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Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Preface

Preface
This manual is provided as a guide to personnel involved with the operation, maintenance and repair of this mining
shovel. P&H Mining Equipment, Inc. recommends that key personnel review and become familiar with the general
procedures and information contained within this manual. P&H Mining Equipment, Inc. also recommends that this
manual be kept readily available for reference when repairs or maintenance are necessary.
Due to the complexities of mining equipment and the environment in which it operates, situations may occur which
are not directly discussed in detail in this manual. If a situation like this occurs, past experience, availability of
equipment, and common sense play a large part in what steps can be taken. In addition, P&H MinePro Service
Representatives are available to answer your questions and assist you upon request.
Please feel free to contact a P&H MinePro Services Representative at any of the locations.
This manual covers the general description and operation of major electrical assemblies and components used on
the P&H Centurion Electric Mining Shovel.
P&H Mining Equipment reserves the right to continually improve its products and associated documentation.
Therefore, physical alterations to the P&H Electric Mining Shovels may not be identified in this manual. Revisions
are frequently made to this manual in an effort to ensure that information contained within is current as alterations
occur to the shovel electrical system.

Copyright
Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc. All rights reserved. All materials contained herein are protected by United States copyright law and international treaties,
and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of P&H Mining Equipment, Inc. You may not
alter or remove any trademark, copyright or other notice from copies of the content. All
rights in translations of these materials shall remain exclusively with P&H Mining
Equipment, Inc.

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Figure -1: P&H Mining Equipment - Electric Mining Shovel

This manual divides into twelve (12) sections covering the following equipment and systems:
Section 1. Shovel Safety
This section describes safe operating practices for users of P&H Electric Mining Shovels and details the location,
description and definition of Safety Hazard Indicators, Decals, and Signs located on the shovel.
Section 2. General Information
This section provides an introduction to the Electric Mining Shovel.
Section 4. User Interface
This section describes in detail the User Interface located on the Electric Mining Shovel.
Section 5. Power Systems
This section provides detailed information about the Centurion Power System.
Section 6. Shovel Control System
This section provides detailed information about the Centurion Control System.

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Section 7. Drive Control System


This section provides detailed information about the Centurion Drive Control System.
Section 7. Motor Maintenance
This section provides information about maintaining shovel motors.
Section 8. Mine Air Systems
This section contains detailed information about function and maintenance of the Mine Air System.
Section 9. Miscellaneous Electrical
This section provides information about miscellaneous electrical components on an Electric Mining Shovel.

Manual Layout
Pages are numbered within each section. This information is located at the bottom of each page and is formatted
with the section identifier on the left side and actual page number on the right. (i.e 1.4) Throughout the manual
you will notice that even numbered pages appear on the left, odd pages on the right. You may also notice that, at
the end of a section, you may often find a blank page. This is to maintain the even-left, odd-right integrity, for two
sided printing. Each section is generously illustrated to support and clarify text coverage of the equipment and
maintenance procedures.
A. Each Section is broken down in the following items of discussion if applicable.
a. General Information - A simplified discussion of the system, operation (controls and indicators),
major components, and their related operating principles. Each basic motion, Hoist, Crowd/Propel,
and Swing, is presented.
b. Operation - A basic detailed discussion of the system, major components, and their related operating principles.
c.

Maintenance - Alignments and adjustments contains information on maintaining equipment at its full
operational potential.

d. Troubleshooting - Test procedures presented in a logical flow chart according to the most probable
malfunctions, in a recommended sequence of diagnosis.
e. Corrective Maintenance - contains information pertaining to maintenance procedures utilized to
repair equipment.
f.

Software Procedures - developed by P&H engineers or by subsystem manufacturers to provide


detailed steps in programming, downloading and uploading applications and data files.

Dangers, Warnings, Cautions, Safety Firsts, and Notices are important. They highlight conditions and
situations which could endanger personnel or equipment when working on and around the shovel due to
carelessness and misuse. Refer to Topic 1.5 for any clarification. Heed these Hazard Indicators at all
times.

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Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
Copyright . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v
List of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
List of Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xxv
SECTION 1, Shovel Safety
1.1 General Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1
1.1.1 Safety Websites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1
1.2 Safe Operating Practices for Users of P&H Mining Equipment - Electric Shovels . . . . . . . . . 1.2
1.2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2
1.3 Responsibilities of All Crew Members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2
1.3.1 Planning the Job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3
1.4 Safety For Electrical And Electronic Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4
1.4.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4
1.4.2 Electrical Safety Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4
1.4.3 Maintenance Work Precautions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4
1.4.4 Electrical Shock Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6
1.5 Safety Hazard Indicators, Decals and Signs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.8
1.5.1 Hazard Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.8
1.5.2 Safety Hazard Decals and Signs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.8
1.5.3 Specific Hazard Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.57
SECTION 2, General Information
2.1 General. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1
2.2 Electrostatic Discharge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1
2.2.1 ESD Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1
2.2.2 Basic Principles of Static Control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1
2.2.3 Causes of Electrostatic Damage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2
2.2.4 Damage Due to Discharge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2
2.2.5 Damage Due to Induction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3
2.2.6 Damage Due to Polarization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3
2.2.7 Electrostatic-Safe Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4
2.2.8 Electrostatic Voltages at Work. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7
2.2.9 Sensitivity of Components to ESD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8
2.2.10 Hidden Effects of Electrostatic Damage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9
2.3 Schematic Diagram Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9
2.3.1 Wire Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9
2.3.2 Referencing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9
2.3.3 Ground Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.10
2.3.4 Location Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.10
2.4 Six-Step Troubleshooting Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.12
2.5 Required Test Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.13

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2.5.1 Other Related Test Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.13
SECTION 3, Electrical Theory of Operation
3.1 Centurion System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1
3.1.1 Hoist System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3
3.1.2 Crowd System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.4
3.1.3 Swing System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.5
3.1.4 Propel System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.5
SECTION 4, User Interface
4.1 Operator Cab Touch Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.1
4.1.1 Touch Panel Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2
4.1.2 Controls and Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3
4.1.3 Touch Panel Setup Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3
4.1.4 Installing Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.6
4.1.5 Connecting the Power Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.6
4.2 Touch Panel Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.6
4.2.1 Powering On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.6
4.2.2 Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.7
4.2.3 Powering Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.7
4.3 Touch Panel Screen Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.8
4.3.1 Main Screen Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.8
4.3.2 Main Screen Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.26
4.3.3 Operation Screens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.40
4.3.4 Diagnostic Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.57
4.3.5 Setup Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.66
4.4 Touch Panel Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.104
4.4.1 Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.104
4.5 Controls and Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.107
4.6 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.108
4.6.1 Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.108
4.6.2 BIOS Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.108
SECTION 5, Power Systems
5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.1
5.1.1 Power System Operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.1
5.2 Air Disconnect Switch with Earthing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.4
5.2.1 Location and Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.4
5.3 2800XPB/XPC Collector Ring Assembly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.6
5.3.1 Location and Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.7
5.4 4100XPB/XPC/BOSS Collector Ring Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.10
5.4.1 Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.10
5.4.2 Operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.10

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5.5 High Voltage Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.16
5.5.1 Location and Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.16
5.6 Key Interlock System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.18
5.6.1 Operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.18
5.7 Main Transformer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.19
5.7.1 Location and Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.19
5.8 Bus Bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.26
5.9 Auxiliary/Field Transformer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.28
5.9.1 Location and Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.28
5.10 Ground Fault and Suppression Operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.32
5.10.1 Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.32
5.10.2 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.33
5.10.3 Ground Fault Relay Auxiliary Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.35
5.10.4 Ground Fault Relay Field Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.38
5.10.5 Suppression Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.39
5.11 Reactive Power Compensation Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.41
5.11.1 Location and Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.41
5.11.2 RPC Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.42
5.12 Converter Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.53
5.12.1 Cabinet Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.53
5.12.2 .Input Power Distribution and Protection Circuit Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.54
5.12.3 Current Feedback Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.55
5.12.4 Converter Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.56
5.12.5 Diverter Circuit Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.59
5.13 Transfer Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.71
5.13.1 Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.71
5.14 Auxiliary Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.76
5.14.1 Location and Cabinet Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.76
5.14.2 Auxiliary Cabinet Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.78
5.15 Propel Motor Heaters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.94
5.15.1 Propel Motor Heater Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.94
SECTION 6, Shovel Control Systems
6.1 General Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.1
6.1.1 AC800 Module Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.3
6.1.2 Control Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.6
6.1.3 Ethernet (MAC) Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.7
6.2 AC800 Processor Unit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.8
6.2.1 Start Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.8
6.2.2 Verification of Proper AC800 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.9
6.3 Profibus DP-V1 Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.10
6.3.1 Key Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.10
6.3.2 Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.11
6.4 External Battery Backup Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.12

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6.5 Remote Input/Output System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.12
6.5.1 Profibus-FMS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.12
6.5.2 Profibus-PA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.13
6.5.3 Profibus-DP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.13
6.5.4 Profibus DP-V1 Masters and Slaves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.14
6.5.5 Structure of the Profibus DP-V1 Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.14
6.5.6 Remote I/O System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.15
6.6 Components of the Remote I/O System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.17
6.7 DIN Rail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.29
6.8 Terminal Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.29
6.8.1 Terminal Modules for the Power Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.29
6.8.2 Terminal Modules for the I/O Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.31
6.9 Interface Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.34
6.9.1 Standard Fiber Optic Interface Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.34
6.9.2 High Density Fiber Optic Interface Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.36
6.9.3 Intelligent Interface Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.38
6.10 Power Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.45
6.10.1 Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.45
6.10.2 Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.47
6.11 Power Supply Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.48
6.11.1 Auxiliary Cabinet Power Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.48
6.11.2 Control Cabinet Power Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.50
6.11.3 Remote I/O Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.53
6.12 Electronic Digital Input Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.58
6.12.1 4 Digital Input 24VDC Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.58
6.12.2 16 Point Digital Input Signal Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.60
6.12.3 2 Digital Input 120VAC Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.61
6.13 Electronic Analog Input Modules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.63
6.13.1 2 Analog Voltage Input High Feature Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.63
6.13.2 2 Analog Voltage Input High Speed Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.65
6.13.3 2 Analog Current Input High Feature Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.67
6.13.4 2 Analog Input RTD Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.69
6.14 Electronic Digital Output Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.70
6.14.1 2 Digital Output 24VDC Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.70
6.14.2 4 Digital Output 24VDC Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.73
6.14.3 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.75
6.14.4 8 Point Digital Output Signal Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.77
6.15 Electronic Analog Output Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.77
6.15.1 2 Analog Voltage Output High Feature Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.78
6.16 Technical Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.80
6.16.1 Communication Ports and Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.81
6.16.2 Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.82
6.16.3 LED Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.82
6.16.4 Switches and Push Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.83

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6.17 Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.84
6.17.1 Technical Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.84
6.17.2 Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.85
6.17.3 Protective and Monitoring Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.88
6.17.4 Signaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.89
6.17.5 Connection and Terminal Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.89
6.18 Ethernet Electrical Lean Switch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.91
6.18.1 Possible Attachments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.91
6.18.2 Ports and Displays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.92
6.19 Profibus Optical Bus Terminal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.94
6.19.1 Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.94
6.19.2 Optoelectric Signal Conversion and Signal Regeneration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.95
6.19.3 Automatic Transmission Rate Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.95
6.19.4 Supported FO Fiber Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.96
6.19.5 Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.96
6.19.6 Operator Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.97
6.19.7 Optical Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.97
6.19.8 Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.97
6.20 Profibus Resolver Interface Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.101
6.20.1 Input Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.101
6.20.2 Status Word Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.102
6.20.3 Output Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.104
6.20.4 Control Word Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.106
6.20.5 Configuration Word Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.107
6.20.6 Programming Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.108
6.20.7 Hardware Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.109
6.20.8 Baud Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.112
6.20.9 Power Up Delay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.113
6.21 Power Rail Booster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.113
6.21.1 Permissible Cable Length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.113
6.21.2 Contact Resistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.114
6.22 Branching Unit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.115
6.22.1 Setting of Communication Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.116
6.22.2 Setting of Optical Power Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.117
6.22.3 Operation Mode Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.118
6.22.4 Address Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.119
6.23 Terminal Assignments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.120
6.23.1 Power Rail Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.120
6.23.2 Signaling Contact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.120
6.23.3 Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.120
6.23.4 Profibus DP Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.120
SECTION 7, Drive Control Module
7.1 Control Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.1

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7.1.1 External Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.1
7.1.2 Control Cabinet Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.7
7.2 Drive Control Module (DCM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.18
7.3 Control and Communications Board (SDCS-AMC-DC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.19
7.3.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.19
7.3.2 Circuit Board Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.19
7.4 Control Board SDCS-CON-2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.21
7.4.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.21
7.4.2 Watchdog Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.21
7.4.3 Memory Circuit and Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.22
7.4.4 Circuit Board Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.23
7.4.5 Connector and Switch Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.23
7.4.6 Seven Segment Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.24
7.5 SDCS-POW-1 Power Supply Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.25
7.5.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.25
7.5.2 Connector and Switch Assignment:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.26
7.6 Power Interface SDCS-PIN-21 Board (Field Controllers) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.27
7.6.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.27
7.6.2 Connector Assignment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.28
7.7 Power Interface SDCS-PIN-205 Board (Field Controllers) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.29
7.7.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.29
7.7.2 Compatibility / Differences of SDCS-PIN-21 compared to SDCS-PIN-205 . . . . . . . . 7.30
7.8 Power Interface SDCS-PIN-61 Board (Armature Controllers). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.31
7.8.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.31
7.8.2 Connector Assignment: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.31
SECTION 8, Mine Air Systems
8.1 Heater / Air Conditioner and Defroster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1
8.1.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1
8.1.2 Standard Control Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2
8.1.3 Mine Logic Controller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.5
8.1.4 Floor Heater/Defroster (Optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.8
8.1.5 Component Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.8
8.2 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.11
8.2.1 Maintenance Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.11
8.2.2 Preventive Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.13
8.3 Troubleshooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.16
8.3.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.16
SECTION 9, Miscellaneous Electrical
9.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.1
9.2 Power Quality Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.1
9.2.1 General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.1

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9.2.2 Features and Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.2
9.2.3 PQM Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.4
9.2.4 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.10
9.3 Joystick Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.68
9.3.1 General Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.68
9.3.2 Left Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.69
9.3.3 Right Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.70
9.3.4 Assembly Notes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.70
APPENDIX A, System Faults
A.1 Shovel Control System Fault Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.1
A.1.1 AC800 Processor Unit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.1
A.1.2 Internal Battery or External Battery Backup Unit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.2
A.1.3 Profibus DP-V1 Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.2
A.1.4 Profibus Optical Bus Terminal Fault Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.3
A.2 Power Rail Booster Fault Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.4
A.2.1 Status and Fault Displays through LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.4
A.2.2 Status and Fault Display through Message Output SF Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.5
A.3 Drive Control System Fault Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.6
A.3.1 Seven Segment Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.6
A.3.2 Fault Signals Referring to the SDCS-AMC-DC Board. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.17
A.3.3 Alarm Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.19
A.3.4 Alarm Signals Referring to the SDCS-AMC-DC Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.22
A.4 Remote I/O Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.23
A.5 Miscellaneous Equipment Fault Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.32
A.5.1 Ethernet Electrical Lean Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.32
APPENDIX B, Power Systems Procedures
B.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B.1
B.2 Entering High Voltage Areas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B.1
B.2.1 Exiting High Voltage Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B.2
B.2.2 High Voltage Cabinet Entrance Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B.3
B.3 Padlocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B.4
B.4 Mechanical Trip Test. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B.4
B.4.1 Motor Starter Overload Relay Troubleshooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B.5
APPENDIX C, Drive Control System Procedures
C.1 Drive Control Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.1
C.1.1 Drive Control Procedures (Drive Windows 2.1x). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.1
C.1.2 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.1
C.2 Flashing the SDCS-CON-2 Converter Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.20
C.3 Drive Control Procedures (Drive Windows 1.4.1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.21
C.3.1 SDCS-AMC-DC Hoist Speed Calculation Application Loading. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.21

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C.3.2 Flashing the SDCS-CON-2 Converter Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.22
C.3.3 Downloading Firmware to the SDCS-CON-2 Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.23
C.3.4 Downloading Firmware to the SDCS-CON-2 Board (Autoexecuting Batch File Method)
C.32
C.3.5 Creating a Hyperterminal Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.42
C.4 Restoring Drive Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.43
C.4.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.43
C.4.2 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.43
C.4.3 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.44
C.4.4 How To Remove An Old Board And Mount A New One . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.49
C.4.5 Jumper / Resistor Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.49
APPENDIX D, Drive Control System Parameters
D.1 Parameter File Assignments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.1
D.2 Signal List for P&H Electric Mining Shovels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.3
D.2.1 Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.3
D.2.2 Analog Output Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.3
D.2.3 Group Tables Explanation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.4
D.2.4 Group 1 (Actual Values) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.6
D.2.5 Group 2 (Actual Values) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.11
D.2.6 Group 3 (Actual Values) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.15
D.2.7 Group 4 (Information) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.21
D.2.8 Group 5 (I/O Signals) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.26
D.2.9 Group 6 (Drive Logic Signals) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.28
D.2.10 Group 7 (Control Words). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.32
D.2.11 Group 8 (Status and Limit Words) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.36
D.2.12 Group 9 (Fault and Alarm Words) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.40
D.3 Parameter List for P&H Electric Mining Shovels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.45
D.3.1 Parameter Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.45
D.3.2 Bit Packed Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.47
D.3.3 Group 12 (Drive Logic I/O) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.52
D.3.4 Group 13 (I/O Settings 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.57
D.3.5 Group 14 (I/O Settings 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.61
D.3.6 Group 15 (Drive Logic Parameters) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.66
D.3.7 Group 16 (System Control Inputs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.75
D.3.8 Group 17 (Test Signal Generator) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.77
D.3.9 Group 18 (LED Panel Control) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.79
D.3.10 Group 19 (Data Storage) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.80
D.3.11 Group 20 (Limits) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.82
D.3.12 Group 21 (Start/Stop Functions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.86
D.3.13 Group 22 (Speed Ramp Functions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.88
D.3.14 Group 23 (Speed Reference) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.90
D.3.15 Group 24 (Speed Control). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.93
D.3.16 Group 25 (Torque Reference). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.97

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D.3.17 Group 26 (Torque Reference Handling) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.98
D.3.18 Group 28 (Motor Protection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.101
D.3.19 Group 40 (Undervoltage Monitoring) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.106
D.3.20 Group 41 (Motor Nominal Values) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.107
D.3.21 Group 42 (Measurement Settings) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.112
D.3.22 Group 43 (Current Control) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.116
D.3.23 Group 44 (Field Excitation) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.121
D.3.24 Group 45 (Field Excitation) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.125
D.3.25 Group 46 (EMF Control) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.127
D.3.26 Group 47 (12-Pulse Operation). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.132
D.3.27 Group 50 (Speed Measurement) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.134
D.3.28 Group 51 (Communication Module) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.139
D.3.29 Group 70 (DDCS Control) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.142
D.3.30 Group 71 (DriveBus) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.148
D.3.31 Group 90 (Dataset Receive Addresses) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.149
D.3.32 Group 91 (Dataset Receive Addresses) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.152
D.3.33 Group 92 (Dataset Transmit Addresses) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.154
D.3.34 Group 93 (Dataset Transmit Addresses) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.157
D.3.35 Group 94 (CON Communication (Actual Values)) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.159
D.3.36 Group 95 (CON Communication (Reference Values)) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.161
D.3.37 Group 97 (Drive) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.163
D.3.38 Group 98 (Option Modules) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.164
D.3.39 Group 99 (Start-up Data) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.165
APPENDIX E, SDCS-CON-2 Procedures
E.1 SDCS-CON-2 Firmware Download. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E.1
E.1.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E.1
E.1.2 Basic Tool List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E.1
E.2 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E.1
APPENDIX F, Shovel Control System Procedures
F.1 Module Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.1
F.1.1 Installing the Interface Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.2
F.1.2 Removing the Interface Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.2
F.1.3 Installing Terminal Modules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.2
F.1.4 Removing the Terminal Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.3
F.1.5 Replacing the Terminal Box on a Terminal Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.4
F.1.6 Installing the Terminating Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.7
F.1.7 Removing the Terminating Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.7
F.1.8 Setting the Profibus DP-V1 Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.8
F.1.9 Changing the Profibus DP-V1 Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.8
F.1.10 Wiring a Terminal Module with Spring Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.8
F.1.11 Inserting and Identifying the I/O Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.12

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F.1.12 Removing the I/O Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.15
F.1.13 Changing the Type of I/O Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.16
F.1.14 Replacing a Defective I/O Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.17
F.2 MMC Card Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.18
F.2.1 Formatting the MMC Prior to a Memory Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.18
F.3 Loading AC800 System Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.21
F.3.1 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.21
F.4 Clearing An AC800 Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.27
F.4.1 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.27
F.5 AC800 IP Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.32
F.6 Downloading An AC800 Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.35
F.6.1 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.35
F.7 System Maintenance and Troubleshooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.39
F.7.1 Personnel and Process Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.39
F.7.2 Machine Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.39
F.7.3 Before Replacing I/O Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.40
F.7.4 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.40
F.7.5 Operating Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.40
F.7.6 Preventive Maintenance Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.41
F.7.7 Changing the AC800 Internal Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.41
F.7.8 Changing the External Battery Backup Unit Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.44
F.7.9 Changing Fuses - ModuleBus and CEX-Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.47
F.8 AC800 Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.49
F.8.1 Uninterruptable Power Supply. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.50
F.8.2 Mounting AC800 Units onto DIN-Rail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.50
F.8.3 Unit to Baseplate Alpha Code Lock. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.53
F.8.4 Installing the AC800 Unit in Single Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.55
F.8.5 Installing the Profibus DP-V1 Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.58
SECTION G, Motor Maintenance
G.1 Motor Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.1
G.1.1 Prior to First Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.1
G.1.2 After Start Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.3
G.2 Lubrication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.5
G.2.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.5
G.2.2 Lubrication Practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.6
G.2.3 Shovel Erection Practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.8
G.2.4 Lubrication After Extended Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.8
G.2.5 Lubrication of Remanufactured Motors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.8
G.3 Brush and Commutator Maintenance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.9
G.3.1 Brush Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.9
G.3.2 Brush Spring Test Procedure (Does Not Apply to K-1690B Motors) . . . . . . . . . . . G.12
G.3.3 Recommended Brush Replacement Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.13
G.3.4 Alternative Brush Replacement Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.13

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G.3.5 Brush Holder Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.15
G.3.6 Arc Director Maintenance (Does Not Apply to K-1690B Motors) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.17
G.3.7 Commutation Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.17
G.3.8 Commutator Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.18
G.3.9 Commutator Clean up by Air Curing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.20
G.3.10 Commutator Surface Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.22
G.4 Neutral Setting of Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.27
G.4.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.27
G.4.2 Procedures for Neutral Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.28
G.5 Field Ring Assembly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.29
G.5.1 Assembly Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.29
G.5.2 Field Coil Inspection (AC Drop Test Comparison) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.32
G.6 Insulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.34
G.6.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.34
G.6.2 Resistance and Connection Readings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.34
G.6.3 Visual Inspection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.35
G.6.4 Insulation Resistance Measurement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.35
G.6.5 Polarization Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.38
G.7 Suggested Maintenance Schedule - Monthly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.39
G.8 Suggested Maintenance Schedule - Semi-Annually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.41
G.9 Preventive Maintenance Inspections Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.42
G.9.1 Crowd Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.42
G.9.2 Swing Motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.43
G.9.3 Hoist Motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.44
G.9.4 Propel Motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.45
G.9.5 Dipper Trip Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.46
G.10 Kits and Service Kits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.47
G.10.1 Brush Kits for all 2800XPB Motion Motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.47
G.10.2 K408 Motor RTD Service Kit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.48
G.10.3 K-489 Interpole Bolt Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.50
G.10.4 K-558A Motor Upgrades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.52
G.10.5 K-558A Blower Assembly Gusset Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.57
G.10.6 K-925 Interpole Coil and Bolt Service Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.60
G.11 Electrical Rotating Machinery Workmanship Standard (MPS-341, Version 07, July 2001) . . .
G.62
G.11.1 Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.62
G.11.2 Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.62
G.11.3 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.62
G.11.4 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.62
G.11.5 Tagging of Leads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.63
G.11.6 Conductor Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.63
G.11.7 Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.64
G.11.8 Windings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.66
G.11.9 Stator and Rotors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.67

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G.11.10 Foreign Material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.11.11 Brush Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.11.12 Seating of Brushes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.11.13 Fits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.11.14 Gaskets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.11.15 Field Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.11.16 Air Gaps and Shimming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.11.17 Torquing (Use Assembly Floor Micrometer Type Torque Wrenches). . . . . . . . .
G.11.18 Lubrication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.11.19 Grease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.11.20 Other Assembly Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.11.21 Hylomar, Permatex, and Other Sealants as Specified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.11.22 Lip Seals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.11.23 Disassembly and Reassembly After Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.11.24 Grounding Provisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.11.25 Installation of Glastic Washers for Bearing Insulators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.11.26 Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G.67
G.67
G.67
G.68
G.68
G.68
G.68
G.68
G.68
G.70
G.70
G.71
G.71
G.73
G.73
G.73
G.73

APPENDIX H, Miscellaneous Electrical Procedures


H.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.1
H.2 Fiber Optic Connectors and Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.1
H.2.1 Plastic Fiber Optics with Simplex Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.1
H.3 Ethernet Electrical Lean Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.14
H.3.1 Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.14
H.3.2 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.16
H.3.3 Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.16
H.3.4 Web Based Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.24
H.3.5 Diagnostics Using SNMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.34
H.3.6 Internet Browser Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.35
SECTION 1, Glossary
SECTION 1,

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List of Tables
SECTION 1, Shovel Safety
Table 1-1: Electrical Shock and Human Response. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6
Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.9
SECTION 2, General Information
Table 2-1: Electrostatic Voltages at Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8
Table 2-2: Component Sensitivity to ESD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8
Table 2-3: Ground Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.10
Table 2-4: Location Code Letter Designation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.10
Table 2-5: Recommended Test Equipment List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.14
Table 2-6: Hardware and Software List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.15
SECTION 3, Electrical Theory of Operation
SECTION 4, User Interface
Table 4-1: Touch Panel Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2
Table 4-2: Touch Panel Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2
Table 4-3: Operations - Main Screen - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.10
Table 4-4: Navigation Bar - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.18
Table 4-5: Status Bar - Controls and Indications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.25
Table 4-6: Operations Main Screen - Controls and Indications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.26
Table 4-7: Diagnostics Main Screen - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.32
Table 4-8: Activity Main Screen - Controls and Indications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.36
Table 4-9: Help Main Screen - Controls and Indications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.38
Table 4-10: Operations - Shovel Inclination Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.41
Table 4-11: Shovel Inclination Screen - Controls and Indications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.43
Table 4-12: Shovel Start Permissive Screen - Controls and Indications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.44
Table 4-13: Brake Release Permissive Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.46
Table 4-14: Shovel Drive Start Permissive - Controls and Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.47
Table 4-15: Operations Lube Screen - Controls and Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.49
Table 4-16: Operation Display Values Screen - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.53
Table 4-17: Temperature Monitoring Screen - Controls and Indications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.55
Table 4-18: I/O Diagnostic Display - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.59
Table 4-19: DDCS System Information Screen - Controls and Indications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.61
Table 4-20: Shovel Motor Information - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.63
Table 4-21: Shovel Brake System Diagnostics - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.65
Table 4-22: User Login Setup - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.68
Table 4-23: Extended Cooling Time Setup - Controls and Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.70
Table 4-24: House Blower Disable Setup Screen - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.73
Table 4-25: Reverse Blowers in AUX Test Setup Screen - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . 4.75
Table 4-26: House Blower Reversing Setup - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.78
Table 4-27: Lube Cycle Setup - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.82
Table 4-28: OptiDig Setup - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.85

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Table 4-29: Motivator Mode Setup - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.87
Table 4-30: Door Interlocks Setup Screen - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.90
Table 4-31: Shovel Production Monitoring Screen - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.92
Table 4-32: Gearcase Oil Selection Setup Screen - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.93
Table 4-33: Shovel RPC Setup Screen - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.96
Table 4-34: Limits/Boomjack Counts Setup Screen - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.98
Table 4-35: Propel Field Setup Screen - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.100
Table 4-36: Shovel TripRite Setup Screen - Controls and Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.102
SECTION 5, Power Systems
Table 5-1: Low Voltage Collector Assembly Ring Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.7
Table 5-2: High Voltage Collector Assembly Ring Assignment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.8
Table 5-3: RPC Step Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.50
SECTION 6, Shovel Control Systems
Table 6-1: Verification of Proper AC800 Operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.9
Table 6-2: Profibus DP-V1 Interface Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.11
Table 6-3: Remote I/O System Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.17
Table 6-4: Reaction to Atypical Operating Conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.26
Table 6-5: Control Cabinet Remote I/O Power Supply Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.27
Table 6-6: Remote I/O Power Supply Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.28
Table 6-7: Power Module Terminal Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.30
Table 6-8: I/O Module Terminal Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.32
Table 6-9: Retentive Behavior of the Memory Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.40
Table 6-10: Positions of the Mode Selector Switch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.42
Table 6-11: Intelligent Interface Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.43
Table 6-12: Power Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.46
Table 6-13: A/B Selector Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.53
Table 6-14: A/B Selector Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.56
Table 6-15: AC800 Technical Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.80
Table 6-16: Communication Ports and Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.81
Table 6-17: Backup Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.82
Table 6-18: LED Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.82
Table 6-19: Switches and Push Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.83
Table 6-21: Adjustable buffering time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.87
Table 6-20: End-of-Charge Voltage for Battery Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.87
Table 6-22: Connection and Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.90
Table 6-23: Properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.91
Table 6-24: Supported Fiber Optics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.96
Table 6-25: Input Data from the PRIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.101
Table 6-26: Output Data to the PRIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.104
Table 6-27: Resolver Status LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.109
Table 6-28: Resolver 1 and 2 Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.110

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Table 6-29: Resolver 1 and 2 Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.110
Table 6-31: Power Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.111
Table 6-30: Input Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.111
Table 6-32: Profibus Status LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.112
Table 6-34: Contact Resistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.114
Table 6-33: Maximum Cable Length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.114
Table 6-35: Optical Power Value - Jumper Positions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.117
Table 6-36: S1 Switch - Positions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.119
Table 6-37: Power Rail Interface Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.120
Table 6-38: Signaling Contact (SF Out) Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.120
Table 6-39: Power Supply DC24V Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.120
Table 6-40: Profibus DP-V1 Connector Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.120
SECTION 7, Drive Control Module
Table 7-1: SDCS-POW-1 Supply Voltages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.26
Table 7-2: SDCS-PIN-21 Jumper Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.28
SECTION 8, Mine Air Systems
Table 8-1: Preventive Maintenance - Daily . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.13
Table 8-3: Preventive Maintenance - Every 500 Hours. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.14
Table 8-2: Preventive Maintenance - Every 250 Hours. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.14
Table 8-5: Preventive Maintenance - Seasonal Pre-Heating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.15
Table 8-4: Preventive Maintenance - Seasonal Pre-Cooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.15
SECTION 9, Miscellaneous Electrical
Table 9-1: Current Input Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.4
Table 9-2: Voltage Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.5
Table 9-3: Sampling Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.5
Table 9-4: Switch Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.5
Table 9-5: Analog Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.6
Table 9-6: Analog Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.6
Table 9-7: Output Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.6
Table 9-8: Measured Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.6
Table 9-9: Undervoltage Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.7
Table 9-10: Overvoltage Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.8
Table 9-11: Underfrequency Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.8
Table 9-12: Overfrequency Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.8
Table 9-13: Power Factor Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.8
Table 9-14: Demand Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.9
Table 9-15: Pulse Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.9
Table 9-16: Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.9
Table 9-17: Control Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.10
Table 9-18: PQM Indications and Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.16

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Table 9-19: Flash Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.24
Table 9-20: List of Possible Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.62
Table 9-21: Joystick Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.68
Table 9-22: Joystick Parts List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.70
APPENDIX A, System Faults
Table A-1: AC800 Fault Finding Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.1
Table A-2: Internal or External Battery Fault Finding Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.2
Table A-3: Profibus DP-V1 Interface Fault Finding Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.2
Table A-4: Profibus OBT Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.3
Table A-5: Status and Fault Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.4
Table A-6: SDCS-CON-2 General Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.7
Table A-7: SDCS-AMC-DC General Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.7
Table A-8: SDCS-CON-2 Starting Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.7
Table A-9: SDCS-CON-2 Fault Signals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.9
Table A-10: SDCS-AMC-DC Fault Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.17
Table A-11: SDCS-CON-2 Alarm Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.19
Table A-12: SDCS-AMC-DC Alarm Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.22
Table A-13: Standard Fiber Optic Interface Module Diagnostic LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.23
Table A-14: High Density Fiber Optic Interface Module Diagnostic LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.25
Table A-15: High Density Fiber Optic Interface Module Diagnostic LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.26
Table A-16: Intelligent Interface Module BF and SF LED Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.28
Table A-17: Intelligent Interface Module Diagnostic LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.29
Table A-18: Power Module Diagnostic LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.30
Table A-19: Digital Remote I/O Modules Diagnostic LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.31
Table A-20: Analog Remote I/O Modules Diagnostic LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.32
Table A-21: Power Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.32
Table A-22: Power Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.33
APPENDIX B, Power Systems Procedures
Table B-1: Motor Starter Overload Relay Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B.5
APPENDIX C, Drive Control System Procedures
Table C-1: Drive/Macro Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.43
APPENDIX D, Drive Control System Parameters
Table D-1: Parameter File Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.1
Table D-2: Signal Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.3
Table D-3: Analog Output Scaling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.3
Table D-4: Group 1 Actual Values. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.6
Table D-5: Group 2 Actual Values. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.11
Table D-6: Group 3 Actual Values. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.15
Table D-7: Group 4 Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.21
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Table D-8: Group 5 I/O Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.26
Table D-9: Group 6 Drive Logic Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.28
Table D-10: Group 7 Control Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.32
Table D-11: Main Control Word. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.32
Table D-12: Auxiliary Control Word. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.33
Table D-13: Auxiliary Control Word 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.35
Table D-14: Group 8 Status and Limit Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.36
Table D-15: Main Status Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.36
Table D-16: Auxiliary Status Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.37
Table D-17: Limit Word 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.38
Table D-18: DI Status Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.39
Table D-19: Group 9 Fault and Alarm Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.40
Table D-20: Fault Word 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.41
Table D-21: Fault Word 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.41
Table D-22: System Fault Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.42
Table D-23: Alarm Word 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.42
Table D-24: Alarm Word 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.43
Table D-25: Fault Word 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.44
Table D-26: Parameter Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.45
Table D-27: Group 19 Special Data Storage Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.48
Table D-28: Group 19 Special Data Storage Signals (Swing Field Continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.49
Table D-29: Bitpacked Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.49
Table D-30: Group 12 Drive Logic I/O. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.52
Table D-31: Group 13 I/O Settings 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.57
Table D-32: Group 14 I/O Settings 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.61
Table D-33: Group 15 Drive Logic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.66
Table D-34: Group 16 System Control Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.75
Table D-35: Group 17 Test Signal Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.77
Table D-36: Group 18 LED Panel Control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.79
Table D-37: Group 19 Data Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.80
Table D-38: Group 20 Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.82
Table D-39: Group 21 Start/Stop Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.86
Table D-40: Group 22 Speed Ramp Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.88
Table D-41: Group 23 Speed Reference. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.90
Table D-42: Group 24 Speed Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.93
Table D-43: Group 25 Torque Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.97
Table D-44: Group 26 Torque Reference Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.98
Table D-45: Group 28 Motor Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.101
Table D-46: Group 40 Undervoltage Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.106
Table D-47: Group 41 Motor Nominal Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.107
Table D-48: Group 42 Measurement Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.112
Table D-49: Group 43 Current Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.116
Table D-50: Group 44 Field Excitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.121
Table D-51: Group 45 Field Excitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.125

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Table D-52: Group 46 EMF Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.127
Table D-53: Group 47 12-Pulse Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.132
Table D-54: Group 50 Speed Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.134
Table D-55: Group 51 Communication Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.139
Table D-56: Group 70 DDCS Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.142
Table D-57: Group 71 DriveBus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.148
Table D-58: Group 90 Dataset Receive Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.149
Table D-59: Group 91 Dataset Receive Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.152
Table D-60: Group 92 Dataset Transmit Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.154
Table D-61: Group 93 Dataset Transmit Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.157
Table D-62: Group 94 CON Communication Actual Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.159
Table D-63: Group 95 CON Communication Reference Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.161
Table D-64: Group 97 Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.163
Table D-65: Group 98 Option Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.164
Table D-66: Group 99 Start-up Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.165
APPENDIX E, SDCS-CON-2 Procedures
APPENDIX F, Shovel Control System Procedures
Table F-1: Remote I/O Profibus Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.9
Table F-2: Backing Up the Operating System on the MMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.20
Table F-3: Preventive Maintenance Frequency Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.41
Table F-4: Factory Preset Alpha Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.55
Table F-5: CN1 Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.57
Table F-6: COM4 Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.58
Table F-7: COM4 Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.59
SECTION G, Motor Maintenance
Table G-1: Bolt Tightening Torque Values - Metallic Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.2
Table G-2: Bolt Tightening Torque Values - Non Metallic Parts to Metallic Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . G.3
Table G-3: Bearing Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.5
Table G-4: Brush Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.9
Table G-5: Optional Brush Grade and Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.10
Table G-6: Spring Tension and Color Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.11
Table G-7: Arc Director Part Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.17
Table G-8: Commutator Surface Wear Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.19
Table G-9: Mainpole and Interpole Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.30
Table G-10: Mainpole and Interpole Bolt Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.30
Table G-11: Resistance and Connection Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.34
Table G-12: Effect of Temperature on Insulation Resistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.36
Table G-13: Recommended Maintenance Schedule - Monthly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.39
Table G-14: Recommended Maintenance Schedule - Semi-Annually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.41
Table G-15: All Motion Motors Brush Kits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.47

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Table G-16: K-408 Motor RTD Service Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table G-17: K-489 Motor RTD Service Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table G-18: K-558A Ball Bearing Upgrade Parts List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table G-19: K-558A Bearing RTD Upgrade Parts List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table G-20: K-558A Field Coil Upgrade Parts List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table G-21: K-558A Blower Assembly Gusset Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table G-22: K-925 Interpole Coil and Bolt Service Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table G-23: Recommended Torque Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table G-24: Wire Gage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G.48
G.50
G.52
G.53
G.55
G.57
G.60
G.65
G.70

APPENDIX H, Miscellaneous Electrical Procedures


Table H-1: Fiber Optic Part Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.1
Table H-2: Management Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.27
Table H-3: Recommended Browser and Java Virtual Machine Plug-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.35
SECTION 1, Glossary
SECTION 1,

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List of Figures
Figure -1: P&H Mining Equipment - Electric Mining Shovel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.ii
SECTION 1, Shovel Safety
Figure 1-1: 4100XPB Deck Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.26
Figure 1-2: 4100XPC Deck Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.27
Figure 1-3: 4100BOSS Shovel Deck Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.28
Figure 1-4: 2800XPB Shovel Deck Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.29
Figure 1-5: 2800XPC Shovel Deck Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.30
Figure 1-6: Under Deck Platform. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.31
Figure 1-7: Lube Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.32
Figure 1-8: Outside Shovel Opposite Operator Cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.33
Figure 1-9: Outside Shovel Operator Cab Side. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.34
Figure 1-10: Shovel Rear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.35
Figure 1-11: Operators Cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.36
Figure 1-12: Main Transformer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.37
Figure 1-13: Auxiliary Transformer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.38
Figure 1-14: Upper High Voltage Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.38
Figure 1-15: Lower High Voltage Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.39
Figure 1-16: Suppression and Ground Fault Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.40
Figure 1-17: Slack Take Up / Dipper Trip Resistors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.41
Figure 1-18: RPC Switching Cabinet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.42
Figure 1-19: Converter Cabinet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.42
Figure 1-20: Remote I/O Transfer Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.43
Figure 1-21: Transfer Contactor Cabinet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.43
Figure 1-22: Auxiliary Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.44
Figure 1-23: Control Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.45
Figure 1-24: Hoist Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.46
Figure 1-25: Swing Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.47
Figure 1-26: Crowd Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.47
Figure 1-27: Propel Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.48
Figure 1-28: Field Supply and Auxiliary Secondaries Breakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.49
Figure 1-29: High and Low Voltage Collector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.49
Figure 1-30: 480VAC Panelboard #1 and #2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.50
Figure 1-31: 120VAC and Flood Light Panelboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.51
Figure 1-32: Machinery House Heater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.52
Figure 1-33: Hoist, Swing, Propel Brake Exhaust Solenoid and Pressure Switch . . . . . . . . . . . 1.52
Figure 1-34: Operators Panelboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.52
Figure 1-35: Cable Winch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.53
Figure 1-36: Applied to all Junction Box Covers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.53
Figure 1-37: All Overhead Bus Covers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.53
Figure 1-38: All Overhead Wire Trays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.54
Figure 1-39: Blower Reverse Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.54
Figure 1-40: 460V Load Center and Field Supply Breaker Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.55
Figure 1-41: Boom Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.55

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Figure 1-42: Crowd and Hoist Brake Solenoids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.56
SECTION 2, General Information
Figure 2-1: Electrostatic Discharges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3
Figure 2-2: Damage Due to Induction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3
Figure 2-3: Damage Due to Polarization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4
Figure 2-4: Damage Due to Polarization - Continued . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4
Figure 2-5: Wrist Strap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6
Figure 2-6: ESD Susceptibility Symbol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7
Figure 2-7: Location Code Subassembly or Panel Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.11
SECTION 3, Electrical Theory of Operation
Figure 3-1: Centurion Control System Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1
Figure 3-2: Hoist Electrical - One Line Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3
Figure 3-3: Crowd Electrical - One Line Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.4
Figure 3-4: Swing Electrical - One Line Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.5
Figure 3-5: Propel Electrical - One Line Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.6
SECTION 4, User Interface
Figure 4-1: Back Side of Touch Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.1
Figure 4-2: Operations - Main Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.8
Figure 4-3: Screen Header Bar (Typical) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.9
Figure 4-4: Screen Control Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.10
Figure 4-5: Shovel Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.13
Figure 4-6: Shovel Inclination Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.14
Figure 4-7: Shovel Operation Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.14
Figure 4-8: Shovel Permissives (Example) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.15
Figure 4-9: Shovel Lube Status. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.16
Figure 4-10: Motor Temperature Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.16
Figure 4-11: Operator Status Indication (Example). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.25
Figure 4-12: Operations - Main Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.26
Figure 4-13: Diagnostics - Main Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.31
Figure 4-14: Setup - Main Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.35
Figure 4-15: Activity - Main Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.36
Figure 4-16: Help Main Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.38
Figure 4-17: Operations - Shovel Inclination Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.41
Figure 4-18: Shovel Start Permissive Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.43
Figure 4-19: Operations - Brake Release Permissive Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.45
Figure 4-20: Operations - Shovel Drive Start Permissive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.47
Figure 4-21: Operations - Lube Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.49
Figure 4-22: Operations - Operation Display Values Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.52
Figure 4-23: Operator Display Values - Monitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.53
Figure 4-24: Operations - Temperature Monitoring Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.54

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Figure 4-25: Motor Monitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.55
Figure 4-26: Diagnostics - Main Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.57
Figure 4-27: I/O Diagnostic Display Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.58
Figure 4-28: Diagnostics - DDCS System Information Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.60
Figure 4-29: Shovel Motor Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.62
Figure 4-30: Shovel Brake System Diagnostics Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.64
Figure 4-31: Setup - Main Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.66
Figure 4-32: User Login Setup Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.68
Figure 4-33: Setup - Extended Cooling Time Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.70
Figure 4-34: Extended Cooling Time Icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.71
Figure 4-35: Extended Cooling Time Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.72
Figure 4-36: More Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.72
Figure 4-37: House Blower Disable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.73
Figure 4-38: Reverse Blowers in AUX Test Setup Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.75
Figure 4-39: House Blower Reversing Setup Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.77
Figure 4-40: Boom Limits Setup Selection Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.79
Figure 4-41: ABSS Setup Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.80
Figure 4-42: Lube Cycle Setup Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.81
Figure 4-43: Remote Hoist Setup Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.83
Figure 4-44: Controller Calibration Setup Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.84
Figure 4-45: OptiDig Setup Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.85
Figure 4-46: Motivator Mode Setup Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.87
Figure 4-47: Door Interlocks Setup Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.89
Figure 4-48: Shovel Production Monitoring Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.90
Figure 4-49: Gearcase Oil Selection Setup Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.93
Figure 4-50: Shovel RPC Setup Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.95
Figure 4-51: Limits/Boomjack Counts Setup Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.97
Figure 4-52: Propel Field Setup Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.100
Figure 4-53: Shovel TripRite Setup Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.102
Figure 4-54: Touch Panel Controls and Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.107
SECTION 5, Power Systems
Figure 5-1: Block Diagram of Power Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.2
Figure 5-2: Electrical Power Distribution Single Line Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3
Figure 5-3: Tail Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.4
Figure 5-4: Air Disconnect Switch with Earthing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.5
Figure 5-5: Collector Ring Assembly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.6
Figure 5-6: Low Voltage Collector Ring Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.8
Figure 5-7: High Voltage Collector Ring Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.9
Figure 5-8: Collector Ring Assembly - (4100XPB/XPC/BOSS Deck Plan) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.10
Figure 5-9: Collector Ring Assembly Sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.11
Figure 5-10: Collector Ring Assembly - High Voltage Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.12
Figure 5-11: Collector Ring Assembly - Low Voltage Section. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.13
Figure 5-13: Collector Ring Assembly - Communication Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.14

