’S BEST PERFORMANCES BY SAN MATEO COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETES >> PAGE 12

AARON DOSTER/USA TODAY SPORTS

Ben Roethlisberger did not play

when the Steelers took on the Patriots during the regular season.

Packers flip the script

By Genaro C. Armas

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

GREEN BAY, Wis. — For once after a game, Green Bay Packers kicker Mason Crosby felt sore. He got mobbed by giddy team- mates after hitting the 51-yard field goal as time expired to beat the Dallas Cowboys.

At one point, Crosby had to beg

hulking left tackle David Bakhtiari from trying to pick up the kicker for a victory parade. After getting eliminated from

the playoffs on the last play in each of the pre- vious three sea- sons, the
the playoffs on
the last play in
each of the pre-
vious three sea-
sons, the
Packers experi-
enced last-sec-
ond elation in
the 34-31 win
over Dallas on
Mason Crosby
Sunday.
Green Bay will face the Atlanta
Falcons on the road in the NFC

See NFC Page 14

  • 12 Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

12 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Katie Guenin enjoyed a splendid week

Katie Guenin enjoyed a splendid week with six goals through two Menlo-Atherton wins.

K atie

Guenin, Menlo-Atherton

g i rl s ’ s o ccer. The Lady Bears

dominated through opening week in

Peninsula Athletic League Bay Division play,

outscoring a pair of opponents by a cumula- tive total of 8-0. Guenin was central to both victories, totaling six goals on the week. She knocked home two goals in last Tuesday’s opener, a 3-0 win over Carlmont. The senior forward followed that with four goals in last Thursday’s 5-0 win over Burlingame.

Greer

Ho y em,

Menl o -Atherto n

g i rl s ’ bas ketbal l . The Lady Bears opened

Honor roll

PAL South Division play with back-to-back statement wins, rolling past San Mateo 75- 47 and following that with a 59-32 win over Carlmont. Hoyem was the overall scoring leader in both games as the junior center posted scores of 18 and 15, respectively.

N’Jai LeBl anc Jr. and Zach Bene,

Sequo i a bo y s ’ bas ketbal l . The Cherokees turned in two massive scoring outputs to open PAL South Division play. In an 81-60 win over Aragon in last Wednesday’s opener, Bene shot 11 of 15 from the field to total a career-high 24 points. Then in Friday’s shootout, a 91-77 win over Woodside, LeBlanc produced a new career-high as well with 28 points.

Aubri e Bus i ng er, Mi l l s g i rl s ’ bas - ketball. The senior center just keeps ham- mering away at the hoop. Having scored in double figures in each of the Vikings’ 14

games this season, Businger led her team to two straight wins to open PAL South Division play, posting double-doubles against both Carlmont (20 points and 13 rebounds) and Burlingame (19 points and 10 rebounds). She followed that with a game- high 16 points in Mills’ 45-19 non-league win over Monta Vista-Cupertino.

Ri cky

Camacho ,

Hal f

bo y s ’ wres tl i ng . After

Mo o n

Bay

helping the

Cougars to their first dual-meet win of the

season with a victory at El Camino, Camacho claimed silver over the weekend at the 54th Annual Jim Root Wrestling Tournament, taking second place in the 220-pound division.

Marquez Mo zeke, Capuchi no bo y s ’ basketball. The Mustangs earned their first PAL South win last Friday 59-48 over Hillsdale. Trailing by 4 entering the final period, Cap exploded to outscore the Knights 24-9 over the final eight minutes. Mozeke led the way with a team-high 20, this after the senior guard totaled 24 points in Wednesday’s league opening loss to Woodside.

Li nds ey Jo hns o n, Sacred Heart

Prep g i rl s ’ s o ccer. The senior forward opened WBAL Foothill Division play with the first consecutive multi-goal scoring efforts of her career. In SHP’s 4-1 victory over the King’s Academy last Tuesday, Johnson totaled two goals and an assist. She followed that with two more goals last Thursday in a 3-2 win, handing Notre Dame- Belmont its first overall loss of the season.

Nathan Chan, Al ma Hei g hts

Chri s ti an

bo y s ’ bas ketbal l . Through

three wins to start their Private School Athletic League schedule, the Eagles have outscored opponents 226-95. Two of those wins came last week, with Chan scoring a new career-high 21 points against Kehillah Jewish. The junior guard followed that with another new career-high 22 points against Latino College Prep Academy.

Ri l ey Wo o ds o n, Menl o Scho o l

bo y s ’ bas ketbal l . The 6-6 junior forward totaled 31 points through back-to-back wins to open West Bay Athletic League play, including a season-high 21 points last Thursday against Pinewood. But it was

12 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Katie Guenin enjoyed a splendid week

Martin Hernandez produced two goals and an assist in back-to-back wins for El Camino.

on the boards where Woodson shined, total- ing a career-high 18 rebounds against each Pinewood and the King’s Academy.

Marti n Hernandez, El Cami no

bo y s ’ s o ccer. The Colts

have emerged as

one of frontrunners in the PAL Ocean Division with wins over San Mateo and Mills to open their league schedule. Hernandez was central to both victories totaling a goal and an assist in last Wednesday’s 2-1 comeback win over San Mateo, then adding a score last Friday in a 3-1 victory over Mills.

AOTW

Continued from page 11

  • 14 points and adding 14 rebounds, accounting

for the margin of victory closing it out by hit-

ting 5 of 6 free throws in the final minute. Prior to that though, in Tuesday’s league opener against Half Moon Bay, Cedeno

12 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Katie Guenin enjoyed a splendid week

Brittney Cedeno

opened the PAL schedule by drilling three 3-point- ers in the opening 2:37 to stake the Warriors to a 9-2 lead. South City never trailed while Cedeno fin- ished with a season-high 25 points in the 49-41

win.

Even for the power-

house Warriors, heading into the formidable opening week gave them

12 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Katie Guenin enjoyed a splendid week

some pause. But Cedeno’s sharp-shooting start was just the rhythm the team needed. “Once we got the win against Half Moon Bay, we were kind of at ease and just kind of went from there,” Cedeno said. But it wouldn’t be South City basketball if Cedeno didn’t give everyone a scare. And while she has worked to improve finishing

her layups on her feet — instead of consis-

tently tumbling to the floor with abandon — that intensity still found a way to rear its head. Against Half Moon Bay, Cedeno got over- ly aggressive on a defensive play, getting air- borne on a HMB player’s baseline pump-fake only to crash down onto the shooter, then to the floor, as a hush fell over the home crowd. “The gym got super quiet but I was fine,” Cedeno said. While Cedeno took approximately 10 sec- onds to get back to her feet, the stoppage in play turned out to be merely precautionary.

After the scare, Carion took the time to remind Cedeno to play within herself.

“If I’m going

to

go up,

I need to

go

up

strong,” Cedeno said. “I need to stay on my feet or, if I’m going to fall, it needs to at least be a safe fall.”

Not that Cedeno is a one-woman show. When South City returned to non-league action Monday — a 67-58 loss to Woodside Priory — three Warriors scored in double fig- ures, with Nevaeh Miller totaling a team- high 18, Cedeno scoring 14 and Jerlene Miller scoring 10.

It’s precisely this depth that has Cedeno and Co. thinking repeat in the PAL North. Already all alone in first pl ace, it’s their divi- sion to win or lose.

“It’s nice to have this target on my back,” Cedeno said. “I’d rather that than be sitting back and trying to beat the best team. I’d rather be the best team.”

12 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Katie Guenin enjoyed a splendid week
12 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Katie Guenin enjoyed a splendid week

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017

13

Sharks put beat down on Jets

By Josh Dubow

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN JOSE — Sharks coach Peter DeBoer wanted a lot more out of his team following a lackluster shutout loss to St. Louis. Joel Ward more than delivered. Ward had a short-handed goal and took a hard hit to assist on Timo Meier’s score, helping San Jose beat the Winnipeg Jets 5-2 on Monday for just its third win in eight games. “That’s the commitment we talk about,” DeBoer said. “Taking that

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 13 Sharks put beat down on Jets

Joel Ward

hit, making that play scores the goal. We need that. Joel’s a guy that brings that to the rink almost every night. That’s

what it’s going

to take at this

time of year in order to have success.” Brent Burns and Chris Tierney also scored and Joe Thornton had an empty-netter as the Sharks bounced back nicely from a 4-0 home loss to St. Louis on Saturday. Martin Jones made 26 saves, allowing two late goals after the game had been decided. Josh Morrissey broke up the shutout with 2:36 to play and Mark Scheifele added a goal in the final minute after Jones tried to shoot the puck toward the empty net but hit Scheifele instead. “That’s the first time I’ve tried, and probably the last, too,” Jones said. Michael Hutchinson made 27 saves for the Jets, who have dropped four in a row. The Sharks broke open a close

Sharks 5, Jets 2

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 13 Sharks put beat down on Jets

STAN SZETO/USA TODAY SPORTS

Sharks center Micheal Haley, right, and Winnipeg Jets defenseman Mark Stuart duke it out Monday afternoon at SAP Center.

game with two goals in the first half

of the second period, starting when

Mark Stuart jumped up into the play and flattened Ward on a clean hit in front of the Jets bench. Ward’s head slammed against the ice but the Sharks took advantage of Stuart’s aggressiveness with a breakaway when Chris Tierney played the puck ahead to Meier, who beat Hutchinson for his second career goal. “It was a hockey play. It was a good hit,” Ward said. “I tried to get the puck out obviously, and next thing I knew I was on my back and heard the horn go off. I wasn’t too sure what happened after that.” Ward was taken off for observa- tion to make sure he didn’t have a concussion. By the time he returned midway through the second, the Sharks had added to the lead. Paul Potsma was penalized for closing his hand on the puck and

Burns made the Jets pay when his point shot hit off the back boards and then deflected off an unsuspecting Hutchinson’s skate and into the net for Burns’ 18th goal of the season. The Jets had some good chances early but Jones robbed Shawn Matthias twice in the opening min- utes of the first period and Blake Wheeler hit a post later in the first. Winnipeg also got the first power- play chance when David Schlemko was called for a high stick, but the Sharks scored when Dustin Byfuglien couldn’t keep the puck in the offensive zone. Ward went in on a partial breakaway and beat Hutchinson with a shot from the top of the circle to make it 1-0 just 15 seconds into the man advantage. Tierney took another high-stick- ing penalty for the Sharks, but the Jets couldn’t score on the 15-sec- ond two-man advantage or either power play.

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 13 Sharks put beat down on Jets

MIKE THEILER/REUTERS

Barack Obama holds up a card for lifetime free tickets as President of Baseball Operations Theo Epstein looks on as the president welcomes the World Champion Chicago Cubs at the White House Monday.

Obama honors hometown World Series champ Cubs

By Darlene Superville

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama celebrated the World Series champion Chicago Cubs on Monday and spoke about the power sports has to unite people. “Throughout our history, sports has had this power to bring us together even when the country is divided,” Obama said at a White House ceremony for his hometown team. “Sports has changed attitudes and culture in ways that seem subtle but that ultimately made us think differently about ourselves.” “It is a game and celebration,” he said, and noted that “there’s a direct line between Jackie Robinson and me standing here.” Robinson, a sec- ond baseman for the Brooklyn Dodgers, broke Major League Baseball’s color line to become its first black player. The White House event came four

days before Obama hands the presi-

dency over to Donald Trump follow-

ing one of the most divisive elec- tions in recent memory. It also follows a weekend in which civil rights icon John Lewis said he didn’t consider Trump a legitimate president b ecause of Russian meddling in the election. Trump responded on Twitter by crit- icizing Lewis as “all talk” and sug- gesting the Democratic congress- man take better care of his Georgia district. Obama has a home in Chicago, but is a longtime White Sox fan. He rooted for the Cubs after the Sox failed to reach the playoffs. His wife, first lady Michelle Obama, however, is a lifelong Cubs fan. She greeted Cubs players before the ceremony, which Obama noted was her first appearance at some of the roughly 50 events he has hosted for championship college and pro- fessional sports teams.

Cal knocked out of Top 25; UConn still No. 1 in the nation

Fresh off its record-breaking 91st consecutive victory, UConn remained the No. 1 team in The Associated Press women’s basketball poll Monday.

The Huskies (16-0) routed SMU on Saturday to better their own NCAA mark and stay the unanimous choice atop the poll. They garnered all 33 votes from the national media panel Monday. The play at Tulsa on Tuesday before hosting Tulane on Sunday.

Women’s hoops

Lindsay Gottlieb Cal — after hang- ing on at No. 24 last week — fell out
Lindsay Gottlieb
Cal — after hang-
ing on at No. 24 last
week — fell out of the
Top 25 after Lindsay
Gottlieb’s team fell
63-57 to unranked
Utah Sunday.
Texas A&M re-
entered the poll at
No. 25. The Aggies
were in the Top 25
for one week earlier this season.