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Figure 5-12: Collector Ring Assembly - Top of Low Voltage Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.14
Figure 5-14: Collector Shoe Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.15
Figure 5-15: High Voltage Cabinet - Single Line Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.17
Figure 5-16: Key Interlock System - Schematic Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.18
Figure 5-17: Main Transformer Primary - Vector Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.19
Figure 5-18: Main Transformer Secondaries - Vector Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.20
Figure 5-19: Main Transformer - Schematic Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.20
Figure 5-20: Main Transformer Thermal Probe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.21
Figure 5-21: Thermal Probe and Temperature Indicator #1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.22
Figure 5-22: Thermal Probe and Temperature Indicator #2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.23
Figure 5-23: Thermal Probe and Temperature Indicator #3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.24
Figure 5-24: Thermal Probe and Temperature Indicator Input to Remote I/O System . . . . . . . . 5.25
Figure 5-25: 2800 XPB Bus Bar Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.26
Figure 5-26: 4100 XPB Bus Bar Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.27
Figure 5-27: Auxiliary/Field Transformer Primary - Vector Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.28
Figure 5-28: Auxiliary/Field Transformer Auxiliary Secondary - Vector Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.28
Figure 5-29: Auxiliary/Field Transformer Control Secondary - Vector Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.29
Figure 5-30: Auxiliary/Field Transformer Field Supply - Vector Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.29
Figure 5-31: Auxiliary/Field Transformer Lighting Supply - Vector Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.30
Figure 5-32: Auxiliary/Field Transformer - Schematic Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.31
Figure 5-33: Ground Fault and Suppression Cabinet Front Door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.32
Figure 5-34: Ground Fault and Suppression Cabinet Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.33
Figure 5-35: Ground Fault Relay Main, GFRM, Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.34
Figure 5-36: GFRM, Ground Fault Relay Main Schematic Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.35
Figure 5-37: Ground Fault Relay Auxiliary GFRA, Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.36
Figure 5-38: GFRA, Ground Fault Relay Auxiliary Schematic Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.37
Figure 5-39: Ground Fault Relay Field, GFRF, Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.38
Figure 5-40: GFRF, Ground Fault Relay Field Schematic Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.39
Figure 5-41: Main Transformer Suppression Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.40
Figure 5-42: RPC Cabinet Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.41
Figure 5-43: RPC Switching and Capacitor/Reactor Cabinet (Typical). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.42
Figure 5-44: KW, KVAR and KVA Relationship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.43
Figure 5-45: Block Diagram of RPC System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.44
Figure 5-46: RPC Firing Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.45
Figure 5-47: Pulse Transformer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.46
Figure 5-48: Thyristor Switch Section - Capacitor Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.47
Figure 5-49: Thyristor Switch Section - Capacitor Discharge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.48
Figure 5-50: RPC Indicator Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.49
Figure 5-51: RPC Indicator Decal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.50
Figure 5-52: Harmonic Frequencies (60Hz Fundamental) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.52
Figure 5-53: Converter Cabinet Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.53
Figure 5-54: Input Power Distribution and Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.54
Figure 5-55: Phase Monitor Relay Input to Remote I/O System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.55
Figure 5-56: SCR Symbol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.56

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Figure 5-57: SCR Controlled Rectification Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.57
Figure 5-58: 3 SCR Bridge Rectifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.58
Figure 5-59: 3 SCR Reversing Bridge Rectifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.58
Figure 5-60: 3 SCR Series Bridge Rectifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.59
Figure 5-61: Diverter Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.60
Figure 5-62: Hoist #1/Propel #1 and Hoist #2 Diverter Capacitor Charge Polarity . . . . . . . . . . . 5.61
Figure 5-63: Swing Diverter Capacitor Charge Polarity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.62
Figure 5-64: Crowd/Propel #2 Diverter Capacitor Charge Polarity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.63
Figure 5-65: Diverter Control Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.64
Figure 5-66: Hoist #1/Propel #1 and Hoist #2 Diverter Trip Motor Dissipation Path . . . . . . . . . . 5.66
Figure 5-67: Swing Diverter Trip Motor Dissipation Path - Forward Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.67
Figure 5-68: Swing Diverter Trip Motor Dissipation Path - Reverse Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.68
Figure 5-69: Crowd/Propel #2 Diverter Trip Motor Dissipation Path - Forward Bridge . . . . . . . . 5.69
Figure 5-70: Crowd/Propel #2 Diverter Trip Motor Dissipation Path - Reverse Bridge . . . . . . . . 5.70
Figure 5-71: Transfer Cabinet Front Door Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.72
Figure 5-72: Field and Armature Contactor Relays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.73
Figure 5-73: Field and Armature Contactors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.74
Figure 5-74: Field and Armature Contactor Flex I/O Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.75
Figure 5-75: Auxiliary Cabinet Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.77
Figure 5-76: Motor Starter Operation - Typical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.78
Figure 5-77: Motor Starter Overload Relay Indicator and Control Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.80
Figure 5-78: Heater Interlock Relay (HIR). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.81
Figure 5-79: Main Transformer Heaters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.81
Figure 5-80: Operators Console - Right Hand Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.82
Figure 5-81: Crowd, Swing, and Hoist Motor Heaters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.83
Figure 5-82: Main Transformer Thermal Overloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.84
Figure 5-83: TTMT - Melting Alloy Thermal Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.85
Figure 5-84: TTMT - Reset Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.85
Figure 5-85: Main Transformer Thermal Overloads (TTMT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.86
Figure 5-86: Instant Overload Relay (QTTM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.87
Figure 5-87: QTTM - First 3 Seconds of Shovel Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.88
Figure 5-88: QTTM - 3 Seconds after Shovel Start. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.90
Figure 5-89: Main Transformer Overload Adjust Relay (MTOAR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.91
Figure 5-90: Instant Overload Relay (QTTM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.92
Figure 5-91: Machine House Heater Relay (MHHR). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.93
Figure 5-92: Propel Motor Heaters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.94
Figure 5-93: SDCS-PIN-61 Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.96
Figure 5-95: Master Control Relay One Line Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.97
Figure 5-94: Drive Synchronizing Voltage Transformer Distribution Block Diagram. . . . . . . . . . 5.97
Figure 5-96: Master Control Relay Circuit Path. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.98
Figure 5-97: Drive Synchronizing Voltage Transformer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.99
SECTION 6, Shovel Control Systems
Figure 6-1: AC800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.1

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List of Figures (Continued)


Figure 6-2: AC800 Controller with Profibus DP-V1 Interface Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.2
Figure 6-3: AC800 Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.3
Figure 6-4: AC800 Functional Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.4
Figure 6-5: 3.6VDC Lithium Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.5
Figure 6-6: Baseplate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.6
Figure 6-7: Ethernet (MAC) Address Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.7
Figure 6-8: AC800 Processor Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.8
Figure 6-9: Profibus DP-V1 Interface Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.10
Figure 6-10: Profibus DP-V1 Interface Functional Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.11
Figure 6-11: External Battery Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.12
Figure 6-12: Profibus DP-V1 Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.14
Figure 6-13: 2800 XPB Remote I/O System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.15
Figure 6-14: 4100 XPB Remote I/O System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.16
Figure 6-15: Standard Fiber Optic Interface Module Diagnostic LEDs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.19
Figure 6-16: Intelligent Interface Module Diagnostic LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.20
Figure 6-17: High Density Fiber Optic Interface Module Diagnostic LEDs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.21
Figure 6-18: Power Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.22
Figure 6-19: Digital Remote I/O Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.23
Figure 6-20: Auxiliary Cabinet Digital Remote I/O Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.24
Figure 6-21: Analog Remote I/O Modules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.25
Figure 6-22: Auxiliary Cabinet Remote I/O Power Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.26
Figure 6-23: Control Cabinet Remote I/O Power Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.27
Figure 6-24: Remote I/O Power Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.28
Figure 6-25: DIN Rail. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.29
Figure 6-26: Power Module Terminal Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.30
Figure 6-27: Power Module Terminal Module Block Diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.31
Figure 6-28: I/O Module Terminal Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.32
Figure 6-29: I/O Module Terminal Module Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.33
Figure 6-30: Standard Fiber Optic Interface Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.35
Figure 6-31: Standard Fiber Optic Interface Module Block Diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.35
Figure 6-32: High Density Fiber Optic Interface Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.37
Figure 6-33: High Density Fiber Optic Interface Module Block Diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.38
Figure 6-34: Intelligent Interface Module Memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.39
Figure 6-35: Interface Module Mode Selector Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.41
Figure 6-36: Intelligent Interface Module Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.44
Figure 6-37: Power Module Fuse Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.45
Figure 6-38: Power Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.46
Figure 6-39: Power Module Block Diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.47
Figure 6-40: Auxiliary Cabinet Power Supply Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.49
Figure 6-41: Auxiliary Cabinet Power Supply Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.49
Figure 6-42: 24VDC to 28.8VDC Potentiometer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.51
Figure 6-43: A/B Selector Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.52
Figure 6-44: 24VDC to 28.8VDC Potentiometer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.54
Figure 6-45: A/B Selector Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.56

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Figure 6-46: 4 Digital Input 24VDC Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.58
Figure 6-47: 4 Digital Input 24VDC Module Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.59
Figure 6-48: 16 Point Digital Input Signal Module Terminal Assignment and Block Diagram. . . 6.60
Figure 6-49: 2 Digital Input 120VAC Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.61
Figure 6-50: 2 Digital Input 120VAC Module Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.62
Figure 6-51: 2 Analog Voltage Input High Feature Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . 6.64
Figure 6-52: 2 Analog Voltage Input High Feature Module Block Diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.64
Figure 6-53: 2 Analog Voltage Input High Speed Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.66
Figure 6-54: 2 Analog Voltage Input High Speed Module Block Diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.66
Figure 6-55: 2 Analog Current Input High Feature Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . 6.67
Figure 6-56: 2 Analog Current Input High Feature Module Block Diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.68
Figure 6-57: 2 Analog Input RTD Module Terminal Assignment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.69
Figure 6-58: 2 Analog Input RTD Module Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.70
Figure 6-59: 2 Digital Output 24VDC Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.71
Figure 6-60: 2 Digital Output 24VDC Module Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.72
Figure 6-61: 2 Digital Output 24VDC Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.73
Figure 6-62: 2 Digital Output 24VDC Module Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.74
Figure 6-63: 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.75
Figure 6-64: 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Module Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.76
Figure 6-65: 8 Point Digital Output Signal Module Terminal Assignment and Block Diagram . . 6.77
Figure 6-66: 2 Analog Voltage Output High Feature Module Terminal Assignment . . . . . . . . . . 6.78
Figure 6-67: 2 Analog Voltage Output High Feature Module Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.79
Figure 6-68: UPS Module Potentiometers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.86
Figure 6-69: Ethernet Electrical Lean Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.91
Figure 6-70: Power Supply Connection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.93
Figure 6-71: Profibus OBT Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.94
Figure 6-72: Profibus OBT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.96
Figure 6-73: Installation of the Profibus OBT on a Standard DIN Rail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.98
Figure 6-74: Profibus OBT Power Supply Terminal Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.98
Figure 6-75: Optical Channels CH2 and CH3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.99
Figure 6-76: Status Word Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.102
Figure 6-77: Control Word Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.106
Figure 6-78: Configuration Word Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.107
Figure 6-79: Hardware Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.109
Figure 6-80: Power Rail Booster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.113
Figure 6-81: Branching Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.115
Figure 6-82: Communication Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.116
Figure 6-83: Branching Unit - Cover Removed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.116
Figure 6-84: Communication Speed - Jumper Position. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.116
Figure 6-85: Optical Power Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.117
Figure 6-86: Optical Power Value Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.117
Figure 6-87: Operation Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.118
Figure 6-88: Operation Mode - Jumper Position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.118
Figure 6-89: Branching Unit Address Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.119

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SECTION 7, Drive Control Module
Figure 7-1: Control Cabinet Front Door Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.2
Figure 7-2: Control Cabinet Meter Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.3
Figure 7-3: Control Cabinet Front Panel Push Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.4
Figure 7-4: Control Cabinet Door Circuit Breakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.5
Figure 7-5: Control Cabinet with Doors Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.6
Figure 7-6: Hoist #1/Propel #1 and Hoist #2 Armature Voltage Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.8
Figure 7-7: Swing Armature Voltage and Voltage Difference Feedback. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.9
Figure 7-8: Crowd/Propel #2 Armature Voltage Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.10
Figure 7-9: Control Cabinet Fan Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.10
Figure 7-10: Control Cabinet Fan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.11
Figure 7-11: Main Transformer Contactor Relay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.12
Figure 7-12: Main Transformer Contactor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.12
Figure 7-13: Main Transformer Contactor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.13
Figure 7-14: MTC Input to Remote I/O System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.13
Figure 7-15: Main Transformer Contactor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.14
Figure 7-16: Test Reference Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.15
Figure 7-17: Main Phase Sensing Relay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.16
Figure 7-18: Main Phase Sensing Relay PLC Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.17
Figure 7-19: Main Phase Sensing Relay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.18
Figure 7-20: Drive Control Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.18
Figure 7-21: SDCS-AMC-DC Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.19
Figure 7-22: SDCS-CON-2 Board Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.23
Figure 7-23: SDCS-CON-2 Seven Segment Display (H1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.24
Figure 7-24: SDCS-POW-1 Power Supply Board Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.25
Figure 7-25: SDCS-PIN-21 Board Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.27
Figure 7-26: SDCS-PIN-205 Power Interface Board. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.29
Figure 7-27: SDCS-PIN-61 Board Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.31
SECTION 8, Mine Air Systems
Figure 8-1: Mine Air Systems Units. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1
Figure 8-2: Standard Control Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2
Figure 8-4: Heat Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.3
Figure 8-3: Cool/Off/Heat Rocker Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.3
Figure 8-6: Pressurizer Toggle Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.4
Figure 8-7: Fan Speed Toggle Switch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.4
Figure 8-5: Cooling Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.4
Figure 8-8: Mine Logic Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.5
Figure 8-9: LCD Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.5
Figure 8-11: Heat/Cool Button. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.6
Figure 8-10: Power On/Off Button. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.6
Figure 8-13: Pressurizer Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.7
Figure 8-12: Temperature Up and Temperature Down Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.7

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Figure 8-15: Floor Heater/Defroster Switch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.8
Figure 8-14: Fan Speed Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.8
Figure 8-16: Control Cabinet Component Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.9
Figure 8-17: Mine Logic Controller (MLC) Component Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.10
Figure 8-18: Mine Air Systems Troubleshooting - No Cooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.17
Figure 8-20: Mine Air Systems Troubleshooting - No Heating - C1 Energized . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.18
Figure 8-19: Mine Air Systems Troubleshooting - No Heating - C1 Deenergized. . . . . . . . . . . . 8.18
Figure 8-21: Electrical Wiring Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.19
Figure 8-22: MLS Relay Board Circuit Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.20
SECTION 9, Miscellaneous Electrical
Figure 9-1: Power Quality Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.1
Figure 9-2: PQM Single Line Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.4
Figure 9-3: PQM Front Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.10
Figure 9-4: PQM Display Readout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.12
Figure 9-5: PQM - Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.12
Figure 9-6: Front Panel Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.15
Figure 9-7: Message Key Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.17
Figure 9-8: Data Entry Page Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.18
Figure 9-9: Setpoint Message Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.20
Figure 9-10: PQM Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.21
Figure 9-11: PQM Setup/Setpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.22
Figure 9-12: Setpoint Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.23
Figure 9-13: Changing Setpoint Access Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.24
Figure 9-14: RS484/RS232 Serial Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.25
Figure 9-15: PQM Setup / DNP Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.26
Figure 9-16: PQM Setup/Clock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.27
Figure 9-18: PQM Setup / Calculation Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.28
Figure 9-17: Set Time/Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.28
Figure 9-19: Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.29
Figure 9-20: PQM Setup - Clear Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.31
Figure 9-21: PQM Setup - Event Recorder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.33
Figure 9-22: Actual Values Message Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.34
Figure 9-23: Actual Values - Metering/Current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.35
Figure 9-24: Actual Values - Metering / Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.37
Figure 9-25: Actual Values: Power (Sheet 1 of 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.40
Figure 9-26: Actual Values: Power (Sheet 2 of 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.41
Figure 9-27: Actual Values: Power (Sheet 3 of 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.42
Figure 9-28: Power Measurement Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.44
Figure 9-29: Actual Values - Metering/Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.45
Figure 9-30: Actual Values - Metering/Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.47
Figure 9-31: Actual Values - Metering/Frequency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.49
Figure 9-32: Actual Values - Metering/Pulse Counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.50
Figure 9-33: Pulse Input Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.51

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Figure 9-34: Actual Values - Metering/Analog Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.52
Figure 9-35: Actual Values Page 2 - Status/Alarms (Page 1 of 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.53
Figure 9-36: Actual Values Page 2 - Status/Alarms (Page 2 of 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.54
Figure 9-37: Actual Values Page 2 - Status/Alarms (Page 3 of 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.55
Figure 9-38: Status/Switches Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.56
Figure 9-39: Status/Clock Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.57
Figure 9-40: Status/Programmable Message Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.57
Figure 9-41: Power Analysis/Power Quality Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.58
Figure 9-42: Total Harmonic Distortion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.59
Figure 9-43: Actual Values - Data Logger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.60
Figure 9-44: Actual Values - Event Recorder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.61
Figure 9-45: Actual Values Page 4 - Software Versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.66
Figure 9-46: Shovel Joystick Controller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.68
Figure 9-47: Top View of Controller and Mounting Plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.71
APPENDIX A, System Faults
Figure A-1: SDCS-CON-2 Board Seven Segment Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.6
Figure A-2: Seven Segment Display Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A.6
APPENDIX B, Power Systems Procedures
Figure B-1: M3BS Switch on Air Disconnect Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B.2
Figure B-2: Key Interlock System - Upper High Voltage Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B.3
Figure B-3: Motor Starter Overload Relay Test Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B.5
APPENDIX C, Drive Control System Procedures
Figure C-1: SDCD-CON-2 Board S2 Jumper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.20
Figure C-2: Group 42 Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.20
Figure C-3: SDCS-AMC-DC Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.21
Figure C-4: SDCD-CON-2 Board S2 Jumper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.22
Figure C-5: Group 42 Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.22
Figure C-6: Checking Converter Software Version (Example) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.23
Figure C-7: RS-232 to 485 Converter P&H Part Number R49117D1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.24
Figure C-8: SDCS-CON-2 Board with SDCS-AMC-DC Removed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.25
Figure C-9: SDCS-CON-2 Board Layout. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.26
Figure C-10: CON2 Download - Hyperterminal Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.27
Figure C-11: Seven Segment Display - Small U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.27
Figure C-12: CON2 Download - Communication Detected. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.28
Figure C-13: CON2 Download - Erasing Flash Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.29
Figure C-14: CON2 Download - Transfer Send Text File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.30
Figure C-15: Seven Segment Display - Small R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.31
Figure C-16: CON2 Download Successful . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.31
Figure C-17: HyperTerminal 1_CON2_Firmware Icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.34
Figure C-18: CON2 Firmware Download Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.35

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Figure C-19: Open Window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.36
Figure C-20: CON2 Firmware Download Screen - File Selected . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.37
Figure C-21: Firmware Update Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.38
Figure C-22: CON2 Firmware Download Window - Waiting for Drive Connection . . . . . . . . . . .C.39
Figure C-23: CON2 Firmware Download Window - ROM Block Erasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.40
Figure C-24: CON2 Firmware Download Window - Percentage Complete Text. . . . . . . . . . . . .C.41
Figure C-25: Macro Loading to the Parameter Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.43
Figure C-26: System Configuration Window - Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.44
Figure C-27: Drives Window - Drive Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.45
Figure C-28: Opening Signals and Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.46
Figure C-29: Opening All Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.46
Figure C-30: Comparing Parameter Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.47
Figure C-31: Comparison Results - Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.47
Figure C-32: Set Parameter 99.11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.48
Figure C-33: Set Parameter 99.09 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C.48
Figure C-34: SDCS-PIN-205 Board Jumper/Resistor Configuration Hoist/Crowd Motions Only C.50
Figure C-35: SDCS-PIN-205 Board Jumper/Resistor Configuration Swing Motion Only . . . . . .C.51
APPENDIX D, Drive Control System Parameters
Figure D-1: Section of Group 14 Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.47
Figure D-2: Section of Group 14 Parameters (Changed) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D.47
APPENDIX E, SDCS-CON-2 Procedures
APPENDIX F, Shovel Control System Procedures
Figure F-1: Interface Module Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.2
Figure F-2: Terminal Module Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.3
Figure F-3: I/O Module Release Buttons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.5
Figure F-4: Terminal Box Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.6
Figure F-5: Terminating Module Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.7
Figure F-6: Interface Module DIP Switches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.8
Figure F-7: Wiring a Terminal Module with Spring Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.12
Figure F-8: I/O Module with Code Element . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.13
Figure F-9: I/O Module Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.14
Figure F-10: I/O Module Release Buttons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.15
Figure F-11: Remove Code Element. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.16
Figure F-12: I/O Module with Code Element . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.17
Figure F-13: I/O Module with Code Element . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.18
Figure F-14: Ethernet Jack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.21
Figure F-15: Open Project in Control Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.22
Figure F-16: Open Project Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.22
Figure F-17: Controller_1 (139.69.18.81) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.23
Figure F-18: Tools - Maintenance - Remote Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.24

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Figure F-19: Remote Systems Window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.24
Figure F-20: Firmware Information Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.25
Figure F-21: Download Firmware Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.26
Figure F-22: Firmware Download Complete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.26
Figure F-23: Ethernet Jack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.27
Figure F-24: Open Project in Control Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.28
Figure F-25: Open Project Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.28
Figure F-26: Controller_1 (139.69.18.81) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.29
Figure F-27: Tools - Maintenance - Remote Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.30
Figure F-28: Remote Systems Window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.30
Figure F-29: Application Information Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.31
Figure F-30: Remove Window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.31
Figure F-31: Ethernet Jack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.35
Figure F-32: Open Project in Control Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.36
Figure F-33: Open Project Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.36
Figure F-34: Download Project and Go Online Icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.37
Figure F-35: Tools, Download Project and Go Online. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.37
Figure F-36: Online Analysis - Online with Download Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.38
Figure F-37: Download Completed Successfully . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.38
Figure F-38: 3.6VDC Lithium Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.42
Figure F-39: External Battery Backup Unit Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.45
Figure F-40: Baseplate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.48
Figure F-41: Lugs at Bottom of Baseplate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.50
Figure F-42: DIN-Rail Locking Device - Positions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.51
Figure F-43: Disconnecting Baseplates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.53
Figure F-44: Unit Baseplate - Alpha Code Lock Arrangement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.55
Figure F-45: CEX-bus Termination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.56
Figure F-46: External Battery Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.57
SECTION G, Motor Maintenance
Figure G-1: Bearing Lube Plate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.6
Figure G-2: Carbon Brush-to-Brush Box Clearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.9
Figure G-3: Brush Spring Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.12
Figure G-4: Brush Holder Cross Connection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.14
Figure G-5: Brush Replacement Order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.15
Figure G-6: Arc Director and Brush Box Clearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.16
Figure G-7: Commutator Surface Wear Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.19
Figure G-8: Light Tan Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.22
Figure G-9: Mottled Surface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.22
Figure G-10: Slot Bar Marking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.23
Figure G-11: Heavy Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.23
Figure G-12: Streaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.24
Figure G-13: Threading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.24
Figure G-14: Grooving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.25

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Figure G-15: Copper Drag. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.25
Figure G-16: Pitch Bar Marking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.26
Figure G-17: Heavy Slot Bar Marking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.26
Figure G-18: Field Ring - Refer to Table G-9 for A-E Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.29
Figure G-19: Connection Diagram Interpole 4 Pole Shunt Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.35
Figure G-20: K-408 Motor - Refer to Table G-16 for Legend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.49
Figure G-21: K-489 Motor - Refer to Table G-17 for Legend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.50
Figure G-22: K-558A Upgrades. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.53
Figure G-23: K-558A 1/4-20 Holes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.54
Figure G-24: K-558A Field Coil Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.56
Figure G-25: K-558A Blower Assembly Gusset Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.58
Figure G-26: K-925 Motor Interpole Coil and Bolt Service Kit - Refer to Table G-22 for LegendG.60
Figure G-27: Lug Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.64
Figure G-28: Bolt Locking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.71
APPENDIX H, Miscellaneous Electrical Procedures
Figure H-1: Cable Knife. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.3
Figure H-2: Adjusting Cable Knife Cutting Depth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.3
Figure H-3: Testing the Cutting Depth of the Cable Knife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.4
Figure H-4: Cut Section of Jacket with a Correctly Set Cable Knife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.4
Figure H-5: Damaged Cable Foil and Buffer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.4
Figure H-6: Stripping the Jacket Using the Cable Knife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.5
Figure H-7: Rotate Cable 180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.5
Figure H-8: Slit the Cable a Second Time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.6
Figure H-9: Removing Outer Jacket, Kevlar Fibers, and Foil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.6
Figure H-10: Use Scissors to Remove Remnants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.6
Figure H-11: Plastic Fiber Optic Cable with the Outer Jacket Stripped. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.7
Figure H-12: Inserting Fiber Optic Cord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.7
Figure H-13: Stripping the Fiber Optic Cord with the Buffer Stripper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.7
Figure H-14: Removing the Stripped Fiber Optic Cord from the Buffer Stripper . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.8
Figure H-15: Fiber Optic Cord with Buffer Removed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.8
Figure H-16: Inserting the Fiber Optic Cord into the Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.9
Figure H-17: Close the Connector. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.9
Figure H-18: Cutting Off Excess Fiber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.10
Figure H-19: Inserting the Simplex Connector into the Polishing Holder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.10
Figure H-20: Grinding Down the Excess Fiber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.10
Figure H-21: Polishing the End Face of the Simplex Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.11
Figure H-22: Cleaning the Surface of the Simplex Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.11
Figure H-23: Inserting the Orange Fiber Optic Cord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.12
Figure H-24: Inserting the Black Fiber Optic Cord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.12
Figure H-25: Closing the Plug Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.13
Figure H-26: Completely Assembled Plug Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.13
Figure H-27: Installing the Ethernet Electrical Lean Switch on a DIN Rail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.14
Figure H-28: Removing the Ethernet Electrical Lean Switch from the DIN Rail . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.15

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Figure H-29: Connecting the IE FC TP Cable to the Ethernet Electrical Lean Switch . . . . . . . .H.15
Figure H-30: Length of Insulation Stripped from the IE FC TP Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.16
Figure H-31: Select Program Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.18
Figure H-32: Selecting a Network Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.18
Figure H-33: PST User Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.20
Figure H-34: Scan Network Progress Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.21
Figure H-35: PST Icons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.21
Figure H-36: PST Component View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.22
Figure H-37: WBM Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.25
Figure H-38: WBM User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.26
Figure H-39: Switch Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.28
Figure H-40: IP Address Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.29
Figure H-41: E-mail Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.30
Figure H-42: Trap Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.31
Figure H-43: Event Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.32
Figure H-44: Statistic Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.33
Figure H-45: Internet Explorer Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.35
Figure H-46: Advanced Internet Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.36
Figure H-47: Internet Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.37
Figure H-48: LAN Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.37
Figure H-49: Proxy Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H.38
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Section 1

Shovel Safety
1.1 General Information
Safety and health in the mining industry has improved greatly since the early 20th Century. Total mining fatalities
reached the lowest level in history in 2001. Listed below are Safety Information Websites that can assist in preventing mining accidents and injuries:

1.1.1 Safety Websites


www.msha.gov. The U.S. Department of Labors Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) helps to reduce
deaths, injuries, and illnesses in the nation's mines with a variety of activities and programs.
www.osha.gov. The U.S. Department of Labors Occupational Safety and Health Administrations (OSHA) mission
is to assure, so far as possible, every working man and woman in the nation safe and healthful working conditions.
www.cdc.gov/niosh. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is the Federal agency
responsible for conducting research and making recommendations for the prevention of work-related disease and
injury. The Institute is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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1.2 Safe Operating Practices for Users of P&H Mining Equipment - Electric
Shovels

NOTICE
A review of many safety sources including MSHA, NIOSH, OSHA, ANSI, and various individual
mine safety policies was conducted to develop these safe operating practices recommendations. The purpose of these recommendations is to assist and support our customer in their
safety efforts in preventing accidents.

1.2.1 Introduction
P&H shovels are carefully designed, manufactured, and tested. When used properly by qualified operators, they
provide safe, reliable service. There are P&H offices worldwide to answer any questions about P&H products or
their safe use. The World Sales and Service Headquarters for P&H Mining Equipment is:
P&H Mining Equipment
4400 West National Avenue
P.O. Box 310
Milwaukee, WI 53201 USA
Telephone: (414) 671-4400
Because shovels are complex and contain massive pieces of equipment, they also have the potential for accidents
if safe operating practices are not followed. This section is intended to help prevent accidents which could result in
injury, death, or property damage.
General safe practices for working machinery must be followed as well as safe operating practices. The following
P&H Mining Equipment recommendations are provided to supplement customer/owner, local or national safety
codes, rules or procedures.

1.3 Responsibilities of All Crew Members

  
Any unsafe condition or practice must be reported to the job supervisor and shovel operator.
Everyone who works around shovels, including support people and maintenance personnel, must obey all safety
hazard signs and watch out for their own safety and the safety of others in the area. Crew members setting up
machines or handling maintenance and repairs are expected to know proper procedures including lockout and
tagout practices.
Watch for hazards during operations and immediately alert the shovel operator of potential safety hazards such as
the unexpected presence of people, other equipment in the area, unstable ground, bank conditions, or approaching storms.

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1.3.1 Planning the Job


Most accidents can be avoided by careful job planning. The person in charge must have a clear understanding of
the work to be done, consider dangers or hazards, develop a plan to do the job safely, and then explain the plan to
all concerned. Factors such as the following should be considered:

How can the shovel tail cable be safely moved at the work site?
Is there other equipment, power lines, or structures which must be moved or avoided during movement of
the shovel?

Is the surface strong enough to support the shovel and load?


How and where will the removed materials be unloaded?
What steps will be taken to keep unnecessary people and equipment at a safe distance from the work area?
These factors are not meant to be all encompassing, but only a starting point. Each job must be individually considered.

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1.4 Safety For Electrical And Electronic Equipment


1.4.1 General
The safety instructions given in this manual cover those issues encountered during normal daily operation of the
shovel. Additional precautions may be necessary to cover unusual circumstances. It is important to remain alert for
any potentially dangerous conditions and report them immediately to your foreman or supervisor.

1.4.2 Electrical Safety Principles


When planning and performing work on electrical systems and equipment, keep these principles in mind:
A. Plan every job.
B. Think about what could go wrong.
C. Use the right tools for the job.
D. Use procedures, drawings and other documents as tools to do the job.
E. Isolate the equipment from energy sources.
F. Identify the electric shock and arc flash, as well as other hazards that may be present.
G. Minimize the hazard by guarding or approach limitations.
H. Test every circuit, every conductor, every time before you touch.
I. Use personal protective equipment (PPE) as a last line of defense in case something goes wrong.
J. Ensure service personnel have the skills, knowledge, tools, and experience to do this work safely.

1.4.3 Maintenance Work Precautions


Inspection, service, and maintenance are essential elements to the proper operation and performance of electric
shovels. The following recommendations are provided to supplement past experience, knowledge, and common
sense of servicemen concerning potential hazards associated with inspection, service, and maintenance.
1. Prior to performing any work on the equipment, the personnel performing the work must notify the operator
about the type and location of the job. Appropriate lockout and tagout procedures must be determined and followed by all individuals involved to guard against potential hazards.
2. Before maintenance or service is attempted, the operator must park the machine in a location to avoid hazards
such as falling rocks and unstable ground. After parking the machine, the operator must:
A. Set the dipper on the ground.
B. Set all brakes.
C. De-energize control functions.
D. Comply with lockout and tagout procedures

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3. Injury, death, and damage can occur if the machine is started before servicing is finished. Never start or operate the equipment if lockouts or tagouts are on the controls. Prior to starting the machine, look under, inside,
and around the equipment.
4. Specific inspection, service and maintenance instructions for P&H Electric are available from product manuals
and the P&H service network. Always read and follow instruction manuals and use the P&H service network for
assistance.
5. On hydraulic systems, release system pressure before attempting to make adjustments or repairs. Pressure in
hydraulic systems can be retained for long periods of time. If not properly released before maintenance people
attempt to work on the hydraulic system, this pressure can allow machinery to move or cause hot oil to shoot
out of the hose ends at high speed.
6. Maintenance and service can involve the handling of heavy parts or components, which can injure personnel.
Use lifting and handling equipment along with blocking to remove, support, and install heavy parts.
7. Ensure both ends of booms or cylinders are supported and the boom suspension lines completely slacked off
before moving pins. Never stand on, inside, under booms during erection or disassembly. Pin-connected
booms may fall if not properly supported when removing or installing pins.
8. When inspecting and retiring wire rope used on surface mining machines:
A. Mine management must provide and appoint qualified personnel to inspect, prepare, and retain written
reports on wire rope inspections.
B. An inspection procedure should be established by Mine Management for each wire rope application on their
mining shovels or excavators.
C. Unless instructed otherwise, the frequency of inspections must be established based upon operating shifts,
days, weeks or months depending upon anticipated rope life and working conditions.
D. An average wire rope life must be established based upon the number of operating cycles, volume of material handled or weight of material handled. Replacement is determined from the this established rope life
analysis.
9. MSHA procedures require all wire rope be inspected daily to determine whether it should be replaced.
As a minimum, wire rope replacement should be performed when any of the following conditions exist:
A. Severe abrasion, scrubbing, peening, or kinking, or broken outer wires.
B. Crushing, or other damage that distorts the rope's structure.
C. Severe reduction of rope diameter or an observable increase in rope lay.
D. Bird-caging or other distortion indicating uneven distribution of load between rope strands.
E. Evidence of severe corrosion, particularly in the vicinity of attachments.
F. Heat damage from any source.
G. A rapid increase in the number of broken wires.
10. Wire rope end connections must be installed properly and inspected daily.

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A. Wire rope secured with a wedge socket should be installed so that the load line is in a straight-line pull with
the eye of the socket; and the loaded part of the rope is not kinked where it leaves the wedge. The rope end
should always protrude at least 6 to 9 inches beyond the socket. Attach a short piece of wire rope to the
rope end with two wire rope clips to prevent the rope end from slipping out of the wedge socket.
11. Electrically powered shovels operate using high voltage wiring, components, and systems. This voltage can kill
or seriously injure people servicing, repairing, or working on the machines. Inspection, maintenance, or service
of any electrical component must be done by qualified personnel. All people working on or around the equipment should read and obey hazard signs and always use lockout and tagout procedures.
12. All guards, signs, warning devices, and guarding devices must be in place and in working conditions before the
shovel is placed back in operation after inspection, service and maintenance.
13. Loose or missing hardware, bolts, or nuts should be properly tightened or replaced with the manufacturer's
specified hardware. Refer to P&H Service and Parts sources for replacement parts.
14. If there is not enough wire rope on the drum, the rope can be pulled off. Allow for at least two wraps of wire
rope on drums when replacing the rope.
15. Electrical junction boxes for electrical motors can contain high voltage electrical power from multiple sources.
Before performing service on electrical junction boxes, determine that all electrical power from all sources has
been disconnected and locked out. Test the components inside of the electrical junction box to verify the electrical power is disconnected.

1.4.4 Electrical Shock Dynamics


When working on an Electric Mining Shovel, service personnel must be aware of three important characteristics of
possible exposure to electrical shock. The three factors are:
A. PATH - of current into and out of the body.
B. AMOUNT - of current or energy flowing in the body.
C. DURATION OF EXPOSURE - degree of injury also depends on the duration and frequency of the current.
60Hz AC Current

Response

0.5 - 3 mA

Start to feel the energy, tingling sensation

3 - 10 mA

Experience pain, muscle contraction

10 - 40 mA

Grip paralysis threshold (brain says let


go, but physically cannot do so)

30 - 75 mA

Respiratory systems shuts down

100 - 200 mA

Experience heart fibrillation

200 - 500 mA

Heart clamps tight

Over 1500 mA

Tissue and organs burn

Table 1-1: Electrical Shock and Human Response

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NOTICE
SHOCK injuries can resemble an Iceberg where most of the injuries are internal, with only
an entry and exit wound visible. Prompt attention is required by individuals specifically trained
to treat electrical injuries.
Accident victims can incur the following injuries from electrical shock:
A. Low-voltage contact wounds.
B. High-voltage contact wounds from entry and exit of electrical current.
C. Burns.
D. Respiratory difficulties (the tongue may swell and obstruct the airway; or vaporized metal or heated air may
have been inhaled).
E. Infectious complications.
F. Injury to bone through falls, heat necrosis (death of tissue), and muscle contraction.
G. Injury to the heart such as ventricular fibrillation, cardiac arrest, or stoppage.
H. Internal organ injuries.
I. Nerve and neurological damage.

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1.5 Safety Hazard Indicators, Decals and Signs


Safety Hazard Indicators, Decals and Signs identify potential safety hazards and prevent accidents by displaying
standard symbols, headers and pictograms or custom graphics. Indicator, Decal and Sign, layouts, headers and
graphics conform to current ANSI guidelines. Commonly used for high voltage, personal protection, confined
space, and bilingual applications.

1.5.1 Hazard Indicators


DANGERS, WARNINGS, CAUTIONS, NOTICES, and SAFETY FIRSTS are used throughout our manuals to
emphasize important and critical instructions. DANGERS, WARNINGS, CAUTIONS, and SAFETY FIRSTS will
precede the paragraph or item to which they apply. NOTICES will follow the paragraph or item to which they apply.
DANGERS, WARNINGS, CAUTIONS, NOTICES and SAFETY FIRSTS are identified and defined as follows:

DANGER

Indicates an imminently hazardous situation which, if not avoided, will result in death or
serious injury. This signal word will be limited to the most extreme situations.

WARNING

Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in death or
serious injury.

CAUTION

Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, may result in minor or
major injury.

CAUTION
A Caution without a Safety Alert Symbol (no Triangle and Exclamation Point) is used to
warn of hazards that result only in property damage.

NOTICE
Used to indicate a statement of company policy directly or indirectly related to the safety of personnel or protection of property. This signal word is not associated directly with a hazard or
hazardous situation and is not used in place of DANGER, WARNING, or CAUTION.

  
Used to indicate general instructions relative to safe working practices, remind of proper safety
procedures, and indicate the location of safety equipment.

1.5.2 Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

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Most Safety Hazard Decals and Signs use pictographs and text to show, both graphically and verbally, where
potential safety hazards exist around the electric mining shovel. These decals and signs do not represent every
possible hazard and are not intended to be a substitute for safe working practices and good judgement.
This subtopic provides examples of Safety Hazard Decals and Signs found on a typical electric mining shovel. Be
certain everyone working on, or near the shovel, understands and knows how to avoid the hazards they represent.

CAUTION

Do not remove, cover, paint over, or deface Safety Hazard Decals or Signs.
If they become damaged or obscured, request replacement decals and signs from your local MinePro Office.

1.5.2.1 Location
Safety Hazard Decals and Signs are located throughout the shovel in various location. Table 1-2 identifies and
describes the Safety Hazard Decals and Signs. Figure 1-5 through Figure 1-38 details their locations. Item numbers are provided on these Figures for easy cross reference back to Table 1-2.
Item Number

Safety Hazard Decal/Sign

Description

03

Hazardous voltage.
Will cause severe injury
or death.
Disconnect tail cable voltage and lock supply
switch open.
Remove tail cable from
machine.
Insure that all high voltage is removed from the
machine before servicing
switch.

-5!!'=

Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

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Item Number

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Safety Hazard Decal/Sign

Description

04

Warning Decal used to


alert user that hazardous
voltage is inside.
Can cause severe injury
or death.
Keep all doors and covers
closed.
Do not open unless qualified and authorized.
Disconnect power to all
circuits.
Use lockout and tagout
procedure before servicing.

-5!'=

05

Warning Decal used to


alert user of hazardous
voltage inside.
Can cause severe injury
or death.
Disconnect tail cable voltage and lock supply
switch open.
Remove tail cable from
shovel.
Insure that all high voltage is removed from the
shovel before servicing
switch.

ES02917a01

Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

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Item Number

Shovel Safety

Safety Hazard Decal/Sign

Description

07, 35

Notice decal used with


32Q1805D_ to alert the
user of level of voltage
which may be present.

-5 '#=

12

Caution Decal used to


alert user that opening
door will stop the shovel.
Unexpected stopping or
abnormal performance
can cause personal injury
and property damage.
Do not open the doors
when shovel is running.

ES02922a01

Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.11-

Peak Services
Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

Shovel Safety

Item Number

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Safety Hazard Decal/Sign

Description

24

Hazardous voltage may


be present.
Can cause sever injury or
death.
Open field supply circuit
breakers.

-5!!'=

25

Abnormal shovel performance can cause personal injury and property


damage.
Changing mode switch
will cause brake setting
and non-operator controlled shovel restart or
abrupt shovel movement.
Change mode with selector switch only after
machine is shut down.

-5!!' =

Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

Peak Services
Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

-1.12-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Item Number

Shovel Safety

Safety Hazard Decal/Sign

Description

26

Caution Decal used to


alert user that abnormal
performance can cause
personal injury.
Probing test points or
removing printed circuit
cards will induce electrical noise or card damage
when shovel is operating.
Probe test points when
shovel is not operating.
Remove printed circuit
cards only after shovel is
shut down and Control
Voltage Supply / Relay
Supply / Constant Voltage Supply Breakers are
open.

-5 ' $=

33

Warning Decal used to


alert user of rotating
parts and hazardous voltage inside.
Can cause severe injury
or death.
Keep fingers clear of
rotating machinery.
Disconnect power to all
circuits before opening
covers.
Use lockout and tagout
procedures before servicing.

ES02930a01

Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.13-

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Shovel Safety

Item Number

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Safety Hazard Decal/Sign

Description

34

Caution Decal used to


alert user that abnormal
performance can cause
personal injury and property damage.
Probing test points or
removing printed circuit
cards will induce electrical noise or card damage
when shovel is operating.
Probe test points when
shovel is not operating.
Remove printed circuit
cards only after shovel is
shut down and Control
Voltage Supply / Relay
Supply / Constant Voltage Supply Breakers are
open.

ES02932a01

Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

Peak Services
Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

-1.14-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Item Number

Shovel Safety

Safety Hazard Decal/Sign

Description

39

Warning Decal used to


alert user of unexpected
machinery or rope movement can cause severe
injury or death.
Keep hands, body, and
clothing away from
machinery and ropes.
Always notify shovel
operator of your presence.
Use pathways and hold
handrails.

ES02936a01

40

Falling, slipping or tripping hazard.


Can cause injury.
Keep area clean and dry.
Watch your step.

-5!!'!=

Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.15-

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Shovel Safety

Item Number

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Safety Hazard Decal/Sign

Description

41

Warning Decal used to


alert user of rotating
parts.
Can cause injury if contacted.
Do not remove guard if
shovel is operating.
Replace guard before
operating the shovel.
Use lockout and tagout
procedures before servicing.

-5 ''=

42

Notice Decal used to alert


user to read the Operators Manual before
attempting to operate the
shovel.

ES02939a01

Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

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-1.16-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Item Number

Shovel Safety

Safety Hazard Decal/Sign

Description

43

Caution Decal used to


alert user that opening
door will stop the shovel.
Unexpected stopping or
abnormal performance
can cause personal injury
and property damage.
Do not open doors while
shovel is running.

ES02942a01

44

Warning Decal used to


alert user that hazardous
voltage is inside.
Can cause severe injury
or death.
Keep all doors and covers
closed.
Do not open unless qualified and authorized.
Disconnect power to all
circuits.
ES02944a01

45

Use lockout and tagout


procedure before servicing.
Danger Decal used to
alert user of hazardous
voltage.
Will cause severe injury
or death.
Check for voltages
present.
Use lockout and tagout
procedures before servicing.
Disconnect power to all
circuits.

ES02946a01

Do not service unless


qualified and authorized.

Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.17-

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Shovel Safety

Item Number

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Safety Hazard Decal/Sign

Description

46

Warning Decal used to


alert user that falling
objects, during digging,
can cause severe injury
or death.
Always notify shovel
operator of your presence.
Never enter this area
while shovel is digging.

ES02948a01

47

Notice Decal used to alert


user of Boarding Ladder
procedures.

ES02950a01

Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

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Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Item Number

Shovel Safety

Safety Hazard Decal/Sign

Description

48

Notice Decal used to alert


user of signal bell.
Pull cord to signal the
operator.

ES02952a01

49

Notice Decal used to alert


user of ladder control.

ES02954a01

50

Warning Decal used to


alert user that hazardous
voltages may be present.
Can cause severe injury
or death.
Disconnect power to all
circuits.
Use lockout and tagout
procedures before servicing.

ES02956a01

Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.19-

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Shovel Safety

Item Number

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Safety Hazard Decal/Sign

Description

51

Danger Decal used to


alert user of hazardous
voltages.
Will cause severe injury
or death.
Disconnect tail cable voltage and lockout supply
switch open before
removing cable.
Follow safe discharge and
protection procedures for
the cable terminator.

ES02958a01

52

Danger Decal used to


alert user of hazardous
voltages.
Will cause severe injury
or death.
Disconnect tail cable voltage and lockout supply
switch open before
removing cable.
Follow safe discharge and
protection procedures for
the cable terminator.

ES02960a01

Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

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Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Item Number

Shovel Safety

Safety Hazard Decal/Sign

Description

59

Caution Decal used to


alert user that stepping
or sitting on cover may
cause collapse.
Can cause personal injury
and electrical damage to
enclosed bus bar.
Do not sit or step on bus
bar covers.

ES02962a01

60

Hazardous voltage.
Do not service unless
qualified and authorized.
Check for voltages
present.
Disconnect power to all
circuits. Use lockout
tagout procedures before
servicing.
Will cause severe injury
or death.

-5!=

Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

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Shovel Safety

Item Number

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Safety Hazard Decal/Sign

Description

61

Shovel runaway, tipover


or damage can occur on
slopes or grades.
Can cause severe injury,
death or property damage.
Do not exceed maximum
recommended grades.
See operators manual or
contact P&H Mining
Equipment, Inc. for recommended grades.

-5!!'"=

62

Warning Decal used to


alert user of a crush and
pinch hazard.
Can cause severe injury
or death.
Stay clear of moving
winch rope and drum.
Do not stand behind
winch drum while operating controls.

ES02965a01

Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

Peak Services
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-1.22-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Item Number

Shovel Safety

Safety Hazard Decal/Sign

Description

66

Warning Decal used to


alert user that manual
brake release may cause
uncontrolled shovel
movement.
Can cause severe injury
or property damage.

ES02968a01

67

Notice Decal used to alert


user that severe boom
jacking, stage 2, is considered an operating
fault.
Frequent boom jacking
will increase boom structural damage.

ES02969a01

Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.23-

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Shovel Safety

Item Number

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Safety Hazard Decal/Sign

Description

68

Warning Decal used to


alert of flammable materials.
Can burn or ignite.
No smoking or open
flames inside this room.
Fire or explosion can
cause severe injury death
or property damage.

ES02970a01

69

Flames or sparks can


cause fires or explosions
resulting in injury or
death.
No smoking, open
flames, sparks or
machine operation permitted when using flammable solvents or sprays.
Area must be well ventilated.


  
 


   
      
  

     


 

 
     
   


    



    


!"#$%



Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

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-1.24-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Item Number

Shovel Safety

Safety Hazard Decal/Sign

88

Description
Caution Decal used to
alert user that abnormal
shovel performance can
cause personal injury and
property damage.
Changing mode switch
will cause brake setting
and shovel shutdown.
Change mode with the
selector switch only after
shovel is shut down.

-5 '%"=

Table 1-2: Safety Hazard Decals and Signs

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.25-

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Shovel Safety

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Shovel

Figure 1-1: 4100XPB Deck Plan

Peak Services
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-1.26-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Shovel Safety

Figure 1-2: 4100XPC Deck Layout

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.27-

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Shovel Safety

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Figure 1-3: 4100BOSS Shovel Deck Layout

Peak Services
Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

-1.28-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Shovel Safety

Figure 1-4: 2800XPB Shovel Deck Plan

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.29-

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Shovel Safety

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Figure 1-5: 2800XPC Shovel Deck Plan

Peak Services
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-1.30-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Shovel Safety

44
07
07

44

44
07

44
07
ES03423a01

44
07
Figure 1-6: Under Deck Platform

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.31-

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Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

07

45
50

07

50

ES03422a01

Figure 1-7: Lube Room

Peak Services
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-1.32-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Shovel Safety

" !'

"$

"
!'

"'

"&
-5!" $=

"

$&

"$

"

"

"%

"%

"'

Figure 1-8: Outside Shovel Opposite Operator Cab

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.33-

Peak Services
Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

Shovel Safety

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

"

"$

!'

"
"
-5!" &=

"%

"&

"' !'

"

"%

"'

"$

Figure 1-9: Outside Shovel Operator Cab Side

Peak Services
Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

-1.34-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Shovel Safety

"

"

"

"$

-5!" %=

#

Figure 1-10: Shovel Rear

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.35-

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Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

Shovel Safety

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

42

61
67

ES03424a01

Figure 1-11: Operators Cab

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-1.36-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Shovel Safety

Cabinets

""

% ""

""

-5!"!=

Figure 1-12: Main Transformer

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.37-

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Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

04

07

45

ES03404a01

Figure 1-13: Auxiliary Transformer

07
04

07

04

04
45

45
45

ES03408a01

Figure 1-14: Upper High Voltage Cabinet

Peak Services
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-1.38-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Shovel Safety

05

03

ES03407a01

Figure 1-15: Lower High Voltage Cabinet

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.39-

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Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

07

44
45

45

ES02877a01

Figure 1-16: Suppression and Ground Fault Cabinet

Peak Services
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-1.40-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Shovel Safety

%
""
%

%
""
%

-5!"#=

Figure 1-17: Slack Take Up / Dipper Trip Resistors

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.41-

Peak Services
Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

Shovel Safety

""

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

% "#

""

"!

"!

%
"#

"!
"#

"# "!
%
"#

"#
%

""
%

"! ""
%

"!

""

""

-5!"=

Figure 1-18: RPC Switching Cabinet

"#
"
"!

$

"#

""

""

"!

%

$

"#
"
"!


"#
"!

%

%
""
%

-5!"'=

%

""

%

Figure 1-19: Converter Cabinet

Peak Services
Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

-1.42-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Shovel Safety

34

07

ES02884a01

Figure 1-20: Remote I/O Transfer Cabinet

"#

""

"!
%

-5!"=

Figure 1-21: Transfer Contactor Cabinet

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.43-

Peak Services
Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

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Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

44
45
07

43
44
45
07
43

ES02896a01

Figure 1-22: Auxiliary Cabinet

Peak Services
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-1.44-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

07

Shovel Safety

07

88
26
34

43
44

45

26

07

44
45

07

07

45
44
ES02910a01

Figure 1-23: Control Cabinet

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.45-

Peak Services
Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

Shovel Safety

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Motors

"

!!
%
#

"

-5!"#=

Figure 1-24: Hoist Motor

Peak Services
Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

-1.46-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Shovel Safety

!!
"

!!
$$
%

%
"#
#

"

"

-5!"%=

Figure 1-25: Swing Motor

!!
%

"#
#

"

-5!"&=

Figure 1-26: Crowd Motor

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.47-

Peak Services
Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

Shovel Safety

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

$$

%
"
"

!!

$$

%
"#
#
"

"
!!

" "

%
"#
#

-5!""=

Figure 1-27: Propel Motor

Peak Services
Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

-1.48-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Shovel Safety

Miscellaneous Components
07

45

44

ES02881a01

Figure 1-28: Field Supply and Auxiliary Secondaries Breakers

#
!!

%

!#
#$ %

"
%

"

!#
#$

"

!!

%

%

"

"

-5!"$=
Figure 1-29: High and Low Voltage Collector

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.49-

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Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

07

07

44
45

44
45

ES02895a01

Figure 1-30: 480VAC Panelboard #1 and #2

Peak Services
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-1.50-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Shovel Safety

07

44
45

50

50

44
45
07

ES03421a01

07

Figure 1-31: 120VAC and Flood Light Panelboard

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.51-

Peak Services
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Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

07

ES02898a01

Figure 1-32: Machinery House Heater

66

66

07

66

07

07

ES02899a01

Figure 1-33: Hoist, Swing, Propel Brake Exhaust Solenoid and Pressure Switch

66

07

ES02899a02

Figure 1-34: Operators Panelboard

Peak Services
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-1.52-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Shovel Safety

07

62

ES02900a01

Figure 1-35: Cable Winch

%

""

-5 '$=

Figure 1-36: Applied to all Junction Box Covers

""

#'

-5!"'=
Figure 1-37: All Overhead Bus Covers

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.53-

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Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

44

07

ES02892a01

Figure 1-38: All Overhead Wire Trays

%

""

-5!"=

Figure 1-39: Blower Reverse Cabinet

Peak Services
Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

-1.54-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Shovel Safety

%

""
"#

"#
%
""

-5!" =

Figure 1-40: 460V Load Center and Field Supply Breaker Cabinet

%

-5!" =

Figure 1-41: Boom Box

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.55-

Peak Services
Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

Shovel Safety

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

$$

$$

-5!" =

Figure 1-42: Crowd and Hoist Brake Solenoids

Peak Services
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-1.56-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Shovel Safety

1.5.3 Specific Hazard Indicators


Observe these Hazard Indicators when operating this shovel. Other Hazard Indicators may appear within specific
parts of this manual. They should be observed as well.

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

-1.57-

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Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

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Peak Services
Section 1, Version 02 - 10/06

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

-1.58-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 1, Safety.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

General Information

Section 2

General Information
2.1 General
This section provides detailed information about Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) and its prevention. In addition, it
also detailed information about reading P&H Mining schematics and basic troubleshooting steps.

2.2 Electrostatic Discharge


Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) can damage or impair electrical circuitry and occurs when electronic components
are handled improperly. Always follow ESD prevention procedures when removing or replacing components.
Proper education and training combined with work-related procedures and precautions can guard against many of
the effects of ESD. This section explains the causes of ESD, and how you can guard against its effects.

2.2.1 ESD Terminology


Catastrophic Failure - An electronic device exposed to ESD that no longer functions. The ESD event may have
caused a metal melt, junction breakdown, or oxide failure. The device's circuitry is permanently damaged causing
the device to fail.
Common Point Ground - A system or method for connecting two or more grounding conductors to the same
electrical potential.
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) - The transfer of charge between bodies at different electrical potentials.
Latent Defect - A device exposed to an ESD event with partially degraded functionality and with possible reduced
operating life expectancy. A product or system incorporating devices with latent defects may experience premature
failure after the user places them in service. Such failures are usually costly to repair and in some applications may
create a personnel hazard.
Protected Areas - An ESD protective area consists of the materials, equipment, and procedures to control or minimize electrostatic charges (static voltage levels).
Static Electricity - An electrical charge caused by an imbalance of electrons on the surface of a material. This
imbalance of electrons produces an electric field that can be measured and that can influence other objects at a
distance.

2.2.2 Basic Principles of Static Control


At the Field Service level, the five basic principles of static control are:

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 2, General Info.fm

-2.1-

Peak Services
Section 2, Version 02 - 10/06

General Information

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Define the level of control needed in your environment - Determine the sensitivity level of the parts you
are using and the products that you are manufacturing and shipping.

Identify and define the electrostatic protected areas (EPA) - These are the areas where you are handling sensitive parts and the areas in which to bond or electrically connect all conductive and dissipative
materials, including personnel, to a known ground.

Eliminate and Reduce Generation - Reducing static generating processes or materials, such as the contact and separation of dissimilar materials and common plastics, from the work environment.

Dissipate and Neutralize - Safely dissipate or neutralize those electrostatic charges that occur through
proper grounding and the use of conductive or dissipative materials.

2.2.3 Causes of Electrostatic Damage


Electrostatic damage is caused by the effects of an electric field that surrounds all charged objects. The electric
field can damage sensitive components by:

discharge - the charge associated with the field is suddenly grounded and the movement is of the charge
creates current in the device.

induction - the electric field moves in relation to the device and generates a current in the device.
polarization - the electric field remains stationary and polarizes the device. Subsequent handling and
grounding first charges then discharges the device.
Electric fields are invisible, and exist around all charged materials. They can generate currents in conductors simply by moving near them. The size of the current depends on the strength of the field and the speed of movement.
Electric fields can polarize sensitive devices. Subsequent handling can cause charging and discharging of the
device.

2.2.4 Damage Due to Discharge


The surfaces of non-conductive materials develop equal and opposite charges when they come in contact, move
against each other, then separate quickly. An electric field surrounds a non-conductive material once it is charged.
We normally develop charge in our bodies and clothing as we move. When we walk on a carpet, our feet rub on
then separate from the carpet, which can give us a charge very quickly.

Peak Services
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-2.2-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 2, General Info.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

General Information

When we approach a conductor, like a door knob or one of todays sensitive electronic devices, the air between our
body and the conductor initially acts as an insulator. At some point, the amount of charge we have built up exceeds
the insulating ability of the air, and a spark jumps to the conductor.

ES02652a01

Figure 2-1: Electrostatic Discharges

The spark introduces current in the conductor. These currents could destroy a sensitive device or degrade performance.

2.2.5 Damage Due to Induction


A conductor that moves in a magnetic field generates an electric current. This is the basic principle of a generator:
induction. The principle is the same if the magnetic field moves and the conductor is at rest. The electric field is
similar to the magnetic field in its ability to generate a current.
Walking across a carpet, building up charge, and approaching a sensitive device causes your electric field to move
across the conductors of the device. The stronger your electric field, and the faster your approach, the more likely
you are to induce damaging currents.

Charged Hand
Approaching

Induced
Current
Electric Field
ES02653a01

Figure 2-2: Damage Due to Induction

2.2.6 Damage Due to Polarization


If the electric field and a sensitive device remain stationary, but close to each other, a polarization effect may occur.

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A good example of polarization is a styrofoam cup placed next to a chip. The cup is a nonconductor that is easily
charged by handling, or even simple movement in the air. Polarization causes the electrons on the chip, which are
negative, to be attracted to the cup, which is positively charged. At this point, the chip is not charged. It is polarized.

ES02654a01

Figure 2-3: Damage Due to Polarization

If we pick up the chip, it becomes negatively charged as free electrons flow from hand to the chip. If we place the
chip on a grounded surface, it discharges. The discharge currents can degrade or destroy the chip.

ES2655a01

Figure 2-4: Damage Due to Polarization - Continued

2.2.7 Electrostatic-Safe Practices


To guard against electrostatic damage, you can:

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create a safe-static work area


wear a wrist strap that grounds you during work
handle sensitive components correctly
control static on personnel and moving equipment
ground
2.2.7.1 Creating a Static-Safe Work Area
An important aspect of guarding against ESD is creating a static-safe work area. To create a static-safe work area:

cover a work bench with a conductive surface that is grounded


cover the floor of the work area with a conductive material that is grounded
remove nonconducting materials from the work area as:

plastics

nylon

styrofoam

cellophane

ground yourself by touching a conductive surface before handling static-sensitive components


be careful with loose parts of clothing such as sleeves, ties, and scarfs, which can easily carry a charge
be careful not to touch the backplane connector or connector pins of the system
be careful not to touch other circuit components in a module when you configure or replace internal components in a module

2.2.7.2 Wearing a Wrist Strap


The most important aspect of guarding against ESD is wearing a wrist strap that connects you to a ground in a
static-safe work area. A wrist strap usually contains:

elastic wrist strap with fastener


molded ground lead with snap and banana plug
alligator clip - for connection with the ground lead and with earth ground
You should always wear and use a wrist strap in normal work activities around sensitive components:

put wrist strap on before beginning work

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make sure the wrist strap fits snugly


make sure the ground lead of the wrist strap is assembled properly and connected securely to ground each
time you use it
take off the wrist strap as the last task you perform before leaving the work area.

Figure 2-5: Wrist Strap

2.2.7.3 Handling Sensitive Components Correctly


Always store and carry components and modules in static-shielding containers that guard against the effect of
electric fields.
Remove components and modules from static-shielding packages only at a static-safe work area. Modules are
only protected when they are completely in a static-shielding bag. Using the bag to hold the module does protect
the module.
You should use correct handling procedures even with modules that are not being returned for repair. This protects
the good components for rework.

2.2.7.4 Controlling Static on Personnel and Moving Equipment


People are one of the prime generators of static electricity. The simple act of walking around or repairing a board
can generate several thousand volts on the human body. If not properly controlled, this static charge can easily discharge into a static sensitive device.

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Electronic Equipment and assemblies sensitive to ESD are identified by the symbol shown in Figure 2-6.

Figure 2-6: ESD Susceptibility Symbol

If the device under repair has the ESD symbol on it, then Wrist Straps must be used to control static charge on personnel. When properly worn and connected to ground, a wrist strap keeps the person wearing it near ground
potential. Because the person and other grounded objects in the work area are at or near the same potential, there
cannot be hazardous discharge between them. In addition, static charges are safely dissipated from the person to
ground and do not accumulate.
When handling ESD sensitive material use wrist straps, mats, chairs, garments, packaging, and other items that
provide ESD protection.

2.2.7.5 Grounding
Effective ESD grounds are of critical importance in any operation, and ESD grounding must be clearly defined and
regularly evaluated. A primary means of protecting ESD susceptible (ESDS) items is to provide a ground path to
bring ESD protective materials and personnel to the same electrical potential. All conductors in the environment,
including personnel, must be bonded or electrically connected and attached to a known ground or contrived
ground, creating an equal potential between all items and personnel.
Electrostatic protection can be maintained at a potential above a zero voltage ground reference as long as all items
in the system are at the same potential. It is important to note that non-conductors in an Electrostatic Protected
Area (EPA) cannot lose their electrostatic charge by attachment to ground.

2.2.8 Electrostatic Voltages at Work


2.2.8.1 Common Voltages
You need to build up only 3,500 volts to feel the effects of ESD, only 4,500 volts to hear them, and only 5,000 volts
to see a spark. The normal movements of someone around a work bench can generate 6,000 volts.

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The charge that builds up on someone who walks across a nylon carpet in dry air can reach 35,000 volts. Potentials as high as 56,000 volts have been measured when a roll of plain polyethylene is unwound. Potentials in more
common work situations range up to 18,000 volts.
A

Can Generate this Voltage

Person walking on carpet on a

humid day

2,000 volts

dry day

35,000 volts

Person walking on vinyl floor on a

humid day

400 volts

dry day

12,000 volts

Person in a padded chair

up to 18,000 volts

Styrofoam coffee cup

up to 5,000 volts

Plastic solder sipper

up to 8,000 volts at the tip

Vinyl covered notebook

up to 8,000 volts

Table 2-1: Electrostatic Voltages at Work

2.2.9 Sensitivity of Components to ESD


Many electronic components are sensitive to electrostatic voltages as low as 30 volts and current as low 0.001
amps,.
Device Type

Electrostatic Voltage
To Degrade

To Destroy

VMOS

30

1,800

MOSFET

100

200

GaAsFET

100

300

EPROM

100

300

JFET

140

7,000

OP AMP

190

2,500

COMOS

250

3,000

Schotty Diodes

300

2,500

Film Resistors
(thick,thin)

300

2,500

Bipolar Transistors

380

7,000

ECL (board level)

500

1,500

Table 2-2: Component Sensitivity to ESD

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Device Type

Electrostatic Voltage
To Degrade

To Destroy

SCR

680

1,000

Schotty TTL

1,000

2,500

Table 2-2: Component Sensitivity to ESD

2.2.10 Hidden Effects of Electrostatic Damage


ESD immediately destroys sensitive devices in only 10% of most ESD incidents. It degrades performance in the
remaining 90%. Only a quarter of the voltage required to destroy the component is needed to degrade its performance. A device that is merely degraded in performance may pass all normal diagnostic tests, However, it may fail
to intermittently as temperature, vibration, and load on the device vary. Ultimately, the device may fail prematurely:
days, weeks, or even months after the ESD incident that degraded it.

2.3 Schematic Diagram Guidelines


The information provided below is a guide for Technicians to use when troubleshooting with schematics to the
module/component level. These are the same guidelines used by the P&H Mining Equipment Engineers.

2.3.1 Wire Numbers


Wire numbers are normally five digits. The first two digits reflect the sheet number of the schematic diagram. The
next two digits reflect the line number from that schematic sheet. The last digit reflects the sequential number of the
wire, starting with the number 1, from left to right, in the line. For example, wire number 03241 refers to:
03

Sheet Number 3

24

Line Number 24

1st new wire from left

One of the exceptions is the ground wire. Since there can be many different types of ground in our system we differentiate them using wire numbers: 01GND, 02GND (UP TO 07GND).

2.3.2 Referencing
We can connect a wire, contact, relay or any other electrical component or signal from one sheet to another using
cross-references. This is done using the sheet number and line number within parenthesis. For example, (23-17)
means the mating signal, component, etc., can be found on sheet 23 at line 17. Underline of cross-references (2317), is only done when an electrical component is considered a normally closed device that will open when activated.

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2.3.3 Ground Identification


Numerous grounds are located throughout the Shovel. The information in Table 2-3 is a quick reference for ground
identification.
NUMBER

Symbol

NAME/DESCRIPTION

01GND

Ground to Lower Frame

02GND

Ground to Upper Frame

03GND

Connect to Ground in Auxiliary Cabinet

04GND

Ground to Upper Frame at Control Cabinet


Ground Bus Bar

05GND

Connect to Ground in Panel Board


** Only used in Australia **

06GND

Light Grounded in Console


** This ground is located in Operators Cab **

07GND

Connect to Ground in Control Cabinet

NONE

Grounded to High Voltage Cabinet Chassis


Table 2-3: Ground Identification

It is important to note the difference between a neutral and ground. A neutral is an electrical point which has a net
electrical charge of 0V. A ground is an electrical connection between equipment or component and earth.

NOTICE
Schematic diagrams should always be utilized and checked prior to ground check procedures.

2.3.4 Location Codes


Each component in the electrical schematic diagrams has a location code associated with it. The location code is
intended to aid in locating electrical components on the Electric Mining Shovel. For example: P01D2
The first letter in the location code identifies the cabinet or major assembly the component is located in. In the
example, P designates the Suppression Cabinet. Refer to Table 2-4 for a list of the Letter Designators.
Letter Designator

Location

Auxiliary Cabinet

Operators Cab

Control Cabinet

RPC Cabinet

High Voltage Cabinet

Table 2-4: Location Code Letter Designation

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Letter Designator

Location

Converter Cabinet

Suppression Cabinet

Transfer Cabinet

Boom Assembly

Lower Assembly

Upper Assembly

FW

Front Wall I/O Cabinet

HGC

Hoist Gearcase I/O Cabinet

Table 2-4: Location Code Letter Designation

Following the Letter Designator is a number which signifies the subassembly or panel within the cabinet or major
assembly that the component is located. In the example, 01 designates the 01 Panel in the Transfer Cabinet.
Following the subassembly or panel number is a letter/number combination which provide coordinates to assist in
locating the component. Refer to Figure 2-7. In the example, D2 coordinates are marked with an . This is a guide
only. Actual grid lines are not provided on the subassembly or panel.

bl
y

Su

ba

Pa or
ne
l

ss

em

G
H

ES1988_01

Figure 2-7: Location Code Subassembly or Panel Coordinates

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2.4 Six-Step Troubleshooting Procedure


You may have the job of maintaining or helping to maintain some electrical or electronic unit, subsystem, or system. Some of these jobs may be complex, but even a complex job can be broken down into simple steps. Basically,
any repair of electric or electronic equipment should be done in the following order:
Step 1:

Symptom recognition. This is the action of recognizing some disorder or malfunction in electronic equipment.

Step 2:

Symptom elaboration. Obtaining a more detailed description of the trouble symptom is the purpose of
this step.

Step 3:

Listing probable faulty functions. This step is applicable to equipment that contains more than one
functional area or unit. From the information you have gathered, where could the trouble logically be
located?

Step 4:

Localizing the faulty function. In this step you determine which of the functional units of the multiunit
equipment is actually at fault.

Step 5:

Localizing trouble to the circuit. You will do extensive testing in this step to isolate the trouble to a specific circuit.

Step 6:

Failure analysis. This step is multi-part. Here you determine which part is faulty, repair/replace the part,
determine what caused the failure, return the equipment to its proper operating status, and record the
necessary information in a record keeping book for other maintenance personnel in the future. While not
a part of this step, the technician should reorder any parts used in repair of the faulty equipment.

Sometimes you may run into difficulty in finding (or troubleshooting) the problem. Some hints that may help in your
efforts are:

Observe the equipment's operation for any and all faults


Check for any defective components with your eyes and nose
Analyze the cause of the failure for a possible underlying problem

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2.5 Required Test Equipment


Test Equipment must be checked prior to performing any testing or troubleshooting procedures. Test equipment
should be verified as calibrated for the tasks being performed. The following is a list of the types of test equipment
that may be used in testing or troubleshooting:
1. Digital Multimeter.
2. Oscilloscope.
3. Multi-Channel Chart Recorder.
4. Clamp-on Ammeter.
5. Megger.
6. Laptop PC.
Shop tests and start-up tests require additional equipment to aid in performing the necessary tests and to provide
the necessary test information:
1. Laptop PC with ABB communications hardware and software is required to communicate with the Drive Control Modules and AC800 Controller.
2. The Touch Panel and Control Module can be used to simplify control of the individual motions during testing.
3. A large resistor, 200 6000W. This is reconfigured to 12.5 and is required to limit the armature current during
the start-up of each converter.
4. For testing the Reactive Power Compensation, a capacitor unit is required as a test load.
5. A voltage divider should be used to aid in making high voltage measurements on the RPC.

2.5.1 Other Related Test Equipment


The following test equipment should be available for testing or troubleshooting:
1. Test Leads.
2. Probes.
3. Cannon connector pins.
4. Clips.
5. Cables.
6. Auxiliary push buttons.
7. Switches.
8. Screwdrivers.

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9. Combination Wrench Set.


10. Any other items that are pertinent to testing or troubleshooting.
Refer to Table 2-5 for recommended and alternate types and manufactures of test equipment and Hardware / Software requirements.
Instrument
Digital Multimeter

Clamp-on Ammeter

Recommend

Alternate

Fluke Model 23

Fluke Model 87

Part No. 89Z514D12

Part No. 1089Z275

Fluke Model i1010

Columbia Electric Type AX w/5


Current Ranges

(Range = 1 to 600A AC / 1000A


DC

Part No. R89Z367

Part No.89Z514D15
Megger

James D. Biddle, Catalog 21158

(Hand Crank) w/Case

Part No. 89Z496

Oscilloscope

Textronix Model THS 710

(Handheld, Dual Trace, Digital


Scope w/ 120V/60Hz Adapter)

Storage, Battery Powered, Soft


Case PART NO. 89Z515D15

(120V/50Hz AC Adapter) (240V


available)

Part No. 89Z515D30

(Hard Carrying Case)

Part No. 89Z515D17

Any previously recommended


Scope is acceptable.

Part No. 89Z515D26

(10 Probe 1Kv)


Isolation Transformer

115VAC P/115VAC S 50/60 Hz,


250VA
Part No. 75Z820D1

Chart Recorder

Hioki Model 8807

[Order each part separately]


Recorder [120/240V - 50/60Hz]

Part No. R10945D1

(Carrying Case - Soft)

Part No. R10945D2

(AC Adapter 90-250V, 50/60Hz)

Part No. R10945D3

(Battery Pack, Rechargeable)

Part No. R10945D4

(Recording Paper 10 rolls)

Part No. R10945D5

Startup Limiting Resister

200, 6000 Watt

Astro-Med, DASH 2 two channel w/


data capture. Astro-Med
DASH2MT, Part No: 89Z835D3
Chart Paper, P/N 89Z835D4 (Zfold)

Part No. 80Z984D1


RPC Capacitor Test Unit

Part No. 89Z508D1

Voltage Divider

Part No. R1192F1

Handheld Drive Programmer

ABB CDP-312, Part No.


R42375D27

SCR Thyristor Tester

Part No. 89z511d1

Part No. 89Z510D1

Table 2-5: Recommended Test Equipment List

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NOTE: P/N is the abbreviation for PART NUMBER.


PLC Communications
(Hardware And Software)
Laptop PC

Customer Use
(Order Through Parts)
N/A

P&H Use
(Order Through Service)
Part No.

1.4GB Hard (Min.), 120 MHz (Min.), Pentium, Windows 2000, 16MB RAM, Floppy,
10X CD-ROM, Audio, PCMCIA, Modem, Carry
Case
Drive Communications Software
Drive Windows 2.1 (includes specialized
interface card)

Part No. R40775D3

Part No. R40775D3

Control Builder M

Part No.

Part No.

Table 2-6: Hardware and Software List

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Electrical Theory of Operation

Section 3

Electrical Theory of Operation


3.1 Centurion System
The Centurion Electrical Control System is the process of controlling and converting AC power into DC power to
drive the Hoist, Crowd, Propel and Swing motion motors. The basic system block diagram is shown in Figure 3-1.

Armature
Converter

Field
Converter

Motor

IFFB

IAFB
Feedback
Board

Firing Pulses

Firing Pulses

VAFB
VFFB

Armature
Drive
Control
Module
(DCM)

Remote I/O
System

Reference
Fiber Optic Cable
Digital Control Signals

Profibus Cable

Fiber Optic Cable


Digital Control Signals

Field
Drive
Control
Module
(DCM)

Profibus Cable

AC800

Operator's
Controllers

Remote I/O
System

Fiber Optic Cable


Digital Control Signals

Ethernet
Switch

Triprite

Touch
Panel

ES04005a01

Figure 3-1: Centurion Control System Block Diagram

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The Centurion System design centers around the type of DC motors used in all motions of the P&H Electric Mining
Shovel. All motion motors have separate armature and separate field windings receiving variable power from independently controlled converters allowing for ideal motion control.
The armature converters for the motions are a set of two 6-pulse converters arranged in a back-to-back configuration which controls voltage and current for motoring and regeneration in both forward and reverse directions. The
unique design of the Hoist motion provides the energy required for the digging (lifting) motion of the electric mining
shovel. This vertical motion of the dipper via a rotating drum and rope assembly is achieved by connecting the two
DC motors in series with two armature converters and applying a 12-pulse sequential control logic. Therefore, the
Hoist motion system uses two sets of 6-pulse converters.
The SCRs in the converters are the control point of the Centurion Control system. The variable DC output of the
converter depends on the gating signal which is controlled by the operator and Drive Control Module (DCM) limits.
Proportional current and voltage feedback (Iab) and (Vab) are sampled by the Drive Control Modules which produce the proper gating signals for the SCRs.
The individual field converters for each motion are single 6-pulse converters controlling the DC to the field winding
of all motion motors. The output of the crowd converter is virtually a fixed value. The output of the hoist and swing
field converters changes during normal operation. The hoist and swing field current decreases, or weakens, allowing the dipper to move faster for a faster dig cycle, or the upper to swing faster, again, allowing the operator to dig
faster. The hoist field current increases during the hoisting portion of the dig cycle producing an increase of available motor torque and bail pull. The swing field current increases when swinging with a full dipper providing the
operator better control of the motion. The output of the propel field converter can increase under specific propelling
conditions. This controlled field strengthening allows the shovel to walk out of higher angled pit ramps.
The motors used in hoist, crowd, and propel motions are speed controlled. These motors develop torque required
within preset current limit to attain and maintain the speed called for by the operator. For example: The Operator
requests full speed movement through the controllers in the Operators cab, the control system develops the
required torque within the limits to maintain this requested speed. As the Operator returns the controller to neutral,
the control system develops the required torque to attain and maintain zero speed.
The motors used in the swing motion are torque controlled. The operator controls the accelerating time by calling
for the amount of accelerating torque or current applied to the motors up to maximum speed. For example: The
Operator requests full torque and the shovel accelerates rapidly to the right or left to maximum speed. As the Operator returns controller to the neutral position, shovel continues to move in original requested direction until inertia
overcomes the weight of the revolving frame, stopping the shovel.

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3.1.1 Hoist System


The electrical system for the hoist motion contains the following major electrical components:

Two Armature Converters


One Field Converter
Two Diverter Circuits
Two DC Motors
Each armature converter receives 3 600VAC from the secondary of the Main Transformer via the overhead bus
bars. Two Drive Control Modules (DCMs) (Hoist/Propel #1 and Hoist #2) produce the gate firing signals for the
controlled conversion of AC to variable DC from both hoist armature converters. The two armature converters and
two DC motors connect electrically in series across the two converters. The resulting armature current produces a
magnetic field around each armature that reacts with the magnetic field across the field winding producing armature rotation. Refer to Figure 3-2 for a one-line diagram of the Hoist electrical system.

Hoist Armature
Converter #1

Hoist #1
Diverter
Circuits

Current Feedback
Iab

HAC
Hoist
Contactor

Hoist Armature
Converter #2

Front Hoist
Motor Armature

Hoist #2
Diverter
Circuits

Rear Hoist
Motor Armature

H1

H2

Front Hoist
Motor Field

Rear Hoist
Motor Field

Field
Converter

Current Feedback
Ifb

Circuit
Breaker
3
600VAC

Main
Transformer

3
600VAC
Auxillary
Transformer

3
High
Voltage

ES2126_01
Figure 3-2: Hoist Electrical - One Line Diagram

The armature shafts of the two DC motors couple to the ends of the hoist transmission first reduction pinion shafts,
which in turn drive the hoist transmission. These provide hoist motion via the hoist drum and hoist cable system.
A resolver sensor mounts on the rear intermediate shaft assembly of the hoist transmission. This acts as a limit
switch control and can be accessed through the touch screen in the operators cab, can be programmed to limit the
range of hoist motion in conjunction with the crowd creating a protective motion envelope.

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3.1.2 Crowd System


The electrical system for the crowd motion contains the following major electrical components:

One Armature Converter


One Field Converter
One Diverter Circuit
One DC Motor
The Crowd armature converter receives 3 600VAC from the secondary of the Main Transformer via the overhead
bus bars. A single DCM (Crowd/Propel #2) produces the required gate firing signals for the controlled conversion
of AC to variable DC from the armature converter. The resulting armature current produces a magnetic field around
the armature that reacts with the magnetic field across the field winding producing armature rotation. Refer to Figure 3-3 for a one-line diagram of the Crowd electrical system.

Crowd
Diverter Circuit
Crowd Armature
Converter

CAC
Crowd
Armature
Contactor

Crowd Motor
Armature
C

Current Feedback
Iab

Crowd
Motor Field
CFC
Crowd Field
Contactor
Field
Converter
Current Feedback
Ifb
Circuit
Breaker

3
600VAC

3
VAC

Main
Transformer

Auxillary
Transformer

3
High
Voltage

ES2127_01
Figure 3-3: Crowd Electrical - One Line Diagram

A DC motor drives the crowd system. It is mounted on the boom with the crowd machinery. The crowd machinery
is securely housed in the crowd gear case, which is an integral part of the boom. A power band belt drive system
couples the crowd motor to the crowd transmission. This belt drive system affords shock protection while the crowd
machinery provides the machine with crowd motion.
A resolver type sensor is mounted on the crowd transmission intermediate shaft on the right hand side of the crowd
gearcase. This acts as a limit switch control and can be accessed through the touch screen in the operators cab,

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can be programmed to limit the range of crowd motion in conjunction with the hoist creating a protective motion
envelope.

3.1.3 Swing System


The Swing System on the electric mining shovel contains the following major electrical components:

One Armature Converter


One Field Converter
One Diverter Circuit
Two DC Motors
The Swing armature converter receives 3 600VAC from the secondary of the Main Transformer via the overhead
bus bars. A single DCM produces the required gate firing signals for the controlled conversion of AC to variable DC
from the armature converter. The Swing armature converter and the Swing 1 & 2 motors are connected electrically
in series. The resulting armature current produces a magnetic field around the armature that reacts with the magnetic field across the field winding producing armature rotation. Refer to Figure 3-4 for a one-line diagram of this
swing electrical system.
Swing
Armature
Converter

Swing
Diverter
Circuit

Current Feedback
Iab

Swing #2
Motor
Armature

Swing #1
Motor
Armature

S2

S1

Swing #2
Motor Fields

Swing #1
Motor Fields
Field Converter
Current Feedback
Ifb

Circuit Breaker
3
600VAC

3
VAC

Main
Transformer

Auxillary
Transformer

3
High
Voltage

ES02804a01
Figure 3-4: Swing Electrical - One Line Diagram

The swing system uses two swing transmissions, one located in the front of the revolving frame and one at the rear
of the revolving frame. The vertically mounted DC swing motors drive each transmission providing the mining
shovel with swing motion.

3.1.4 Propel System

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The electrical system for the propel motion contains the following major electrical components:

Two Armature Converters


One Field Converter
Two Diverter Circuits
Two DC Motors
The Propel Motion uses the Hoist #1 armature converter as the source of the electrical energy for the Propel #1
motor and the Crowd armature converter as the source of the electrical energy for the Propel #2 motor. The Propel
#1 armature converter and the Propel #2 armature converter receive 3 600VAC from the secondary of the Main
Transformer via the overhead bus bars. The two Drive Control Modules (DCMs) produce the required gate firing
signals for the controlled conversion of AC to variable DC from the armature converters. The electrical energy from
the Hoist #1 armature converter and Crowd armature converter is redirected in the Transfer Cabinet through contactors to the Propel #1and Propel #2 motors. The resulting armature current produces a magnetic field around the
armature that reacts with the magnetic field across the field winding producing armature rotation. Refer to Figure 35 for a one-line diagram of the Propel electrical system:

Hoist Armature
Converter #1

Hoist #1
Diverter
Circuits

HAC
Hoist
Contactor

Front Hoist
Motor Armature

Hoist Armature
Converter #2

Hoist #2
Diverter
Circuits

Rear Hoist
Motor Armature
H2

H1

Current
Feedback
Iab

Front Hoist
Motor Field

CAC
Crowd
Contactor

Crowd
Motor Armature
C

P1AC
Propel
Contactor

Crowd/Propel #2
Current
Feedback Armature Converter
Iab

Propel #1
Motor Armature

P2AC
Propel
Contactor

Rear Hoist
Motor Field

Crowd
Motor Field

Propel #2
Motor Armature

P1

P2

Propel #1
Motor Field

Propel #2
Motor Field
PFC
Propel Field
Contactor

CFC
Crowd Field
Contactor

Crowd/Propel
Field
Converter
Current Feedback
Ifb
3
600VAC

Main
Transformer

Circuit
Breaker
3
VAC

3
600VAC
Auxillary
Transformer

3
High
Voltage

ES2129_01

Figure 3-5: Propel Electrical - One Line Diagram

To achieve forward and reverse propel motions and smooth differential steering, the propel system uses two independent drive trains. Each drive train consists of a DC propel motor, a planetary propel transmission, a propel
brake assembly, a tumbler drive shaft, and a crawler side frame and crawler belt assembly.

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Section 4

User Interface
4.1 Operator Cab Touch Panel

NOTICE
In the past, Touch panels have been referred to as GUIs, MMIs, HMIs, etc. In this manual, and
all future P&H Mining Equipment manuals, they will be referred to as Touch Panels.
The operator touch panel is used for a variety of machine control and monitoring applications on the P&H Electric
Mining Shovel.
The standard number of Touch Panels on a P&H Electric Mining Shovel is two and they are normally found in the
following locations:

Operators Cab
Control Room
You can use this section to learn about the Touch Panel, and by using it as a reference when you need more information about certain features of the Touch Panel. This section of the manual takes you through installation and
operation of the Touch Panel.
This Touch Panel model is compact, rugged, and ready for installation in mobile environments. It can also be configured to the requirements of the user. Refer to Figure 4-1.

Figure 4-1: Back Side of Touch Panel

The different card slots and connectors allow you to extend the capabilities of the Touch Panel by adding different
accessories, such as hard disks, radio cards, modems, LAN cards, etc.

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4.1.1 Touch Panel Specifications


Table 4-1 and Table 4-2, display the specifications and options associated with the Touch Panels utilized on the
Electric Mining Shovel.
BASE SYSTEM
PROCESSOR

Intel Pentium M 1.4 Ghz

RAM MEMORY

1024 MB

CACHE

1MB L2 (Pentium M)

DISPLAY

Color Active Matrix TFT256K colors-screen, 15.1" XGA (1024x768 pixels, 120 degree viewing angle, dimmable analog control, 400 NIT)

GRAPHIC CONTROLLER

ATI RAGE Mobility VGA Controller

BOOT DEVICE

PC-Card, Compact Flash, 2.5" IDE HD, USB Floppy

PC-CARD SLOT

2 (PCMIA 2.0)

PORTS

2 Serial ports RS 232C (COM 1-2, up to 115 Kbit/s)


2 USB ports
10/100 BaseT Ethernet (RJ45)
1 Sound Port 9pin D-sub (Audio In, Out, and MIC in)
1 Mouse/Keyboard port 9pin D-sub (PS/2)

POWER SUPPLY

DC voltage 9V to 36V

DIMENSIONS

14" (w) x 11" (h) x 2.50" (d)

MOUNTING HOLES

Size: 6m, 265mm (w), 135mm (h), 12mm (t)

WEIGHT

11.7 lbs

ENVIRONMENT

Operating Temperature: -20C to 50C


Storage Temperature: -30C to 70C
Humidity: 10 - 95% RH, non-condensing

VIBRATION

5-500Hz/4.5g RMS
3 hours XYZ (non rotating disk)
Table 4-1: Touch Panel Specifications

OPTIONS
INTERNAL MEMORY

64 MB Expandable to 256 MB

PROCESSOR

800MHz - 1.4 GHz

BOOT DEVICE

Hard Disk 2.5"


Flash Disk
Compact Flash Disk
USB Floppy
Table 4-2: Touch Panel Options

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OPTIONS
TOUCH SCREEN

15" touch screen (PS2)

CDROM

USB CDROM

FLOPPY

USB Floppy

PARALLEL

USB Parallel port adaptor cable


Table 4-2: Touch Panel Options

4.1.2 Controls and Components


1. The card slots (PCMCIA) hold additional PC Cards such as radio cards, hard drives, LAN cards, etc.
2. Keyboard Connector - Used to connect a PS/2 Keyboard or Mouse.
3. The Com 1 and Com 2 ports are used for peripherals with serial (RS 232) interface, such as a scanner or
printer.
4. The USB ports are used to connect many different types of external devices.
5. Power Connector - Used to connect the DC power cable to Touch Panel.
6. 10/100 Ethernet Port.
7. SB16 Compatible Sound Port.
8. Mounting holes - Used to mount the Touch Panel.
9. Power Switch - used for turning touch panel ON and OFF.
10. Dimmer Buttons - Used to brighten or dim the display.
11. IDE PC-card

4.1.3 Touch Panel Setup Description


This section is based on the assumption that your new system has been pre-installed with an operation system. In
general, the sequence of events are:

Connect the different accessories to the Touch Panel; i.e., keyboard, scanner, etc.
Connect the power cable to the power source 10-36VDC, and to the power connector.
Turn on your Touch Panel by pressing the power button.
4.1.3.1 Connecting Accessories
Connection ports are provided to the end-user for the following items:

Unit Power

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USB Components
Audio Devices
Communication Devices
IDE PC-card Slot
PCMCIA Card Slot
4.1.3.2 Keyboard

CAUTION
Improper or prolong keyboard use may result in injury.
If a keyboard is part of your Touch Panel Unit, it will have a 9-pin D-Sub instead of the standard PS/2 connector.

4.1.3.3 Printer
Any serial (RS 232/9-pin) or USB printer can be connected to the Touch Panel.

NOTICE
It is recommended that before installing or connecting accessory components that the end-user
contact the local MinePro Office for component selection criteria and guidance.
4.1.3.4 Scanner
A serial bar-code scanner needs a +5 V on pin 9. The user must set the COM port voltage to +5V.

4.1.3.5 Touch Screen


Touch screen is factory mounted and uses a PS/2 port.

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4.1.3.6 Sound
Sound capability is available with this model of Touch Panel. Connection requirements include a Y cable that is
connected to SB compatible sound port. Speakers are then able to be connected to the correct ports on the end of
the multimedia Y cable.

4.1.3.7 Mouse
The Touch Panel can be operated through different types of mouse devices:

Serial

The serial mouse is connected to the COM 1 or the COM 2 ports.

PS/2

The PS/2 mouse is connected through the keyboard connector.

NOTICE
This type of mouse requires a modified keyboard cable.
USB

The USB mouse is connected via the USB interface. Drivers are not needed when using USB Legacy
support in BIOS.

4.1.3.8 Hard Disk


Four different types of hard disks can be installed in the Touch Panel, these are:

IDE 2.5
Compact Flash
PCMCIA Rotating
PCMCIA ATA Flash
4.1.3.9 Ethernet
Connect your desired Cat 5 Cable with a RJ45 connector to the 10/100 Ethernet port.

4.1.3.10 Communication Card


A communication card can be installed for system backup, upgrade, installation of software drivers, or for interfacing with another computer. The communication card is installed in the card slot to the left (as viewed from the
front).

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4.1.4 Installing Software


The touch panels associated with your electric mining shovel come with the software pre-installed and checked by
P&H Milwaukee personnel. Any problems encountered with your touch panel should be directed to your local
MinePro Services representative.

4.1.5 Connecting the Power Cable


The power cable for the Touch Panel shall be connected to the power source with the red wire going to the positive
terminal, the black wire going to the negative terminal.
Inserting the power connector to the unit (make sure the black arrow on the connector is facing out).

4.2 Touch Panel Operation


After the Touch Panel has been connected to a mounting bracket and all accessories have been connected, the
system is ready for use.

4.2.1 Powering On
Step 1:

Attach the power cable connector to the power input on the rear side of the Touch Panel.