Coach

Gary

Blair’s

team

plays

Missouri and LSU this week.

Baylor, Maryland, Mississippi State and South Carolina followed the Huskies as the first five teams were unchanged. The Gamecocks will face UConn on Feb. 13 in a game that could have the Huskies going for a 100th consecutive victory, but South Carolina has a huge conference

matchup first against undefeated

Mississippi State (18-0) on Jan. 23. That game could go a long way in deciding the SEC regular-season title.

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 13 Sharks put beat down on Jets
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  • 14 Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

49ers coach search narrows, GM search expands

By Josh Dubow

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANTA CLARA — The search for San Francisco’s new coach nar- rowed on Monday with New England offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels pulling out of the running for the job, while the 49ers added more candidates for their general manager vacancy. Shortly after McDaniels said he was no longer a candidate to replace the fired Chip Kelly in San Francisco, team CEO Jed York inter- viewed Seattle co-directors of player personnel Trent Kirchner and Scott Fitterer later Monday for the GM job previously held by Trent Baalke. McDaniels, who was the head coach in Denver from 2009-10, was considered one of the favorites to land the coaching job b ecause of his

14 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL 49ers coach search narrows, GM search

John McDaniels

success running

New England’s

offense before deciding to stay with the Patriots for at least another year.

He said he was

impressed with

York,

chief

strategy officer Paraag Marathe and director of foot- ball administration and analytics Brian Hampton. “They did a great job with their presentation, and again (I’m) hum- bled to be included in that process,” McDaniels said. “At this time, it’s best for my family and myself to remain here in New England and focus on this year’s playoffs and fin- ish out the year however it turns out.” That leaves only two coaching

14 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL 49ers coach search narrows, GM search

Kyle Shanahan

candidates remaining unless San Francisco decides to open up the search before making a final decision.

Atlanta offen-

sive coordinator

Kyle Shanahan previously interviewed for the job, but can’t be hired until the Falcons season is over. Seattle offensive line coach Tom Cable also interviewed on Sunday. Three coaches who interviewed with York have already taken jobs elsewhere with Washington offen- sive coordinator Sean McVay get-

ting hired by the Los Angeles Rams, Carolina defensive coordinator Sean McDermott getting the job in

Buffalo and Bills interim coach Anthony Lynn taking over the Chargers. Vance Joseph was hired in Denver before he could interview with San Francisco. The 49ers have the only coach opening left in the NFL after the other

five vacancies have all been filled.

York said he was open to hiring either the coach or general manager first. He said the primary goal in the search is finding a coach and general manager who can work well together. Kirchner has 17 years of experi- ence in the NFL since starting as a scouting intern in Seattle in 2000. He spent one year in Washington as a college scouting coordinator and eight years in Carolina as a pro per- sonnel scout before returning to Seattle in 2010 as assistant director of pro personnel.

In 2013, he was promoted to direc- tor of player personnel before assuming his current position in

2015.

Fitterer has 19 years of NFL per-

sonnel experience and has been with the Seahawks since 2001. He was Seattle’s director of college scouting from 2010-14, before being pro- moted to his current role in 2015. York has already interviewed seven other candidates for general manager: Arizona vice president of player personnel Terry McDonough, ESPN analyst Louis Riddick, Carolina assistant GM Brandon Beane on Monday, Indianapolis vice president of football operations Jimmy Raye III, Minnesota assis- tant GM George Paton, Green Bay director of football operations Eliot Wolf and Packers director of player personnel Brian Gutekunst.

NFC

Continued from page 11

championship game on Sunday.

“Usually after a game, I don’t feel beat up,” a smiling Crosby said on Monday. “We play a kid’s game,

and those moments like that, just kind of bring that (joy) out of us.”

Crosby’s clutch kick was set up by Aaron Rodgers’ throw , while

rolling to his left, to toe-dragging tight end Jared Cook along the sideline for a 36-yard gain. Coach Mike McCarthy on Monday cred- ited Rodgers with making all the right calls on that play.

With those two plays, the Packers were able to cross “last- second win on the road” off their checklist during what has been a remarkable turnaround for a team that was once 4-6.

Last season, the Arizona Cardinals beat the Packers in overtime 26-21 in the divisional round on Larry Fitzgerald’s 5-yard touchdown catch.

The Packers fell 28-22 to the Seahawks in overtime on Jermaine Kearse’s 35-yard touch- down reception in the NFC title game in Seattle two years ago after blowing a 16-0 lead.

They lost 23-20 in a wild-card

game in the 2013 season

to

the

San

Francisco 49ers on Phil

Dawson’s 33-yard field goal as

time expired in regulation.

The Packers have bounced back from the season-ending injury to running back Eddie Lacy in October. They have proven that they can win even without top receiver Jordy Nelson, who missed the Cowboys game with injured ribs. The defense has with- stood injuries to the secondary.

14 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL 49ers coach search narrows, GM search

AFC

Continued from page 11

Backup quarterback Landry Jones was serviceable in just his third career start in Roethlisberger’s absence.

The Steelers outgained the Patriots 375-362, but were 1 for 4 in the red zone and Jones finished with only one touchdown and an interception.

Pittsburgh is expecting, and will need a stronger performance from the quarterback position this time around.

Coach Bill Belichick said Monday that Big Ben’s return makes the Steelers’ primary offensive options — running back Le’Veon Bell and receiv- er Antonio Brown — only that much harder to contend with. Bell rushed for 81 yards in the first meeting and Brown had seven catches for 106 yards.

“They’re a tremendous offense.

14 Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL 49ers coach search narrows, GM search

Antonio Brown

Kansas City was able to make some plays in the red area, but I mean (the Steelers) could’ve

easily been up in the 40s,” Belichick said.

“They do a lot of

things well; can run

it, can throw it. Brown’s the main guy, but all of the receivers, tight ends, backs, I mean they’re all a problem.” The Chiefs may have planted the seed for how to keep Roethlisberger out of the end zone, however. The Steelers were held without a touchdown in Sunday’s 18-16 divi- sional-round win over Kansas City. They also ranked 12th in the NFL dur- ing the regular season in red zone effi- ciency, scoring a touchdown on 59 percent of the trips inside the 20-yard line. They were 0 for 5 in their trips against Kansas City. Roethlisberger had 13 touchdowns

and only three interceptions in the red zone in 14 regular-season games.