Step 2:

Turn ON the power switch.

NOTICE
During certain conditions, the power drain from a vehicles power source may cause the voltage
level to drop below 10V. A custom charge guard or available external UPS unit may be necessary.
Step 3:

When the start-up sequence is complete, the system is ready for use.

Step 4:

You may now run your desired applications.

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4.2.2 Display
Resolution
The normal resolution for the Touch Panel is:

15.1 1024 x 768 XGA


Brightness
The display brightness is adjustable by means of two buttons on the right side of the system. As viewed from the
front: Brightness can be controlled by repetitively pressing the up or down button.

4.2.3 Powering Off


Step 1:

Close all applications.

Step 2:

Choose Shut down from the Start Menu. (Windows Only).

Step 3:

Hold in the power button until the unit turns off. (Non-Windows).

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4.3 Touch Panel Screen Operation


The screens on the P&H Electric Mining Shovel have been redesign to eliminate large amounts of text. New symbols were create and some may unfamiliar. This section will cover the main operator screens and navigation tools.

4.3.1 Main Screen Types


The screens utilized on the Electric Mining Shovel are broken down into the following sections, each type has a
main starting screen:

Operation Screens
Diagnostics Screens
Setup Screens
Activity Screens
Help Screens
.

Figure 4-2: Operations - Main Screen

This sub-section will describe the controls and indications that appear or can appear on each type of screen. Each
screen can be broken down into the following sections:

Header Bar
Control Bar

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Main Panel
Navigation Bar
Status Bar
4.3.1.1 Header Bar

Figure 4-3: Screen Header Bar (Typical)

The Header Bar in Figure 4-3, displays the following information:

P&H Logo
Shovel serial number
Model of shovel
Date and time
Temperature: Temperature is display in both Celsius and Fahrenheit

NOTICE
The model type and serial number shown in this manual are provided as an example. Your
model type and serial number may be different.

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4.3.1.2 Control Bar Controls and Indications

Figure 4-4: Screen Control Bar

The Control Bar, refer to Figure 4-4, will always be displayed on the left hand side of every screen.

These button/indicators allow the Operator to navigate through the various touch panel screens for operation, diagnostics, activity, help, setup and language (English or Spanish). Refer to Table 4-3.

Screen Control

Description
Operations Mode - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to select an Operations
screen on the touch panel and informs the operator that the touch
panel is in the Operations Mode.
Operations Mode - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screens on the
touch panel are not active in the Operations Mode.

Table 4-3: Operations - Main Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Diagnostics Mode - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to select a Diagnostics
screen on the touch panel and informs the operator that the touch
panel is in the Diagnostics Mode.
Diagnostics Mode - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screens on the
touch panel are not active in the Diagnostics Mode.
Setup Mode - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to select a Setup screen
on the touch panel and informs the operator that the touch panel is in
the Setup Mode.
Setup Mode - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screens on the
touch panel are not active in the Setup Mode.
Activity Mode - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to select an Activity
screen on the touch panel and informs the operator that the touch
panel is in the Activity Mode.
Activity Mode - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screens on the
touch panel are not active in the Activity Mode.
Help Mode - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to select a Help screen
on the touch panel and informs the operator that the touch panel is in
the Help Mode.
Help Mode - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screens on the
touch panel are not active in the Help Mode.
English-Espanol Button (English Active)
This push button/indicator informs the operator that English will be the
language displayed on the various screens.

When the indication has a yellow background this shows the language selected.
Table 4-3: Operations - Main Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
English-Espanol Button (Espanol Active)
This push button/indicator informs the operator that Espanol will be the
language displayed on the various screens.

When the indication has a yellow background this shows the language selected.
Table 4-3: Operations - Main Screen - Controls and Indications

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4.3.1.3 Main Panel Display


Depending upon which screen type you selected on the Control Bar (Subtopic 4.3.1.2), the Main Panel Display can
display the following types of screens:

Shovel Status

Figure 4-5: Shovel Status

This screen informs the operator that the blowers are running (blue vent), ladder is down (red ladder),
crowd and hoist warning (yellow dipper and dipper handles), and the boom limits are exceeded in Stage
2 (red ropes with lines at the boom point and around the ropes).

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Shovel Inclination

Figure 4-6: Shovel Inclination Screen

Shovel Operation Values

Figure 4-7: Shovel Operation Values

This screen informs the operator about the following values associated with motion;

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Operator reference

Armature current

Armature voltage

Field current

User Interface

It also informs the operator about line voltage, KVAR level, and RPC step values.

Shovel Permissives

Figure 4-8: Shovel Permissives (Example)

Shovel Permissive screens consist of:

Start Permissive (Refer to Figure 4-8)

Brakes Permissive

Drives Permissive

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Shovel Lube Status

Figure 4-9: Shovel Lube Status

This screen informs the operator of the maximum and minimum setpoints, the current setpoint, and the
time remaining to the next cycle.

Shovel Motor Temperatures

Figure 4-10: Motor Temperature Screen

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This screen informs the operator of the temperature status of the following motors;

Front Hoist Motor

Rear Hoist Motor

Left Propel Motor

Right Propel Motor

Crowd Motor

Front Swing Motor

Rear Swing Motor

The yellow flag indicates the warning limit setpoint and the red flag indicates the fault limit setpoint.

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4.3.1.4 Navigation Bar


Depending on which Control Bar push button/indicator you have selected will determine what navigation push button/indicators are displayed on the screen. Table 4-4 provides a description of all possible navigation push button/
indicators.

Controls and Indications


The normal background color of a Navigation control and indicator is white. It will only turn amber if the operator
selects the push button. Once selected the associated screen will open.

Screen Control

Description

Operation Screen Navigation Controls


Inclination - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Inclination information.
Inclination - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Inclination.
Operator Values - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Operator Values.
Operator Values - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Operator Values.
Permissive - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Permissives information.
Permissive - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Permissives information.
Lube - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Lube system information.
Lube - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Lube system information.
Table 4-4: Navigation Bar - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Temperature - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Temperature information.
Temperature - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Temperature information.
Production - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Production information.
Production - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Production information.
Operator Feedback - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Operator Feedback.
Operator Feedback - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Operator Feedback.

More - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to navigate
through the Operation navigation control groups.
Diagnostics Screen Navigation Controls
Brake System - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Brake System diagnostics.
Brake System - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Brake System diagnostics.
Drive Information - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Drive Information diagnostics.
Table 4-4: Navigation Bar - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Drive Information - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Drive Information diagnostics.
I/O Status - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for I/O Status diagnostics.
I/O Status - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for I/O Status diagnostics.
Lube System - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Lube System diagnostics.
Lube System - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Lube System diagnostics.
Motors - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Motor diagnostics.
Motors - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Motor diagnostics.
Permissives - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Permissives diagnostics.
Permissives - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Permissives diagnostics.
Temperature - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Temperature diagnostics.
Temperature - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Temperature diagnostics.
Table 4-4: Navigation Bar - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
More - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to navigate
through the Diagnostic control screens.

Setup Screen Navigation Controls


Login - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to gain access to
the Login screen. The Login setup screen allows for the user to
change the level of security for the user interface.
Login - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for the Login screen.
Extended Cooling - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for setting up the blowers for extended cooling.
Extended Cooling - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for setting up the blowers for extended cooling.
Boom Limits - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for boom limit setup.
Boom Limits - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for boom limit setup.
ABSS - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for setting up the Automatic Boom Soft Set
down (ABSS).
ABSS - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for ABSS setup.
Lube Time - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for setting up the lube cycle timers.
Table 4-4: Navigation Bar - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Lube Time - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Lube Cycle setup.
Remote Hoist - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Remote Hoist operation and setup.
Remote Hoist - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Remote Hoist operation and setup.
Auto Cal - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for controller calibration.

Auto Cal - Not Active


This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for controller calibration.

OptiDig - Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for OptiDig setup.
OptiDig - Not Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for OptiDig setup.
Motivator - Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Motivator Mode setup.
Motivator - Not Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Motivator Mode setup.
Door Interlock - Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Door Interlocks setup.
Door Interlock - Not Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Door Interlocks setup.
Table 4-4: Navigation Bar - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Production Monitoring - Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Shovel Production Monitoring Setup.
Production Monitoring - Not Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Shovel Production Monitoring Setup.
Oil Grade - Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Gearcase Oil Selection setup.
Oil Grade - Not Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Gearcase Oil Selection setup.
RPC - Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Shovel RPC setup.
RPC - Not Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Shovel RPC setup.
Boom Counts - Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Limits/Boomjack Counts setup.
Boom Counts - Not Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Limits/Boomjack Counts setup.
Propel Field - Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for the Propel Field setup.
Propel Field - Not Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for the Propel Field setup.
AirScrubPro - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for the AirScrubPro system.
Table 4-4: Navigation Bar - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
AirScrubPro - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for the AirScrubPro system.
TripRite - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for the TripRite system.
TripRite - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for the TripRite system.
More - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to navigate
through the Setup navigation control groups.
Table 4-4: Navigation Bar - Controls and Indications

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4.3.1.5 Status Bar


The status bar informs the operator of faults and touch panel access security levels.

Control and Indications


This status indication informs the user which type of access the user of the Touch Panel has been given. Refer to
Figure 4-11.

Figure 4-11: Operator Status Indication (Example)

Table 4-5 provides a description of all possible push button/indicators and displays.
Screen Control

Description
Status Bar Indication - Operator
This informs the operator that they only have an Operator security level access.
Status Bar Indication - Maintenance
This informs the operator that someone has the shovel in a
Maintenance security level and that technicians are using associated screens to perform maintenance.
Status Bar Indication - MinePro
This informs the operator that a MinePro representative has the
shovel in a MinePro security level and that technicians are using
associated screens to perform maintenance and/or troubleshooting.
Status Bar Indication - Engineer
This informs the operator that P&H Mining has the shovel in a
Engineer security level and that P&H Mining Equipment personnel are using associated screens to perform maintenance, testing, and/or troubleshooting.
Key - Active
This indication informs the operator that a key is in the PLS/
Lube slot and the shovel is in a Run or Program state.
Key - Not Active
This indication informs the operator that a key is not in the PLS/
Lube slot.
Table 4-5: Status Bar - Controls and Indications

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4.3.2 Main Screen Types


4.3.2.1 Operations - Main Screen (Refer to Figure 4-12)

Figure 4-12: Operations - Main Screen

The Operations Main screen is the screen that the Operator will normally have display during shovel digging operations.

Controls and Indications


For information on the Control and Navigation bars, refer to Subtopic 4.3.1.2. and Subtopic 4.3.1.4.
The controls and indications associated with the Operations Main screen are described in Table 4-6.
Screen Control

Description
Pressure Indication
This display informs the operator of the amount of system air
pressure.

Scale: 0-200
Units: Pounds per square inch
Table 4-6: Operations Main Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
!

WARNING

Unexpected movement of shovel components may result in severe injury and/or


death, or damage to the shove. Be prepared
for movement of major shovel components
controlled by the various brakes which may
occur when brakes are released. Ensure
that all personnel are clear of major
motions affected by the associated brake
system.
Swing Brake Set Indication
This indication is displayed when the Swing Brakes are set.

Activation of the Swing Brake switch to the On position


(Left Switch Panel) will cause the red indication on the
upper portion of the switch to illuminate along with the
Swing Brake Set indication on the Operators Touch
Panel.
Swing Brake Release Indication
This indication is displayed when the Swing Brakes are not set.

Activation of the Swing Brake switch to the Off position


(Left Switch Panel) will cause the the red indication on
the upper portion of the switch to extinguish and change
the indicator on the touch panel from amber to white.
Hoist Brake Set Indication
This indication is displayed when the Hoist Brakes are set.

Activation of the Hoist Brake switch to the On position


(Left Joystick Controller) will cause the red indication on
illuminate along with the Hoist Brake Set indication on
the Operators Touch Panel.
Hoist Brake Release Indication
This indication is displayed when the Hoist Brakes are release.

Activation of the Hoist Brake switch to the Off position


(Left Joystick Controller) will cause the the red indication
on the upper portion of the switch to extinguish and
change the indicator on the touch panel from amber to
white.
Table 4-6: Operations Main Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Crowd Brake Set Indication
This indication is displayed when the Crowd Brakes are set.

Activation of the Crowd Brake switch to the On position


(Left Joystick Controller) will cause the red indication on
illuminate along with the Crowd Brake Set indication on
the Operators Touch Panel.
Crowd Brake Release Indication
This indication is displayed when the Hoist Brakes are release.

Activation of the Crowd Brake switch to the Off position


(Left Joystick Controller) will cause the the red indication
on the upper portion of the switch to extinguish and
change the indicator on the touch panel from amber to
white.
!

WARNING

Set the Hoist and Crowd brakes before


pushing the Propel Mode push button. Failure to do so may allow unexpected machine
movement, which may result in injury,
death, or equipment damage.
Propel Brake Set Indication
This indication is displayed when the Propel Brakes are set.

Activation of the Dig Mode push button places the shovel


in the Dig Mode and will initiate the electrical sequence
which places the shovel in the dig condition, including
setting the propel brakes.

Activation will cause the blue Propel indicator on the


Right Joystick Controller to extinguish and cause the
indication on the Touch panel to be amber.
Propel Brake Release Indication
This indication is displayed when the Propel Brakes are
released.

Activation of the Propel Mode push button initiates the


electrical sequence which places the shovel in the propel
conditions, including releasing the brakes.

When the shovel Propel brakes are released, the blue


indicator on the Right Joystick Controller will be illuminated and cause the indicator on the Touch Panel to turn
from amber to white.
Table 4-6: Operations Main Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Shovel Level
This indication informs the operator of shovel position in relation to level.

The bulls-eye in the figure informs the operator that the


shovel is back and right of center.
Dig Mode - Active
This indication informs the operator that the Shovel is in the Dig
Mode.

The Dig Mode indicator (yellow) on the Right Hand Joystick is illuminated.
Propel Mode - Active
This indication informs the operator that the Shovel is in the
Propel Mode.

The Propel Mode indicator (blue) on the Right Hand Joystick is illuminated.
Upper Lube - Active
This indication informs the operator that the Upper Lube system
is in operation (automatically or manually).
Upper Lube - Not Active
This indication informs the operator that the Upper Lube system
is not in operation (automatically or manually).
Upper Lube Fault
This indication alerts the operator that there is a fault associated with the Upper Lube system.
Lower Lube Active
This indication informs the operator that the Lower Lube system
is in operation (automatically or manually).
Lower Lube Not Active
This indication informs the operator that the Lower Lube system
is not in operation (automatically or manually).
Lower Lube Fault
This indication alerts the operator that there is a fault associated with the Lower Lube system.
Table 4-6: Operations Main Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Open Gear Active
This indication informs the operator that the Open Gear system
is in operation (automatically or manually).
Open Gear Not Active
This indication informs the operator that the Open Gear system
is not in operation (automatically or manually).
Open Gear Fault
This indication alerts the operator that there is a fault associated with the Open Gear system.
Propel Lube Active
This indication informs the operator that the Propel Lube system is in operation (automatically or manually).
Propel Lube Not Active
This indication informs the operator that the Propel Lube system is not in operation (automatically or manually).
Propel Lube Fault
This indication alerts the operator that there is a fault associated with the Open Gear system.
Shovel Display Panel
Shovel display is shown in the middle of the screen. The graphic
shown is for normal operation.

Table 4-6: Operations Main Screen - Controls and Indications

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4.3.2.2 Diagnostics - Main Screen

Figure 4-13: Diagnostics - Main Screen

When the operator selects the Diagnostics button/indicator, the screen in Figure 4-13 will be displayed. This screen
informs the operator if the following items:

Meter Selector Switch position


Test Selector Switch position
Operation Location Switch position - Remote Hoist
Lube/PLS Switch position
Test Screen position
Field Current
Armature Current
Armature Voltage
Hoist Hours
Swing Hours

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Crowd Hours
Propel Hours
Total Hours
Controls and Indications
The controls and indications associated with the Diagnostics Main screen are described in Table.
Screen Control

Description
Meter Selector Switch Indication
This indication informs the operator which position the five position Meter Selector switch is in.

Off
Hoist
Crowd/Propel
Swing
RPC
The Meter Selector Switch selects the motion to be displayed on
the analog meters. The RPC Step Indication Level can also be
displayed on the Armature Voltage Meter when selected with
this switch.
The Meter Selector switch is located on the Control Cabinet in
the Machinery House Right Hand room.
!

CAUTION

Do not change the Test Selector Switch


position while the shovel is running. Damage to the shovel electronics may occur.
Shut the shovel down before changing
modes of operation.
Table 4-7: Diagnostics Main Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

User Interface

Description
Test Selector Switch Indication
This indication informs the operator which position the five position Test Selector switch is in.

Run - This is the normal position for operation of the


shovel.

Armature Test - This position is used to perform motor


armature testing. Only armature current is applied to the
motors during this test.

Field Test - This position is used to perform motor field


testing. Only field current is applied to the motors during
this test.

Control Test - This position is used in testing the control


system of the shovel. No current is applied to the
motors, only control voltages are present in the control
system during this test.

Auxiliary Test - This position is used to test all shovel


auxiliary motors and systems.
The Test Selector switch is located on the Control Cabinet in the
Machinery House Right Hand room.
Operation Location Switch Indication
This indication informs the operator of the position of the Operation Location switch. Normal position is Operators Coop and
Local is using only selected for Remote Hoist operation.
The Operation Location switch is located on the Control Cabinet
in the Machinery House Right Hand room.

Lube/PLS Switch Indication


This indication informs the operator of the position of the Lube/
PLS switch is either in Run or Program.
The Lube/PLS keyswitch is used to access programming screens
on the Touch Panel for the Lube System Timing and Programmable Limit Switches.
The Lube/PLS switch is located on the Control Cabinet in the
Machinery House Right Hand room.
Table 4-7: Diagnostics Main Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Test Screen Switch Indication
This indication informs the operator of the position of the Test
Screen Switch.
The Test Screen keyswitch is used to access the Commissioning
data in the AC800 utilized by MinePro Services and P&H Mining
Equipment personnel during shovel commissioning and testing.
The Test Screen switch is located on the Control Cabinet in the
Machinery House Right Hand room.
Field Current (A) Meter Indication
This indication informs the operator of the field current of the
motion selected at the Meter Selector switch.
Armature Current (A) Meter Indication
This indication informs the operator of the armature current of
the motion selected at the Meter Selector switch.
Armature Voltage (V) Meter Indication
This indication informs the operator of armature voltage of the
motion selected at the Meter Selector switch.
Hoist Hours Indication
This indication informs the operator of the number of hours that
the hoist motion has been operating, or the number of hours
that the hoist brakes have been released.
Swing Hours Indication
This indication informs the operator of the number of hours that
the swing motion has been operating, or the number of hours
that the swing brakes have been released.
Crowd Hours Indication
This indication informs the operator of the number of hours that
the crowd motion has been operating, or the number of hours
that the crowd brakes have been released.
Propel Hours Indication
This indication informs the operator of the number of hours that
the propel motion has been operating, or the number of hours
that the propel brakes have been released.
Total Hours Indication
This indication informs the operator of the total number of
hours that the shovel motions have been operating, or the
number of hours that the shovel brakes have been released.

Table 4-7: Diagnostics Main Screen - Controls and Indications

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4.3.2.3 Setup - Main Screen (Refer to Figure 4-14)

Figure 4-14: Setup - Main Screen

The Setup Main Screen acts as a shield to protect against unauthorized access to systems and components setup
screens. In order to access Setup screens, the user must have a MAINTENANCE level password.

NOTICE
Depending on your Mines Preventive Maintenance Program, operators may or may not have
this security level. If not, a maintenance technician will have to login to access these screens.

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4.3.2.4 Activity - Main Screen (Refer to Figure 4-15)

Figure 4-15: Activity - Main Screen

This screen informs the operator of the activities occurring on the shovel. For example, Figure 4-15 shows that
HP1 Motor 1 has an over temperature.

Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Activity Main screen are described in Table 4-8.
Screen Control

Description
Activity Mode - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to select an Activity screen on the touch panel and informs the operator that the
touch panel is in the Activity Mode.

When indication has a yellow background the screen is


active.
Reset All Button
This push button/indicator allows the operator to reset all faults.

Table 4-8: Activity Main Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Clear Display Button
This push button/indicator allows the operator to clear the activity screen display.
Help Button
Selecting this push button/indicator allows the operator to navigate to the Help Main Screen. Refer to Subtopic 4.3.2.5.
Status Bar
This indication informs the operator of the latest fault that has
occurred on the shovel. As shown in Figure, the Fault being displayed is a HP1 Motor 1 Over Temp (thermal).
Display Panel
This display informs the operator of the current shovel activities,
which include:

Activity Name: Name of malfunction.


ID: Identifies
Time:
Status:
Save Log - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that he/she is
able to save shovel information to a USB Stick or hard drive.
Save Log - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that he/she is not
able to save shovel information to a disk.
View Log - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to view the past
weeks activity log.
View Log - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that he/she does
not have the ability to view the past weeks activity log.
Table 4-8: Activity Main Screen - Controls and Indications

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4.3.2.5 Help Main Screen


The Help Main Screen (Refer to Figure 4-16) provides the operator with information on correcting or troubleshooting a shovel fault. The Help Main Screen also provides the operator with information and warnings on hazards
associated with the system, components, and recommended troubleshooting techniques.

Figure 4-16: Help Main Screen

Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Activity Main screen are described in Table 4-9.
Screen Control

Description
Help Mode - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to select the Help
screen on the touch panel and informs the operator that the
touch panel is in the Help Mode.

When indication has a yellow background the screen is


active.
Down Arrow
This push button allows the operator to scroll down the Help
screen.
Table 4-9: Help Main Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Up Arrow
This push button allows the operator to scroll up the Help screen.

Back Button
This push button allows the operator to return to the previous
screen.
Fault Identification Window
This window is the Fault Table of Contents. Scrolling through the
various fault types allows the operator or maintenance technician
to select the fault type, which will allow the operator or maintenance technician to view the associated fault help file.

This window is similar to the help file layout found in various operating system help files.

Fault Information Window


This window displays the information needed in analyzing and
troubleshooting the fault.

Each help screen begins with a brief description of the


fault.

It list the hazards associated with the fault, system, and/or


component.

It discusses possible causes and provides information on


what items to check.

NOTICE
This list of possible cause is not all inclusive, but
acts as a starting point in the troubleshooting process.
Table 4-9: Help Main Screen - Controls and Indications

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4.3.3 Operation Screens


The Operation Screens consist of the following:

Shovel Inclination
Shovel Operation Display Values
Shovel Permissives

Start Permissive

Brakes Permissive

Drives Permissive

Shovel Lube System Status


Motor Temperatures

Hoist Temperatures

Crowd Temperatures

Shovel Production Monitoring


Besides the Main Screens, these screens are the ones that the operator will most frequently view and utilize.

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4.3.3.1 Operations - Shovel Inclination Screen

Figure 4-17: Operations - Shovel Inclination Screen

The Shovel Inclination Screen provides the operator with a visual of the leveling condition of the shovel.

Main Screen
When the touch panel is selected to this screen, the following shovel level representations can be seen, refer to
Table 4-10.
The main screen is split into two section:

Left and Right


Front and back
The text under each screen informs the operator of what amount and direction that the shovel is not level. There
are ten possible screens that can be displayed.

Graphic Representation

Description
Shovel Level Back Front
This indication informs the operator that the shovel is
in a level position between 0 to 2 in the relation to
back and front position.

Table 4-10: Operations - Shovel Inclination Screens

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Graphic Representation

Description
Shovel Level Left Right
This indication informs the operator that the shovel is
in a level position between 0 to 2 in the relation to left
and right position.
Shovel 5 Back
This indication informs the operator that the shovel in a
position between 2.1 to 7 in the relation to the backwards direction.
Shovel 5 Forward
This indication informs the operator that the shovel in a
position between 2.1 to 7 in the relation to the forward direction.
Shovel 5 Left
This indication informs the operator that the shovel in a
position between 2.1 to 7 in the relation to the left
direction.
Shovel 5 Right
This indication informs the operator that the shovel in a
position between 2.1 to 7 in the relation to the right
direction.
Shovel 10 Back
This indication informs the operator that the shovel in a
position between 7.1 to 10 in the relation to the backwards direction.
Shovel 10 Forward
This indication informs the operator that the shovel in a
position between 7.1 to 10 in the relation to the forward direction.
Shovel 10 Left
This indication informs the operator that the shovel in a
position between 7.1 to 10 in the relation to the left
direction.
Shovel 10 Right
This indication informs the operator that the shovel in a
position between 7.1 to 10 in the relation to the forward direction.

Table 4-10: Operations - Shovel Inclination Screens

Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Operations - Shovel Inclination screen are described in Table.

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Screen Control

Description
Operations Mode - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to select an Operations screen on the touch panel and informs the operator that the
touch panel is in a Operations Mode screen.
When indication has a yellow background the screen is active.
Inclination - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Inclination information.
Inclination Bulls eye
This indication informs the operator of shovel position in relation
to level.

The bulls-eye in the figure informs the operator that the


shovel is back and right of center.
Table 4-11: Shovel Inclination Screen - Controls and Indications

4.3.3.2 Operations - Shovel Start Permissive Screen

Figure 4-18: Shovel Start Permissive Screen

The Shovel Permissive screen provides the operator with a visual checklist of the condition of the permissives
associated with starting the shovel. These permissives consist of:

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Start Push Button


Main Phase Sensor OK
No System Faults
Remote Hoist Stop Button OFF
Operator Cab Stop Button OFF
Propel Brake Maintenance Switch OFF
Controls and Indications
Screen Control

Description
Operations Mode - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to
select an Operations screen on the touch panel and
informs the operator that the touch panel is in a Operations Mode screen.

When indication has a yellow background the


screen is active.
Not Active Block
This indication informs the operator that the status of
the associated parameter is not active.
Active Block
This indication informs the operator that the status of
the associated parameter is active.
More - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to proceed to the next permissive screen.
Table 4-12: Shovel Start Permissive Screen - Controls and Indications

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4.3.3.3 Operations - Brakes Release Permissive

Figure 4-19: Operations - Brake Release Permissive Screen

The Brakes Release Permissive screen provides the operator with a visual checklist of the condition of the permissives associated with the shovel brakes. These permissives consist of:

Brake Release Push Button


Field/Armature Contactors Closed
Field Drives OK
Torque Check Passed
Drives Ready For Reference
Not in Remote Hoist
4.3.3.4 Controls and Indications
The controls and indications associated with the Operations - Brake Release Permissive screen are described in
Table 4-13.

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Screen Control

Description
Operations Mode - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to select an
Operations screen on the touch panel and informs the
operator that the touch panel is in a Operations Mode
screen.
When indication has a yellow background the screen is
active.
Active Block
Informs the operator that the permissive is ready for operation.
Exclamation
Provides directions to the operator to access additional
information.

For example; Touch the permissive for additional


information.
More Large - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to proceed
to the next permissive screen.
Not Active Check
Informs the operator that the permissive is not ready for
operation.
Permissives Active
Informs operator that he/she is in a permissives screen.

Permissives Not Active


Informs operators that he/she is not in a permissives
screen.
White Block
Informs the operator that the permissive associated with
the motion is not available.
Table 4-13: Brake Release Permissive Screen

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4.3.3.5 Operations - Shovel Drive Start Permissive

Figure 4-20: Operations - Shovel Drive Start Permissive

The Shovel Drive Start Permissive screen provides the operator with a visual checklist of the condition of the permissives associated with the shovel drives. These permissives consist of:

Ready for ON
Ready for RUN
Ready for REF (Reference)
Controls and Indications
The controls and indications associated with the Operations - Shovel Drive Start Permissive screen are described
in Table 4-14.
Screen Control

Description
Operations Mode - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to select an Operations screen on the touch panel and informs the operator that the
touch panel is in a Operations Mode screen.
When indication has a yellow background the screen is active.

Table 4-14: Shovel Drive Start Permissive - Controls and Indicators

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Screen Control

Description
Active Check
Informs the operator that the permissive is ready for operation.

Exclamation
Provides directions to the operator to access additional information.

For example; Touch the permissive for additional information.


More Large - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to proceed to the
next permissive screen.
Not Active Check
Informs the operator that the permissive is not ready for operation.
Permissives Active
Informs operator that he/she is in a permissives screen.

Permissives Not Active


Informs operators that he/she is not in a permissives screen.

Table 4-14: Shovel Drive Start Permissive - Controls and Indicators

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4.3.3.6 Operations - Lube

Figure 4-21: Operations - Lube Screen

The Lube Screen provides the operator with a visual representation of the lubes levels of the shovel and of which
lube zone is active.

Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Operations - Lube screen are described in Table 4-15.
Screen Control

Description
Operations Mode - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to select an
Operations screen on the touch panel and informs the
operator that the touch panel is in a Operations Mode
screen.
When indication has a yellow background the screen is
active.
Upper Lube - Active
This indication informs the operator that the Upper Lube
system is in operation (automatically or manually).

Table 4-15: Operations Lube Screen - Controls and Indicators

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Screen Control

Description
Upper Lube - Not Active
This indication informs the operator that the Upper Lube
system is in operation (automatically or manually).
Upper Lube - Fault
This indication informs the operator that there is a fault
associated with the Upper Lube system.
Open Gear - Active
This indication informs the operator that the Open Gear
system is in operation (automatically or manually).
Open Gear - Not Active
This indication informs the operator that the Open Gear
system is not in operation (automatically or manually).
Open Gear - Fault
This indication alerts the operator that there is a fault
associated with the Open Gear system.
Lower Lube - Active
This indication informs the operator that the Lower Lube
system is in operation (automatically or manually).
Lower Lube - Not Active
This indication informs the operator that the Lower Lube
system is not in operation (automatically or manually).
Lower Lube - Fault
This indication alerts the operator that there is a fault
associated with the Lower Lube system.
Propel Lube - Active
This indication informs the operator that the Propel Lube
system is in operation (automatically or manually).
Propel Lube - Not Active
This indication informs the operator that the Propel Lube
system is in operation (automatically or manually).
Propel Lube - Fault
This indication alerts the operator that there is a fault
associated with the Propel Lube system.

Table 4-15: Operations Lube Screen - Controls and Indicators

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Screen Control

User Interface

Description
Lube System Diagnostics - Active
This push button/indication informs the operator that the
screen being viewed is for Lube System Diagnostic.
Lube Diagnostics - Not Active
This push button/indication informs the operator that the
screen being viewed is not for Lube System Diagnostic.

Table 4-15: Operations Lube Screen - Controls and Indicators

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4.3.3.7 Operations - Operation Display Values

Figure 4-22: Operations - Operation Display Values Screen

The Operation Display Value Screen provides the operator with a visual representation of the electrical signals and
components associated with shovel motions, such as (refer to Figure 4-23):

Operators Reference*
Armature Voltage*
Armature Current*
Field Current*
RPC Steps
KVAR Level
Line Voltage

NOTICE
Values indicated with a star (*) are shown with each motion being employed by the operator
(i.e. Dig or Propel Mode).

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Figure 4-23: Operator Display Values - Monitors

Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Operations - Operation Display Values screen are described in
Table 4-16.
Screen Control

Description
Operations Mode - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to select an Operations screen on the touch panel and informs the operator that the
touch panel is in a Operations Mode screen.
When indication has a yellow background the screen is active.
Operator Values - Active
This push button/indication informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Operator Values.
Operator Values - Not Active
This push button/indication informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Operator Values.

Table 4-16: Operation Display Values Screen - Controls and Indications

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4.3.3.8 Operations - Temperature Monitoring

Figure 4-24: Operations - Temperature Monitoring Screen

The Operations - Motor Temperatures Screen provides the operator with a visual representation of the temperatures associated with each shovel motor, such as:

Front Hoist Motor


Rear Hoist Motor
Left Propel Motor
Right Propel Motor
Crowd Motor
Front Swing Motor
Rear Swing Motor
There are three flags associated with each monitor (black, amber, and red) and values are shown in degrees of
Celsius.

Amber flag: Displays warning temperature setpoint.


Red flag: Displays fault temperature setpoint.
Each motor is monitored at (refer to Figure 4-25):

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DE - Drive End
NDE - Non Drive End
IPOL - Interpole
FLD - Field

Figure 4-25: Motor Monitors

Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Operations - Temperature Monitoring screen are described in
Table 4-17.

Screen Control

Description
Operations Mode - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to select an Operations screen on the touch panel and informs the operator that the
touch panel is in a Operations Mode screen.
When indication has a yellow background the screen is active.
Temperature Monitoring - Locations
Informs temperature change from ambient temperature in the
machinery house, Right hand room and Outside in both Fahrenheit
and Celsius.

Table 4-17: Temperature Monitoring Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
More Large - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to proceed to the
next Temperature Monitoring screen.
Temperature Monitoring - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Temperature Monitoring.

Table 4-17: Temperature Monitoring Screen - Controls and Indications

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4.3.4 Diagnostic Screens

Figure 4-26: Diagnostics - Main Screen

The Diagnostic Screens consist of the following:

I/O Diagnostics Display


DDCS System Information
Start Permissive
Lube System
Temperature Monitoring
Shovel Motor Information
Shovel Brake System
For detailed description of the Diagnostic Main Screen, refer to Subtopic 4.3.2.2.

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4.3.4.1 Diagnostics - I/O Diagnostic Display Screen

Figure 4-27: I/O Diagnostic Display Screen

The I/O Diagnostic Display Screen provides the operator or service technician the following information:
Status of the Remote I/O Units

Control Cabinet
Front Wall
Transfer Cabinet
Hoist Gearcase
Lower Control Cabinet
Lube Room
AUX Cabinet
RPC Cabinet
RH Console (Operators Cab)
LH Console (Operators Cab)

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Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Diagnostics - I/O Diagnostic Display screen are described in Table
4-18.
Screen Control

Description
I/O Push button/Indicator - Red Background
When an I/O push button/indicator has a red background,
the information display is not for that Remote I/O unit.

I/O Push button/Indicator - Green Background


When an I/O push button/indicator has a green background, the information display is for that Remote I/O
unit.
Table 4-18: I/O Diagnostic Display - Controls and Indications

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4.3.4.2 Diagnostics - DDCS System Information Screen

Figure 4-28: Diagnostics - DDCS System Information Screen

The DDCS System Information Screen provides the operator or service technician the following information:

Drive Name
Application Name
CON2 Firmware
AMC Firmware
User Macro Loaded
Controls and Indications
The controls and indications associated with the Diagnostics - DDCS System Information screen are described in
Table 4-19.

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Screen Control

Description
Diagnostics - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to select a Diagnostics screen on the touch panel and informs the operator that the
touch panel is in the Diagnostics Mode.
Drive Information - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is for Drives Information Diagnostics.
Drive Information - Not Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the screen
being viewed is not for Drives Information Diagnostics.
More Button - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to navigate through
the Diagnostic navigation control groups.
Display Section
This portion of the screen displays each one of the Digital Drives
associated with the shovel.
The screen provides the operator with:

Drive Name

Application Name

Con2 Firmware

AMC Firmware

User Macro Loaded

Table 4-19: DDCS System Information Screen - Controls and Indications

4.3.4.3 Diagnostics - Shovel Permissive Screens


The Shovel Permissive Screens are the same the screens described in Subtopic 4.3.3.2 through Subtopic 4.3.3.5.

4.3.4.4 Diagnostics - Shovel Lube System Status


The Shovel Lube System Status Screen is the same as the screen describe in Subtopic 4.3.3.6.

4.3.4.5 Diagnostics - Temperature Monitoring


The Shovel Temperature Monitoring Screen is the same as the screen describe in Subtopic 4.3.3.8.

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4.3.4.6 Diagnostics - Shovel Motor Information Screen

Figure 4-29: Shovel Motor Information

The Shovel Motor Information screen provides the operator or service technician the following information on all
motion motors:

Motor Type

NOTICE
The abbreviation FW in the motor type means Field Weakening.
Speed Limits

Maximum

Minimum

Nominal Data

Armature Voltage

Armature Current

Field Current

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Speed

Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Diagnostics - Shovel Motor Information screen are described in
Table 4-20.
Screen Control

Description
Motors - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that
the screen being viewed is for Motor diagnostics.

Motors - Not Active


This push button/indicator informs the operator that
the screen being viewed is not for Motor diagnostics.

Shovel Motor Information Display


The center of the screen contains 4 displays like the
one shown in the left column. The four motors displayed are the for the shovel motions.

Hoist
Crowd
Swing
Propel

More - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to navigate to other Diagnostic control screens.

Table 4-20: Shovel Motor Information - Controls and Indications

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4.3.4.7 Diagnostics - Shovel Brake System Diagnostics Screen

Figure 4-30: Shovel Brake System Diagnostics Screen

The Shovel Brake System Diagnostics Screen provides the operator or service technician with the status of the following:

Hoist Brake Solenoid


Left Propel Brake Solenoid
Right Propel Brake Solenoid
Crowd Brake Solenoid
Swing Brake Solenoid
Left Propel Exhaust Solenoid
Right Propel Exhaust Solenoid
Front Hoist Exhaust Solenoid
Rear Hoist Exhaust Solenoid
Front Swing Exhaust Solenoid
Rear Swing Exhaust Solenoid

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The screen also provides graphic meter (0-150 psi) displays for the brakes on the shovel.

Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Diagnostics - Shovel Brake System Diagnostics screen are
described in Table 4-21.
Screen Control

Description
Brake Systems - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that
the screen being viewed is for Brake Systems diagnostics.
Meter Graphic Display
This graphic meter has a range of 0-150 psi. There are
seven displays for the brakes associated with the:

Front Hoist
Rear Hoist
Front Swing
Rear Swing
Left Propel
Right Propel
Crowd
Solenoid Indication - Not Active
This indication informs the operator that the system
component is not active. There are two components
associated with this type of indication:

Brake Solenoids
Exhaust Solenoids
Solenoid Indication - Active
This indication informs the operator that the system
component is active. There are two components associated with this type of indication:

Brake Solenoids
Exhaust Solenoids
Table 4-21: Shovel Brake System Diagnostics - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
More Button - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to navigate through the Diagnostic control screens.

Table 4-21: Shovel Brake System Diagnostics - Controls and Indications

4.3.5 Setup Screens

Figure 4-31: Setup - Main Screen

The Setup Screens consist of the following:

User Level Login


Extended Cooling Time Setup
Boom Limits Setup Selection
ABSS Setup
Lube Cycle Setup
Remote Hoist Setup

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Controller Calibration Setup


OptiDig Setup
Motivator Mode Setup
Door Interlock Setup
Shovel Production Monitoring Setup
Gearcase Oil Selection Setup
Shovel RPC Setup
Limits/Boomjack Counts Setup
Propel Field Setup
AirScrubPro Setup
TripRite Setup
For description of the Setup Main Screen, refer to Subtopic 4.3.2.3.

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4.3.5.1 User Login Setup Screen

Figure 4-32: User Login Setup Screen

The User Level Login screen provides the operator the ability to change level of security for user interface.

Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Setup - User Level Login screen are described in Table 4-22.
Screen Control

Description
Login - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to gain
access to the Login screen. The Login setup screen allows
for the user to change the level of security for the user
interface.

Table 4-22: User Login Setup - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Numeric Keypad
This keypad allows the operator to input access passwords
to change the users security level and to gain access to
the various Setup screens.

Enter - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to enter the
value to change the security level.
Clear - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to clear the
value on the keypad.
Logout Push button
This push button/indicator when pressed, returns the user
in the Operator Security Level.

Current User Level


Informs the operator of security level currently access.
The security access levels are:

Operator
Maintenance
MinePro
Engineering
Table 4-22: User Login Setup - Controls and Indications

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4.3.5.2 Extended Cooling Time Setup Screen

Figure 4-33: Setup - Extended Cooling Time Setup

The Setup -Extended Cooling Time Setup Screen provides the operator with the ability to adjust the cooling time of
the machinery house blowers. Other blower screens include:

House Blower Disable Setup Screen


Reverse Blowers in AUX Test Setup Screen
House Blower Reversing Setup Screen
Controls and Indications
The controls and indications associated with the Setup - Extended Cooling Time Setup screen are described in
Table.
Screen Control

Description
Extended Cooling - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the
screen being viewed is for setting up the blowers for
extended cooling.

Table 4-23: Extended Cooling Time Setup - Controls and Indicators

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Screen Control

Description
Cycle Time Remaining Indication
This indication informs the operator of the time remaining for extended cooling.
Meter is scaled in Hours, Minutes and Seconds.
Extended Cooling Set Time
This indication informs the operator of the extended cooling setpoint in hour, minutes, and seconds.
Set Time Button
This push button allows the operator to set the time once
selection is made on the time bar.
Time Bar
This bar indication allows the operator to move the
pointer to the desired time. Bar is scaled from 0 to 2
hours.

NOTICE
Set to ZERO to disable extended cooling.
More Large - Active
This push button/indicator allows the operator to proceed
to the next blower screen. These screens are:

House Blower Disable Setup Screen


Reverse Blowers in AUX Test Setup Screen
House Blower Reversing Setup Screen
Table 4-23: Extended Cooling Time Setup - Controls and Indicators

Setting the Extended Cooling Time Procedure


Step 1:

Select the Setup Screen and Extended Cooling icons. Refer to Figure 4-34.

Figure 4-34: Extended Cooling Time Icons

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Step 2:

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Once screen appears, used your finger to slide the pointer on the time bar to the desired time setting.
Refer to Figure 4-35.

Figure 4-35: Extended Cooling Time Bar


Step 3:

Once setting is selected, Press the Set Time push button.


Extended Cooling Time is now set.

Step 4:

To proceed to the next blower setup screen, select More button in the display screen. Refer to Figure 436.

Figure 4-36: More Button

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4.3.5.3 House Blower Disable Setup Screen

Figure 4-37: House Blower Disable

The House Blower Disable Setup screen provides the operator with the ability to disable house blowers for 20 minutes.

Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Setup - House Blower Disable Setup are described in Table 4-24.
Screen Control

Description
Extended Cooling - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the
screen being viewed is for setting up the blowers for
extended cooling.
Enable/Disable Blowers Button
This push button/indicator allows the operator to enable
or disable the house blowers. If background is RED, then
blowers are OFF. If background is GREEN, then blowers
are ON.
Time Indication
This indication informs the operator of the time remaining
that the blowers will be disabled.

Table 4-24: House Blower Disable Setup Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
More Large Button
This push button/indicator allows the operator to proceed
to the next associated blower screen.

Table 4-24: House Blower Disable Setup Screen - Controls and Indications

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4.3.5.4 Reverse Blowers in AUX Test Setup Screen

Figure 4-38: Reverse Blowers in AUX Test Setup Screen

The Reverse Blowers in AUX Test Setup screen provides the operator the ability to run the house blowers in the
reverse direction while the Test Selector Switch is in the AUX Test position.

Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Setup - Reverse Blowers in AUX Test Setup screen are provided
in Table.
Screen Control

Description
Extended Cooling - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the
screen being viewed is for setting up the blowers for
extended cooling.
AUX Test Reverse - OFF/ON
The push button/indicator allows the operator to control
the machinery house blowers when the Mode Select
Switch is in AUX Test. When blowers are OFF, the background of the push button is RED. When blowers are ON,
the background is GREEN.

Table 4-25: Reverse Blowers in AUX Test Setup Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
More Large Button
This push button/indicator allows the operator to proceed
to the next associated blower screen.

Table 4-25: Reverse Blowers in AUX Test Setup Screen - Controls and Indications

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4.3.5.5 House Blower Reversing Setup Screen

Figure 4-39: House Blower Reversing Setup Screen

The House Blower Reversing Setup Screen provides the operator with the ability to setup when the house blowers
will run in the reverse direction. The time settings include:

Disable
12 hours
Once a Day
Once a Week
Once a Month
Setting the time is similar to the procedure in Subtopic 4.3.5.2.

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Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Setup - House Blower Reversing Setup screen are described in
Table 4-26.
Screen Control

Description
Extended Cooling - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the
screen being viewed is for setting up the blowers for
extended cooling.
Time Indication
This indication informs the operator of the setpoint for
the house blower to turn in the reverse direction automatically.
Time Bar
This bar indication allows the operator to move the
pointer to the desired time. Bar is scaled from DISABLE
to Once A Month.
More Large Button
This push button/indicator allows the operator to proceed
to the next associated blower screen.

Table 4-26: House Blower Reversing Setup - Controls and Indications

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4.3.5.6 Boom Limits Setup Selection Screen

Figure 4-40: Boom Limits Setup Selection Screen

The Boom Limits Setup Selection screen provides the operator with a choice of Four Point Boom Limit setup or
Single Point Boom Limit setup. For procedures on setting Boom Limits, proceed to Subtopic.

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4.3.5.7 Automatic Boom Soft Setdown (ABSS) Setup

Figure 4-41: ABSS Setup Screen

The Automatic Boom Soft Setdown Setup screen provides the operator with the ability to set the two stages of the
ABSS System. For detailed description refer to Subtopic.

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4.3.5.8 Lube Cycle Setup Screen

Figure 4-42: Lube Cycle Setup Screen

The Lube Cycle Setup screen provides the operator with the ability to set the automatic lube cycles for the following zones:

Upper Lube (10 - 30 minute time limit)


Open Gear Lube (10 - 30 minute time limit)
Lower Lube (10 - 30 minute time limit)
Propel Lube (3 - 6 minute time limit)

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Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Setup - Lube Cycle Setup screen are described in Table 4-27.
Screen Control

Description
Lube Time - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the
screen being viewed is for setting up the lube cycle timers.
10-30 Minute Time Bar
This bar indication allows the operator to move the
pointer to the desired time for the Upper, Open Gear
and Lower zones.

Scale: 10-30 minutes (1 minute increments)


3-6 Minute Time Bar
This bar indication allows the operator to move the
pointer to the desired time for the Propel zone.

Scale: 3-6 minutes (0.5 minute increments)


Set Cycle Times
This push button allows the operator to set the times
once selection is made on each of the time bar.
Table 4-27: Lube Cycle Setup - Controls and Indications

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4.3.5.9 Remote Hoist Setup Screen

Figure 4-43: Remote Hoist Setup Screen

  
The hoist machinery should never be operated by means of the remote hoist control unless a
qualified shovel operator is in the operator cab. The qualified operator must have a clear view of
the dipper handles, the dipper, and the hoist ropes and must have a positive means of communication with the remote hoist controller operator.
This screen allows the operator at the operators station or a maintenance technician in the right hand room to
monitor the actions of the remote hoist operator. For detailed description on the operation of the Remote Hoist system and associated screens.

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4.3.5.10 Controller Calibration Setup Screen

Figure 4-44: Controller Calibration Setup Screen

The Controller Calibration Setup screen provides the operator with the ability to set the Loading Control Center joysticks. For detailed description refer to Subtopic.

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4.3.5.11 OptiDig Setup Screen

Figure 4-45: OptiDig Setup Screen

The OptiDig Setup screen provides the operator with the ability to turn on the OptiDig system.The functional purpose of OptiDig is to prevent the dipper from stalling. It is not intended to be a form of automated digging.
When enabled, OptiDig will allow the operator to hold both the dig mode controllers full on when engaged in the
bank. OptiDig will automatically apply the correct amount of retract reference as the dipper approaches a stall condition, effectively removing crowd force sufficiently to allow the continued hoisting of the dipper through the bank.
Unlike previous versions of OptiDig, this version only requires the Operator to enable or disable this shovel feature.
Controls and Indications
The controls and indications associated with the Setup - OptiDig Setup screen are described in Table 4-28.
Screen Control

Description
OptiDig - Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the
screen being viewed is for OptiDig setup.

Table 4-28: OptiDig Setup - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
OptiDig Enabled/Disabled
This push button/indicator informs the operator that the
OptiDig system is either enabled or disabled. If the background is GREEN, then the system is ENABLED. If the
background is RED, then the background is GREEN.
OptiDig System Active/Not Active
This indicator informs the operator when the OptiDig system is active or not active. When digging, the indication
will change states depending upon the operation of the
shovel and actions of the operator.

Table 4-28: OptiDig Setup - Controls and Indications

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4.3.5.12 Motivator Mode Setup Screen

Figure 4-46: Motivator Mode Setup Screen

The Motivator Mode Setup screen provides the operator the ability to run the shovel from a portable alternator at
reduced performance levels.

NOTICE
If your mine does not have a portable alternator, then this feature is disabled.
Controls and Indications
The controls and indications associated with the Setup - Motivator Mode Setup screen are described in Table 4-29.
Screen Control

Description
Motivator - Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the
screen being viewed is for Motivator Mode setup.
Motivator Mode Button Enabled/Disabled
This push button/indicator allows the operator to activate
or disable the Motivator Mode feature.

Table 4-29: Motivator Mode Setup - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Reference Ramp Scaling Time Bar
This time bar allows the operator to set the Reference
Ramp Scaling from 1 to 5 seconds.
Set Ramp Scaling Button
This push button allows the operator to set the Reference
Ramp Scaling value, once it is selected on the time bar.

Table 4-29: Motivator Mode Setup - Controls and Indications

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4.3.5.13 Door Interlocks Setup Screen

Figure 4-47: Door Interlocks Setup Screen

WARNING

Opening a cabinet while power is applied is extremely dangerous and only should be
done in extreme cases by authorized personnel.

WARNING

Door Interlock Setup Screen values should only be utilized or changed by an authorized
and qualified maintenance technician or MinePro Services technician. Operation of this
screen by unauthorized personnel can result in severe personal injury or death.
The Door Interlocks Setup screen provides the operator with the ability to disengage the door interlock feature for a
maximum time limit of 5 minutes. This feature is incorporated as a troubleshooting tool for maintenance personnel.
This screen controls the door interlocks for:

Lower Control Cabinet


RPC Cabinet
Transfer Cabinet

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Converter Cabinet
Controls and Indications
The controls and indications associated with the Setup - Door Interlocks Setup screen are described in Table 4-30.
Screen Control

Description
Door Interlock - Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the
screen being viewed is for Door Interlocks setup.
Door Interlock Enable/Disable Button
This push button/indication will allow the operator to
enable or disable the door interlock. If the door interlock
is ENABLED, then the background will be GREEN. If the
door interlock is DISABLED, then the background will be
RED.

Table 4-30: Door Interlocks Setup Screen - Controls and Indications

4.3.5.14 Shovel Production Monitoring Setup

Figure 4-48: Shovel Production Monitoring Screen

The Shovel Production Monitoring Setup screen provides the operator with the ability to identify how shovel operations are conducted at his/her mine. The information includes:

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Current shift
Number of shifts
Shift Duration
Minimum number of cycles required to fill a truck
Start time of first shift

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Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Setup - Shovel Production Monitoring screen are described in
Table 4-31.
Screen Control

Description
Production Monitoring - Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the
screen being viewed is for Shovel Production Monitoring
Setup.
Current Shift Up/Down Buttons
These push button/indicators allow the operator to use
the UP or DOWN arrows to select the current and new
shift. The shift numbers are 1, 2, and 3.
Number of Shifts Buttons
These push button/indicators allow the operator to select
the number of operation shifts at his mine. When the
background is GREEN, this indicates the number of shifts
selected. When the background is RED, this indicates that
this number of shifts is not selected.
Number of Cycles Buttons
These push button/indicators allow the operator to select
the minimum number of cycles required to fill a truck.
When the background is GREEN, this indicates the number of cycles required. When the background is RED, this
indicates that these number of cycles are not selected.
Shift Duration Buttons
These push button/indicators allow the operator to select
the number of hours in a shift. Operator can scroll
through the numbers by using the UP and DOWN arrows.
Start Time of First Shift Buttons
These push button/indicators allow the operator to set
the time of the first shift. The two sets of UP and Down
arrows are separated into hours and minutes.
Set New Values Button
This push button/indicator allows the operator to set the
new values once they have been selected using the push
button/indicators previously discussed.
Reset Truck Count
This push button/indicator allows the operator to reset
the truck count. The Operator should reset the truck
count prior to each shift.

Table 4-31: Shovel Production Monitoring Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Reset Cycle Time
This push button/indicator allows the operator to reset
the cycle time.

Table 4-31: Shovel Production Monitoring Screen - Controls and Indications

4.3.5.15 Gearcase Oil Selection Setup Screen

Figure 4-49: Gearcase Oil Selection Setup Screen

The Gearcase Oil Selection Setup Screen provides the operator with the ability to select the type of oil being used
in the Hoist, Crowd, and Swing gearcases.

Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Setup - Gearcase Oil Selection Setup screen are described in
Table 4-32.
Screen Control

Description
Oil Grade - Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the
screen being viewed is for Gearcase Oil Selection setup.

Table 4-32: Gearcase Oil Selection Setup Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Current Type
This indication informs the operator of the type of oil that
currently being used in the associated gearcase.
New Type
These push button/indications allow the operator to
select the new type of oil associated with the gearcase.
Set Gearcase Oil Type
This push button allows the operator to set the oil types
associated with the hoist, crowd, and swing gearcases.

Types of Oils

ISO150
ISO220
ISO320
ISO460
ISO680
SYN220
SYN320
SYN460
SYN680
SYN1000
SYN1500
Table 4-32: Gearcase Oil Selection Setup Screen - Controls and Indications

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4.3.5.16 Shovel RPC Setup Screen

Figure 4-50: Shovel RPC Setup Screen

CAUTION
Only authorized and qualified maintenance or MinePro Services technicians should
access the RPC Setup screen. Access by unauthorized personnel may result in equipment damage.
The Shovel RPC Setup Screen provides the operator with the ability to test the RPC banks when the Mode Selector Switch is in either the Control Test or Armature Test modes.
When the shovel started in Control or Armature Test mode, press the button for the desired bank to turn that bank
ON. Only one bank will be enabled at a time. All RPC breakers can remain ON.
This screen is normally used during shovel commissioning or troubleshooting the RPC banks.

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Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Setup - Shovel RPC Setup Screen are described in Table 4-33.
Screen Control

Description
RPC - Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the
screen being viewed is for Shovel RPC setup.
RPC Bank Push Buttons/Indications
These push button/indications allow the operator to
select All Banks, 1/2 Bank, Bank 1, Bank 2, and Bank 3
ON or OFF.
Only one button can be selected at a time.
When the background is GREEN, the bank is selected is
ON. When the background is RED, the bank is not
selected and OFF.

NOTICE
The only button that is different is the All
Banks Off button. When the background is
GREEN, all RPC banks are off. When the
background is RED, another bank button is
selected.
RPC Test Enable/Disable Button
This push button/indication allows the operator to test
the selected RPC bank.
When the RPC Test button is Enabled (button background
is GREEN), it will cause the selected bank to oscillate ON
and OFF at 200ms.
When the background of the button is RED, the feature is
disabled.
Bank Rotation Enable/Disable Button
This push button/indication allows the operator to enable
or disable bank rotation.
Enabling bank rotation (button background GREEN) will
alternate the usage of the appropriate banks to prevent
overheating. Disabling will turn this feature off.
Table 4-33: Shovel RPC Setup Screen - Controls and Indications

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4.3.5.17 Limits/Boomjack Counts Setup Screen

Figure 4-51: Limits/Boomjack Counts Setup Screen

The Limits/Boomjack Counts Setup screen informs the operator of the following information:

Hoist Limit Exceeded Counts


Crowd Limit Exceeded Counts
Retract Limit Exceed Counts
Lower Limit Exceeded Counts
Profile Limit Exceeded Counts
Stage 1 Boomjack Counts
Stage 2 Boomjack Counts
Hoist Resolver Counts
Crowd Resolver Counts

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Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Limits/Boomjack Counts Setup screen are described in Table 434.
Screen Control

Description
Boom Counts - Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the
screen being viewed is for Limits/Boomjack Counts
setup.
Limits Exceeded Counter
This indication informs the operator how many times a
particular limit has been exceeded.
There is a total of 5 Limits Exceeded counters. These
counters are for:

Hoist
Crowd
Retract
Lower
Profile
Boomjack Counter
This indication informs the operator how many times
either a Stage 1 or Stage 2 boomjack has occurred.
There is a total of 2 Boomjack counters, one for each
stage.

Stage 1
Stage 2
Hoist Resolver Counter
This indication informs the operator of boom and dipper
positioning as a numeric value in relation to the hoist
motion.
Scale is between 0 - 8000.
Crowd Resolver Counter
This indication informs the operator of boom and dipper
positioning as a numeric value in relation to the crowd
motion.
Scale is between 0 - 8000.
Table 4-34: Limits/Boomjack Counts Setup Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Reset Limit Counts Button
This button allows the operator to reset the counters
associated with the:

Hoist Limits Exceeded


Crowd Limits Exceeded
Retract Limits Exceeded
Lower Limits Exceeded
Profile Limits Exceeded
Reset Boomjack Counts Button
This button allows the operator to reset the counters
associated with:

Stage 1 Boomjack Counts


Stage 2 Boomjack Counts
Table 4-34: Limits/Boomjack Counts Setup Screen - Controls and Indications

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4.3.5.18 Propel Field Setup Screen

Figure 4-52: Propel Field Setup Screen

The Propel Field Setup Screen provides the maintenance and MInePro Services technicians with the ability to test
strong and normal propel fields.

NOTICE
This screen is normally used during shovel commissioning.

Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Propel Field Setup screen are described in Table 4-35.
Screen Control

Description
Propel Field - Active
This push button indicator informs the operator that the
screen being viewed is for the Propel Field setup.
Strong Field Button
This push button/indicator allows the operator to Enable
(GREEN background) or Disable (RED background) a
strong propel field.

Table 4-35: Propel Field Setup Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Normal Field Button
This push button/indicator allows the operator to Enable
(GREEN background) or Disable (RED background) a
normal propel field.

Table 4-35: Propel Field Setup Screen - Controls and Indications

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4.3.5.19 Shovel TripRite Setup Screen

Figure 4-53: Shovel TripRite Setup Screen

The Shovel TripRite Setup Screen provides the maintenance and MInePro Services technicians with the ability to
set and adjust the slack take-up torque for the TripRite System. Drive Status Word 1, Bits 0, 1, 2, and 3 are part of
the start sequence of the TripRite Drive and system components.

Controls and Indications


The controls and indications associated with the Shovel TripRite Setup screen are described in Table 4-36.
Screen Control

Description
Ready to Switch On Button
This push button/indicator informs the operator of the
state of Drive Status Word 1 (Bit 0). When the background is GREEN, the TripRite system is ready to be turn
on. When the background is RED, the TripRite system is
normally Running.
Ready for Operation
This push button/indicator informs the operator of the
state of Drive Status Word 1 (Bit 1). When the background is GREEN, the TripRite system is ready for operation. When the background is RED, the TripRite system is
normally Running.

Table 4-36: Shovel TripRite Setup Screen - Controls and Indications

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Screen Control

Description
Running
This push button/indicator informs the operator of the
state of Drive Status Word 1 (Bit 2). When the background is GREEN, the TripRite system is running. When
the background is RED, the TripRite system is not running.
Fault Active
This push button/indicator informs the operator of the
state of Drive Status Word 1 (Bit 3). When the background is GREEN, there is a fault associated with the
TripRite system. When the background is RED, there are
no faults associated with the TripRite system.
Drive Status Displays
These indications inform the operator of:

Motor Temperature
Drive Temperature
Speed
Motor Current
Slack Take-up Torque Bar
This bar informs the operator of the percentage of torque
with slack take-up. The white bar displays the current
(previous) torque setting. The yellow bar displays the
new torque setting. Once the percentage of torque has
been set, the white bar will move to the position of the
yellow bar and remain white.
Slack Take-up Left Arrow
This push button allows the operator to move the yellow
bar in the left direction.

Slack Take-up Right Arrow


This push button allows the operator to move the yellow
bar in the right direction.

Set Torque Button


This push button allows the operator to set the slack
take-up torque setting.

Table 4-36: Shovel TripRite Setup Screen - Controls and Indications

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4.4 Touch Panel Options


The Touch Panel offers an endless variety of options for uses for applications needing a larger display. It offers a
crisp and clear 1024 x 768 XGA daylight viewable display. The larger display allows for multiple windows/applications to be open and offers a 120 degree angle of viewing from all four sides.
The Touch Panel has a precision milled aluminum housing that lends itself to harsh conditions. They are built to
withstand rough terrain, rain, dust, wind, extreme temperatures, water, etc.
With the wide voltage input range of 9VDC to 36VDC, the Touch Panel works perfect with the mining shovel without the need for voltage conversion.
The Touch Panel includes: (2) DB9 Serial Ports, (2) USB 1.1 Ports, 10/100 Ethernet Port, Audio Port, DB9 Keyboard and Mouse port, (2) PCMCIA Type II slots, Power Connection, 15.1 1024 768 XGA display and a bootable
PC HDD Card slot.

Designed to be fixed-mounted and take up considerably less room than a mounted laptop or notebook computer. This is important for both Operators and Maintenance Personnel.

One-piece construction, fully sealed and ultra thin. The exterior housing is comprised of two solid precision
milled aluminum halves, approximately 3/16 thick with integrated passive heat-sinking. The design ensures
the ruggedness and the ability to handle temperature extremes.

The Touch Panel has a high contrast bright 1024 768 resolution display.

4.4.1 Specifications
4.4.1.1 Processor
STORAGE : Compact Flash 2GB

Operating System : Windows XP Embedded

Intel Pentium III 700Mhz


4.4.1.2 L2 Cache
256Kb pipelined-burst
4.4.1.3 RAM
SODIMM 1024MB
4.4.1.4 Display
15.1" Diagonal
XGA
120 viewing angle
0-100% dimmable

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4.4.1.5 Resolution
XGA (1024 768)
4.4.1.6 Luminance
400 NIT
4.4.1.7 User Interface
High resolution resistive touch screen.
Rugged DB9 Keyboard/Mouse port.
4.4.1.8 Graphics
4 MB, 2-D and 3-D accelerator, DVD ready
4.4.1.9 Storage

Compact Flash 2GB

PC-Card slot for ATA/IDE


4.4.1.10 Interfaces
PCMCIA: 2 type II or 1 type III (PCMCIA 2.1) 16-bit.
2 Serial ports RS232C
2 USB 1.1 A
1 Ethernet 10/100-TP, RJ45
1 PS2 rugged Mouse/Keyboard port (PS/2 adaptable cable available)
Buzzer, Microphone, CD line-in and line-out.
4.4.1.11 Power Supply
9VDC - 36VDC
4.4.1.12 Operating Systems
Windows XP Embedded
4.4.1.13 Environment
Operating Temperature: -20C (-4F) to 50C (122F)
Storage Temperature: -30C (-22F) to 75C (167F)

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Water and Dust Sealing: IP-54


Humidity: 10 - 95 % RH, non-condensing
Vibration: 5-500Hz/4.5 g RMS 3 hours XYZ (non-rotating disks)
Shock: 30g for 11ms (non-rotating disks)
MILSPEC 810E and 810C compliant
Highly Accelerated Life Tested (HALT)
4.4.1.14 Physical Characteristics
Precision Milled Aluminium Housing
14" (w) x 11" (h) x 2.5" (d)
10 lbs. (4.5kg)

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4.5 Controls and Connectors


03

04

02
LEGEND
01. Power Button
02. Dimmer Buttons
03. IDE PC Card
04. PCMCIA Card Slots
05. Power Connector
06. Ethernet
07. COM 1
08. COM 2
09. Keyboard
10. Soundport
11. USB Ports

01

ES04075a01

11

10

09

08

07

06

05

Figure 4-54: Touch Panel Controls and Connectors

Power Button. Turns power on or off to the Touch Panel.


Dimmer Buttons. Used to brighten or dim the display.
IDE PC Card. Enables an embedded computer system to use Type I, II and III SRAM, Flash and ATA Flash PC
Cards.
PCMCIA Card Slots. PCMCIA (Personal Computer Memory Card International Association) card slots hold additional PC Cards such as radio cards, hard drives, LAN cards, etc.
Power Connector. Used to connect the DC power cable to Touch Pane.
10/100 Ethernet Port. This port is used to network the Touch Panel. Ethernet will handle about 10,000,000 bitsper-second or 100,000,000 bits per second and can be used with almost any kind of computer.
COM 1 and COM 2. The Com 1 and Com 2 ports are used for peripherals with serial (RS 232) interface, such as a
scanner or printer.
Keyboard Connector. Used to connect a PS/2 Keyboard or Mouse.
Sound Port. SB16 Compatible Sound Port.
USB Ports. The USB ports are used to connect many different types of external devices.

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4.6 Maintenance
The Touch Panel is maintenance-free, except for normal cleaning. All settings, i.e. date and time etc, should be
done through the interface of the operating system, just like on any non-rugged PC.
The BIOS firmware is available, but should be accessed with care and only in exceptional cases.

4.6.1 Cleaning

CAUTION
Do not use sharp objects or tools when cleaning. Damage to the Touch Panel Screen will
occur.

CAUTION
Do not blow low pressure air directly onto the Touch Panel Screen. Damage to the Touch
Panel Screen will occur.

CAUTION
The Touch Panel Display should only be cleaned with a special cleaning agent made
specifically for this purpose. Damage to the Touch Panel Screen will occur.
Using a soft, lint-free cloth, keep the Touch Panel clean and free from dust and dirt. If available, you can use compressed air but do not blow directly on the Touch Panel Display.

4.6.2 BIOS Firmware


Normally, the BIOS firmware should not be accessed. All settings should be programmed though the interface of
the operating system. In exceptional cases the BIOS is available for use.
If the Touch Panel function is abnormal or unstable use the following procedure to restored it to the default
CHIPSET settings. Date and time can also be altered within the BIOS Firmware.
Step 1:

Make sure a keyboard is connected and apply power to the Touch Panel.

Step 2:

On the keyboard, press the F2 Key while the Touch Panel is booting.

Step 3:

Use the arrow keys to navigate through the BIOS Firmware.

Step 4:

To restore the Touch Panel to the default CHIPSET.


Go to the last page of the bios and choose Restore Default.
Set the following parameters:

Parallel = Disabled

USB Controller = Enabled

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USB Legacy = Enabled (For non-windows operation)

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Power Systems

Section 5

Power Systems
5.1 Introduction
This section provides details about the distribution of electrical power on the Centurion Electric Mining Shovel. The
shovel converts input electrical energy to output mechanical energy in the DC motion motors to move the mechanical components and assemblies of the shovel in the process of loading.

5.1.1 Power System Operation


The first electrical connection and isolation device on the shovel is the Air Disconnect Switch with Earthing. It is
found on the rear of the shovel Lower Assembly. This assembly receives the high voltage supply of alternating current (AC) from a substation connected to the mines electrical distribution network.
The Shovel Lower remains stationary during the digging cycle while the revolving Upper Assembly rotates on the
center gudgeon and swing circle. The converters supplying electrical energy to the DC motion motors are located
on the Upper Assembly; therefore, the electrical energy must be transferred from lower to upper through a Collector Ring Assembly.
An installed Kirk-key interlock system limits exposure to high energy electrical power located in the high voltage
enclosures and assemblies.
The High Voltage Cabinet provides electrical connection and isolation on the revolving Upper Assembly. This cabinet also contains lightning protection devices and fuses. Optional equipment includes current and voltage feedback transformers and an electric high voltage supply meter.
A three phase, dry type, air cooled, delta-to-wye Main Transformer provides the supply voltage to the armature
converters by stepping down the high voltage supply to 600VAC. Bus bars distribute the 3, 600VAC to the Reactive Power Compensation Cabinet and Armature Converter Cabinets.
A three phase, dry type, air cooled, delta-to-wye Auxiliary/Field Transformer provides various supply voltages by
stepping down the high voltage supply to 480VAC (380VAC 50Hz), 365VAC, 240VAC, 208VAC (190VAC 50Hz),
and 195VAC.

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Refer to Figure 5-1 for a block diagram detailing the components associated with this section. The shaded area
identifies all the components found on the stationary Lower Assembly. All other devices represented by blocks are
found on the revolving Upper Assembly.

Air
Disconnect
Switch

Collector
Rings

Main High Voltage


Disconnect Switch

High Voltage
Isolator

Main
Transformer

Armature
Converters

Bus Bars

Auxillary
Transformer

ES04053a01

Figure 5-1: Block Diagram of Power Distribution

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Figure 5-2 shows the single line diagram of the electrical power distribution.

Tail Cable
Supply

To Ground
Check Wire
in Tail Cable

A4

A3

Air Disconnect
Switch with
Earthing Switch

A4 A4 A3

Lower
High Voltage
Cabinet

A3

A4

Low Voltage
Collector

A4

High Voltage
Collector

Ground
Check Circuit

Upper High Voltage Cabinet

A2

A2

Main High
Voltage
Disconnect
Switch

A4

A4
Main Transformer
Isolator Switch

Lightning Lightning
Arrestor Arrestor
(Line to (Line to
Line)
Ground)

Power
Quality
Meter

Potential
Transformer

Main
Transformer
Contactor

ES04054a01

Armature Converters

600 VAC

Main Transformer
Themal &
Overload
Protection

Armature Converters

600VAC

480VAC
(380VAC 50Hz)
Auxiliary Supply
Circuit Breaker

240VAC
240 Supply
Control Supply
Circuit Breaker Circuit Breaker

Fuse

208VAC
(190VAC 50Hz)
Auxiliary Transformer
Secondary Circuit
Breaker

Lighting Secondary
Circuit Breaker

365VAC

195VAC
Swing Field
Circuit
Breaker

C/P Field
Circuit
Breaker

Hoist Field
Circuit
Breaker

Figure 5-2: Electrical Power Distribution Single Line Diagram

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5.2 Air Disconnect Switch with Earthing


This assembly provides permanent connection and complete isolation capabilities of the high voltage supply to the
shovel. A four conductor cable carrying the three phase voltage and ground enters this cabinet for initial distribution
to assemblies throughout the shovel. Incorporating a kirk-key lockout mechanism insures electrical isolation when
servicing is required. Refer to Topic 5.6 for details on the Key Interlock System operation.
The earthing functions enable for the application of ground through the Collector Ring Assembly when the high
voltage contacts of the Air Disconnect Switch is open.

5.2.1 Location and Operation


This assembly connects directly to the Carbody on the right rear of the Lower Assembly. The right propel motor
and right propel transmission are directly in front of this cabinet.
The tail cable carrying the high voltage supply, ground, and ground circuit check wires enters this cabinet through
cable clamp and armored cable connector on the front of the cabinet door. A cable sheath to ground connection
reduces insulation degradation due to high voltage corona effects. Refer to Figure 5-3.
Yellow Ground
Check Conductor
Bare Conductor
Ground (2)

Shielded
Phase
Conductors

Sheilded - Ground Check


Tail Cable
(Yellow)
Ground
Ground Check

-5!%#=

Phase Conductors
(3) Shielded
Ground

Cable Cross Section


Figure 5-3: Tail Cable

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Each shielded phase conductor of the tail cable connects to a bus bar bolted to the top of the Air Disconnect
Switch. Refer to Figure 5-4.

Figure 5-4: Air Disconnect Switch with Earthing

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5.3 2800XPB/XPC Collector Ring Assembly


The Collector Ring Assembly provides continuous electrical connections. This enables the Lower Assembly and
Upper Revolving Assembly to rotate and maintain electrical continuity throughout 360 of rotation during the dig
cycle. This assembly can be divided into two sections: (Refer to Figure 5-5)

Low Voltage - Bi-directional data connection for the Profibus DP-V1 communication used in the AC800
Remote I/O System. It also provides connection for the distribution of 480VAC, Propel Fields, Propel Armature, 120VAC control, and brake supply voltage from Upper Assembly to Lower Assembly.

High Voltage -Connection for the distribution of the three phase high voltage supply from the Lower Assembly to the Upper Assembly.

Figure 5-5: Collector Ring Assembly

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5.3.1 Location and Operation


The Low Voltage Collector Ring Assembly has a protective metal enclosure surrounding it. An inner Plexiglas viewing door allows for inspections during shovel operation.
The upper portion of the Collector ring assembly, or low voltage section, has 21 continuous electrical rings allowing
the Lower Assembly and Upper Revolving Assembly to rotate and maintain electrical continuity throughout 360 of
rotation.
Various signals, voltages, and/or currents are passed from the lower to the upper section and from the upper to the
lower section via these 21 rings. These signals, voltages, and/or currents are listed in Table 5-1.
Ring Number

Description

Spare

Spare

Spare

Pilot Ground wire - Kirk Key Ground

Brake Supply Signal from drive (clear - 24VDC Com.)

Brake Supply Signal from drive (black - 24VDC Supply)

Profibus Connection - Red

Profibus Connection - Green

Spare

10

Lower I/O Supply

11

Lower Heater Supply

12

Lower Supply COM

13

480VAC Supply

14

480VAC Supply

15

480VAC Supply

16

Propel Field

17

Propel Field

18

Left Propel Motor Armature

19

Left Propel Motor Armature

20

Right Propel Motor Armature

21

Right Propel Motor Armature

Table 5-1: Low Voltage Collector Assembly Ring Assignment

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Figure 5-6 provides a graphical representation of the Low Voltage Collector Ring Assembly.

Figure 5-6: Low Voltage Collector Ring Assembly

Tail cable voltage is passed from the lower to the upper section via these 4 rings. The list of signals, voltages, and/
or currents are listed in Table 5-2.
Ring Number

Description

GND

High Voltage VAC (Tail Cable Voltage)

High Voltage VAC (Tail Cable Voltage)

High Voltage VAC (Tail Cable Voltage)

Table 5-2: High Voltage Collector Assembly Ring Assignment

The High Voltage Collector ring assembly has 4 continuous electrical rings allowing the Lower Assembly and
Upper Revolving Assembly to rotate and maintain electrical continuity throughout 360 of rotation.

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Figure 5-7 provides a graphical representation of the High Voltage Collector Ring Assembly.
07 08

09

03 04 05 06

LEGEND
01. Mounting Bracket
02. Collector Ring (Ground)
03. Collector Ring (Ground)
04. Collector Ring (AC)
05. Collector Ring (AC)
06. Collector Ring (AC)
07. Splice Bar
08. Connector
09. Cable
10. Insulator
11. Collector Ring (AC)

ES04103a01

02

10

01

11

Figure 5-7: High Voltage Collector Ring Assembly

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5.4 4100XPB/XPC/BOSS Collector Ring Assembly


This assembly provides continuous electrical connections allowing the Lower Assembly and Upper Revolving
Assembly to rotate and maintain electrical continuity throughout 360 of rotation during the dig cycle. This assembly can be divided into three sections:

Communication - Bidirectional data connection for the Data Highway Plus [DH+] communication used in the
PLC remote I/O system.

Low Voltage/Field - Connection for the distribution of 480VAC, Propel Fields, Propel Armature, 120VAC
control, and brake supply voltage from Upper Assembly to Lower Assembly.

High Voltage -Connection for the distribution of the three phase high voltage supply from the Lower Assembly to the Upper Assembly.

5.4.1 Location

ES1826_01
Figure 5-8: Collector Ring Assembly - (4100XPB/XPC/BOSS Deck Plan)

The Collector Ring Assembly has a protective metal enclosure which surrounds it. An inner Plexiglas viewing door
allows for inspections during shovel operation.

5.4.2 Operation

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The three sections of the Collector Ring Assembly are shown in Figure 5-9.

Communication

Low Voltage

High Voltage

ES1480_01
Figure 5-9: Collector Ring Assembly Sections

The high voltage section contains the four (4) High Voltage ring-brush connections carrying the three phase high
voltage supply and ground. Refer to Figure 5-10.

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04

03

02

01

ES1481a_01

LEGEND
01. (01GRND) Ground Connection
02. (L31) Tail Cable Supply - C
03. (L21) Tail Cable Supply - B
04. (L11) Tail Cable Supply - A
Figure 5-10: Collector Ring Assembly - High Voltage Section

The low voltage section of the Collector Ring Assembly contains the connections for supplying the Propel armature
and field current, 460VAC or 480VAC, 120VAC, Brake Supply voltage, and ground monitor for use by assemblies
and components located in the Lower. Refer to Figure 5-11.

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01
02
03

04

05

06

ES1483a_01
LEGEND:
01. Right Propel Field
02. Left Propel Field
03. Right Propel Armature
04. Right Propel Armature
05. Left Propel Armature
06. Left Propel Armature
Figure 5-11: Collector Ring Assembly - Low Voltage Section

The eight brush-ring connectors at the top of the low voltage section carry voltages and signals at lower current
values than the lower part of the low voltage section therefore, they are smaller in size. Refer to Figure 5-12.

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08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
ES1489a_01

LEGEND:
01. 460VAC or 480VAC Auxiliary Supply - C
02. 460VAC or 480VAC Auxiliary Supply - B
03. 460VAC or 480VAC Auxiliary Supply - A
04. 120VAc Supply Neutral
05. Brake Supply
06. 120VAC Constant Voltage supply - Control Supply Neutral
07. 120VAC Constant Voltage Supply
08. Ground Monitor System
Figure 5-12: Collector Ring Assembly - Top of Low Voltage Section

The Communication section, located on the top of the Collector Ring Assembly, contains three brush/commutator
connections carrying the remote input-output data associated with the SLC system to and from the Lower Control
Cabinet assemblies. Refer to Figure 5-13.

03
02
01

ES1492a_01
LEGEND:
01. Clear
02. Shield
03. Blue
Figure 5-13: Collector Ring Assembly - Communication Section

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Connecting the high voltage from the Lower Assembly to the Collector Rings on the Upper Revolving Assembly are
Collector Shoes. Refer to Figure 5-14.

08

09

07
06
10

05
04

11
12

13

03

14

02

4.875 inches
0.0625 inches

15
16
17

01

ES04104a01

LEGEND
01. Shims
02. Bracket
03. Cable
04. Flexible Shunt
05. Spring
06. Collector Shoe

07.
08.
09.
10.
11.
12.

Collector Ring (Ground)


Mounting Bracket
Insulator
Collector Ring (AC)
Collector Shoe
Spring

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.

Flexible Shunt
Cable
Shims
Spring Base
Insulator

Figure 5-14: Collector Shoe Assemblies

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5.5 High Voltage Operation


The High Voltage Cabinet provides the components and circuits required for distributing the high voltage supply
from the Collector Ring Assembly to the Main Transformer and Auxiliary/Field Transformer. For a detailed location
of this cabinet, see Chapter 3, Centurion System Theory of Operation.

5.5.1 Location and Operation


The following components are located in the High Voltage Cabinet:

Main High Voltage Disconnect Switch


Main Transformer High Voltage Isolator Switch
Lightning Arrestors
Main Transformer Contactor
Power Quality Meter (PQM) (optional)
The Main High Voltage Disconnect Switch (H02X4) receives the high voltage supply from the Collector Ring
Assembly. Opening the Main High Voltage Disconnect Switch deenergizes and isolates the entire Upper Assembly
of the shovel. Potential Transformer (H08X1) provides the Power Quality Meter (H12X1) with Voltage inputs and
Control Power.
The high voltage is applied to the primary of the Main Transformer through the Main Transformer High Voltage Isolator Switch (H04X4) and directly to the primary winding of the Auxiliary/Field Transformer. During servicing or
maintenance, the Main Transformer High Voltage Isolator Switch disconnects power to the Main Transformer and
armature converters preventing shovel motion. The in-line fuses, (H02X1, H02X2, and H02X3) protect the Main
Transformer from excessive in-rush current. The Main Transformer Contactor (H05X1) is energized via a Remote
I/O output module and Main Transformer Contactor Relay (E13A4). After a proper machine start-up sequence, this
allows the high voltage supply to be applied to the primary of the Main Transformer.

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Figure 5-15 shows a single line diagram of the high voltage cabinet.

Power Quality
Meter
M

Main Transformer
High Voltage
Isolator Switch

Potential
Transformer
High Voltage
From Collector
Ring Assembly
Ground
Ground Check

Main Transformer
Contactor

Main Transformer
(2500/3500 kVA)

Main High Voltage


Disconnect Switch

Line-to-Ground
Lightning
Arrestors

Line-to-Line
Lightning
Arrestors
Auxilary - Field
Transformer
(350/435 kVA)

L01OX1

L01OX2

L01OX3

H11X1

H11X1
ES04055a01

Figure 5-15: High Voltage Cabinet - Single Line Diagram

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5.6 Key Interlock System


The following applies to a standard 7.5 KV system with above deck slip-rings and lower high voltage isolator with
an earthing feature. For detailed procedures, see Appendix B..

5.6.1 Operation
The P&H Electric Shovel is equipped with a series of special locks to prevent entry into areas which could pose an
electrocution hazard to personnel. Figure 5-16 is a schematic diagram of the Key Interlock System. See Appendix
F for detailed information that is intended to provide an understanding of the system which will enable personnel to
work in cooperation with the system and with all applicable Federal, State, Local and Mine specific safety regulations.
Tail Cable
Supply

To Ground Check
Wire in Tail Cable
M3BS
A4

A4

A4

Air Disconnect
Switch with
Earthing

A3

3 - Entrances

High Voltage
Collector

SK

Low Voltage
Collector

A4

A3

A3

Ground Check
Circuits

A4

M2B
A2

Main
High Voltage
Disconnect
Switch

A2

A4

Key A2
From Lower
Disconnect
A4

Main Transformer
Primary
Isolator Switch
To Main
Transformer
Primary

MTC
ES02808a01

To Aux
Transformer
Primary

Thermal and
Instantaneous
Overload Protection

Figure 5-16: Key Interlock System - Schematic Diagram

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WARNING

This Key Interlock System must not be defeated and must be maintained in the as provided condition. The padlocks supplied are a convenience and are not intended to
replace lock out - tag out procedures.

5.7 Main Transformer


The Main Transformer receives the three phase high voltage supply from the High Voltage Cabinet components.
The high voltage is stepped down to 600VAC which is applied to the bus bars feeding the four Armature converters.

5.7.1 Location and Operation


The 2000KVA delta wound primary receives the high voltage supply from the switches and contactors located in
the High Voltage Cabinet. Refer to Figure 5-17 for the vector diagram of the primary winding of the Main Transformer.

MT2

MT1

MT3
ES04056a01

Figure 5-17: Main Transformer Primary - Vector Diagram

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The 1550KVA wye wound secondaries each output 600VAC to the Armature converters via the bus bars. Refer to
Figure 5-18.
MS12

MS11

MSN

MS22

MS21

N2

MS23

MS13

ES1517b01

Figure 5-18: Main Transformer Secondaries - Vector Diagram

As the voltage is applied and current flows through the primary, magnetic lines of force are generated. During the
time current is increasing in the primary, magnetic lines of force expand outward from the primary and cut the secondary. A voltage is induced into a coil when magnetic lines cut across it. Therefore, the voltage across the primary
causes a voltage to be induced across the secondary.
The secondary voltage of a transformer may be either in phase or out of phase with the primary voltage. This
depends on the direction in which the windings are wound and the arrangement of the connections to the external
circuit. This means that the two voltages may rise and fall together or one may rise while the other is falling.
The Main Transformer secondary voltage is in phase with the primary and is referred to as a like-wound transformer. Phase indicating dots are used to indicate points on a transformer schematic symbol that have the same
polarity. Refer to Figure 5-19 for a schematic diagram of the Main Transformer.

7 5 3 1

2 4 6 8

7 5 3 1

MS11

MSN

MS12

MS21

N2

7 5 3 1

2 4 6 8

2 4 6 8

MS13

MS23

MS22

ES04076a01

Figure 5-19: Main Transformer - Schematic Diagram

The total voltage induced into the secondary winding of a transformer is determined by the ratio of the number of
turns in the primary to the number of turns in the secondary, and by the amount of voltage applied to the primary.

5.7.1.1 Main Transformer Thermal Probe

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The Main Transformer Thermal Probe provides thermal protection for the Main Transformer. Refer to Figure 5-20.

7 5 3 1

2 4 6 8

7 5 3 1

MS11

MSN

1L2

MS21

N2

U41X05
Main Transformer Thermal
Probe in #2 Coil
NC

MS23

MS22
2L2

2L1

2 4 6 8

MS13
1L3

MS12

1L1

7 5 3 1

2 4 6 8

2L3
ES04097a01

Figure 5-20: Main Transformer Thermal Probe

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A meter that indicates the temperature of the inside of the Main Transformer is located on the inboard side of the
Main Transformer. There are three types of meters that can be used on the Main Transformer. .
02

03

100

150

200

250
50
WINDING TEMPERATURE

LEGEND
01. Thermal Probe
02. Maximum Indicator
Pointer
03. Maximum Pointer Reset
Knob

ES04098a01

01

Figure 5-21: Thermal Probe and Temperature Indicator #1

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02
03
100
50

150
200

CENTIGRADE

250

ES04099a01

01

LEGEND
01. Thermal Probe
02. Maximum Indicator Pointer
03. Maximum Pointer Reset Knob
Figure 5-22: Thermal Probe and Temperature Indicator #2

A normally closed contact associated with the Thermal probe and Temperature Indicator is provides as an input to
a 16 Point Digital Input Signal Module of the Remote I/O System in the Auxiliary Cabinet.
If the temperature of the Main Transformer reaches 190C, the normally closed contact opens causing the AC800
Controller to initiate a 30 second delayed shutdown of the shovel. Refer to Figure 5-24.

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03
02
100

150

50

200

250

TEMPERATURE C

ES04100a01

01

Figure 5-23: Thermal Probe and Temperature Indicator #3

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120VAC

Neutral
A01A11C
16DI 120/230 2.25.0
01

1N
02

TTMT

Main Transformer
Thermal Probe in
#2 Coil

(10)

0
03

Main Transformer
Thermal Overload

(11)
04

2
05

3
06

4
07

5
08

6
09

7
10

2N
11

3N
12

0
13

1
14

2
15

3
16

17

5
18

6
19

ES04086a01

20

4N

Figure 5-24: Thermal Probe and Temperature Indicator Input to Remote I/O System

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5.8 Bus Bars


The Bus Bars deliver 600VAC from the Main Transformer secondaries to the five Armature Converters in the Converter Cabinet and the Reactive Power Compensation Cabinet. A total of six bars carry the three phase power on
an inboard set (1L1, 1L2, 1L3) and outboard set (2L1, 2L2, 2L3). The bus bars are totally contained within a sealed
enclosure for the entire run length from the Main Transformer to the RPC Cabinet.

2L1

1L3

2L2

1L2

2L3

1L1

Converter
Cabinet
MS11
MS12
MS13

MS21
MS22
MS23

RPC
Cabinet

Main
Transformer
MS13
MS12
MS11
MS23
MS22
MS21

Auxiliary
Transformer

ES02987a01

Figure 5-25: 2800 XPB Bus Bar Assembly

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Crowd Converter
Swing 3 Converter

Swing 2 Converter

Swing 1 Converter

Hoist 2 Converter

Hoist 1 Converter

Front of Shovel

RPC Bank 4

RPC Bank 3

RPC Bank 2

RPC Bank 1

RPC Bank
Secondary #1
MS13
MS12
MS11
MS23
MS22

Main
Transformer

MS21

Auxiliary/Field
Transformer

Secondary #2

ES1829_01

Figure 5-26: 4100 XPB Bus Bar Assembly

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5.9 Auxiliary/Field Transformer


The Auxiliary/Field Transformer receives the high voltage supply from the High Voltage Cabinet components.
Using transformer action, it converts the high voltage input into 480VAC (380VAC, 50Hz), 240VAC, 195VAC,
365VAC and 208VAC (190VAC, 50Hz). These voltages are distributed to the loads located throughout the shovel.

5.9.1 Location and Operation


The Auxiliary/Field Transformer is located in the right rear of the machinery house. The 350KVA delta wound primary receives the high voltage supply from the switches and contactors located in the High Voltage Cabinet. Refer
to Figure 5-27.

AT2

AT1

AT3
ES04057a01

Figure 5-27: Auxiliary/Field Transformer Primary - Vector Diagram

The list below identifies the outputs that are associated with the AS1, AS2 and AS3 wye wound secondary of the
Auxiliary Field Transformer. Refer to the electrical prints for the specific voltage associated with this shovel. Refer
to Figure 5-28 for an Auxiliary/Field Transformer Control Secondary Vector Diagram.

3, 480VAC, 60Hz.
3, 380VAC, 50Hz.
AS2
ASN
AS1
AS3
ES1533b01
Figure 5-28: Auxiliary/Field Transformer Auxiliary Secondary - Vector Diagram

The list below identifies the outputs that are associated with the CS1, CS2 and CS3 wye wound secondary of the
Auxiliary Field Transformer. Refer to the electrical prints for the specific voltage associated with this shovel. Refer
to Figure 5-29 for an Auxiliary/Field Transformer Field Supply Vector Diagram.

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3, 240VAC, 60Hz.
3, 240VAC, 50Hz.

CS2
CSN
CS1
CS3
ES1534a_01
Figure 5-29: Auxiliary/Field Transformer Control Secondary - Vector Diagram

The list below identifies the outputs that are associated with the FS11, FS12 and FS13, FS21, FS22 and FS23,
FS31, FS32 and FS33 wye wound secondary of the Auxiliary Field Transformer. Refer to the electrical prints for
the specific voltages associated with the shovel. Refer to Figure 5-30 for an Auxiliary/Field Transformer Lighting
Supply Vector Diagram

3, 365VAC, 60Hz for FS11, FS12 and FS13.


3, 195VAC, 60Hz for FS21, FS22 and FS23.
3, 365VAC, 50Hz for FS11, FS12 and FS13.
3, 195VAC, 50Hz for FS21, FS22 and FS23.