But so far in the playoffs, Big Ben has just two total passing touchdowns and three interceptions.

Still, the Steelers coaching staff’s trust in him to throw the deep ball is something that will be a point of

emphasis this week, Patriots defen- sive coordinator Matt Patricia said.

In

particular

he

said

Roethlisberger’s calm in the pocket and his offensive line’s ability to pro- tect him helps him buy time to impro- vise.

“If those plays can get extended or prolonged, that’s when it becomes really difficult,” Patricia said. “I think Roethlisberger right now (is) very mobile, very healthy, a guy that showed even again (Sunday night) that just a slight bit of movement or a slight bit of ability to maybe evade the rush, or stand in there just a little bit longer gives his guys enough time to get open in those situations.”

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SPORTS

Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017

15

Wagner leads old guard for U.S. figure skating

By Dave Skretta

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Ashley Wagner remembers being glued to her TV in the winter of 1998, when a sprightly young figure skater named Tara Lipinski was dazzling the judges on her way to gold at the Nagano Olympics. Wagner was 7 years old at the time. Lipinski was just 15. Nearly two decades later, Wagner is still trying to follow Lipinski’s foot- steps, albeit in much different fashion. That dainty skater who captured Wagner’s imagination all those years ago became the youngest Olympic champion in history, while Wagner will head to Kansas City for the U.S. figure skating championships this week aiming to become one of the old- est next year in South Korea. She is at the forefront of what might best be described as the antithesis of a youth movement, a push by American figure skating’s old guard to finally return the U.S. to the Olympic podium. Wagner would be 26 in Pyeongchang. Mirai Nagasu would be 24. Gracie Gold would be 23. Not exactly young in the world of figure skating. “I’ve always admired Michelle Kwan,” Wagner said of the two-time Olympic medalist, who spent a decade competing at the elite level. “She clawed onto that top spot for so long, and that’s something I always wanted

in my career.

“I’ve been around for so long, I’ve

seen athletes come and go,” she con- tinued, “and I’ve been able to cling to my spot b ecause I’m so hungry to be something in this sport, and be remembered for achieving something great. Whether that’s my world silver medal or an Olympic medal down the road, we’ll see.” Wagner qualified for the 2014 Sochi Olympics and finished sixth in the ladies’ competition, then helped the U.S. team win a bronze medal in the newly formed team event. But along with Gold’s fourth-place finish and ninth for Polina Edmunds, the Americans once more struggled to find Olympic success. The nation that produced champions such as Scott Hamilton and Brian Boitano on the men’s side and Peggy Fleming and Dorothy Hamill on the women’s side has not had a ladies’ medalist since Sasha Cohen won silver at the 2006 Torino Games. The drought follows 11 straight Winter Olympics with at least one ladies figure skating medal. So perhaps it’s a good thing the U.S. team could be on the experienced side in Pyeongchang. So many of the mis- steps in recent years have come with teams of youngsters — Edmunds had not yet turned 16 in Sochi — rather than skaters who have been through the grind. Yes, there’s something to be said for youthful exuberance in a sport where

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 15 Wagner leads old guard for U.S.

CHRISTINE BRENNAN/USA TODAY SPORTS

At 25, Ashley Wagner is the ranking veteran of the U.S. figure skating team.

showmanship is often rewarded, but there is also a benefit to knowing how to deal with nerves on a world stage. “Ashley has said this before, I think: We’re like bottles of wine,” Nagasu said, “and we just get better with age. I’ve really learned through figure skating there are going to be ups and downs.” Likewise, the triumvirate of top Americans has learned how to deal with them. Gold heads to Kansas City this week after a lackluster Grand Prix season, but the two-time and reigning U.S. champion said her confidence is “sur- prisingly high.” She believes a strong performance can remind everyone that she has what it takes to land on the Olympic podium.

Serena sets out to win record 23rd major title

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MELBOURNE, Australia — For five games in the second

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 15 Wagner leads old guard for U.S.

Serena

Williams

set, Serena Williams played almost flaw- less tennis in her first-round match at the Australian Open. Then came the rustiness that tends to follow a lengthy layoff, giving Belinda Bencic a glimmer of hope, before the six- time Australian Open championWilliams regained her composure to win 6-4, 6-3 on Tuesday.

The No. 2-ranked Williams’ priority

here is an Open era record 23rd major

title. In round two she’ll meet Lucie

Safarova, who beat Yanina Wickmayer 3-6, 7-6 (7), 6-1.

MLB briefs

Phillies, Michael Saunders agree to 1-year deal

PHILADELPHIA — A person familiar with the negotia- tions tells The Associated Press that outfielder Michael Saunders and the Philadelphia Phillies have agreed on a $9 million, one-year contract. Saunders’ deal was first reported by MLB.com. MLB Network reported Saunders has an option for 2018 worth $11 million with escalators that can make it reach $14 mil- lion, and the deal includes a $1 million buyout. A 2016 AL All-Star with Toronto, Saunders hit a career- best 24 homers and batted .253 with 57 RBIs last season.

Bautista and Blue Jays working hard on return

TORONTO — A person with knowledge of the negotiations tells The Associated Press that outfielder Jose Bautista and the Toronto Blue Jays are “working really hard” to bring him back to the club. The 36-year-old Bautista hit 22 homers with 69 RBIs last year while batting .234 in an injury-slowed season.

DUBS

Continued from page 11

overall. Beyond embarrassed, Cavs players made for the tunnel before the final buzzer even sounded. The latest altercation between Green and James came with 6:55 left in the first half. Golden State led 52-35 when James collided with Green near midcourt, result- ing in a flagrant 1 foul on Golden State’s emotional All-Star. Green’s arm extended across the upper body of James, who went down hard and lay on the court. Green reacted by appearing to mock James for flopping — and he wasn’t the only one to sense some embellishment from LeBron.

“Flagrant 1 on Draymond?? What has happened to my league??” former player-turned-analyst Reggie Miller posted on Twitter.

After a long replay review, a double

technical was called on Green and Richard Jefferson.

This tension goes back a while: Green was suspended for Game 5 of last sea- son’s NBA Finals after swiping at James’ groin the previous game. The absence of Green helped swing the series.

After Curry’s pull-up 3 moments before halftime Monday sent his team into the break with a 78-49 lead, the star guard did what looked like a little celebratory breakdancing move on his behind at the sideline.

You bet this one meant a lot to the Warriors to regain some swagger in

this rivalry after Cleveland had won the past four meetings.