FS12
FS22
FS21
FS11

FSN

FS23
ES02810a01

FS13

Figure 5-30: Auxiliary/Field Transformer Field Supply - Vector Diagram

The list below identifies the outputs that are associated with the LS1, LS2 and LS3 wye wound secondary of the
Auxiliary Field Transformer. Refer to the electrical prints for the specific voltages associated with the shovel. Refer
to Figure 5-31 for an Auxiliary/Field Transformer Schematic Diagram.

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3, 208VAC, 60Hz for LS1, LS2 and LS3.


3, 190VAC,50Hz for LS1, LS2 and LS3.

LS2

LS1

LSN

ES02989a01

LS3

Figure 5-31: Auxiliary/Field Transformer Lighting Supply - Vector Diagram

As the voltage is applied and current flows through the primary, magnetic lines of force are generated. During the
time current is increasing in the primary, magnetic lines of force expand outward from the primary and cut the secondary. A voltage is induced into a coil when magnetic lines cut across it. Therefore, the voltage across the primary
causes a voltage to be induced across the secondary.
The secondary voltage of a transformer may be either in phase or out of phase with the primary voltage. This
depends on the direction in which the windings are wound and the arrangement of the connections to the external
circuit. This means that the two voltages may rise and fall together or one may rise while the other is falling.

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The Auxiliary/Field Transformer secondary voltages are in phase with the primary and is referred to as a likewound transformer. Phase indicating dots are used to indicate points on a transformer schematic symbol that have
the same polarity. Refer to Figure 5-32 for a schematic diagram of the Auxiliary/Field Transformer.

AT1
753 1

AT3

AT2
753 1

2468

2468

753 1

2468

ASN

AS1

AS2

AS3

CSN

CS1

CS2

CS3

FSN

FS21

LSN

FS11

FS22

LS1

FS12

LS2

FS23

FS13

LS3

ES04077a01
2

Figure 5-32: Auxiliary/Field Transformer - Schematic Diagram

The total voltage induced into the secondary winding of a transformer is determined mainly by the ratio of the number of turns in the primary to the number of turns in the secondary, and by the amount of voltage applied to the primary.

5.10 Ground Fault and Suppression Operation


The Ground Fault and Suppression Cabinet contains sensing components for detecting ground faults occurring in
both Main Transformer secondaries and the auxiliary supply secondary, control supply secondary and field supply
secondary of the Auxiliary Transformer. This cabinet also contains the components providing transient voltage suppression on the 600VAC bus bars. Transient voltage suppression is required because of the transients produced
by the DC motion motor mechanical commutation and the natural commutation of the four Armature Converter thyristor assemblies.

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5.10.1 Location
The Main Transformer Suppression Circuit Breakers, mount on the left side panel of the cabinet. The Ground Fault
Trip Indicators, Ground Current Test push buttons, Continuity Test push button, and Ground Fault Reset push buttons all mount on the inside of the front door panel. Refer to Figure 5-33. All of these items are accessible from the
outside of the cabinet for required maintenance and servicing by qualified personnel.

-5 ''$=

Figure 5-33: Ground Fault and Suppression Cabinet Front Door

Internal components group into either Ground Fault or Suppression components internally in the cabinet. The
Ground Fault components includes resistors, relays, current sensors, filtering capacitors and inductive chokes. The
Suppression components includes resistors, capacitors, and circuit breakers. Refer to Figure 5-34.

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LEGEND
01. Chokes
02. Capacitors
03. Sensing Resistors
04. Current Transformers
05. GFRM
06. Main Transformer Secondary #2 Suppression Breaker
07. Capacitors
08. Main Transformer Secondary #1 Suppression Breaker
09. Resistors
10. Capacitors
11. Resistors
12. GFRA
13. GFRF
14. Ground Fault Relay Tester





'

&

%
$

#

!

"

"

!



-5 ''#=

Figure 5-34: Ground Fault and Suppression Cabinet Layout

5.10.2 Operation
The main transformer ground fault system consists of current limiting resistors, which are connected to earth
ground from transformer secondary terminal MSN and two sensing systems, Ground Fault Relay Main (GFRM)
P02M1, and Ground Fault Relay P02N2. If there is a ground fault, current flows in the series resistors to ground.

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This current produces a voltage drop across the resistors in the chain. The voltage developed across P02E1D is
sampled by the ground fault circuitry.
A filter is used to allow only the AC component of current to pass through to the GFRM Current Sensor, P02N1.
Current is limited to about 2 amps, with GFRM sensing set to pick up at 2 amps. This first sensing system is sensitive to ground faults on the AC side of the Power Converters.
Ground faults on the DC side produce a peculiar current waveform. A filter is used to attenuate the base frequency
components. The output of the filter produces an AC voltage that is rectified by bridge rectifier P02N4, and the
resultant DC voltage level is sensed by the DC Ground Fault Relay, P02N2. The level of the voltage is proportional
to the current through the series resistor chain, which is the fault current.
This system of filters and separate sensing devices discriminates between AC and DC ground faults.
GFRM is a neutral-grounding-resistor monitor. It measures current in the transformer neutral, transformer neutralto-ground voltage, and continuity of the neutral grounding resistor. GFRM coordinates these three measurements
and provides one output contact for undervoltage operation in a main-breaker trip circuit. Trips are latched and
indicated by LEDs. Refer to Figure 5-35 for Ground Fault Relay Main (GFRM) settings and Figure 5-36. for ground
fault schematics

-5 ''!=
Figure 5-35: Ground Fault Relay Main, GFRM, Settings

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To Remote I/O
System
From Main
Transformer Neutral
MSN

From Ground Fault


Relay Tester
Terminal C
100 OHM
160W

120VAC
Neutral

CURRENT
SENSOR
CT1

L2
L1
B
A
CT2

33 OHM
300W
CHOKE
33 OHM
300W

From 24VDC
Power Supply
in the Transfer
Cabinet Terminal

FAULT
INDICATOR

F1

G
R
R1
+
G1
SW

40uF
40uF

33 OHM
300W
CHOKE

GROUND FAULT
RELAY MAIN (GFRM)

RESET P.B.

CHOKE

To Ground Fault
Relay Tester
Terminal HI

40uF
33 OHM
300W

TEST P.B.

CHOKE

CHOKE
50 OHM
25W

40uF

40uF

40uF

20K
OHM

50 OHM
25W

R
G
45V
45V

ES04078a01
GROUND FAULT RELAY (GFRDC)

2
750 OHM
10W

600VC SENSING RESISTOR

24VDC

(+)

(-)

To Remote I/O
System

Figure 5-36: GFRM, Ground Fault Relay Main Schematic Diagram

Current in the transformer neutral is sensed by a series window-type current transformer with a 5A secondary. A
trip level of 2A (2800XPB application) is switch selectable for use with a 5A, 15A, or 25A grounding resistor. This
corresponds to 0.25%, 1.0%, or 2.0% of the primary rating of the current transformer. Trip time is adjustable from
0.1 to 2.0 seconds
Transformer neutral-to-ground voltage and continuity of the neutral-grounding resistor are continuously measured
through an external sensing resistor connected to the neutral of the transformer. A resistor fault will be detected if
neutral-to-ground voltage exceeds the trip-level setting or if resistance of the neutral-grounding resistor exceeds
the trip resistance.
The main transformer is a dual secondary winding unit. The windings on the transformer are very closely coupled.
When a ground fault current flows in the non-monitored winding, MS21, MS22 and MS23, a fault current is
reflected in the monitored secondary, MS11, MS12 and MS13, activating the ground fault system.

5.10.3 Ground Fault Relay Auxiliary Operation


Refer to Figure 5-37 for Ground Fault Relay Auxiliary (GFRA) settings.

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Figure 5-37: Ground Fault Relay Auxiliary GFRA, Settings

GFRA is a neutral-grounding-resistor monitor. It measures current in the transformer neutral, transformer neutralto-ground voltage, and continuity of the neutral grounding resistor. GFRA coordinates these three measurements
and provides one output contact for undervoltage operation in a main-breaker trip circuit. Trips are latched and
indicated by LEDs. For a schematic diagram, refer to Figure 5-38.

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From Current
Sensor of GFRM

Power Systems

From Auxiliary Transformer


Neutral ASN and CSN
R

CURRENT
SENSOR

120VAC
Neutral
CT1

L2
L1
B
A
CT2

33 OHM
300W

F1

33 OHM
300W

GROUND FAULT RELAY


AUXILIARY (GFRA)

600VC SENSING RESISTOR


20K
OHM

G
R
R1
+
G1
SW

33 OHM
300W

R
G

AUX. RESET

45V
45V

33 OHM
300W

From Auxiliary
Transformer Neutral
FSN

From 24VDC
Power Supply
in the Transfer
Cabinet Terminal

FAULT INDICATOR

To Remote
I/O System

AUX. TEST

CURRENT
SENSOR

120VAC
Neutral

600VC SENSING RESISTOR

33 OHM
300W

33 OHM
300W

R
G

F1

GROUND FAULT
RELAY FIELD (GFRF)

45V
45V

G
R
R1
+
G1
SW

33 OHM
300W

CT1

33 OHM
300W

20K
OHM

L2
L1
B
A
CT2

From 24VDC
Power Supply
in the Transfer
Cabinet Terminal

FAULT INDICATOR

To Remote
I/O System

33 OHM
300W

FIELD RESET
2

To Current
Sensor of
GFRM

120VAC
Neutral

FIELD TEST

L2
L1
RMT
LO
HI
C

33 OHM
300W

TEST P.B.

GROUND FAULT RELAY TESTER

ES04079a01

Figure 5-38: GFRA, Ground Fault Relay Auxiliary Schematic Diagram

Current in the transformer neutral is sensed by a series window-type current transformer (P02N3) with a 5A secondary. A trip level of 0.5A (2800XPB application) is switch selectable for use with a 5A, 15A, or 25A grounding
resistor. This corresponds to 0.25%, 1.0%, or 2.0% of the primary rating of the current transformer. Trip time is
adjustable from 0.1 to 2.0 (0.5 for 2800XPB application) seconds.
Transformer neutral-to-ground voltage and continuity of the neutral-grounding resistor are continuously measured
through an external sensing resistor connected to the neutral of the transformer. A resistor fault will be detected if
neutral-to-ground voltage exceeds the trip-level setting or if resistance of the neutral-grounding resistor exceeds
the trip resistance.
The auxiliary transformer ground fault system consists of current limiting resistors, P02E2A, E2B, E2C, and E2D
which are connected to earth ground from transformer secondary terminal ASN and one sensing systems, Ground
Fault Relay Auxiliary (GFRA) P02M2.

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The Current Sensor, P02N3, samples the ground fault current. The signal is fed into GFRA. This relay is set for
0.5A. When this level of ground fault current exists, GFRA will pick up and a Auxiliary Ground Fault will be indicated.

5.10.4 Ground Fault Relay Field Operation


Ground Fault Relay Field (GFRF) is a neutral-grounding-resistor monitor. It measures current in the transformer
neutral, transformer neutral-to-ground voltage, and continuity of the neutral grounding resistor. GFRF coordinates
these three measurements and provides one output contact for undervoltage operation in a main-breaker trip circuit. Trips are latched and indicated by LEDs. Refer to Figure 5-39 for GFRF settings.

-5 '' =


Figure 5-39: Ground Fault Relay Field, GFRF, Settings

5.10.4.1 .Operation
The field transformer ground fault system consists of current limiting resistors, P02F1A, F1B, F1C, F2A, F2B, and
F2C which are connected to earth ground from transformer secondary terminal FSN and one sensing systems,
Ground Fault Relay Field (GFRF), P02M3.
The Current Sensor, P02N5, samples the ground fault current. The signal is fed into GFRF. This relay is set for
0.5A. When this level of ground fault current exists, GFRF will pick up and a Field Ground Fault will be indicated.
Current in the transformer neutral is sensed by a series window-type current transformer (P02N5) with a 5A secondary. A trip level of 0.5A (2800XPB application) is switch selectable for use with a 5A, 15A, or 25A grounding

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resistor. This corresponds to 0.25%, 1.0%, or 2.0% of the primary rating of the current transformer. Trip time is
adjustable from 0.1 to 2.0 (0.5 for 2800XPB application) seconds.
Transformer neutral-to-ground voltage and continuity of the neutral-grounding resistor are continuously measured
through an external sensing resistor connected to the neutral of the transformer. A resistor fault will be detected if
neutral-to-ground voltage exceeds the trip-level setting or if resistance of the neutral-grounding resistor exceeds
the trip resistance. Refer to Figure 5-40 for the GFRF Schematic diagram.
From Current
Sensor of GFRM

From Auxiliary Transformer


Neutral ASN and CSN
R

CURRENT
SENSOR

120VAC
Neutral
CT1

L2
L1
B
A
CT2

33 OHM
300W

F1

33 OHM
300W

GROUND FAULT RELAY


AUXILIARY (GFRA)

600VC SENSING RESISTOR


20K
OHM

G
R
R1
+
G1
SW

33 OHM
300W

R
G

AUX. RESET

45V
45V

33 OHM
300W

From Auxiliary
Transformer Neutral
FSN

From 24VDC
Power Supply
in the Transfer
Cabinet Terminal

FAULT INDICATOR

To Remote
I/O System

AUX. TEST

CURRENT
SENSOR

120VAC
Neutral

600VC SENSING RESISTOR

33 OHM
300W

33 OHM
300W

R
G

F1

GROUND FAULT
RELAY FIELD (GFRF)

45V
45V

G
R
R1
+
G1
SW

33 OHM
300W

CT1

33 OHM
300W

20K
OHM

L2
L1
B
A
CT2

From 24VDC
Power Supply
in the Transfer
Cabinet Terminal

FAULT INDICATOR

To Remote
I/O System

TEST P.B.

33 OHM
300W

120VAC
Neutral

FIELD TEST

L2
L1
RMT
LO
HI
C

33 OHM
300W

FIELD RESET
2

To Current
Sensor of
GFRM

GROUND FAULT RELAY TESTER

ES04079a01
2

Figure 5-40: GFRF, Ground Fault Relay Field Schematic Diagram

5.10.5 Suppression Circuit


Two types of suppression circuits connect to each Main Transformer secondary. A phase to phase RC notch filter
with each phase circuit consisting of two 6 resistors in parallel and one 20F capacitor in series with the resistors.
These RC notch filters are connected in a delta configuration across each secondary. Their purpose is to suppress
the ringing on the commutation notches produced by the converters.

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The second RC filter consists of a 1F capacitor in parallel with a 12K resistor which connects each phase-toground across each Main Transformer secondary. This phase to ground RC filter reduces the effects of distributed
capacitance present on the bus bar distribution system when the Main Transformer connects to the 600VAC bus
bar. Refer to Figure 5-41 for a diagram of the suppression circuit.

ES1994_01
Figure 5-41: Main Transformer Suppression Circuit

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5.11 Reactive Power Compensation Operation


The Reactive Power Compensation (RPC) Cabinet contains the components which provide a means of controlling
the reactive power demanded by the converters and simultaneously provides a filter for predominant harmonics
generated in the electrical system during normal shovel operation.

5.11.1 Location and Configuration


The Reactive Power Compensation Cabinet is divided into six sections. The cabinet contains four banks of capacitors located in sections F19, F11, F32, and F33. Related distribution and control components are contained in the
F21 and F22. sections. Refer to Figure 5-42 and Figure 5-43 for diagrams on how the RPC cabinet is configured.

Bank 1

Bank

Thyristors for
Bank 1 and Bank 3

Thyristors for
Bank and Bank 2

Bank 3

Bank 2

Front of
Shovel

ES02999a01
Figure 5-42: RPC Cabinet Layout

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Figure 5-43: RPC Switching and Capacitor/Reactor Cabinet (Typical)

The first cabinet contains the capacitors, reactors, and circuit breakers for the Bank and Bank 1. The Bank is
on the inboard side and Bank 1 is on the outboard side.
The second cabinet contains the switching components for the Bank, Bank 1, Bank 2, and Bank 3. This cabinet
also contains the dV/dT circuits, SCRs, and diodes used for charging and discharging the capacitors. The Bank
and Bank 2 components are on the inboard side. Bank 1 and Bank 3 components are on the outboard side.
The third cabinet contains the capacitors, reactors, and circuit breakers for Bank 2 and Bank 3. Bank 2 is on the
inboard side and Bank 3 is on the outboard side.

5.11.2 RPC Operation


The RPC System consists of the following basic components:

Summing Transformer
KVAR Sensing Potential Transformer
KVAR Transducer
Intelligent Interface Module
RPC Firing Board
Pulse Transformers

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Switching Components, Reactors and Capacitors


5.11.2.1 Power Factor Correction
The load for the armature and field converters is the inductive motors requiring electromagnetic fields to operate.
These inductive loads require two components of electrical power to operate:

Working power, KW, to perform the actual work of creating motion.


Reactive power, KVAR, to sustain the electromagnetic field.
Working power, or KW, consumes watts which are readable with a wattmeter. Reactive power, or KVAR, does not
perform any useful work because the reactive current circulates between the converter and motor placing a heavier
drain on the power source and distribution system. KW and KVAR together make up Apparent Power (AP), measurable in Kilovolt-amperes (KVA). Refer to Figure 5-44 for a graphical representation of KW, KVAR, and KVA.

kW

kVAR
kVA

ES1197_01

Figure 5-44: KW, KVAR and KVA Relationship

Power Factor (PF) is the ratio of actual KW to the total KVA of the flowing current. PF can be determined by using
the following formula:
PF = KW KVA
A PF of one (1) indicates all of the current flowing between the source and load is consumed in the production of
work in the load. As reactive current increases, and the Power Factor decreases, the amount of current performing
work decreases. This is not a desirable electrical condition or economical situation and can be overcome through
the use of a reactive power compensation system.
The RPC System takes advantage of a capacitors natural tendency to draw leading current when connected to an
AC line. The RPC system controls the level of reactive power through an electronic switch by connecting and disconnecting banks of capacitors from the line.
The leading capacitive current compensates for the lagging inductive reactive current inherent in operation of the
motion converters. The result is that total line current equals the active current. In terms of power the active power
equals the apparent power or volt-amperes where the Power Factor now achieves one (1).

5.11.2.2 Reactive Power Compensation


he KVAR Transducer, U94B7, compares the phase relationship of the voltage and current in the bus bars feeding
the armature converters. The KVAR Transducer receives two input signals and produces an output error signal

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proportional to the phase differences between the voltage and current on the 600VAC bus bars. Under no load
conditions, the output signal will be at or near 0V, as the voltage and current on the AC bus bars remain in phase.
Under increasing load conditions, when the shovel starts to dig and Hoist and Crowd motions are being used, the
output of the KVAR Transducer will increase as the voltage and current phase relationship changes.
The KVAR Transducer receives 115VAC from the KVAR Sensing Potential Transformers, U94B5 and U94B6. This
input serves as supply power and a voltage reference. The current sensing inputs come from the Summing Transformers, K02E1and K06E1. Summing Transformer Phase A, K02E1, uses Current Transformers to measure the
A line current from both 1L1 and 2L1 bus bars. Summing Transformer Phase C, K06E1, also uses Current Transformers to measure the C line current from both 1L3 and 2L3 bus bars. Internally the KVAR transducer analyses
the voltage from the KVAR Sensing Potential Transformers and the current from the Summing Transformers. The
output error voltage represents the required KVAR correction factor and is applied to the Remote I/O System 2
Analog Voltage Input High Speed Module, U94A8N.

Summing
Transformer
Phase A

240VAC, 3

KVAR Sensing
Potential Transformers

1L1 1L2 1L3

CT
CT

KVAR
Transducer

2L1 2L2 2L3

CT

Bank
Pulse
Transformers

Bank
Thyristor
Switches

Bank 2
Pulse
Transformers

Bank 2
Thyristor
Switches

Bank 1
Pulse
Transformers

Bank 1
Thyristor
Switches

Bank 3
Pulse
Transformers

Bank 3
Thyristor
Switches

CT

Remote I/O
System
Summing
Transformer
Phase C
Hoist Field
Drive

Line
Voltage

2
Analog
Voltage
Input
High
Speed
Module

Bank
4
Digital
Bank 2
Output
24VDC
Module Bank 1

RPC
Firing
Board

Bank 3

ES04034a01

Figure 5-45: Block Diagram of RPC System

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The Intelligent Interface Module evaluates the KVAR feedback signal and outputs digital control signals from a 4
Digital Output 24VDC Module, U94A8P to the RPC Firing Board, U94C1. Refer to Figure 5-46.

3
34VAC

To Pulse
Transformers
Bank

+24VDC
RPC Power
Check

To Pulse
Transformers
Bank 2

To Pulse
Transformers
Bank 1

To Pulse
Transformers
Bank 3

Digital
Control
Signals
from
Remote
I/O System

+15VDC
COM

ES04035a01

Figure 5-46: RPC Firing Board

The RPC Firing Board produces control pulses to the Pulse Transformers in the proper phase relationship to the
600VAC line voltage.
The Power Supply and Line Sync circuit receives a +24VDC input from a 24VDC Supply in the RPC Cabinet,
U94A7, and 3 34VAC from the RPC Synchronizing Transformer, U94C2. This circuit provides all operating voltages for the RPC Firing Board and also provides the B-A, A-B, C-B, B-C, A-C, and C-A synchronizing signals to the
Pulse Generators. The synchronizing signals ensure that the Pulse Generator produces control pulses in the
proper phase relationship to the 600VAC line voltage.
The 100KHz Oscillator and On-Signal Interface generates a 100KHz OSC signal to be used by the Pulse Generators in producing the control pulses to the Pulse Transformers. The digital control signals are used to synchronize

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the on-signals, ON1, ON2, ON3, ON4 and ON5 which tell the Pulse Generator when to turn on and produce an output.
The Pulse Generators compare the OSC signals, B-A, A-B, C-B, B-C, A-C, and C-A synchronizing signals and
ON1, ON2, ON3, ON4 and ON5 signals to generate the control pulses for the Pulse Transformers. The control
pulses are generated at the proper phase relationship to the 600VAC line voltage. This allows the RPC capacitors
to be connected to the line in a synchronous manner without producing transients.
The Pulse Transformers, refer to Figure 5-47, condition the control pulses into firing pulses which are applied
directly to the gate and cathode circuit of the RPC Thyristors. An LED on the Pulse Transformer illuminates when a
firing pulse is being applied to the thyristor.

ES1999_01

Figure 5-47: Pulse Transformer

The Thyristor Switch section contains three thyristor switches for each bank of capacitance. Each thyristor switch
consists of an SCR and diode in parallel configuration which is in series with the reactor and capacitor bank.
When the Main Transformer energizes, the diode in each bank leg allows the capacitors to charge to the peak of
the line-to-line voltage. When reactive power compensation is required, the thyristor is gated by the RPC Firing

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Board via the Pulse Transformers at the peak of the AC line, connecting the capacitor banks to the AC bus bar
without any transients.Refer to Figure 5-48 and Figure 5-49.
3 600VAC

3 600VAC

1C-3

CAPACITOR CIRCUIT
BREAKER

200A

200A

200A

200A

200A

200A

1C-1

200A

200A

200A

200A

200A

200A

1C-2

200A

200A

200A

ES04080a01

200A

200A
A
200A
B

Figure 5-48: Thyristor Switch Section - Capacitor Charge

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3 600VAC

3 600VAC

1C-3

CAPACITOR CIRCUIT
BREAKER

200A

200A

200A

200A

200A

200A

1C-1

200A

200A

200A

200A

200A

200A

1C-2

200A

200A

200A

ES04080b01

200A

200A
A
200A
B

Figure 5-49: Thyristor Switch Section - Capacitor Discharge

Each of the four Reactor - Capacitor sections consist of a single 1200 Amp circuit breaker, three air core reactors,
three capacitor circuits with associated set of two 1200V, 200A fuses. The handle of the circuit breaker extends
through the front panel door for ease of maintenance when resetting is required. One pole of the breaker and single air core reactor connect in series with three capacitors connected in parallel. The reactors and capacitors form

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a tuned circuit to filter out the predominant harmonics generated by the thyristor converters. The capacitors connect to the outbound bus via two fuses.
Bank indicators, refer to Figure 5-50, located on the front door of each reactor-capacitor section, consists of a
series of directional diodes and LEDs connected across the capacitor banks on each phase. One light illuminated,
per phase, indicates the capacitors are charged. One light illuminated, per phase, indicates the capacitors are in
circuit. Three LEDs are used to indicate that the 3 phase-to-phase capacitor circuits are charged. Three more
LEDs are used to indicate that the 3 phase-to-phase capacitor circuits are being used. A decal shows the combination of indicator lights and meaning of that indication. Refer to Figure 5-51.

LED 1
D1

R2

D2

R3

LED 2

Charge
Discharge

R1

A1 B1 C1
R5 A1 B1 C1

R4

ES2000_01

Figure 5-50: RPC Indicator Circuit

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= Off
= On

RPC Indication
Phase

Mode of
Operation

A-C C-B

Condition

Description

Normal

Yellow lights are on.


Position important, only one light per phase.

B-A

15 Seconds
After Start-up
and During
Machine Idling

Hoist, Crowd
and Swing
Motors Stalled

Motors Stalled in
Sequence Slowly,
i.e. Hoist, Crowd,
Swing

Fault

Capacitors are not charged.


Power diodes are not responding.
Open circuit breaker.

Fault

Any two lights in any phase are on.


The thyristor/diode controlling the capacitor
banks on that phase are shorted.

Normal

All capacitor banks should be on line and all


six indicator lights for each step should be
on.

Fault

All or any one step as shown. This indicates


step not being brought on line. Faulty KVAR
Transducer or electronics.
All six indicator lights for each step should go
on as the step becomes active. If not, check
RPC electronics and KVAR Transducer for
proper operation.

Normal

ES1969_01

Figure 5-51: RPC Indicator Decal

Implementing the Reactive Power Compensation requires varying levels of capacitance as the KVAR requirements
increase and decrease depending on the load requirements of the shovel. In order to achieve the varying levels of
KVAR, the RPC switches parallel banks of capacitors into the electrical system. Four banks of capacitors are
placed on the shovel to meet this varying KVAR requirement. Each bank consists of three capacitors that add
together defining the amount of VAR compensation. The banks are identified below with their KVAR values:

Bank - 675 KVAR (60Hz) 750 KVAR (50Hz)


Bank 1 - 1350 KVAR (60Hz) 1312 KVAR (50Hz)
Bank 2 - 1350 KVAR (60Hz) 1312 KVAR (50Hz)
Bank 3 - 1350 KVAR (60Hz) 1312 KVAR (50Hz)
The RPC System sequences the banks on in a controlled manner to effectively produce steps of compensation.
This system consists of four independently controlled banks of capacitance. In this implementation a total of seven
incremental steps of compensation are available throughout the digging cycle. Table 5-3 displays the steps.
Banks

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

Step 6

Step 7

Bank

on

off

on

off

on

off

on

Bank 1

off

on

on

on

on

on

on

Table 5-3: RPC Step Sequence

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Banks

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

Step 6

Step 7

Bank 2

off

off

off

on

on

on

on

Bank 3

off

off

off

off

off

on

on

Table 5-3: RPC Step Sequence

5.11.2.3 Harmonic Filtering

CAUTION
The Reactors and Capacitors form tuned circuits. It is imperative that all the components
be kept in proper working order. Blown capacitor fuses, removed or leaking capacitors
will upset the tuning which may lead to faulty operation of the shovel or unnecessary
disturbances on the supply network. If any one bank of capacitors cannot be completely
maintained as designed, the entire bank should be disconnected from service.
The RPC system also filters predominant undesirable harmonic frequencies produced by the converters. The converters used on the shovel are phase controlled and the line currents lag the voltage and are not pure sine waves.
Mathematically this non-sinusoidal waveform can be broken down into a series of sinusoidal waveforms that vary
in peak amplitude, phase relationship, and frequency. These frequencies are called harmonics. A three-phase six
thyristor converter current generates definite frequencies or harmonics. The formula for generated harmonics (h)
is:
h = pn 1
p = number of firing pulses. For example, 6 thyristors, 6 pulses.
n = 1,2,3,4,5,etc.
Harmonics for a 6 thyristors converter are as follows:

h = 6 1 1 = 5,7 or,
h = 6 2 1 = 11, 13 or
h = 6 3 1 = 17, 19 etc.

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The capacitor banks are connected in series with air core reactors. This L-C circuit is approximately tuned to the
4.5 harmonic, (4.5 60 = 270Hz) for 60Hz systems and (4.5 50 = 225Hz) for 50 Hz systems. Refer to Figure 552 for details on harmonic frequencies.

17 13

11

11

13 17

ES1198a_01

Figure 5-52: Harmonic Frequencies (60Hz Fundamental)

The higher the number of the harmonic the lower the percentage of the fundamental current. The filter tuning is to
the 4.5 harmonic to prevent the resonance problems causing extremely high currents. Because of the size and tuning of the RPC system to the 4.5 harmonic, the predominant harmonics of 5, 7, 11, and 13 are greatly attenuated.

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Power Systems

5.12 Converter Operation


The Converter Cabinet contains the power electronics and associated components supplying direct current to the
armatures of each motion motors. The Converter Cabinet contains four major sections: Input Power Distribution
and Protection, Current Feedback, Converters, and Diverter Circuitry.

5.12.1 Cabinet Layout


Refer to Figure 5-53 for the Converter Cabinet Layout. The Converter Cabinet contains eight sections.
Inboard side

Swing Converter section.


Hoist #1/Propel #1 - Swing Input Power Distribution and Protection, Diverter Circuitry.
Hoist #1/Propel #1 Converter section.
Outboard side

Hoist #2 Converter section.


Hoist #2 - Crowd/Propel #2 Input Power Distribution and Protection, Diverter Circuitry.
Crowd/Propel #2 Converter section.
The sections are cooled by top mounted vane axial blowers. These blowers draw in filtered machinery air through
the cabinet doors and over thyristors for cooling and ventilation
:

Swing

Swing
Hoist #1
Hoist #2
Hoist #1/Propel #1 Propel #1
Input Power
Distribution and
ES03003a01
Protection
Diverter Circuitry

Hoist #2
Crowd/Propel #2
Input Power
Distribution and
Protection
Diverter Circuitry

Crowd
Propel #2

Figure 5-53: Converter Cabinet Layout

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5.12.2 .Input Power Distribution and Protection Circuit Operation


The Input Power Distribution and Protection Section contains bus bars, fuses, varistors, and a Phase Monitor
Relay. The bus bars distribute the three-phase power from the overhead bus bars to the Thyristor section. The bus
bar fuses protect the converter from over current conditions. The varistors protect the converter and Phase Monitor
Relay from voltage spikes. The Phase Monitor Relay detects phase loss.
Refer to Figure 5-54. Each bus bar phase has two fuses, rated at 800V/1300A, wired in parallel providing overcurrent protection for the SCRs in the converter.
3 600 VAC

Line
Fuses

A
Output to
PLC System

C
Fuses

Varistors

Phase Monitor
Relay
ES1170a_01

Figure 5-54: Input Power Distribution and Protection

Branching off of the 600VAC bus bars to the Phase Monitor Relay are 700V/50A fuses which are used in conjunction with the Phase Monitor Relay to detect a loss of incoming 600VAC phase.
Metal Oxide Varistors, or MOVs, provide transient voltage protection for the converter.

5.12.2.1 Phase Monitor Relay


The Phase Monitor Relays (PRH1, PRH2, PRSF, and PRC), refer to Figure 5-54, continuously monitor the 3
600VAC Converter incoming voltage for phase loss, low voltage and phase reversal. The monitor consists of a
solid-state sensing circuit, driving an electromechanical relay.

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Applying correct voltage and phase rotation energizes the relay. Normally open contacts associated with the
Phase Monitor Relay close applying 24VDC to a 4 Digital Input 24VDC Module of the Remote I/O System in the
Converter Cabinet. Refer to Figure 5-55.
+24VDC
U95B01G
4DI 24VDC
1

2.26.5

2
3
4
PRH1

5
PRH2

Phase Monitor
Relay
Hoist 1
Hoist 2

7
8
U95B01H
4DI 24VDC
1

PRSF
PRC

2.26.6
Swing 1, 2, 3
Crowd/Propel

3
4

5
6
7

ES04072a01

Figure 5-55: Phase Monitor Relay Input to Remote I/O System

When properly adjusted, a fault condition will cause the relay to de-energize, even when regenerated voltage is
present. This causes the contact associated with the Phase Monitor Relay to open. The active input to the 4 Digital
Input 24VDC Module is interrupted. This causes the Controller to initiate an instant shutdown of the mining shovel.
When the fault is corrected the Phase Monitor Relay automatically resets. Each of the Phase Monitor Relays is
adjustable to allow the monitor to be set for existing conditions. NORMAL and TRIP LED indicators are provided to
aid in adjustment and system troubleshooting.

5.12.3 Current Feedback Operation


Current Transformers are used on the 600VAC bus input to the Converters and provide a current feedback signal
to the Digital Control Modules. This current feedback signal is proportional to the current at the motor. The CTs
have a turns ratio of 4000:5.

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5.12.4 Converter Operation


The five Armature Converters have a Forward and Reverse bridge containing six SCRs each. A total of twelve
SCRs produce the voltage and current required to run the armature circuit of the DC motors.
The converter/motor combination operate together in two basic modes of operation, Converter or Inverter. During
the converter mode of operation, the converters supply direct current to the motors for motion through controlled
thyristor gating.
During the inverter mode of operation, the motors supply the converter with stored energy from the armatures collapsing magnetic field. The converter inverts this energy back into AC energy through controlled thyristor gating.
The inverted AC current is applied onto the overhead bus bars. It can be used by other motions or fed back through
the Main Transformer onto the mines power distribution grid. This inverting of stored energy from the motors into
AC energy is referred to as regeneration.

5.12.4.1 SCR Theory


An SCR, or Thyristor, is an electronic switch, it only conducts when it is gated on. Refer to Figure 5-56.

Gate Lead (G)

Cathode Lead (K)

Anode (A)

Cathode (K)

ES2002_01

Figure 5-56: SCR Symbol

The Anode must be positive with respect to the Cathode to bias an SCR for conduction however, this alone does
not make an SCR conduct. The Gate Lead must also have a positive voltage applied, again, with respect to the
Cathode, to make the SCR conduct.
If all biasing conditions are correct, the SCR will conduct for as long as the Anode to Cathode relationship remains,
even if the Gate to Cathode relationship is removed. Only when the Cathode becomes positive, with respect to the
Anode, will the SCR turn off.
The important thing to remember is that a small current from Gate to Cathode can fire the SCR. The only way to
stop the SCR from conducting is to reduce the load current to a value less than the minimum forward bias current.
Gate current is required only until the Anode current has completely built up to a point sufficient to sustain conduction. After conduction from Cathode to Anode begins, removing the Gate current has no effect.

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Refer to Figure 5-57. When alternating current is applied to an SCR, the controlled rectifier may be turned on at
any time during the half cycle, thus controlling the amount of DC power available from zero to maximum.

Input

Output

Gate Lead

Input

Output

Gate Lead

Input

Output

Gate Lead
ES2003_01

Figure 5-57: SCR Controlled Rectification Example

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5.12.4.2 Converters
When SCRs are used in a 3 Bridge Rectifier, the DC output can be controlled by controlling when the SCRs are
fired. Refer to Figure 5-58.

T1

Motor

ES2005_01

Figure 5-58: 3 SCR Bridge Rectifier

In the example shown in Figure 5-58, the red line shows which SCRs would be fired at T1. The A is the most
positive phase, C the most negative phase. In this standard six SCR 3 Bridge Rectifier, DC current can only
flow in one direction through the Motor.
In order to reverse the current, a twelve SCR 3 Bridge Rectifier is required. Refer to Figure 5-59.

T1

Motor

Forward
Reverse
ES2006_01

Figure 5-59: 3 SCR Reversing Bridge Rectifier

In a twelve SCR 3 Bridge Rectifier, current can flow in either the forward or reverse direction through the motor
depending on which SCRs are fired. When forward direction of the motor is required, the forward bridge SCRs are
fired. The reverse bridge SCRs are in a blocked condition. No firing pulses are applied to the gate. When reverse
direction of the motor is required, the reverse bridge SCRs are fired. The forward bridge SCRs are in a blocked
condition. No firing pulses are applied to the gate.

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The hoist motor armatures are connected across two 12 SCR 3 Bridge Rectifiers. To double the voltage output of
the converter a series bridge arrangement is used. Refer to Figure 5-60.

T1

Forward
Reverse

Motor

Motor

T1

ES2007_01

Figure 5-60: 3 SCR Series Bridge Rectifier

5.12.5 Diverter Circuit Operation


The Diverter Circuit discharges a capacitor to block, or force off, Armature Converter SCRs when over current
conditions are detected. It also provides a path to dissipate the built up magnetic field across the motor armature.
The Diverter Circuit is adjusted at shovel commissioning to initiate a diverter trip at 140% of stall armature current.
The three stages of operation in the Diverter system are as follows:

Diverter Capacitor Charging.


Overcurrent Detection.
Diverter Capacitor Discharge and Motor Dissipation.
Diverter protection is provided for the following bridges:

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Hoist #1/Propel #1 Converter - Forward bridge protection only.


Hoist #2 Converter - Forward bridge protection only.
Swing Converter - Forward and reverse bridge protection.
Crowd/Propel #2 Converter - Forward and reverse bridge protection.
In the Hoist converters, only one capacitor requires charging because only the forward bridge produces enough
current capable of flashing the motors. In the Crowd and Swing Converters, either direction is capable of producing
enough current to flash the motors therefore, two capacitors require charging to protect both the forward and
reverse converters. The Propel #1 motor is excited by the Hoist #1 converter and the Propel #2 motor by the Crowd
converter. Diverter protection is provided by those respective systems.

5.12.5.1 Diverter Capacitor Charging


240VAC is applied through normally open contacts of the Diverter Charging Relay Hoist (DCH), Diverter Charging
Relay Swing (DCS) and Diverter Charging Relay Crowd/Propel (DCCP) to the Diverter Power Supplies Front and
Rear Hoist, Swing and Crowd Propel. Refer to Figure 5-61.
3 240VAC
DCH
DCH
Front
Hoist
K07B5

Rear
Hoist
K03B4

Rectifier
K07C6

Rectifier
K03C3

DCS
DCS
Swings
K07B4
Rectifier
K07C3
DCCP
DCCP
Crowd/
Propel
K12B5

ES04058a01

Rectifier
K12C6

Figure 5-61: Diverter Power Supplies

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The 240VAC is rectified and applied to the Diverter Capacitors in the correct polarity to protect either the forward or
reverse bridges. Each capacitor charges to approximately 1300 VDC. Refer to Figure 5-62, Figure 5-63, and Figure 5-64.
K06B04D

K06B04E
K06B04C

(2)

DIVERTER PROTECTION
RELAY, HOIST #1/PROPEL #1

DPH1

.36 OHM

+
K08G03A

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Front Hoist

K06K07

K08K01

K08G02

K06B04B
3.3K

K06B04A
3.3K

K06B02

K08G04

A1H1

(7)

K08G03B

K07A07D

K07A07C

RC

5K

1200uF

K07A07B
DCH

DCH

DCH

RC

K08G03D
K08G03C

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Front Hoist

K08G03
K08G03E
K08G03F

K07A07A
5K

To Motion
Feedback Circuit
Board

K08G03G
K08G03H

RIGHT PROPEL MOTOR


ARMATURE (PROPEL FIELD)

P1AC

(A1)

21

To Motion Feedback
Circuit Board

P1

(A2)

A1

To Motion Feedback
Circuit Board

H1

A2

K02B03D

To Motion Feedback
Circuit Board

K02B03E
K02B03C
(7)

(2)

DIVERTER PROTECTION
RELAY, HOIST #2

DPH2

K02B03B
3.3K

K02B01

K01G01
K01G04

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Rear Hoist

HOIST MOTOR
ARMATURE FRONT

HAC

A1H2

20

.36 OHM

K02R05

K01K01

K01G02B

K03A04C

K01G02A

K03A04D

RC

K01G02D
K01G02C

K01G02
K01G02E

K02B03A
3.3K

5K

K03A04B
DCH

1200uF
DCH

DCH

RC

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Rear Hoist

K03A04A

A2H1

5K

K01G02F
K01G02G
K01G02H

U61X01A
HOIST MOTOR
ARMATURE REAR
A1

H2

A2

To Motion
Feedback Circuit
Board

ES04081a01

A2H2

Figure 5-62: Hoist #1/Propel #1 and Hoist #2 Diverter Capacitor Charge Polarity

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To Motion
Feedback Circuit
Board

To Motion
Feedback Circuit
Board
A1

S1

To Motion
Feedback Circuit
Board

A2

A1

S2

K05L01
K05H01
K05H03B

K07A05C
RC

K05H03A

A2
K06K06

K07A05A
5K
K07A05D

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Swing

1200uF
DCS

DCS

DCS

RC

K05H04
K05H03D
K05H03C

K05H03

K05H03E

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Swing

K07A05B
5K

K05H03F
K05H03G
K05H03H

K06B03D

K06B03E
DIVERTER PROTECTION
SWING

K06B03C
(2)

K05G04

DPS1
(7)

K06B03A
3.3K

K06B01

.36 OHM

K05K01

+
K07A04B
5K
K07A04D

K05G02
K07A04C

K05G03B

RC

K05G03A

K06B03B
3.3K

K06K05

1200uF
DCS

DCS

DCS

RC

ES04082a01
K05G03D
K05G03C

K05G03
K05G03E
K05G03F

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Swing

K07A04A
5K

K05G03G
K05G03H

Figure 5-63: Swing Diverter Capacitor Charge Polarity

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CAC

K02R07

K04L01
K04H03

K03A05A
5K

K03A05E

K04H02B
K04H02A

K03A05F

RC
K04H01

K04H02D
K04H02C

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Front Hoist

P2AC

P2

+
DCCP

DCCP

DCCP

RC

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Front Hoist
K02B04D

K03A05B
5K

K02B04E

K04H02E
K04H02

K04H02F
K04H02G

DIVERTER PROTECTION RELAY


CROWD/PROPEL #2

K02B04C

K04G01

(2)

DPCP
(7)

K04H02H

K02B04A
3.3K

K02B02

K02B04B
3.3K

.36 OHM

K04K01

K02R06

K04G04

K03A05C
5K
K03A05G

K04G02B
K04G02A

RC

K03A05H

DCCP

DCCP

DCCP

RC

ES04083a01
K04G02D
K04G02C

K04G02
K04G02E
K04G02F

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Front Hoist

K03A05D
5K

K04G02G
K04G02H

Figure 5-64: Crowd/Propel #2 Diverter Capacitor Charge Polarity

At shovel start, the normally closed contacts of the Diverter Charging Relay Hoist (DCH), Diverter Charging Relay
Swing (DCS) and Diverter Charging Relay Crowd/Propel (DCCP) open allowing the Diverter Capacitors to charge
to 1300VDC. This charge will be maintained on the Diverter Capacitors until an overcurrent condition is detected
and a diverter trip is initiated or, when the shovel is shutdown. Refer to Subtopic 5.12.5.3 for a description of capacitor discharge, motor dissipation.
When the shovel is shutdown, the Diverter Charging Relay Hoist (DCH), Diverter Charging Relay Swing (DCS) and
Diverter Charging Relay Crowd/Propel (DCCP) de-energize allowing the Diverter Capacitors to discharge through
the normally closed contacts.

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5.12.5.2 Diverter Control Modules


Figure 5-65 shows a typical Diverter Control Module with all possible inputs. The Diverter Control Module Hoist
(DCMH) does not require inputs at TB1-8, 9 and 10 due to protection only being provided for the forward bridge.

A
B
C
D
E

Common
+15VDC
+ Output
- Output
-15VDC

Current
Sensor

+28VDC

To Diverter
SCR

COM
To Diverter
SCR

DELR

DCM

+24VDC
Diverter Trip Signal

Reverse
Gate Block

Forward
COM

COM
ES03033a01

Figure 5-65: Diverter Control Module

Inputs
Current Sensor - The Current Sensor produces a voltage proportional to the current flowing through it and
identical in waveform. The polarity of the output is directly proportional to the current flow in the circuit.
The current sensor works on the Hall Effect principle. A Hall generator, four pole magneto-sensitive device,
is mounted in the core gap of the sensor. The magnetic field in the core gap is proportional to the current
flowing through the motor armature. The Hall generator produces an output voltage which is proportional to
the magnetic field in the core gap. The Hall generator output is amplified to the range of 0VDC to 10VDC.
Pins 1 (A), 2 (B) and 5 (E) are supply voltage inputs to the Current Sensor from the Diverter Control Module.
The Current Sensor outputs, Pin 3 (C), is approximately equal to 1VDC for every 500A of current flowing
through the motor, Pin 4 (D) is COM output of the current sensor.

+28VDC - This input at TB1-1, is a supply voltage to the Diverter Control Module from the Diverter Power
Supply, K07D4.