A day after the Christmas loss at Cleveland last month, the NBA said James should have received a technical for hanging on the rim with 1:43 to play and that Jefferson fouled Durant on the game’s final play. That prompted Durant to call on the league to ditch the Last Two Minute Report altogether.

On Monday, Durant appeared down- right possessed. KD’s driving, emphatic tomahawk jam 1:43 before halftime sent Oracle Arena’s sellout crowd into a frenzy.

Zaza Pachulia pulled down 13 rebounds as Golden State had a 58-35 edge on the boards. Andre Iguodala came off the bench to make all five of his field goal attempts for a season-high 14 points, and Shaun Livingston added 13.

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SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NBA GLANCE
NBA GLANCE

EASTERN CONFERENCE

 

Atlantic Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Toronto

27

13

.675

Boston

26

15

.634

1 1/2

New York

18

24

.429

10

Philadelphia

13

26

.333

13 1/2

Brooklyn

8

32

.200

19

Southeast Division

 

Atlanta

24

17

.585

Washington

21

19

.525

2 1/2

Charlotte

20

21

.488

4

Orlando

17

26

.395

8

Miami

11

30

.268

13

Central Division

Cleveland

29

11

.725

Indiana

21

19

.525

8

Milwaukee

20

20

.500

9

Chicago

21

21

.500

9

Detroit

19

24

.442

11 1/2

WESTERN CONFERENCE

 

Southwest Division

San Antonio

31

9

.775

Houston

32

11

.744

1/2

Memphis

25

18

.581

7 1/2

New Orleans

16

26

.381

16

Dallas

13

27

.325

18

Northwest Division

 

Utah

27

16

.628

Oklahoma City

25

18

.581

2

Portland

18

25

.419

9

Denver

16

23

.410

9

Minnesota

14

27

.341

12

Pacific Division

Warriors

35

6

.854

L.A. Clippers

29

14

.674

7

Sacramento

16

24

.400

18 1/2

L.A. Lakers

15

30

.333

22

Phoenix

13

28

.317

22

Monday’s Games

Atlanta 108, New York 107

 

Washington 120, Portland 101 Philadelphia 113, Milwaukee 104 Indiana 98, New Orleans 95 Denver 125, Orlando 112 Boston 108, Charlotte 98 Golden State 126, Cleveland 91 Utah 106, Phoenix 101 L.A. Clippers 120, Oklahoma City 98

Tuesday’s Games

Houston at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Toronto at Brooklyn, 4:30 p.m. Dallas at Chicago, 5 p.m. Minnesota at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Denver at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.

NHL GLANCE
NHL GLANCE

EASTERN CONFERENCE

 

Atlantic Division

 
 

GP W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Montreal

45

27

12

6

60

138

113

Boston

47

23

19

5

51

117

117

Ottawa

41

22

15

4

48

105

107

Toronto

41

20

13

8

48

128

120

Florida

45

20

17

8

48

106

122

Tampa Bay

45

21

20

4

46

125

133

Detroit

44

19

19

6

44

112

127

Buffalo

43

17

17

9

43

101

120

Metropolitan Division

 

Washington 44

29

9

6

64

138

94

Columbus

42

29

9

4

62

141

95

Pittsburgh

43

27

11

5

59

153

131

N.Y. Rangers

44

28

15

1

57

152

116

Philadelphia 46

22

18

6

50

132

148

Carolina

43

21

15

7

49

121

117

New Jersey

45

18

18

9

45

101

129

N.Y. Islanders42

17

17

8

42

120

128

WESTERN CONFERENCE

 

Central Division

 

Minnesota

42

28

9

5

61

138

92

Chicago

46

27

14

5

59

126

116

St. Louis

44

23

16

5

51

124

129

Nashville

43

20

16

7

47

119

114

Dallas

45

18

19

8

44

119

138

Winnipeg

47

20

23

4

44

129

145

Colorado

41

13

27

1

27

82

137

Pacific Division

 

Anaheim

46

24

13

9

57

123

116

Edmonton

46

24

15

7

55

131

122

Sharks

44

26

16

2

54

117

102

Calgary

46

23

20

3

49

119

125

Los Angeles 44

22

18

4

48

111

110

Vancouver

45

20

19

6

46

111

130

Arizona

43

13

24

6

32

91

137

Monday’s Games

 

Buffalo 4, Dallas 1 N.Y. Islanders 4, Boston 0

 

Detroit 1, Montreal 0 San Jose 5, Winnipeg 2 Tampa Bay 2, Los Angeles 1 Pittsburgh 8, Washington 7, OT Edmonton 3, Arizona 1

Tuesday’s Games

Carolina at Columbus, 4 p.m. Dallas at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Buffalo at Toronto, 4:30 p.m. Ottawa at St. Louis, 5 p.m. New Jersey at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Florida at Calgary, 6 p.m. Chicago at Colorado, 6 p.m. Nashville at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Anaheim, 7 p.m.

Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL NBA GLANCE EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division

BRIAN SPURLOCK/USA TODAY SPORTS

Justin Thomas tees off the first hole during the third round of the Sony Open golf tournament at Waialae Country Club.

GOLF

Continued from page 11

this guy or where was this guy? More than just a wire-to-wire victory in the Sony Open, Thomas opened the tournament with a 59, only the eighth sub-60 round in PGA Tour history. And he never really let up until he set the 36- hole scoring record, tied the 54- hole scoring record, and tapped in for birdie on his final hole to set the 72-hole scoring record. In two weeks on two islands, he was 49 under par. This being the Aloha State, it’s fair to ask if this was hello or goodbye. Was this a two-week stretch in which Thomas stamped himself a veritable rising star? Or was it simply a player riding the

kind of wave found across the island on the North Shore? Or maybe, as Spieth suggested, it’s neither. “He’s already been there,” Spieth

said. “He’s gone through the

process. He’s succeeded at each level and just moved up the totem pole. When you get out to the big tour, sometimes it takes a little bit of time to win, or win in bunches.” Spieth speaks from experience. He won in his first year, then went through a winless PGA Tour season as a sophomore. In his third season, Spieth rocketed to the top of golf by winning the Masters and U.S. Open, chasing the Grand Slam and winning the FedEx Cup to go with his five victories. This is the third year for Thomas. He already has won three times in five starts, as many titles as anyone captured all of last year. And it’s not even February, so maybe more great golf is on the

horizon. The first major is still three months away. Thomas is not lacking confi- dence, nor humility. He doesn’t take himself seriously, only his golf. With a seven-shot lead going into the final round, all he heard Saturday night and all of Sunday morning was that no one had ever lost a 54-hole lead that large. It led to jangled nerves when teed off in the final round, and even though no one ever got closer than five shots, he had one nervous moment over an 8-foot par putt on the sixth hole. Miss it and he would be 2 over for his round, his lead down to four. He made it. After four birdies in his next six holes, the lead was up to eight and Thomas was on his way. The last birdie gave him a 72- hole score of 253, one better than the record Tommy Armour III set in 2003 at the Texas Open. Thomas spoke confidently after he set the 36-hole record of 123 (59-64) when to measure how he was playing. “I definitely haven’t shown the world my best golf,” he said. So after setting scoring records, after posting his 12th consecutive round in the 60s worldwide (his average is 66.1 over his last three events), winning back-to-back in Hawaii and destroying his compe- tition at Waialae, Thomas was asked if he was getting closer to his best. “Yeah, I’m obviously playing great. I’m not going to sit here and tell you I’m playing OK,” he said. “I would take the golf I played the last few weeks every week I play.”

Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL NBA GLANCE EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division
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Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL NBA GLANCE EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/HEALTH

Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017

17

MLK

Continued from page 1

Of more than 100 observers who turned out to the 18th annual event, many expressed the belief that some of King’s most trenchant social commentary again gained immediate rel- evance ahead of Friday, Jan. 20, when President-elect Donald Trump takes his oath of office. Maurice Goodman, a trustee for the San Mateo County Community College District, said he saw the event as a means of demonstrat- ing to his twin 10-year-old sons Malcolm and Justice the importance of remaining dedicated in the battle against oppression and inequality. “This is a way of showing them they are always going to have to have their armor on and fight for those who cannot fight for them- selves,” said Goodman, who planned after the event to attend similar rallies in San Francisco with his sons. Goodman said he has spent his sons’ forma- tive years instilling in them the virtue of King’s lessons to prepare them for obstacles some fear could be presented for people of color under a Trump presidency. “We are not going to stand for the rhetoric of this coming administration,” said Goodman. “But this is nothing new for our country … we can and will overcome this challenge.” Trump’s path to the Oval Office raised con- cerns among many due to his criticism of social movements such as Black Lives Matter, endorsement of stop-and-frisk police tactics, calls for stringent immigration reform and more. His campaign receiving the endorsement of white nationalist groups and the selection of conservative media strategist Steve Bannon as a top White House counselor compounded many of those fears. More recently, Trump generated outrage after tweeting harsh critiques of U.S. Rep. John Lewis, D-Atlanta, a committed civil rights activist who helped coordinate in 1963 the March on Washington, where King performed his iconic sp eech “I Have a Dream.” Many of those who spoke at the event in San

Mateo noted though the coming months and years under the Trump presidency may seem bleak, they looked to King’s message of perse- verance and hope to fortify their spirit.

“Only with love can we go forward,” said the

Rev. Penny Nixon, senior minister at the Congregational Church of San Mateo, who was honored for her church’s efforts alongside the Clergy Together For Housing organization to advance the fight for civil rights locally.

She noted though there is plenty of work ahead for those who plan to oppose many of Trump’s policies.

“We will need to protest unjust laws,” she said.

Shirley Lamarr, director of Cameo House, also received recognition as the event’s hon- orary chairperson for her work supporting underprivileged families. Local t eachers Karen Ramroth, of Carlmont High School, and Karin Pickard, of Sunnybrae Elementary School, accepted the Dorothy Boyajian Honored Teacher award for authoring outstanding social justice lessons.

Ramroth said looking ahead to the chal- lenges facing Trump’s opponents, she is heart- ened by the commitment of her students to sup- port causes advancing causes in keeping with King’s legacy.

“Our future is in the strong and capable stu- dents who are ready to do the hard work that needs to be done,” said Ramroth.

She pointed to those who have participated in rallies or registered new voters as examples of the efforts of students interested in preserving and advancing King’s message.

Considering the fears harbored by many, event coordinator Maya Perkins said the opti- mism and hope expressed by those in atten- dance gave her great confidence looking ahead.

“There is so

much work to be done,” said

Perkins, a legislative aide to county Supervisor Warren Slocum. “But it’s great to gather and know we are not alone.”

Goodman echoed a similar sentiment, and said he believes in the ability of communities to unify and overcome the challenges ahead which at first may seem intimidating.

“We will show the world what makes us the best country,” he said.

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IRS warns millions about health insurance penalty

By Ricardo Alonzo-Zaldivar

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — If you haven’t signed up for health insurance, you may soon be getting a not-too-subtle nudge from the taxman. The IRS is sending personalized letters to millions of taxpayers who might be unin- sured, reminding them that they could be on the hook for hundreds of dollars in fines under the federal health care law if they don’t sign up soon through HealthCare.gov. It’s an unusual role for a revenue-collection agency. Fines are one of the most unpopular parts of the 2010 health overhaul, and there’s a high likelihood they’ll get repealed by Republicans, even if other parts of “Obamacare” survive. The administration is counting on IRS reminders to help sign up as many people as possible before open enroll- ment ends Jan. 31. That’s soon after officials hand off President Barack Obama’s signature program to a Trump administration committed to “repeal and replace.” Letters bearing the IRS logo will be sent to an estimated 7.5 million people who either claimed an exemption from the law’s require- ment that most Americans carry health insur- ance, or who paid a penalty for being unin- sured during the 2015 tax year. The coverage requirement was included in the law as a way to get healthy people into the insurance pool, helping to keep premiums in check. The penalty for this year could be $2,085 or more, depending on family size and income, says one draft version of the IRS letter. Another draft takes a somewhat different approach, leaving a blank sp ace for the IRS to provide an individualized estimate of what the particular uninsured taxpayer might owe. The drafts were obtained by the Associated Press. Although the administration has made no secret of the IRS role in open enrollment

“People receiving these letters

have already made up their minds about Obamacare when they applied for an exemption or paid a penalty. They don’t want stock letters. They want better health care choices and lower costs.”