Diverter Enable Logic - This input at TB1-3, is controlled by the AC800 Controller via a 2 Relay Output
24VDC-120VDC Module of the Remote I/O System in the Converter Cabinet. This signal enables the
Diverter Control Module for operation at shovel start.

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Reverse Signal - This input at TB1-8, comes from the Drive Control Module SDCS-PIN-61 board. It tells the
Diverter Control Module that the reverse bridge is conducting. This signal is not required on the Diverter
Control Module Hoist (DCMH).

Forward Signal - This input at TB1-9, comes from the Drive Control Module SDCS-PIN-61 board. It tells the
Diverter Control Module that the forward bridge is conducting. This signal is not required on the Diverter
Control Module Hoist (DCMH).

+24VDC - When an overcurrent condition is detected, this input at TB2-6, is routed through the Diverter
Control Module internal relay contacts (DCM) to a 4 Digital Input 24VDC Module of the Remote I/O System
in the Converter Cabinet.

Outputs
Firing Pulse Outputs - When an overcurrent condition is detected and a diverter trip is initiated, the Pulse
Transformers receive firing pulse signals from the Diverter Control Module and produce gate firing pulses to
the Diverter SCRs. When the Diverter SCR turns on, the respective Diverter Capacitors discharge placing
1300VDC on the cathodes of the conducting Converter SCRs. This Diverter Capacitor discharge reverse
biases the conducting Converter SCRs forcing them off.

Diverter Trip Signal - +24VDC is routed through an internal relay contact, DCM, when an overcurrent condition is detected and a diverter trip is initiated. When the AC800 Controller senses the Diverter Trip Signal,
an instant shutdown of the shovel is initiated by Controller. The Controller Program Logic prevents a complete shovel startup for 60 seconds to allow the motor and Diverter Capacitor to completely dissipate and
the Diverter Grid Resistor to cool down.

Diverter Gate Block - When an overcurrent condition is detected and a diverter trip is initiated, this signal is
sent to the SDCS-PIN-61 board and tells the Drive Control Module to stop generating gate pulses.

5.12.5.3 Diverter Capacitor Discharge, Motor Dissipation


When an overcurrent condition is detected and a diverter trip is initiated, the Diverter Control Module sends gate firing pulses to the proper Diverter SCR providing a path for the Diverter Capacitor and the built up motor armature
magnetic field to discharge. When the Diverter Capacitor discharges, 1300VDC is placed on the cathodes of the
conducting Converter SCRs. This reverse biases the conducting Converter SCRs causing them to turn off.
When the Converter SCRs stop conducting, the motor loses current flow. Since the motor armature is a coil, its
inherent characteristic is to oppose any change in current flow. To prevent this loss in current flow, the motor armature reverses polarity and the magnetic field across the motor armature discharges through the Diverter SCR and
is dissipated across the Diverter Grid Resistor.
The collapsing motor armature dissipates through the Diverter Protection Relay, (DPR) causing it to energize. Normally open contacts associated with DPR, close, providing an input to the Remote I/O System in the Converter
Cabinet. This input is sensed by the Controller. The Controller Program Logic initiates an instant shutdown and
prevents shovel start for 60 seconds following the Diverter trip. The zener diodes across DPR regulate the voltage
drop across DPR to 50VDC.

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Refer to Figure 5-66, Figure 5-67, Figure 5-68, Figure 5-69 and Figure 5-70 for motor armature dissipation paths.
K06B04D

K06B04E
K06B04C

(2)

DIVERTER PROTECTION
RELAY, HOIST #1/PROPEL #1

DPH1

.36 OHM

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Front Hoist

K06K07

K08K01

K08G02

K06B04B
3.3K

K06B04A
3.3K

K06B02

K08G04

A1H1

(7)

1200uF
K08G03A

K08G03B

K07A07D

K07A07C

RC

5K

K07A07B
DCH

DCH

DCH

RC

K08G03D
K08G03C

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Front Hoist

K08G03
K08G03E
K08G03F

K07A07A
5K

To Motion
Feedback Circuit
Board

K08G03G
K08G03H

RIGHT PROPEL MOTOR


ARMATURE (PROPEL FIELD)

P1AC

(A1)

21

To Motion Feedback
Circuit Board

P1

(A2)

A1

To Motion Feedback
Circuit Board

H1

A2

K02B03D

To Motion Feedback
Circuit Board

K02B03E
K02B03C
(7)

(2)

DIVERTER PROTECTION
RELAY, HOIST #2

DPH2

K02B03B
3.3K

K02B01

K01G01
K01G04

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Rear Hoist

HOIST MOTOR
ARMATURE FRONT

HAC

A1H2

20

.36 OHM

K02R05

K01K01

K01G02B

K03A04C

K01G02A

K03A04D

RC

K01G02D
K01G02C

K01G02
K01G02E

K02B03A
3.3K

5K

K03A04B
DCH

1200uF
DCH

DCH

RC

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Rear Hoist

K03A04A

A2H1

5K

K01G02F
K01G02G
K01G02H

U61X01A
HOIST MOTOR
ARMATURE REAR
A1

H2

A2

To Motion
Feedback Circuit
Board

ES04081b01

A2H2

Figure 5-66: Hoist #1/Propel #1 and Hoist #2 Diverter Trip Motor Dissipation Path

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Section 5, Power Systems.fm

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To Motion
Feedback Circuit
Board

Power Systems

To Motion
Feedback Circuit
Board
A1

S1

To Motion
Feedback Circuit
Board

A2

A1

S2

K05L01
K05H01
K05H03B

A2
K06K06

K07A05A
5K
K07A05D

K07A05C
RC

K05H03A

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Swing

1200uF
DCS

DCS

DCS

RC

K05H04
K05H03D
K05H03C

K05H03

K05H03E

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Swing

K07A05B
5K

K05H03F
K05H03G
K05H03H

K06B03D

K06B03E
DIVERTER PROTECTION
SWING

K06B03C
(2)

K05G04

DPS1
(7)

K06B03A
3.3K

K06B01

.36 OHM

K05K01

K06K05
K07A04B
5K
K07A04D

K05G02
K07A04C

K05G03B

RC

K05G03A

K06B03B
3.3K

1200uF
DCS

DCS

DCS

RC

ES04082b01
K05G03D
K05G03C

K05G03
K05G03E
K05G03F

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Swing

K07A04A
5K

K05G03G
K05G03H

Figure 5-67: Swing Diverter Trip Motor Dissipation Path - Forward Bridge

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 5, Power Systems.fm

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To Motion
Feedback Circuit
Board

To Motion
Feedback Circuit
Board
A1

S1

To Motion
Feedback Circuit
Board

A2

A1

S2

K05L01
K05H01
K05H03B

A2
K06K06

K07A05A
5K

K07A05C

K07A05D

RC

K05H03A

Fro
Char

1200uF
DCS

DCS

DC

RC

K05H04
K05H03D
K05H03C

K05H03

K05H03E

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Swing

K07A05B
5K

K05H03F
K05H03G
K05H03H

K06B03D

K06B03E
DIVERTER PROTECTION
SWING

K06B03C
(2)

K05G04

DPS1
(7)

K06B03A
3.3K

K06B01

.36 OHM

K05K01

K06K05
K07A04B
5K

K05G02
K07A04C

K05G03B

RC

K05G03A

K06B03B
3.3K

K07A04D

1200uF
DCS

DCS

DC

RC

ES04082c01
K05G03D
K05G03C

K05G03
K05G03E
K05G03F

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Swing

K07A04A
5K

Figure 5-68: Swing Diverter Trip Motor Dissipation Path - Reverse Bridge

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Section 5, Power Systems.fm

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Power Systems

CAC

K02R07

K04L01
K04H03

K03A05A
5K
K03A05F

K03A05E

K04H02B
K04H02A

RC
K04H01

K04H02D
K04H02C

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Front Hoist

P2AC

P2

DCCP

DCCP

DCCP

RC

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Front Hoist
K02B04D

K03A05B
5K

K02B04E

K04H02E
K04H02

K04H02F
K04H02G

DIVERTER PROTECTION RELAY


CROWD/PROPEL #2

K02B04C

K04G01

(2)

DPCP
(7)

K04H02H

K02B04A
3.3K

K02B02

K02B04B
3.3K

.36 OHM

K04K01

K02R06

K04G04

K03A05C
5K
K03A05G

K04G02B
K04G02A

RC

K03A05H

DCCP

DCCP

DCCP

RC

ES04083b01
K04G02D
K04G02C

K04G02
K04G02E
K04G02F

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Front Hoist

K03A05D
5K

K04G02G
K04G02H

Figure 5-69: Crowd/Propel #2 Diverter Trip Motor Dissipation Path - Forward Bridge

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 5, Power Systems.fm

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CAC

K02R07

K04L01
K04H03

K03A05A
5K

K03A05E

K04H02B

K03A05F

RC

K04H02A

K04H01

K04H02D
K04H02C

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Front Hoist

P2AC

P2

DCCP

DCCP

DCCP

RC

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Front Hoist
K02B04D

K03A05B
5K

K02B04E

K04H02E
K04H02

K04H02F
K04H02G

DIVERTER PROTECTION RELAY


CROWD/PROPEL #2

K02B04C

K04G01

(2)

DPCP
(7)

K04H02H

K02B04A
3.3K

K02B02

K02B04B
3.3K

.36 OHM

K04K01

K02R06

K04G04

K03A05C
5K
K03A05G

K04G02B
K04G02A

RC

K03A05H

DCCP

DCCP

DCCP

RC

ES04083c01
K04G02D
K04G02C

K04G02
K04G02E
K04G02F

From Diverter
Charging Circuit
Front Hoist

K03A05D
5K

K04G02G
K04G02H

Figure 5-70: Crowd/Propel #2 Diverter Trip Motor Dissipation Path - Reverse Bridge

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Section 5, Power Systems.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Power Systems

5.13 Transfer Operation


The Transfer Cabinet contains six contactors, interfacing relays and power supply components for the 100VDC
contactor coil supply.

5.13.1 Overview
Two mechanically interlocked universal type contactors are used to direct field current. The Crowd Field Contactor
(CFC) connects the Crowd/Propel field supply to the Crowd motor. The Propel Field Contactor (PFC) connects the
Crowd/Propel field to the Propel motor.
Four heavy duty transportation type DC contactors are used to direct armature current. The Hoist Armature Contactor (HAC) connects the Hoist #1/Propel #1 armature converter current to the Hoist motor. The Propel #1 Armature Contactor (P1AC) connects the Hoist #1/Propel #1 armature converter current to the Propel motor. The Crowd
Armature Contactor (CAC) connects the Crowd/Propel #2 armature converter current to the Crowd motor. The Propel #2 Armature Contactor (P2AC) connects the Crowd/Propel #2 armature converter current to the Propel motor.
Refer to Figure 5-71 for cabinet layout

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 5, Power Systems.fm

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.
06

07

05

08

04

09

10
03
11

02

12

01
13

LEGEND
01. Propel #2 Armature Contactor (P2AC).
02. Propel #1 Armature Contactor (P1AC).
03. Remote I/O Cabinet.
04. Crowd Field Contactor
Relay (CFCR).
05. Propel Armature Contactor Relay (PACR).
06. Contactor Supply
100VDC Rectifier.
07. Hoist/Crowd Armature
Contactor Relay
(HCACR).
08. Propel Field Contactor
Relay (PFCR).
09. Propel Field Contactor
(PFC).
10. Crowd Field Contactor
(CFC).
11. Dipper Trip Contactors
(DTC1 and DTC2). (right
side of cabinet, not
shown)
12. Hoist Armature Contactor
(HAC).
13. Crowd Armature Contactor (CAC).

ES03044a01

Figure 5-71: Transfer Cabinet Front Door Open

A separate compartment contains the Remote I/O System components. This assembly consists of the terminal
modules and various I/O modules.
The Remote I/O System, located in the Transfer Cabinet, provides the output to energize the Crowd Field Contactor Relay (CFCR), Propel Field Contactor Relay (PFCR), Hoist/Crowd Armature Contactor Relay (HCACR) and/or
Propel Armature Contactor Relay (PACR). Refer to Figure 5-72.
The Contactor Relays have normally open contacts in series with the Propel Field Contactor (PFC), Crowd Field
Contactor (CFC), Propel #1 Armature Contactor (P1AC), Propel #2 Armature Contactor (P2AC), Hoist Armature
Contactor (HAC) and/or Crowd Armature Contactor (CAC). When the relays are energized, the normally open contacts close providing continuity to energize the associated contactor. Refer to Figure 5-73.

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Section 5, Power Systems.fm

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Power Systems

As long as the HAC and CAC Contactors are de-energized, normally closed contacts associated with these contactors allow P1AC and P2AC to energize. If HAC and CAC are energized, the normally closed contacts open preventing P1AC and P2AC from energizing. Refer to Figure 5-73.
As long as the P1AC and P2AC Contactors are de-energized, normally closed contacts associated with these contactors allow HAC and CAC to energize. If P1AC and P2AC are energized, the normally closed contacts open preventing HAC and CAC from energizing. Refer to Figure 5-73.
When the contactors are energized, a normally open contact associated with the contactor closes providing an
input to the Remote I/O System in the Transfer Cabinet. Refer to Figure 5-74. This input confirms with the Controller that the associated contactor is either energized or de-energized.
.
120VAC
U96B01S
2RO
1

Neutral

2.27.15
CFCR

2
3

Crowd Field
Contactor Relay

PFCR
Propel Field
Contactor Relay

6
7
8
U96B01T
2RO
1

2.27.16
HCACR
Hoist/Crowd
Armature Contactor

2
3
4

PACR
Propel Armature
Contactor Relay

6
7
ES04059a01

Figure 5-72: Field and Armature Contactor Relays

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 5, Power Systems.fm

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+100VDC

-100VDC

PFCR

PFCR

CFCR

CFCR

PACR

PACR

HAC

PACR

PACR

CAC

HCACR

HCACR

P1AC

HCACR

HCACR

P2AC

PFC

Propel Field
Contactor

CFC

Crowd Field
Contactor

P1AC

Propel #1 Armature
Contactor

P2AC

Propel #2 Armature
Contactor

HAC

Hoist Armature
Contactor

CAC

Crowd Armature
Contactor

ES04060a01

Figure 5-73: Field and Armature Contactors

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Section 5, Power Systems.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Power Systems

+24VDC
U96B01C
4DI 24VDC
1

2.27.1

2
3
4
P1AC

P2AC

CAC

Propel #1 Armature
Contactor
Propel #2 Armature
Contactor
Crowd Armature
Contactor

6
7
8
U96B01D
4DI 24VDC
1

HAC
CFC

2
3

2.27.2
Hoist Armature
Contactor
Crowd Field
Contactor

4
PFC

5
6

Propel Field
Contactor

7
8
ES04061a01

Figure 5-74: Field and Armature Contactor Flex I/O Inputs

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 5, Power Systems.fm

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5.14 Auxiliary Operation


The Auxiliary Cabinet contains thermal overload protection for the Main Transformer, Instant Overload Relay
(QTTM), motor starters and circuit breakers for auxiliary motors, relays for the heater systems and Dipper Trip circuit breaker, motor starter and contactor.

5.14.1 Location and Cabinet Layout


The top left panel of the Auxiliary Cabinet houses the Heater Interlock Relay (HIR), Machine House Heater Relay
(MHHR), and Instant Overload Relay (QTTM).
The top right panel of the Auxiliary Cabinet houses its specific Remote I/O System and Main Transformer Overloads (TTMT).
The lower section of the Auxiliary Cabinet houses the motor starters and contactors. Refer to Figure 5-75 for component locations in the Auxiliary Cabinet

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Section 5, Power Systems.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Power Systems

'

 

! " # $ % & '  

LEGEND

" 01. Left Machine House Blower Starter

&
#
%

$

#

&
'
!

"

!

!




02.
03.
04.
05.
06.
07.
08.
09.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.

RPC and 1 Bank Blower Motor Starter


RPC Switch Blower Motor Starter
RPC Bank 2 and 3 Blower Motor Starter
Dipper Trip Motor Starter
Front Hoist Blower Motor Starter
Rear Hoist Blower Motor Starter
Front Swing Blower Motor Starter
Rear Swing Blower Motor Starter
Instant Overload Relay, QTTM
Crowd Blower Motor Starter
Hoist Lube Pump Motor Starter
Machine House Heater Relay, MHHR
Heater Interlock Relay, HIR
Main Transformer Overload, TTMT
120V Input Module
Remote I/O Adapter
120V Input Module
120V Input Module
120V Input Module
Relay Output Module
Relay Output Module
Relay Output Module
Relay Output Module
Hoist Converter Blower Motor Starter
Swing/Crowd Converter Blower Motor
Starter
Lower Supply
Motor Heater Contactor
Transformer Heater Contactor
Windshield Wiper Motor Starter
Control Cab Blower Starter
Right Machine House Blower Starter
Lighting Contactor
Dipper Trip Contactor

-5!%"=

!"

!!

Figure 5-75: Auxiliary Cabinet Layout

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 5, Power Systems.fm

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5.14.2 Auxiliary Cabinet Operation


For additional information, refer to Section 6 for a detailed description of the Remote I/O System.

5.14.2.1 Motor Starters


The lower panel of the Auxiliary Cabinet contain the motor starters for all auxiliary motors.
Many of the motor starters consist of the same basic components. Protection for a particular motor is achieved by
the correct trip level setting on the breaker and the correct heater elements for the Thermal Overloads.

CAUTION
When replacing starters, the trip settings and heater elements must remain the same
value as original. Damage to the motors and/or starters, if manufacturer settings are
changed, is possible.
The motor starters receive 120VAC from an 8 Point Digital Output Signal Module in the Remote I/O System of the
Auxiliary Cabinet. The 120VAC is applied to the motor starter coil causing the motor starter to energize. When the
motor starter energizes, normally open contacts associated with the motor starter close applying 3 VAC to the
auxiliary motor. Refer to Figure 5-76.
Motor Starter

Neutral
Auxiliary
Motor

MS
MS

3
VAC

MS
120VAC

120VAC

Neutral
8DO 120/230

Auxiliary Contact
Motor Starter
Coil
MS

To Remote I/O
System
OL

01
02 1L
03 1N
04

ES04068a01

05
06 1
07
08 2
09
10 3
11
12 2L
13
14

2N
4

15
16

17
18

19
20

Figure 5-76: Motor Starter Operation - Typical

There is an auxiliary contact associated with the motor starter coil. This normally open contact closes when the
starter coil is energized, providing an input to a 16 Point Digital Input Signal Module in the Remote I/O System of
the Auxiliary Cabinet. This input confirms with the Controller that the Motor Starter Coil is energized.

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Section 5, Power Systems.fm

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Power Systems

5.14.2.2 Thermal Operation


The thermal trip operation is of a solid state type. The solid state device, when operated within its operating temperature range, does not require actual ambient compensation such as a bi-metallic strip or melting alloy type.
Only the level of current being drawn by the motor affects the trip of the device. A trip is initiated if the phase currents exceed 125% of the trip current adjustment dial setting on the front of the overload relay.
The time to trip depends upon the following:

The level of monitored currents.


The trip class of the device.
The length of time since the last trip.
The trip function is an inverse time function, the device trips sooner at higher current levels than at lower levels.
The overload relay is designed to meet NEMA standards for a 1.15 service factor motor. This means that the overload relay must not trip for currents that are 100% of its current adjustment dial setting, and that it must trip for currents that are 125% of its current adjustment dial setting.

5.14.2.3 Phase Loss and Phase Unbalance Protection


The phase loss/phase unbalance circuitry initiates a trip within three seconds if:

A current unbalance of 25% or greater is present


One of the 3-phase currents is not present
The phase loss/phase unbalance circuitry can detect a phase loss in either the primary or secondary of a star-delta
or delta-star transformer. The phase loss/phase unbalance trip function is fully operational at currents as low as
75% of the minimum marked dial setting on the device and provides protection for lightly loaded motors.

5.14.2.4 Indicators and Controls

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


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CAUTION

DO NOT use the Power Applied LED as an indicator for control power or motor supply
power disconnect status.
04

03

05

02

01

18
14
12

95

96

10

6
8

LEGEND
01. Reset Push Button
02. Yellow Trip indicator for overload,
Phase-Loss or Phase Unbalance
03. Power Applied Indicator
04 Full Load Ampere Adjustment Dial
05. Alternate Location of the Power
Applied Indicator

RESET

ES03077a01

Figure 5-77: Motor Starter Overload Relay Indicator and Control Locations

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Power Systems

5.14.2.5 Heater Interlock Relay (HIR)


During shovel shutdown, HIR will be de-energized. Normally closed contacts associated with HIR will remain
closed. With HIR contacts closed, supply voltage is available to the Transformer Heater Contactor (THC). Refer to
Figure 5-78.
Neutral
HIR

Neutral

120VAC
8DO 120/230
01
02 1L
03 1N
04

120VAC

HIR

05

MHES1

MHHR

MHHT

Neutra

06 1
07
08 2
09

THC

120VAC

10 3

To Main Transformer
Heaters

11
12 2L
13
14

2N
4

HIR

OL

15
16

17
18

19
20

HB2

120VAC
120VAC

HB3

120VAC

HB4

MHC

To Front Hoist/Swing Motor Heaters


To Rear Hoist/Swing Motor Heaters
To Crowd Motor Heaters
To Remote I/O System

ES04069a01

HIR

MHT1

OL

Figure 5-78: Heater Interlock Relay (HIR)

When THC energizes, it supplies the Main Transformer Heaters with current to maintain the Main Transformer at
the proper operating temperature when the shovel is shutdown. Refer to Figure 5-79.
Neutral
From Transformer
Heater Contactor

500W

500W

500W

500W

ES04070a01

Figure 5-79: Main Transformer Heaters

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 5, Power Systems.fm

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During shovel shutdown, normally closed contacts associated with HIR provide supply voltage to the Motor Heater
Switch (MHT1), refer to Figure 5-78, located on the right hand Operators Console. Refer to Figure 5-80.
02
01

LEGEND
01. Motor Heater Switch
02. House Heater Switch

ES03080a01

Figure 5-80: Operators Console - Right Hand Control

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MHT1 provides the operator the option of turning on or off the Motor Heaters. Refer to Figure 5-81.
From Motor
Heater Contactor

Neutral

Crowd Motor
Heaters

From Motor
Heater Contactor

Front Hoist

Front Swing
Front Hoist &
Front Swing
Motor Heaters

From Motor
Heater Contactor

Rear Hoist

Rear Swing
Rear Hoist &
Rear Swing
Motor Heaters

ES03079a01

Figure 5-81: Crowd, Swing, and Hoist Motor Heaters

During shovel shutdown, normally closed contacts associated with HIR provide supply voltage to the House Heater
Switch (MHES1), refer to Figure 5-78, located on the right hand Operators Console. Refer to Figure 5-80.
The House Heater Switch provides the operator the option of turning on or off the House Heaters. When the House
Heater Switch is turned on, the Machine House Heater Relay (MHHR) energizes. Normally open contacts associated with MHHR close providing supply voltage to the House Heaters. Refer to Subtopic 5.14.2.8 for a more
detailed description for MHHR.
When the shovel is started, HIR is energized by an 8 Point Digital Output Signal Module of the Remote I/O System
in the Auxiliary Cabinet. Refer to Figure 5-78. With HIR energized, the normally closed contacts associated with
HIR open. This disables the Main Transformer Heaters, Crowd, Hoist, and Swing Motor Heaters, and the Machinery House Heaters.

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


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5.14.2.6 Main Transformer Thermal Overloads (TTMT)


The Main Transformer Thermal Overloads (TTMT) are melting alloy type thermal overload relays connected to the
Main Transformer Primary via Current Transformers. Refer to Figure 5-82.

1A

1A
1A

1A

009-20

1A

H2

X2

H1

X1

H2

X2

H1

X1

009-21

009-22

1A

MT3

MT2

MT1

Main Transformer
Thermal Overloads

TTMT

7 5 3

MSN

N2

2 4

6 8

7 5 3

2 4

MS11

7 5 3

6 8

MS12

MS21

MS22

2 4

6 8

MS13

MS23

ES04085a01

Figure 5-82: Main Transformer Thermal Overloads

In melting alloy thermal overload relays, the current passes through a small heater winding. Under overload conditions, the heat causes a special solder to melt allowing a ratchet wheel to spin free thus opening the control circuit

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Power Systems

contacts. When this occurs, the relay is tripped. The solder pot melts at 125C. The heater coil and solder pot are
combined in a one piece unit. Refer to Figure 5-83.

LEGEND
01. Solder pot (heat sensitive element). It provides accurate
response to overload current. Prevents nuisance tripping.
02. Heating winding (heat producing
element) is permanently joined to
the solder pot so proper heat
ES03081a01
transfer is insured.

01

02
Figure 5-83: TTMT - Melting Alloy Thermal Unit

Melting alloy thermal overload relays must be reset by a deliberate hand operation after they trip. A reset button is
mounted on the cover. Refer to Figure 5-84.

RESET

ES03083a01

Figure 5-84: TTMT - Reset Button

The normally closed contacts associated with TTMT provide an input to an 8 Point Digital Output Signal Module of
the Remote I/O System in the Auxiliary Cabinet. During normal operation, these contacts remain closed providing
an input to the Module. This input confirms with the Controller that there is no thermal overload condition.

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 5, Power Systems.fm

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When a thermal overload condition exists and the contacts open, the input to the Module is interrupted. This
causes the Controller to initiate a 30 second delayed shutdown of the shovel. Refer to Figure 5-85.
120VAC

Neutral
A01A11C
16DI 120/230 2.25.0
01

1N
02

TTMT

Main Transformer
Thermal Probe in
#2 Coil

(10)

0
03

Main Transformer
Thermal Overload

(11)
04

2
05

3
06

4
07

5
08

6
09

7
10

2N
11

3N
12

0
13

1
14

2
15

3
16

17

5
18

6
19

ES04086a01

20

4N

Figure 5-85: Main Transformer Thermal Overloads (TTMT)

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Power Systems

5.14.2.7 Instant Overload Relay (QTTM)


The QTTM relay provides instantaneous overcurrent protection for the main transformer. It is triggered by a monitoring circuit comprised of CT's, a three phase diode bridge and a precision resistor. This resistor value varies
depending upon the transformer it is associated with. Refer to Figure 5-86.

1
2
CT-1

CT-2
CT-3
2
1A

1A
1A

1A

1A

H2

X2

H1

X1

H2

X2

H1

X1

1A

A01B10
7 5 3 1

2 4 6 8

7 5 3 1

7 5 3 1

2 4 6 8

2 4 6 8

A01B02

1.58 OHM

MSN

MS11

MS12

MS13

A01B03
QTTM
INSTANT O.L RELAY
1

N2

MS21

A01B01A
47K
MTOAR
(1) (2)

120VAC

BEFORE
PICKUP

P.U. 15V.DC.
D.O. 2V.DC.

BEFORE
PICKUP

P.U. 5V.DC.
D.O. .4V.DC.

MS22

MS23

ES04087a01

Figure 5-86: Instant Overload Relay (QTTM)

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During the first 3 seconds of shovel start, refer to Figure 5-87, the Main Transformer Overload Adjust Relay
(MTOAR) is de-energized. Normally open contacts associated with MTOAR remain open. With MTOAR open, the
Instant Overload Relay (QTTM) is conditioned with a higher trip level voltage to compensate for higher levels of inrush current through the Main Transformer at shovel start. QTTM pick up voltage during this first 3 seconds is
15VDC which represents approximately 450% overcurrent. QTTM drop out voltage is 2VDC.

1
2
CT-1

CT-2
CT-3
2
1A

1A
1A

1A

1A

H2

X2

H1

X1

H2

X2

H1

X1

1A

A01B10
7 5 3 1

2 4 6 8

7 5 3 1

7 5 3 1

2 4 6 8

2 4 6 8

A01B02

1.58 OHM

MSN

MS11

MS12

MS13

A01B03
QTTM
INSTANT O.L RELAY
1

N2

MS21

A01B01A
47K
MTOAR
(1) (2)

120VAC

BEFORE
PICKUP

P.U. 15V.DC.
D.O. 2V.DC.

BEFORE
PICKUP

P.U. 5V.DC.
D.O. .4V.DC.

MS22

MS23

ES04087b01

Figure 5-87: QTTM - First 3 Seconds of Shovel Start

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Power Systems

3 seconds after shovel start, refer to Figure 5-88, MTOAR energizes. With MTOAR energized, the normally open
contacts associated with MTOAR close. MTOAR is a function of a 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Module of the
Remote I/O System in the Control Cabinet. This increases the sensitivity of QTTM for normal operation following
the initial startup current rush through the Main Transformer. QTTM pick up is reduced to 5VDC which represents
approximately 150% overcurrent. QTTM drop out voltage is reduced to 0.4VDC\

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1
2
CT-1

CT-2
CT-3
2
1A

1A
1A

1A

1A

H2

X2

H1

X1

H2

X2

H1

X1

1A

A01B10
7 5 3 1

2 4 6 8

7 5 3 1

7 5 3 1

2 4 6 8

2 4 6 8

A01B02

1.58 OHM

MSN

MS11

MS12

MS13

A01B03
QTTM
INSTANT O.L RELAY
1

N2

MS21

A01B01A
47K
MTOAR
(1) (2)

120VAC

BEFORE
PICKUP

P.U. 15V.DC.
D.O. 2V.DC.

BEFORE
PICKUP

P.U. 5V.DC.
D.O. .4V.DC.

MS22

MS23

ES04087c01

Figure 5-88: QTTM - 3 Seconds after Shovel Start

MTOAR contacts are a function of a 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Module of the Remote I/O System in the
Control Cabinet. MTOAR contacts close 3 seconds after shovel start. Refer to Figure 5-89.

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From Bridge
Rectifier A01B10

Power Systems

E22A01A33
2RO

2.22.31

N.O.0
2

To QTTM

N.O.0

MAIN TRANSFORMER
OVERLOAD ADJUST
RELAY

3
4

N.C.
5

N.O.1
6

N.O.1
7
8

N.C.
E22A01A34
PWR MOD

2.22.32

V L1
3

COM/NEUT
4

GND

V L1
7

COM/NEUT
8

GND
E22A01A35
2DI 120VAC

2.22.33

DI0
2

L1
3

COM
4

N.C.
5

DI1
6

L1
7

ES04088a01

COM
8

N.C.

Figure 5-89: Main Transformer Overload Adjust Relay (MTOAR)

If QTTM picks up, normally open contacts associated with QTTM close providing an input to a 16 Point Digital Input
Signal Module of the Remote I/O System in the Auxiliary Cabinet. With this input active, an instant shutdown will be
initiated by the Controller. Refer to Figure 5-90.

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Neutral

120VAC
A01A11C
16DI 120/230 2.25.0
01

1N

QTTM

Main Transformer
Over Current

02

0
03

1
04

2
05

3
06

4
07

5
08

6
09

7
10

2N
11

3N
12

0
13

1
14

2
15

3
16

17

5
18

6
19

ES04089a01

20

4N

Figure 5-90: Instant Overload Relay (QTTM)

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Power Systems

5.14.2.8 Machine House Heater Relay (MHHR)


The Machine House Heater Relay controls the Machinery House Heaters. The relay is controlled by a switch on
the Operators Console. Refer to Figure 5-78.
During shovel shutdown, normally closed contacts associated with the Heater Interlock Relay (HIR), refer to Subtopic 5.14.2.5, provides supply voltage to the House Heater Switch, refer to Figure 5-78, located on the right hand
Operators Console, refer to Figure 5-80.
The House Heater Switch provides the operator the option of turning on or off the House Heaters. When the House
Heater Switch is closed, the Machine House Heater Relay (MHHR) energizes. Normally open contacts associated
with MHHR close providing supply voltage to the House Heaters. Refer to Figure 5-91.
VAC

Neutral
HIR

MHES1

MHHT

House Heaters
Switch

MHHR
Machine House
Heater Relay

3 480VAC
MHHB1

Machinery House
Heater #1

MHHB2

Machinery House
Heater #2

MHHR

MHHR

ES03089b01

Figure 5-91: Machine House Heater Relay (MHHR)

When the shovel is started, the normally closed contact associated with HIR opens, removing supply voltage to the
House Heater Switch. This disables the Machinery House Heaters while the shovel is started.

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5.15 Propel Motor Heaters


The propel motor heaters and motor heater circuits are located on the Lower Assembly of the P&H Electric Mining
Shovel.

5.15.1 Propel Motor Heater Operation


The Motor Heaters Lower - Control (MHCL) is controlled by a 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Module of the
Remote I/O System in the Lower Control Cabinet. The output from the Module is active when the shovel is shutdown. This active output is supplied to MHCL causing it to energize. When MHCL is energized, normally open contacts associated with MHCL close supplying 120VAC to the Propel Motor Heaters. The Propel Motors will stay at
optimum operating temperature when the shovel is shutdown. Refer to Figure 5-92.
120VAC

Neutral

MHCL
Propel Motor
Heaters Right

24VDC

120VAC
Propel Motor
Heaters Left
ES4071a01
To Remote I/O System

Figure 5-92: Propel Motor Heaters

When the shovel is running, the output from the 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Module is inactive. This removes
the active input to MHCL causing it to de-energized. The normally open contacts associated with MHCL open. The
Propel Motor Heaters de-energize.
As the voltage is applied and current flows through the primary, magnetic lines of force are generated. During the
time current is increasing in the primary, magnetic lines of force expand outward from the primary and cut the secondary. A voltage is induced into a coil when magnetic lines cut across it. Therefore, the voltage across the primary
causes a voltage to be induced across the secondary.
The secondary voltage of a transformer may be either in phase or out of phase with the primary voltage. This
depends on the direction in which the windings are wound and the arrangement of the connections to the external
circuit. This means that the two voltages may rise and fall together or one may rise while the other is falling.
The Drive Synchronizing Voltage Transformer secondary voltage is in phase with the primary and is referred to as
a Like-Wound Transformer. Phase indicating dots are used to indicate points on a transformer schematic symbol
that have the same polarity.
The 34VAC induced into the secondary winding of the transformer is determined mainly by the ratio of the number
of turns in the primary to the number of turns in the secondary and by the amount of voltage applied to the pri-

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mary.The 3 34VAC is used by the SDCS-PIN-61 Board in the Armature DCMs as a supply voltage and to synchronize the firing pulses to the Converter SCRs.

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3 34VAC
Drive Synchronizing
Voltage Transformer
3 34VAC to
Armature Drive
Control Modules
SDCS-PIN-61 Board

ES2047_01

Figure 5-93: SDCS-PIN-61 Board

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Power Systems

Drive
Synchronizing
Voltage
Transformer

Hoist #1
SDCS-PIN-61

Hoist #2
SDCS-PIN-61

Swing
SDCS-PIN-61

Crowd/Propel
SDCS-PIN-61
ES03071b01

Figure 5-94: Drive Synchronizing Voltage Transformer Distribution Block Diagram

5.15.1.1 Master Control Relay


Figure 5-95 shows the path to energize the Master Control Relay (MCR).

Lighting Secondary
Circuit Breaker

RSB

Relay Supply
Circuit Breaker
RSCB

Emergency
Stop
Operators
Console

Emergency
Stop
Control
Cabinet

3
208VAC
Main 120VAC
Panelboard

Shunt
Trip

Master
Control
Relay
MCR

ES2032b_01

Figure 5-95: Master Control Relay One Line Diagram

When de-energized, the Master Control Relay disables the 24VDC Power Supplies for the RPC Cabinet, Transfer
Cabinet, Converter Cabinet, Filtration System, Front Wall, Lube Room, and Hoist Gearcase Remote I/O Systems.
120VAC is removed from the 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Modules (2.27.15, 2.27.16, and 2.27.17) in the
Transfer Cabinet. 120VAC is removed from the 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Modules (2.26.8, 2.26.9, and
2.26.10) in the Converter Cabinet. Refer to Figure 5-96

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Lighting Secondary
Circuit Breaker

Relay Supply
Circuit Breaker
RSCB

RSB

3
208VAC
Main 120VAC
Panelboard

Emergency
Stop
Operators
Console

Emergency
Stop
Control
Cabinet

1
2

2RO

5
6

MCR

RPC Cabinet
Filter

L
N

L
N

GND

GND

L 24VDC L+
Power
N Supply L-

L
N

GND

GND

2RO

CFCR

PFCR

HCACR

PACR

PE

Transfer Cabinet
Filter

1
2

Master
Control
Relay
MCR

24VDC L+
Power
N Supply L-

1
2

2RO

PE

Converter Cabinet
Filter

L
N

L
N

GND

GND

24VDC L+
Power
N Supply L-

PE

Filtration System (Opttional)


L

Filter

L
N

GND
2

GND

24VDC L+
Power
N Supply L-

1
2

PE

5
6

Front Wall (Boom)


L

Filter

L
N

GND

GND

24VDC L+
Power
N Supply L-

1
2

Filter

L
N

GND

GND

Filter

N
GND

L
N

GND

DCCP

24VDC L+
Power
N Supply L-

PE

DCS

Hoist Gearcase
L

2RO

DCH

PE

Lube Room
L

2RO

1
2

2RO
Plenum
Vibrator
5

24VDC L+
Power
N Supply L-

PE

ES04066a01

Figure 5-96: Master Control Relay Circuit Path

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Power Systems

The Master Control Relay energizes prior to shovel start as long as the Lighting Secondary Circuit Breaker, Relay
Voltage Supply Circuit Breaker (RSB), Relay Supply Circuit Breaker (RSCB), Emergency Stop Operators Console,
and Emergency Stop Control Cabinet buttons are closed.
When energized, normally open contacts associated with MCR close applying 120VAC to the 24VDC Power Supplies for the RPC Cabinet, Transfer Cabinet, Converter Cabinet, Filtration System, Front Wall, Lube Room, and
Hoist Gearcase Remote I/O Systems. 120VAC is also applied to the 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Modules
(2.27.15, 2.27.16, and 2.27.17) in the Transfer Cabinet and the 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Modules (2.26.8,
2.26.9, and 2.26.10) in the Converter Cabinet. Refer to Figure 5-96.

5.15.1.2 Drive Synchronizing Voltage Transformer


The Drive Synchronizing Voltage Transformer steps down 3 240VAC to 3 34VAC to be used as a supply voltage by the Armature Drive Control Modules. Figure 5-97 shows a schematic diagram of the transformer.
3 VAC
SB

CSCB

PSR

Drive Synchronizing
Voltage Transformer
ES04067a01

Figure 5-97: Drive Synchronizing Voltage Transformer

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Shovel Control Systems

Section 6

Shovel Control Systems


6.1 General Information
The AC800, refer to Figure 6-1, is a hardware platform to which individual hardware units may be connected and
which, depending on the specific unit configuration and operating system selected, can be programmed to perform
multiple functions.

Figure 6-1: AC800

Once configured, the AC800 hardware platform effectively becomes the AC800 Controller.
The hardware units that form the AC800 Controller are:

Processor units.
Communication interface modules.
Power supply units, providing various power output levels.
Battery back-up unit.

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When equipped with the specified Control Software, the AC800 Controller will act either as a stand-alone process
controller, or as a controller performing local control tasks in a control network consisting of many interconnected
controllers, operator stations and servers.
Various I/O systems can be connected to the AC800 Controller, either directly or via Profibus DP-V1.
The AC800 Controller consists of a selection of units mounted on horizontal DIN-rails, refer to Figure 6-2, which
can be housed within an enclosure. The majority of units consist of a base mounting plate and removable cover
attached with screws. The baseplate, which is always mounted onto the DIN-rail, carries the majority of the connections to processor, the power supplies and communication interfaces, as well as to the external buses and systems.

Figure 6-2: AC800 Controller with Profibus DP-V1 Interface Modules

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6.1.1 AC800 Module Identification


Physically, the AC800 Unit consists of two basic parts: (refer to Figure 6-3)

The Processor Unit with CPU and Power Supply boards.


Baseplate which houses the unit termination board.

LEGEND
01. DIN-Rail Locking Device
02. CN1/CN2 Ports
03. Baseplate
04. Tx/Rx Status Indicators
05. Processor Unit

06.
07.
08.
09.
10.
11.

INIT Push Button


LED Status Indicators
Tx/Rx Optic Ports
External Battery Supply Socket
Power Supply and Supervision Signal Socket
COM3/COM4 Ports

Figure 6-3: AC800 Unit

Within the Processor Unit there is a CPU board and Power Supply board.

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0 .
%






!01
%

 -.
'/

%0

&,



#

 


 







$)



 -

The CPU board contains the microprocessor and the RAM-memory, controllers for all built-in communication interfaces, real-time clock, LED indicators, and INIT push button. Refer to Figure 6-4.

# +










 

) &!

 




(

!

"

!

"

#


$%

'"'2

#


$%

3
433

&

 #'% 

Figure 6-4: AC800 Functional Block Diagram

The RAM included in the processor unit provides an automatic Shadow-memory function for detection of arbitrary
bit errors in the memory.

All memory updates are written to both the primary memory and to the shadow memory in parallel.
At every memory read cycle, the data from tho two memories is compared.
If there is a mismatch in the data a changeover is forced.
The shadow memory handling is done in hardware and without any delay to the memory cycle time.

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Shovel Control Systems

The power supply board generates isolated, circuit-proof +5VDC and +3.3VDC for the CPU and I/O units. The
board also contains opto-isolated RS232-C drivers/receivers for the service port, together with a back-up battery
holder for memory/real time clock, (RTC). Refer to Figure 6-5.

Figure 6-5: 3.6VDC Lithium Battery

CAUTION
When the External Battery Backup is connected to the AC800, it is connected in parallel
with the AC800 internal battery. This causes both batteries to drain prematurely. To
avoid a reduction in the available memory backup time, remove the AC800 internal battery.
The Baseplate, refer to Figure 6-6, houses a termination board, which is where the majority of the external connections take place. The board is grounded to the DIN-rail through the metallic components of the housing. The termination board is provided with screw terminals for power supply and redundant power supply monitoring, with

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connectors for the control network and serial port, a connector for the service port, the electrical ModuleBus and
the CEX-Bus.

LEGEND
01. CEX Bus Socket
02. Module-Bus Socket
03. Fuses CEX Bus/Module-Bus

Figure 6-6: Baseplate

24VDC is connected to the Baseplate and powers all units on the CEX-bus and the electrical ModuleBus.
In single CPU configuration it is possible to connect an S800 I/O cluster directly to the built-in electrical ModuleBus
plug located on the right hand side of the Baseplate.
The processor unit has a communication expansion bus connector located on the left-hand side of the Baseplate.
This CEX-bus provides for extending the on-board communication ports with additional communication units.

6.1.2 Control Software


The software used by the AC800 Controller is named Control Software.
This name does not stand for a specific software package. It is a generic name for the scope of functions used in a
controller. These functions are provided by:

Hardware functions (supervision, communication buses, I/O buses).


Firmware functions loaded into the controller (real time executive system, real time clock, redundant communication).

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Application programs loaded into the controller (library functions, communication protocols).
To produce an application, it is necessary to use the Control Builder M tool. This tool is extremely versatile, having
many useful functions in addition to system configuration.

6.1.3 Ethernet (MAC) Address


The Baseplate is provided with a unique Ethernet address (Media Access Control (MAC) Address). This address is
used by the licensing management system to identify the hardware. When ordering licenses for the Control Software, the unique Ethernet (MAC) address must always be quoted.
The address can be found on the Ethernet (MAC) address label attached to the Baseplate, as shown in Figure 6-7.

Figure 6-7: Ethernet (MAC) Address Label

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6.2 AC800 Processor Unit

Figure 6-8: AC800 Processor Unit

The AC800 Processor Unit consists of a Microprocessor running at 48MHz, 16MB RAM with internal or external
battery back-up facility, 12 I/O units can be connected to the electrical ModuleBus, and Four on-board communication ports:

CN1 + CN2, Ethernet ports (IEEE 802.3, 10 Base T).


COM3, serial port (RS232-C) with modem support.
COM4, serial port (RS232-C) for service tool.
Basic communication is extendable by using additional communication interface units.

6.2.1 Start Modes


6.2.1.1 Warm Start
Application-controlling tasks are initiated. Variable values are initialized unless marked Retain or Cold retain.
To initiate a warm restart, disconnect the power supply for a few seconds.
Following a power failure, the warm restart function will be automatically initiated on power restoration.

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6.2.1.2 Cold Restart


The application program restarts. Variable values are initialized unless marked Cold retain.
To initiate a cold restart, the Controller must be restarted by briefly pressing the INIT push button (less than 2.5
seconds).

6.2.1.3 Controller Reset


The system stops. The application program and variables are erased.
To initiate Controller Reset, press and hold the Controller INIT push button (more than three seconds) until the Run
LED begins to flash. A Controller Reset must be performed if the system is in an undefined position and consequently unavailable to the user.