— Kevin Brady,

R-Texas House Ways and Means Chairman

this year, officials have not responded to requests for copies of the actual letters. Republicans say the whole thing is a waste of money. The campaign will cost about $4 million, say congressional aides. “People receiving these letters have already made up their minds about Obamacare when they applied for an exemption or paid a penal- ty,” said House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas. “They don’t want stock letters. They want better health care choices and lower costs.” Supporters of the health care law say research has shown that many people who remain uninsured are still unaware that they can go to HealthCare.gov and qualify for gov- ernment subsidies to help pay their premiums. Those subsidies were designed as tax credits, bringing the IRS into the picture. The IRS let- ters make the pitch:

“Most people who enroll in a plan through HealthCare.gov can find plans for $75 a month or less after financial help,” the letters say. “At HealthCare.gov, you can compare plans to find one that meets your needs and budget.”

See LETTER, Page 19

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL/HEALTH Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 17 MLK Continued from page 1 Of
THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL/HEALTH Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 17 MLK Continued from page 1 Of
  • 18 Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017

HEALTH

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tots recognize words are symbols

By Lauran Neergaard

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Celebrate your child’s scribbles. A novel experiment shows that even before learning their ABCs, youngsters start to recognize that a written word sym- bolizes language in a way a drawing doesn’t — a developmental step on the path to read- ing. Researchers used a puppet, line drawings and simple vocabulary to find that children as young as 3 are beginning to grasp that nuanced concept. “Children at this very early age really know a lot more than we had previously thought,” said developmental psychologist Rebecca Treiman of Was hington University in St. Louis, who co-authored the study. The research published Wednesday in the journal Child Development suggests an additional way to consider reading readi- ness, beyond the emphasis on phonetics or being able to point out an “A” in the alpha- bet chart. Appreciating that writing is “something that stands for something else, it actually is a vehicle for language — that’s pretty pow-

Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 HEALTH THE DAILY JOURNAL Tots recognize words are symbols By

Kathy

Hirsh-Pasek

erful stuff,” said Temple University psychology professor Kathy Hirsh- Pasek, a specialist in lit- eracy development who wasn’t involved in the new work. And tots’ own scrib-

bling is practice.

What a child calls a family portrait may look

like a bunch of grapes but “those squiggles, that ability to use lines to represent something bigger, to represent something deeper than what is on that page, is the great open door into the world of sym- bolic thought,” Hirsh-Pasek said. The idea: At some point, children learn that a squiggle on a page represents some- thing, and then that the squiggle we call text has a more specific meaning than what we call a drawing. “Dog,” for example, should be read the same way each time, while a canine drawing might appropriately be labeled a dog, or a puppy, or even their pet Rover. Treiman and colleagues tested 114 preschoolers, 3- to 5-year-olds who hadn’t

received any formal instruction in reading or writing. Some youngsters were shown words such as dog, cat or doll, sometimes in cur- sive to rule out guessing if kids recognized a letter. Other children were shown simple drawings of those objects. Researchers would say what the word or drawing por- trayed. Then they’d bring out a puppet and

ask the child if they thought the puppet

knew what the words or drawings were. If the puppet indicated the word “doll” was “baby” or “dog” was “puppy,” many chil- dren said the puppet was mistaken. But they more often accepted s ynonyms for the draw- ings, showing they were starting to under- stand that written words have a far more spe- cific meaning than a drawing, Treiman said. Language is “like a zoom lens on the world,” said Hirsh-Pasek. This study shows “even 3-year-olds know there’s something special about written words.” It’s not clear if children who undergo that developmental step at a later age — say, 5 or 6 instead of 3 or 4 — might go on to need extra help with learning to read, cautioned Brett Miller, an early learning specialist at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development,

which helped fund the research. But because some children did better than others in the experiment, Treiman plans to study that. Scientists have long known that reading to very young children helps form the foun- dation for them to later learn to read, by introducing vocabulary, rhyming, and differ- ent speech sounds. But it’s important to include other activi- ties that bring in writing, too, Treiman said. Look closely at a tot’s scribbles. A child might say, “I’m writing my name,” and eventually the crayon scribble can become smaller and closer to the line than the larger scrawl that the tot proclaims is a picture of a flower or mom, she said. “It’s very exciting to see this develop,” she said. Previous studies have shown it’s helpful to run a finger under the text when reading to a youngster, because otherwise kids pay more attention to the pictures, Miller said. If the words aren’t pointed out, “they get less exposure to looking at text, and less oppor- tunity to learn that sort of relationship — that text is meaningful and text relates to sound,” he said.

Cells dripped into the brain help man fight a deadly cancer

By Marilynn Marchione

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A man with deadly brain cancer that had spread to his spine saw his tumors shrink and, for a time, completely vanish after a novel treatment to help his immune system attack his dis-

Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 HEALTH THE DAILY JOURNAL Tots recognize words are symbols By

ease — another first in this promising field.

The type of immunotherapy that 50-year-old Richard Grady received already has helped some people with blood cancers such as leukemia. But the way he was given it is new, and may allow its use not just for brain tumors but also other cancers that can spread, such as breast and lung.

Grady was the first person to get the treatment dripped through a tube into a sp ace in the brain where s pinal fluid is made, sending it down the path the cancer traveled to his spine.

He had “a remarkable response” that opens the door to wider testing, said Dr. Behnam Badie, neurosurgery chief at City of Hope, a cancer center in Duarte, California, where Grady was treated.

The case is reported in this week’s New England Journal of Medicine.

Each year in the United States, about 20,000 people are diagnosed with a type of brain tumor called glioblastoma. Grady, who lives in Seattle, had the usual surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, but the cancer came back.

He enrolled in a clinical trial at City of Hope and had some of his own blood cells, called T cells, removed and genetical- ly modified in the lab to turn them into specialized soldiers to seek and destroy cancer.

The treatment, called CAR-T cell therapy, has been used for blood cancers, but its value for solid tumors is unknown. City of Hope has been testing injecting the cells directly into the brain.

First, Grady had more surgery to remove three of his largest tumors. Then he got six weekly infusions of the cells through a tube into his brain, where the biggest one had been. No can- cer recurred there, but the remaining tumors continued to grow, new ones appeared, and cancer spread to his spine.

Doctors decided on a bold step: placing a second tube in his brain, into a cavity where spinal fluid is made, and putting the cells there.

“The idea was to have the flow of the spinal fluid carry the T cells to different locations,” along the route the cancer had taken, Badie said.

After three treatments, all tumors had shrunk dramatically. After the 10th treatment, “we saw all the tumors disappear,” and Grady was able to cut back on other medicines and return to work, Badie said.

New tumors, though, have now emerged in different spots in his brain and spine, and he is getting radiation treatment. But his response to immunotherapy lasted more than seven months, and “for him to live more than a year and half” after starting it is amazing for a situation where survival often is measured in weeks, Badie said.

Side effects of the treatment were manageable, including headaches, fatigue and muscle aches, and some may have been due to other medicines Grady needed, doctors reported.

It’s early research, but it’s an advance for the field “that they showed this is safe, at least in this patient,” said Dr. Donald O’Rourke, a neurosurgeon heading a similar study at the University of Pennsylvania.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

HEALTH/LOCAL

Tuesday Jan. 17, 2017

19

LETTER

Continued from page 17

While such low-cost plans are available, many people actually pay more, and the $75 figure does- n’t take into account deductibles and copayments. The average monthly premium last year for HealthCare.gov customers was $106, after financial help, accord- ing to the government. The admin- istration has not released a compa- rable premium estimate for this year. Insurers raised their sticker prices significantly, but the law’s subsidies should cushion the impact for most HealthCare.gov customers.

About 800,000 letters went out after Thanksgiving, and an addi- tional 6.7 million are going out now, according to congressional aides.

Last year about 6.5 million peo- ple paid fines for being uninsured, averaging $470, according to recent IRS data. The amount is gen- erally deducted from a taxpayer’s anticipated refund. The fines start- ed small in 2014, but are now fully phased in, starting at about $700.

The administration has a goal of signing up 13.8 million people for coverage this year and is looking for a strong finish to open enroll- ment season. Although the Affordable Care Act has reduced the nation’s uninsured rate to a his- toric low, it remains politically divisive.

NOISE

Continued from page 1

City were among the first to lodge complaints with community members in several other cities in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties following suit. The influx of complaints reached local offi- cials, who organized a working group to design solutions for the cross-jurisdictional issue. “There’s been a lot of community involve- ment, a lot of different local and elected officials involved in this issue,” said Kelly. Don Horsley, president of the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors, has worked to coor- dinate the efforts of the working group, which includes Supervisor Warren Slocum, staff from the offices of U.S. representatives Anna Eshoo, D-Palo Alto, and Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo, air- port staff and Surf Air representatives, among others. “We’ve had this working group for a long time and we’ve continually tried to come up with miti- gating measures,” Horsley said.

Flight path adjustments

Over the past four years, the group has worked to adjust the number of and direction of Surf Air flight paths over Peninsula neighborhoods. Kelly said the group quickly engaged the Federal Aviation Administration to request permission for planes to fly higher, increasing the distance between homes and aircraft, as well as routes that veered slightly to the right or left of the original path. But many of these strategies bumped up against air traffic from nearby San Francisco International Airport or spread the nuisance to other neighborhoods. Following a community input session at a March Board of Supervisors meeting, the group coordinated with the FAA to create and pilot a new a flight path called the Bayside Visual Approach, which took Surf Air planes over the Bay and

avoided paths directly over neighborhoods. Kelly said the FAA’s willingness to respond to community input with a new route was unprece- dented.

“It really speaks to the involvement of the

elected officials and the willingness of the FAA to work with them,” she said. After testing the new route in May, the FAA approved Surf Air’s use of the Bayside Visual Approach beginning July 5 for six months. Kelly said Surf Air planes used this route approx- imately 54 percent of the time during this period, averaging 15 arrivals into the San Carlos Airport a day, with a high of 24 arrivals a day. Airport staff have been using an online complaint form to log observations from residents. Kelly said that while some of the complaints have shifted to Sunnyvale, where pilots receive direction on whether they will fly the Bayside route, the air- port has consistently received consistent feed- back about overhead noise.

Evaluation of new route, frustrations

Now that the trial has ended, evaluation of the new route is set to begin. The county, airport and FAA are in the process of evaluating the new route’s impact on the community and environ- ment, as well as its operational capacities. Glen Martin, regional administrator for the FAA’s Western-Pacific Region, has worked close- ly with the working group to gauge the feasibili- ty of the Bayside Visual Approach. “The FAA certainly wants to work with commu- nity to address their concerns as they relate to noise and the impacts airports have on those communities, he said. “This air sp ace is very complex, so there weren’t a lot of options. We look forward to reviewing all the results of the six-month test.” Some county officials aren’t convinced the Bayside route will signal the end to resident com- plaints. For Horsley, the trial’s abrupt end is another frustrating bump on a complicated road to devising solutions. “I don’t think any of us realized that this was

only a test,” said Horsley. “We thought the eval- uation would occur simultaneously. We’re disap- pointed that that’s not the case.”

Because the FAA sets the routes, flight paths and altitude planes must fly at when approaching the San Carlos Airport, the decision whether to approve the Bayside Visual Approach is theirs. Slocum isn’t optimistic residents will see relief any time soon.

“San Mateo County has been dealing with the Surf Air situation for years and unfortunately things have not improved b ecause the county’s hands are virtually tied,” he wrote in an email. “As we wait for the FAA to make a ruling on the less invasive Bayside approach — which could take several months, residents continue to expe- rience the ordeal of noisy skies.”

Though complaints from Atherton and Menlo Park have topped the San Carlos airport’s log dur- ing the pilot period, residents of San Carlos have been bearing the burden of increased overhead air traffic. Of the 19 cities for which the airport has data, the city garnered the sixth highest number of complaints.

Ben Fuller said residents in his neighborhood in Greater East San Carlos have been increasing- ly bothered by Surf Air planes for years, and he less than pleased with the efforts made to mitigate the noise.

“When Surf Air came in, what used to be a high- ly constrained flight route that was unhearable to us has been constant interruption from all direc- tions,” he said. “It’s virtually unlivable to the point where people are thinking about selling their homes and are incredibly upset.”

For Horsley, complaints from his residents have not let up since the pilot was implemented. Though he hopes the new route proves to be suc- cessful, his frustrations with the process linger.

“I’m just disappointed it’s taken so long,” he said.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL HEALTH/LOCAL Tuesday • Jan. 17, 2017 19 LETTER Continued from page 17 While
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LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

INDEX

Continued from page 1

“It does take a community to address dis- parities like this. And when you think about what a thriving community looks like, it’s where everyone is successful, when you have access to health care, education, those kinds of things. So it does call into ques- tion what kind of community you want to have,” Farrales said. Last month, supervisors reviewed the index compiled from four years of census information and staff plans to upload 2015 information into a the new online platform, said John Ridener, the county’s open data community liaison, and Management Analyst Alison Holt. Instead of relying on anecdotal stories, the index provides evidence of where the needs are greatest, they said. “What we need to create are data-driven stories,” Ridener said. In general, portions of the county consis- tently rated as most vulnerable. For