6.2.2 Verification of Proper AC800 Operation


To confirm that the AC800 Controller and all associated units are operating properly, refer to Table 6-1. Check the
status of each LED indicator and compare it against the criteria listed in Table 6-1. .
LED

Status

AC800 Processor Unit


F(ault) Red LED must be OFF

OK

R(un) Green LED must be ON (steady)

OK

P(ower) Green LED must be ON (steady)

OK

B(attery) Green LED must be ON (steady)

OK

Profibus DP-V1 Interface


F(ault) Red LED must be OFF

OK

R(un) Green LED must be ON (steady)

OK

Table 6-1: Verification of Proper AC800 Operation

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6.3 Profibus DP-V1 Interface

Figure 6-9: Profibus DP-V1 Interface Modules

The Profibus DP-V1 Interface Unit and its associated Baseplate is used for connecting to Remote I/O via an external gateway on Profibus DP. Field instruments can be connected to the AC800. The Baseplate has two female
DB9 connectors for connecting Profibus DP with support of line redundancy. The Baseplate has a code lock that
prevents the installation of an incorrect type of unit onto the Baseplate.
The Profibus DP-V1 Interface expansion unit contains the CEX-Bus logic, the CPU-Kernel with memory, the Profibus interface with line redundancy unit and a DC/DC converter that supplies the appropriate voltages from the
+24VDC supply, via the CEX-Bus. The Profibus DP must always be terminated at the two outer nodes.

6.3.1 Key Features


Profibus DP with redundant line interface (two DB9 female connector located on the Baseplate).
Simple DIN-rail mounting.
In addition to the cyclic data transfer, the Profibus DP-V1 Interface supports acyclic DP-V1 communication
and slave redundancy.

By using repeaters it is possible to connect a maximum of 124 nodes to one Profibus DP (32 nodes are permitted on one segment).

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Pre-set, two-letter Alpha code locking device installed in unit base prevents mounting of incompatible components.



 
  
 



  

'

   

  !"
*  -.-

# !   $%

&
 '  " 

',$
',


# $



   
  ( 


# 

'%)*



   
 

%/-01) /1

Figure 6-10: Profibus DP-V1 Interface Functional Block Diagram

6.3.2 Indicators

LED

Function

F(ault) /Red

Unit error detected. Controlled by Control Software. Set and


cleared by the Hardware during controller Reset.

R(un) /Green

Operating. Controlled by the Control Software. Cleared by the


Hardware during controller Reset.

RxA /Yellow

Receive Data on Line A. For each telegram received the LED


flashes approximately 150ms.

RxB /Yellow

Receive Data on Line B. For each telegram received the LED


flashes approximately 150ms.
Table 6-2: Profibus DP-V1 Interface Status Indicators

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6.4 External Battery Backup Unit

Figure 6-11: External Battery Backup

The External Battery Backup Unit battery unit is used as an external power supply to provide extended memory
back-up for the AC800 Controller. The unit is DIN-Rail mounted and provided with a separate connecting cable.

6.5 Remote Input/Output System


The Remote I/O system is based on the Profibus communication standard.
Profibus is defined as an open fieldbus standard for use in manufacturing and building automation as well as process control. Profibus utilizes either an electrical network based on a shielded two-wire line or an optical network
based on a fiber-optic cable. Profibus is standardized under the European Fieldbus Standard EN 50 170. Three
main versions of Profibus are used in industry today. They are:

FMS
PA
DP

DP-V1

6.5.1 Profibus-FMS

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The Profibus-FMS (Fieldbus Message Specification) variant provides the user with a wide selection of functions
which, however, makes it more complex to implement compared to the other variants. The powerful Profibus-FMS
services can be used to solve even extensive and complex communication tasks. The Profibus-FMS variant supports communication between automation systems (e.g. programmable logic controllers and automation stations)
as well as data exchange with field devices. Profibus-FMS can therefore be used for a wide range of applications,
operating at average transmission speeds.

6.5.2 Profibus-PA
The Profibus-PA (Process Automation) variant, meets the special requirements of process automation. The Profibus-PA communication is based on the services provided by DP-V1, and is implemented as a partial system
embedded in a higher-level Profibus-DP communication system. Unlike the automated applications in manufacturing engineering which require short cycle times of few milliseconds, other factors are of importance in process
automation, such as the following:

Intrinsically safe transmission techniques.


Field devices are powered over the bus cable.
Reliable data transmission.
Interoperability (standardization of device functions).
The aspects intrinsic safety and bus supply were neglected at first when Profibus was standardized. Only when
the international standard IEC 1158-2 was published in October 1994, was a suitable transmission technique internationally specified for this area of application and implemented in the European standard EN 61158-2. The Profibus-PA specifications published in March 1995 included this transmission technique for intrinsically safe
installations and field devices powered over bus cables.

6.5.3 Profibus-DP
The Profibus-DP (Decentralized Periphery) variant is the high-speed solution of Profibus. It has been designed and
optimized especially for communication between automation systems and decentralized field devices. Therefore,
Profibus-DP requires less than 2ms for the transmission of 1K bytes of input and output data. In this way even
extremely time-critical communication tasks can be solved.
Profibus-DP communicates via cyclic data traffic exclusively. Each field device exchanges its input and output data
with the automation device, the class-1 master, within a given cycle time.
In process engineering as well as in building and process automation, operation and monitoring tasks require a
visualization device in addition to the automation device. This class-2 master is responsible for the various start-up,
parameterization and monitoring functions of up-to-date field devices. They require that device data be read or written during operation independent of the control cycle.

6.5.3.1 Profibus DP-V1


Since the original Profibus-DP specifications did not provide any special services for these tasks, appropriate function extensions were defined in 1997. These extensions can be implemented optionally and are compatible with
the existing Profibus-DP protocol and all earlier versions. The extended Profibus-DP variant is referred to as Profibus DP-V1. In addition to the cyclic Profibus-DP communication services, it also offers acyclic services for alarm
messages, diagnostics, parameterization and control of the field devices. For this reason it is the standard adopted
for use on P&H Electric Mining Shovels utilizing the Universal Control System (UCS).

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6.5.4 Profibus DP-V1 Masters and Slaves


The Profibus DP-V1 master links the AC800 with the Remote I/O systems. The Profibus DP-V1 master exchanges
data with the Remote I/O systems and monitors the Profibus DP-V1 bus system.
The Remote I/O system, or slaves, prepare the data from the remote devices connected locally to the Remote I/O
so that they can be transmitted by Profibus DP-V1 to the AC800.

6.5.5 Structure of the Profibus DP-V1 Network


Figure 6-12 illustrates the PROFIBUS DP-V1 network structure. The DP-V1 master is integrated in the AC800 system. The AC800 has a Profibus DP-V1 Interface Module. The DP-V1 slaves are the Remote I/O system connected
to the DP-V1 masters by means of Profibus DP-V1
.

Control Cabinet
Armature
Drives

Touch Panel

Field
Drives

Touch Panel

UPS

Branching
Unit

DDCS

UPS

Operator Cab

Ethernet
Electrical
Lean
Switch

AC800 System

Ethernet
Electrical
Lean
Switch

Operator Console
Remote I/O

NODE: 24
NODE: 12

NODE: 11
Profibus
Resolver
Interface

TripRite
Drive

Profibus
Optical Bus
Terminal
Profibus
Optical Bus
Terminal

Power
Rail
Booster

Control Cabinet
Remote I/O

Auxiliary Cabinet
Remote I/O

NODE: 22

NODE: 25

RPC Cabinet Remote I/O

Transfer Cabinet
Remote I/O

Converter Cabinet
Remote I/O

NODE: 28

NODE: 26

NODE: 27
Collector
Ring
Assembly

NODE: 30

Power
Rail
Booster
Profibus
Optical Bus
Terminal

Profibus
Optical Bus
Terminal

Lower Control Cabinet

Profibus
Optical Bus
Terminal

NODE: 31

NODE: 13
Lower Control Cabinet
Remote I/O

Boom Junction
Box Remote I/O

NODE: 33

Filteration System
Remote I/O
Big Tank Only

NODE: 32

Lube Room Remote I/O

Ultrasonic
Level
Controller

Lub e Ro om

Hoist Gearcase
Remote I/O

NODE: 29
Legend:
Fiber Optic Profibus
Copper Profibus
Ethernet
DDCS

Figure 6-12: Profibus DP-V1 Network

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6.5.6 Remote I/O System


The Remote I/O System is a finely-graduated modular, highly flexible DP-V1 slave.
Virtually any number of I/O modules in any combination can be connected right next to the Interface Module that
transfers the data to the DP-V1 master. The configuration of the I/O can be adjusted to suit any requirements.
Depending on the type Interface Module used, each Remote I/O System can consist of up to 63 modules. For
example, power modules, I/O modules, and motor starters.
The fact that motor starters can be integrated (switching and protecting any three-phase load up to 7.5kW) ensures
that the Remote I/O System can be adapted quickly.
The Remote I/O System consists primarily of various passive terminal modules to which is connected the electronic modules and motor starters.
The Remote I/O System is connected to the Profibus DP-V1 bus system by means of Profibus DP-V1 connectors
on the interface module. Each Remote I/O System is a DP-V1 slave on the Profibus DP-V1 bus system.
Location of all Remote I/O Systems located on a P&H Electric Mining Shovels are shown in below.

ES04032c01

Figure 6-13: 2800\XPB/XPC Remote I/O System

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ES04226a01

Figure 6-14: 4100XPB/XPC/BOSS Remote I/O System

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6.6 Components of the Remote I/O System


Table 6-3 provides you with an overview of the components of the Remote I/O System.
Component

Function

DIN Rail

Provides a surface to mount the Remote


I/O System Components.

Terminal Modules

Carries the wiring and receives the power


and electronic modules. Terminal modules are available with spring terminals
for the following modules:

Interface Module

Detailed Description
Topic 6.7

Power Modules.

Subtopic 6.8.1

I/O Modules.

Subtopic 6.8.2

Connects the Remote I/O System with


the DP-V1 master and prepares the data
for the electronic modules and motor
starters.
Three types of Interface Modules are
used within the Universal Control System.

Standard Fiber Optic Interface

Subtopic 6.9.1

Module

High Density Fiber Optic Interface

Subtopic 6.9.2

Module

Intelligent Interface Module


Power Module

Monitors the voltage for all the electronic


modules in the potential group. The following power modules are available:

Subtopic 6.9.3
Topic 6.10

For a 24VDC, 120VAC/230VAC


supply with diagnostics and fuse.
Auxiliary Cabinet
Power Supply Module

Converts the line voltage (120VAC/


230VAC) to 24VDC operating voltage to
supply the Remote I/O System in the
Auxiliary Cabinet.

Subtopic 6.11.1

Can be used as load power supply for the


24VDC load circuits.
Control Cabinet
Power Supply Module

Converts the line voltage (120VAC/


230VAC) to 24VDC operating voltage to
supply the Remote I/O System in the
Control Cabinet.

Subtopic 6.11.2

Remote I/O Power


Supply

Converts the line voltage (120VAC/


230VAC-500VAC) to 24VDC operating
voltage to supply each Remote I/O System.

Subtopic 6.11.3

Table 6-3: Remote I/O System Components

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Component
Electronic Digital
Input Modules

Function

Detailed Description

Is connected to the terminal module and


determines the function of that terminal.
Three types of Digital Input Modules are
used within the Universal Control System.

4 Digital Input 24VDC Module

Subtopic 6.12.1

16 Point Digital Input Signal Mod-

Subtopic 6.12.2

ule

2 Digital Input 120VAC Module


Electronic Analog
Input Modules

Subtopic 6.12.3

Are connected to the terminal module


and determines the function of that terminal. For time-critical measuring of voltage and current, the High Speed modules
are used. The High Feature modules provide a higher resolution and greater
accuracy. Four types of Analog Input
Modules are used within the Universal
Control System.

2 Analog Voltage Input High Fea-

Subtopic 6.13.1

ture Module

2 Analog Voltage Input High

Subtopic 6.13.2

Speed Module

2 Analog Current Input High Fea-

Subtopic 6.13.3

ture Modules

2 Analog Input RTD Modules


Electronic Digital
Output Modules

Subtopic 6.13.4

Is connected to the terminal module and


determines the function of that terminal.
Four types of Digital Output Modules are
used within the Universal Control System.

2 Digital Output 24VDC Module

Subtopic 6.14.1

4 Digital Output 24VDC Module

Subtopic 6.14.2

2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC

Subtopic 6.14.3

Module

8 Point Digital Output Signal Mod-

Subtopic 6.14.4

ule
Table 6-3: Remote I/O System Components

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Component
Electronic Analog
Output Modules

Shovel Control Systems

Function

Detailed Description

Are connected to the terminal module


and determines the function of that terminal. One type of Analog Output Module
is used within the Universal Control System.

2 Analog Voltage Output High Fea-

Subtopic 6.15.1

ture Module
Table 6-3: Remote I/O System Components

his section discusses the function of the LEDs located on the front panel of the Remote I/O System Modules and
how they can be used to troubleshoot system issues.

6.6.0.1 Standard Fiber Optic Interface Module

-5!'!"=

Figure 6-15: Standard Fiber Optic Interface Module Diagnostic LEDs

The Standard Fiber Optic Interface Module shown in Figure 6-15 is used for the following Remote I/O System
Groups:

Control Cabinet
Operator Cab Left Hand Console

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Operator Cab Right Hand Console


Converter Cabinet
Transfer Cabinet
Hoist Gearcase
Lube Room
Boom Junction Box
Lower Control Cabinet
6.6.0.2 Intelligent Interface Module

ES03936a01

Figure 6-16: Intelligent Interface Module Diagnostic LEDs

The Intelligent Interface Module shown in Figure 6-16 is used for the following Remote I/O System Group:

RPC Cabinet
Filtration System
The Run, Stop, On, BF, SF, and FRCE LEDs display important information on the states of the Intelligent Interface
Module to the user.

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6.6.0.3 High Density Fiber Optic Interface Module

SF

SIEMENS

BF

ACT
ON

MMC

SIMATIC
ET 200M

IM 153-2
X2
34

ES03935a01

Figure 6-17: High Density Fiber Optic Interface Module Diagnostic LEDs

The High Density Fiber Optic Interface Module shown in Figure 6-17 is used for the following Remote I/O System
Group:

Auxiliary Cabinet
6.6.0.4 Power Modules
Power Modules are used in all of the Remote I/O System with the exception of the Auxiliary Cabinet. Refer to Figure 6-18
.

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SF

FSG PWR

ES03937a01

Figure 6-18: Power Module

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6.6.0.5 Digital Remote I/O Modules


Digital Remote I/O Modules, as shown in Figure 6-19, are used in all of the Remote
I/O Systems except for inside the Auxiliary Cabinet.

SF

ES03938a01

Figure 6-19: Digital Remote I/O Modules

There are several types of Digital Remote I/O Modules used within the Universal Control System. They are:

2 Digital Input 120VAC Module


4 Digital Input 24VDC Module
2 Digital Output 24VDC Module
4 Digital Output 24VDC Module
2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Module

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Auxiliary Cabinet
Digital Remote I/O Modules, as shown in Figure 6-20, are used in the Auxiliary Cabinet.

SF
0
1

3
4
5

6
7

0
1

2
3

5
6
7

ES03956a01

ES03957a01

Figure 6-20: Auxiliary Cabinet Digital Remote I/O Modules

6.6.0.6 Analog Remote I/O Modules


Analog Remote I/O Modules, as shown in Figure 6-21, are used in all of the Remote
I/O Systems except for inside the Auxiliary Cabinet

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SF

ES03958a01

Figure 6-21: Analog Remote I/O Modules

6.6.0.7 Auxiliary Cabinet Power Supply Module


Converts the line voltage (120VAC/230VAC) to 24VDC operating voltage to supply the Remote I/O System in the
Auxiliary Cabinet. Refer to Figure 6-22.

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Figure 6-22: Auxiliary Cabinet Remote I/O Power Supply Module

There is one LED associated with the Auxiliary Cabinet Power Supply Module, the DC24V LED. Its purpose is to
indicate the status of the Power Supply. Refer to Table 6-4.
Problem
If the output circuit is overloaded:

Symptom

DC24V LED

Then the voltage dip, automatic


voltage recovery Voltage drop,
shortening of service life.

Flashes

If the output is short-circuited.

Then the output voltage will go


to 0V and automatic voltage
recovery after short circuit has
been eliminated.

Off

If an overvoltage occurs on the


primary side.

There may be possible destruction of the Power Supply.

If there is an undervoltage on
the primary side.

Then automatic disconnection;


automatic voltage recovery.

Off

I > 2.6A (dynamic).


2A < I < or = to 2.6A (static).

Table 6-4: Reaction to Atypical Operating Conditions

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6.6.0.8 Control Cabinet Power Supply Module


The Control Cabinet Remote I/O Power Supply is a 24VDC/20A power supply and is DIN Rail mounted. Refer to
Figure 6-23.

OUTPUT

2 3 4

INPUT
AC 120V - 230V

DC 24V 20A
24V - 28.8V

24V OK
OVERLOAD

50/60Hz

Jump N L1 PE
120VAC L21

SHUTDOWN

-5!'$=
Figure 6-23: Control Cabinet Remote I/O Power Supply Module

There are three LEDs associated with the Control Cabinet Power Supply Module, the 24V OK, Overload, and
Shutdown LEDs. Refer to Table 6-5.
LED

Meaning

24V OK

Overload

Shutdown

On

Output voltage is >20.5VDC

On

Overload, output voltage is < 20.5VDC. (in


Constant current mode only).

On

Latched shutdown (in Shutdown operating


mode only) or Remote Off via supplementary module.

Table 6-5: Control Cabinet Remote I/O Power Supply Module

6.6.0.9 Remote I/O Power Supply


The Remote I/O Power Supply Module is used in all Remote I/O Systems except for the Auxiliary Cabinet, refer to
Subtopic 6.6.0.7, and Control Cabinet, refer to Subtopic 6.6.0.8.

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The Remote I/O Power Supply is a 24VDC/10A power supply and is DIN Rail mounted. Refer to Figure 6-24.

3 4

INPUT
AC 120V/230V-500V 50/60Hz
PE

24V OK

N L2

L1

OUTPUT DC 24V
10A

OVERLOAD
SHUTDOWN

ES03961a01

Figure 6-24: Remote I/O Power Supply Module

There are three LEDs associated with the Remote I/O Power Supply Module, the 24V OK, Overload, and Shutdown LEDs. Refer to Table 6-6.
LED

Meaning

24V OK

Overload

Shutdown

On

Output voltage is >20.5VDC

On

Overload, output voltage is < 20.5VDC. (in


Constant current mode only).

On

Latched shutdown (in Shutdown operating


mode only) or Remote Off via supplementary module.

Table 6-6: Remote I/O Power Supply Module

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6.7 DIN Rail


The Remote I/O System is installed on a zinc-plated rail. Refer to Figure 6-25.

Figure 6-25: DIN Rail

6.8 Terminal Modules


The Terminal Modules receive the I/O Modules and Power Modules. They can be pre-wired (without I/O Modules).
All Terminal Modules must be installed to the right of the Interface Module.

6.8.1 Terminal Modules for the Power Modules


Terminal modules for Power Modules include the following features:

Infeed for a new potential group up to the next TM-P terminal module.
Connection by means of spring terminal.
2 3 terminals.
Pre-wiring of the terminal module.
Noise diversion from the I/O Module to the DIN rail by means of spring contact.
Fitting of a shield contact element.
Interrupted AUX1 bus with connection to terminals A4 and A8.
6.8.1.1 Terminal Assignment

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Refer to Figure 6-26 and Table 6-7 for the terminal assignment of the Power Module Terminal Module.

Figure 6-26: Power Module Terminal Module Terminal Assignment

Terminal

Description

L+/L

Rated load voltage for inserted the Power


Module and associated I/O Group.

M/ N

A4

AUX1

Any connection for the ground bus or voltage bus up to the maximum rated load
voltage of the module.

L+/L

M/ N

Rated load voltage for inserted the Power


Module and associated I/O Group.

A8

AUX1

Any connection for the ground bus or voltage bus up to the maximum rated load
voltage of the module.

Table 6-7: Power Module Terminal Module Terminal Assignment

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6.8.1.2 Block Diagram

01
02
03

PM-E

04

A
4

A
8

05

LEGEND
01. Backplane bus.
02. Infeed of the power buses to the I/O
Modules.
03. Infeed of the power buses to the I/O
Modules.
04. Terminals with connection to the
Power Module.
05. Terminals with connection to the
Power Module.
06. Use of terminals A4 and A8 as protective conductor terminals or
potential terminals of any kind.
07. Infeed of the AUX1 bus by means of
terminals A4 and A8.

06
07

ES03964a01
Figure 6-27: Power Module Terminal Module Block Diagram

6.8.2 Terminal Modules for the I/O Modules


Terminal modules for I/O Modules include the following features:

Connection by means of spring terminals.


2 4 terminals.
Pre-wiring of the terminal module.
Noise diversion from the electronic module to the DIN rail by means of spring contact.
Fitting for a shield contact element.
Uninterrupted AUX1 bus without connection to terminals 4 and 8.

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6.8.2.1 Terminal Assignment


Refer to Figure 6-28 and Table 6-8 for the terminal assignment of the I/O Module Terminal Module.

SF

ES03965a01

Figure 6-28: I/O Module Terminal Module Terminal Assignment

Terminal

Description

1
2

The assignment depends on what type I/O


Module is inserted into the Terminal Module.

No access to the AUX1 bus.

4
5
6

Terminals not used by the I/O module can


be used for unneeded connecting wires.
The permitted potential corresponds to the
potential of the I/O Module used.

7
8
Table 6-8: I/O Module Terminal Module Terminal Assignment

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6.8.2.2 Block Diagram

01
02
03

I/O
Module

04
05
06

LEGEND
01. Backplane bus.
02. Uninterrupted power buses from the
Power Module.
03. Uninterrupted power buses from the
Power Module.
04. Terminals with connection to the I/O
Module.
05. Terminals with connection to the I/O
Module.
06. Terminals with connection to the I/O
Module.
07. Terminals with connection to the I/O
Module.
08. Uninterrupted AUX1 bus without
connection to terminals 4 and 8.

07
08

ES03966a01

Figure 6-29: I/O Module Terminal Module Block Diagram

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6.9 Interface Modules


6.9.1 Standard Fiber Optic Interface Module
The Standard Fiber Optic Interface Module has the following features:

It connects the Remote I/O System with the Profibus DP-V1 via the fiber-optic cable interface.
It prepares the data for the electronic modules that are associated with its specific group.
It supplies the backplane bus.
The Profibus DP-V1 address of the Remote I/O System can be set by means of switches.
If the 24VDC power supply is disconnected, the Standard Fiber Optic Interface Module is also disconnected.
The maximum address space is 128 bytes for inputs and 128 bytes for outputs.
The reference potential of the supply voltage of the Standard Fiber Optic Interface Module to the rail (protective conductor) is connected by means of an RC combination, thus permitting an ungrounded configuration.

A maximum of 63 modules can be operated with the Standard Fiber Optic Interface Module.
The maximum width of the station is 1m.
6.9.1.1 Terminal Assignment
Refer to Figure 6-30 for the terminal assignment of the Standard Fiber Optic Interface Module for the 24VDC voltage supply and Profibus DP-V1 with fiber-optic cable interface

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LEGEND
01. Receiver - Fiber
Optic Cable Connection
02. Transmitter - Fiber
Optic Cable Connection
03. 1L+ (24VDC)
04. 2L+ (24VDC) (for
loop through)
05. 1M (Ground)
06. 2M (Ground) (for
loop through)

Figure 6-30: Standard Fiber Optic Interface Module Terminal Assignment


 



  
   
(
&  ' 
!
 

(

"
    


  

 

 

6.9.1.2 Block Diagram



( 
 

# $%

 

 
 

!$)* +)

Figure 6-31: Standard Fiber Optic Interface Module Block Diagram

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6.9.2 High Density Fiber Optic Interface Module


The High Density Fiber Optic Interface Module has the following features:

Module change during operation, when programmed.


Direct communication.
Enhanced diagnostics.
Forwarding of parameterization data from a PC directly to a field device.
Time synchronization on the Profibus DP-V1 bus system, time stamping of input signals.
Configuration modification in RUN in the non-redundant system.
Clock synchronism.
Identification data.
6.9.2.1 Terminal Assignment
Refer to Figure 6-32 for the terminal assignment of the High Density Fiber Optic Interface Module for the 24VDC
voltage supply and Profibus DP-V1 with fiber-optic cable interface

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LEGEND
01. Receiver - Fiber Optic
Cable Connection
02. Transmitter - Fiber
Optic Cable Connection
03. Ground
04. M (Ground)
05. L+ (24VDC)

Figure 6-32: High Density Fiber Optic Interface Module Terminal Assignment

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6.9.2.2 Block Diagram


 



 





 

Figure 6-33: High Density Fiber Optic Interface Module Block Diagram

6.9.3 Intelligent Interface Module


The Intelligent Interface Module is a component of the Remote I/O System with degree of protection. The Intelligent Interface Module is an Intelligent Pre-Processing Unit, or I-Slave. It enables you to decentralize control tasks.
A Remote I/O System with an Intelligent Interface Module can exercise full independent control over a process
related functional unit and can be used as a stand-alone CPU. The use of the Intelligent Interface Module leads to
further modularized and standardized process-related functional units and simple, clear machine concepts.
The Intelligent Interface Module has the following features:

The Interface Module has PLC functionality (integrated CPU component with 48K Byte working memory).
The Interface Module can only be operated with fitted load memory (Micro Memory Card) (MMC).
The Interface Module can be enhanced with up to 63 I/O modules.
The Interface Module has a mode selector with positions for RUN, STOP and MRES (Reset the CPU Memory).

There are 8 LEDs on the front of the Interface Module to indicate the following:

Remote I/O faults (SF).

Bus faults (BF).

Supply voltage (ON).

Force requests (FRCE).

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Operating mode of the Interface Module (RUN and STOP).

Fiber optic transmission status (FO1F and FO2F).

Connection to the Profibus DP-V1 via fiber-optic cables.


6.9.3.1 Memory Areas of the Intelligent Interface Module
The memory of the Interface Module can be divided into three areas. Refer to Figure 6-34.

Intelligent Interface Module


Working
Memory

MMC
Load
Memory

System
Memory
ES03972a01

Figure 6-34: Intelligent Interface Module Memory

Load Memory
The load memory is installed on a Micro Memory Card, or MMC. The Load Memory is used to record code and
data blocks as well as system data (configuration, connections, module parameters, etc.).
Blocks which are designated as non-process-related are recorded in the load memory.
The complete configuration data for a project can also be stored on the MMC.
The program in the MMC is always retentive. When downloaded, it is stored on the MMC such that it is unaffected
by power failures and is not erased by memory resets.

NOTICE
The Intelligent Interface Module can only be operated with the MMC inserted.
Working Memory
The working memory is integrated on the Interface Module and cannot be expanded. It is used to process the
codes and data of the user program. Program processing is only performed at the working memory and system
memory.
The working memory of the Interface Module is retentive if the MMC is inserted. The data in the working memory is
saved on the MMC if the power supply is interrupted.

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System Memory
The system memory is integrated on the Interface Module and cannot be expanded.
It contains

The address areas memory markers, timers, and counters.


The process images of the inputs and outputs.
The local data.
For memory markers, timers and counters, you can configure (Properties of the CPU, Retentivity tab) which parts
are to be retentive and which parts are to be initialized with 0 when a complete restart (warm restart) is performed.
The diagnostic buffer, transmission rate, as well as the run-time meter are generally stored in the retentive memory
area on the CPU. Retentivity of the transmission rate ensures that your CPU is still able to communicate following
a power failure, a memory reset or the loss of communication parameters (by removing the MMC or erasing the
communication parameters).

Retentivity
The Interface Module has a retentive memory. The retentivity is provided on the MMC and Interface Module.
The retentivity means that the content of the retentive memory is retained even following power off and a restart
(warm restart).

6.9.3.2 Retentive Behavior of the Memory Objects


Table 6-9 shows the retentive behavior of the memory objects during the individual operating mode transitions.
Memory Object

Operating Mode Transition


POWER ON
POWER OFF

STOP
RUN

Memory
Reset

User program/data (load memory)

Current values of the DBs

Memory markers, timers and counters


configured as retentive

Diagnostic buffers, run-time meters

Transmission rate

= Retentive

= Not Retentive
Table 6-9: Retentive Behavior of the Memory Objects

6.9.3.3 Resetting the Memory


The memory of the Intelligent Interface Module must be reset under the following conditions:

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To erase retentive areas (memory markers, times, counters).


If the Intelligent Interface Module requests a memory reset by flashing the Stop LED at 0.5Hz.
The following are possible reasons why the Intelligent Interface Module requests the memory reset function:

The Remote I/O is starting up for the first time.


Inconsistent memory areas.
The MMC has been replaced.
To reset the Memory of the Intelligent Interface Module with the Mode Selector switch, perform the following steps:
Step 1:

Place the Mode Selector Switch to the Stop position. Refer to Figure 6-35.

Figure 6-35: Interface Module Mode Selector Switch

NOTICE
When placing the Mode Selector switch in the MRES position, it is spring returned to the Stop
position. You will have to hold the switch in the MRES position to accomplish this procedure.
Step 2:

Press down and hold the Mode Selector Switch in the MRES (Memory Reset) position. Hold the Mode
Selector Switch in this position until the Stop LED illuminates for the second time (3 seconds).

Step 3:

Allow the Mode Selector Switch to return to the Stop position.

Step 4:

Within 3 seconds, press and hold the Mode Selector Switch back to the MRES position until the Stop LED
flashes rapidly, (at 2Hz). When the Interface Module has completed the memory reset function, the Stop
LED will cease flashing and remains illuminated.

6.9.3.4 Positions of the Mode Selector Switch


The positions of the mode selector are explained in the order in which they are arranged on the Intelligent Interface
Module. Refer to Table 6-10.

6.9.3.5 Micro Memory Card (MMC)

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Position

Function

Description

Run

Run Mode

The CPU executes the user program.

Stop

Stop Mode

The CPU does not execute the user program.


Programs can:

Be downloaded from the Interface Module using a Laptop PC.

Transferred to the Interface Module


using a Laptop PC.
MRES

Memory Reset

Momentary-contact position of the mode


selector for resetting the Interface Module
memory.
You must adhere to a specific sequence when
resetting the Interface Module memory using
the Mode Selector Switch, refer to Subtopic
6.9.3.3.

Table 6-10: Positions of the Mode Selector Switch

A 64K Micro Memory Card (MMC) is used as a memory module for the Intelligent Interface Module. The MMC can
be used as a load memory and portable data carrier. It is an essential requirement for operating the Interface Module. The following data is stored on the MMC:

User program (all blocks).


Archives and recipes.
Configuration data.
Data for an operating system update, operating system backup.

CAUTION
The module content of a MMC can be corrupted if the card is removed while a write operation is being performed. If this happens, the MMC must be erased or formatted in the
Interface Module. Never remove the MMC in Run Mode. It should only be removed when
the Interface Module is in the power off or Stop Mode and only if the Laptop PC is not
currently performing a write access operation. If in the Stop Mode you are not sure
whether or not the Laptop PC is performing a write access operation (e.g. loading/erasing a block), unplug the communication connections beforehand.
The service life of an MMC mainly depends on the following factors:

The number of erasing and programming operations.


External influences such as ambient temperature.
At an ambient temperature of up to 60 C, the service life of an MMC with max. 100,000 erase/write operations is
10 years. To prevent data loss, do not exceed the maximum number of erase/write operations.

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6.9.3.6 Terminal Assignment


Table 6-11 details the terminal assignments of the Intelligent Interface Module for the RS485, Profibus DP-V1 with
fiber-optic cable interface, and 24VDC.
View

6
7
8
9

Signal Name

1
2
3
4
5

Receiver

Description

M24

External 24 VDC supply

RxD/TxD-P

Data line B

RTS

Request To Send

M5V2

Data reference potential (from the station)

P5V2

Supply plus (from the station)

P24

External 24 VDC supply

RxD/TxD-N

Data line A

Top

Receive

Bottom

Transmit

1 L+

24V DC

2L+

24 V DC (to loop through)

1M

Chassis ground

2M

Chassis ground (to loop through)

Transmitter
1L+ 2L+ 1M 2M

Table 6-11: Intelligent Interface Module Terminal Assignment

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6.9.3.7 Block Diagram

RS-485 with permanently


integrated terminating resistor

Backplane Bus

A
B
Stop

Backplane Bus
Interface Module
Electronics

Run
SF
BF

RAM

Profibus DP-V1 Connection


Fiber
Optic
Interface

A
B
A
B

Mode Selector
Switch

Run
Stop
MRES

FRCE
On
MMC

L+

Internal Power
Supply

M
ES03973a01

Figure 6-36: Intelligent Interface Module Block Diagram

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6.10 Power Module


The 24VDC, 120VAC/230VAC Power Module has the following characteristic features:

Monitors the supply voltage for all the electronic modules in the potential group.
The supply voltage is fed in by means of the TM-P terminal module.
Can be used universally and can be parameterized for DC and AC load voltage for use with any Remote I/O
Module.

Is required at least once for the Remote I/O System Group to the right of the Interface Module.
Is additionally equipped with a replaceable fuse. Refer to Figure 6-37 for fuse replacement.

LEGEND
01. Open the compartment on the bottom right side of
the Power Module
with a screwdriver
02. The fuse is located
in the compartment

01

02
ES03974a01

Figure 6-37: Power Module Fuse Replacement

6.10.1 Terminal Assignment

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Refer to Figure 6-38 and Table 6-12 for the terminal assignment of the Power Module:

Figure 6-38: Power Module Terminal Assignment

Terminal

Description

L+/L

Rated load voltage for inserted the Power


Module and associated I/O Group.

M/ N

A4

AUX1

Any connection for the ground bus or voltage bus up to the maximum rated load
voltage of the module.

L+/L

M/ N

Rated load voltage for inserted the Power


Module and associated I/O Group.

A8

AUX1

Any connection for the ground bus or voltage bus up to the maximum rated load
voltage of the module.

Table 6-12: Power Module Terminal Assignment

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6.10.2 Block Diagram

Backplane Bus

FSG

Backplane
Bus
Interface
Module

P2

M/N

P1

24VDC/L1

PWR

ES03975a01

Fuse
Monitor

Load
Voltage
Monitor

Fuse

3
7
2
6

Figure 6-39: Power Module Block Diagram

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6.11 Power Supply Modules


There are three types of Power Supply Modules associated with the Universal Control System. They are:

Auxiliary Cabinet Power Supply Module


Control Cabinet Power Supply Module
Remote I/O Power Supply Modules

6.11.1 Auxiliary Cabinet Power Supply Module


The Auxiliary Cabinet Power Supply Module has the following features:

Output current of 2A.


Output voltage of 24VDC.
Protection against short-circuit and open circuit.
Connection to single-phase AC system (input voltage 120VAC/230VAC, 50Hz/60Hz).
Can be used as load power supply.
6.11.1.1 Terminal Assignment

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Refer to Figure 6-40 for the terminal assignment of the Auxiliary Cabinet Power Supply Module.

01

DC24V

02

Voltage
Selector
LEGEND
01. LED for 24VDC output voltage available
02. Input Voltage Selector
03. On/Off Switch for 24VDC
04. Terminals for system voltage and protective ground04
ing conductor
05. Terminals for 24VDC output
04
voltage
06. Strain-relief assembly

03

On
Off

L1
N

04

L+
M
L+
M

06

05
05
05
05

ES03976a01

Figure 6-40: Auxiliary Cabinet Power Supply Terminal Assignment

6.11.1.2 Block Diagram

L1

L+

M
U

24VDC
ES03977a01

On/Off

Figure 6-41: Auxiliary Cabinet Power Supply Block Diagram

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6.11.2 Control Cabinet Power Supply Module

WARNING

Hazardous voltages are present in this electrical equipment during operation. Failure to
properly maintain the equipment can result in death, severe personal injury or substantial property damage. Only qualified personnel should work on or near this equipment.
The Power Supply Module will function correctly and safely only if it is properly transported, stored, installed, and set up.

WARNING

The main switch must be switched off and secured against reconnecting prior to installation or maintenance of the equipment. Failure to disconnect the main switch means
that contact with live voltage can result in death or severe personal injury. To operate
the unit in 120VAC mode, a jumper must be inserted between the two Jump 120VAC
terminals. This optional jumper carries hazardous voltage. It must have the same cross
section and insulation as the mains supply cable. It must not be longer than 100mm.
The Control Cabinet Power Supply is a chassis-mounted unit. It is a primary switched-mode power supply for connection to 1 phase AC systems or to 2 phases of a three phase system. Rated voltage input of 120VAC/230VAC,
50Hz/60Hz. Output voltage rated at +24VDC, floating, short-circuit proof and stable at no load.

6.11.2.1 Input Variables


Rated input voltage:

AC120VAC/230VAC, 50Hz/60Hz.

Operating voltage range:

85-132VAC/176-264VAC.

Mains buffering:

120VAC/230VAC is 20ms.

Input current (Ie):

120VAC/230VAC is 7.7Arms/3.5Arms.

Making current limitation (25C) standard:

<60A, <9.9A2s.

Efficiency at full load (typical) is 89%.


Power consumption (active power) is 540W.

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6.11.2.2 Output Variables


Output DC voltage delivery state:

24VDC 1%.

Setting range: 24VDC to 28.8VDC, set via potentiometer on front of unit, refer to Figure 6-42.

A B

ES03978a01

Figure 6-42: 24VDC to 28.8VDC Potentiometer

De-rating at >24VDC:

4% Ia or 3C tamb / V Ua.

Output voltage ripple:

<100mVpp residual ripple.

<200mVpp peaks.

Direct output current Ia:

0-20A.

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6.11.2.3 Environment
Temperature:

for storage and shipment: -25C to +85C.

for operation: 0C to +60C.

Humidity rating according to climatic category 3K3 to EN 60721, Part 3; no condensation.


Natural air cooling.
6.11.2.4 Protective and Monitoring Functions
Static current limitation:

Typical 1.15 Ia.

Behavior under short-circuit conditions (output):

Constant current / shutdown, can be switched over via selector switch B, refer to Figure 6-43.

A B

ES03979a01

Figure 6-43: A/B Selector Switch

Signaling:

LED green: Output voltage >20.5V.

LED amber: Overload, output voltage < 20.5V (in Constant current mode only).

LED red: Latched shutdown (in Shutdown operating mode only).

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6.11.2.5 A/B Selector Switch


Selector Switch
Position

Function

For load distribution in parallel operation, the devices can be switched from single
mode (switch setting off) to parallel mode (switch setting on). Switch setting on
produces an inclined output characteristic.

In switch setting off (constant current mode), the device supplies a constant current of about 1.15 rated current in the case of an overload/short circuit. In
switch setting on (shutdown mode), the device is shut down if it is overloaded for
more than about 100ms. This status can be reset by Power off for at least 5 seconds followed by Power on.
Table 6-13: A/B Selector Switch

6.11.3 Remote I/O Power Supply

WARNING

Hazardous voltages are present in this electrical equipment during operation. Failure to
properly maintain the equipment can result in death, severe personal injury or substantial property damage. Only qualified personnel should work on or near this equipment.
The Power Supply Module will function correctly and safely only if it is properly transported, stored, installed, and set up.

WARNING

The main switch must be switched off and secured against reconnecting prior to installation or maintenance of the equipment. Failure to disconnect the main switch means
that contact with live voltage can result in death or severe personal injury. To operate
the unit in 120VAC mode, a jumper must be inserted between the two Jump 120VAC
terminals. This optional jumper carries hazardous voltage. It must have the same cross
section and insulation as the mains supply cable. It must not be longer than 100mm.
The Remote I/O Power Supply is a chassis-mounted unit. It is a primary switched-mode power supply for connection to 1 phase AC systems or to 2 phases of a three phase system. Rated voltage input of 120VAC/230VAC to
500VAC, 50Hz/60Hz. Output voltage rated at +24VDC, floating, short-circuit proof and stable at no load.

6.11.3.1 Input Variables


Rated input voltage:

120VAC / 230VAC to 500VAC, 50Hz/60Hz.

Operating voltage range:

85-132VAC/176-550VAC.

Mains buffering at 120VAC/230VAC:

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25ms.

Input current Ie at 120VAC/230VAC:

4.4Arms/2.4Arms.

Making current limitation (25C) standard

<35A, <4.0A2s.

Efficiency at full load (typical):

86%.

Power consumption (active power):

280W.

6.11.3.2 Output Variables


Output DC voltage:

Delivery state: 24VDC 1%.

Setting range: 24V to 28.8V, set via potentiometer on front of unit. Refer to Figure 6-44.

A B

ES03978a01

Figure 6-44: 24VDC to 28.8VDC Potentiometer

De-rating at Ua > 24VDC:

4% Ia or 3C tamb / V Ua.

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Output voltage ripple:

<50mVpp residual ripple.

<200mVpp peaks.

Direct output current Ia:

0A - 10A.

6.11.3.3 Environment
Temperature:

for storage and shipment: -25C to +85C.

for operation: 0C to +60C.

Humidity rating according to climatic category 3K3 to EN 60721, Part 3; no condensation.

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6.11.3.4 Protective and Monitoring Functions


Static current limitation:

Typical 1.15 Ia.

Behavior under short-circuit conditions (output):

Constant current / shutdown, directly via selector switch B. Refer to Figure 6-45.

A B

ES03979a01

Figure 6-45: A/B Selector Switch

Signaling:

LED green: Output voltage >20.5VDC.

LED amber: Overload, output voltage < 20.5VDC (in Constant current mode only).

LED red: Latched shutdown (in Shutdown operating mode only).

6.11.3.5 A/B Selector Switch


Selector Switch
Position

Function

For load distribution in parallel operation, the devices can be switched from single
mode (switch setting off) to parallel mode (switch setting on). Switch setting on
produces an inclined output characteristic.
Table 6-14: A/B Selector Switch

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Selector Switch
Position
B

Function
In switch setting off (constant current mode), the device supplies a constant current of about 1.15 rated current in the case of an overload/short circuit. In
switch setting on (shutdown mode), the device is shut down if it is overloaded for
more than about 100ms. This status can be reset by Power off for at least 5 seconds followed by Power on.
Table 6-14: A/B Selector Switch

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6.12 Electronic Digital Input Modules


The range of Electronic Digital Input Modules includes input modules for 24VDC and 120VAC.

6.12.1 4 Digital Input 24VDC Module


The 4 Digital Input 24VDC Module has the following characteristic features:

Digital electronic module with four inputs.


Rated input voltage 24VDC.
Suitable for switches and proximity switches.
Supports clocking operation (isochronal mode).
6.12.1.1 Terminal Assignment
Refer to Figure 6-46 for the terminal assignment of the 4 Digital Input 24VDC Module.

SF

CH0
CH2

CH1
CH3

DI0

DI1

DI2

DI3

24VDC

24VDC

24VDC

24VDC

ES03980a01

Figure 6-46: 4 Digital Input 24VDC Module Terminal Assignment

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Backplane Bus

6.12.1.2 Block Diagram

Backplane
Bus
Interface
Module

Input
Electronics

Input
Electronics

Input
Electronics

Input
Electronics

Short Circuit
Protection

1M
P1
L+
P2

Reverse Polarity
Protection

ES03981a01

3
7
4
8

Figure 6-47: 4 Digital Input 24VDC Module Block Diagram

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6.12.2 16 Point Digital Input Signal Module


The 16 Point Digital Input Signal Module is used specifically in the Auxiliary Cabinet and features the following
characteristics:

16 inputs, electrically isolated in groups of 4.


120/230 VAC rated input voltage.
Suitable for switches and two / three-wire proximity switches (alternating voltage).
6.12.2.1 Terminal Assignment and Block Diagram
Refer to Figure 6-48 for terminal assignment and block diagram of the 16 Point Digital Input Signal Module.

1
2
3

0
1
2

4
5
6
7
8
9
10

3
4
5
6
7

M
Backplane Bus
Interface

11
12
13
14
15
16
17

0
1
2
3
4
5

18

19
20

N
ES03982a01

Channel Number
Status Display - Green

Figure 6-48: 16 Point Digital Input Signal Module Terminal Assignment and Block Diagram

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6.12.3 2 Digital Input 120VAC Module


The 2 Digital Input 120VAC Module has the following characteristic features:

Digital electronic module with two inputs.


Rated input voltage of 120VAC.
Suitable for switches.
6.12.3.1 Terminal Assignment
Refer to Figure 6-49 for the terminal assignment of the 2 Digital Input 120VAC Module.

SF

CH0

CH1

DI0

DI1

L1

L1

n.c.

n.c.

2 Conductor

3 Conductor

ES03983a01

Figure 6-49: 2 Digital Input 120VAC Module Terminal Assignment

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6.12.3.2 Block Diagram

Backplane Bus

P1
P2

Backplane Bus
Interface
Module

3
7
2

N
L1
ES03984a01

Figure 6-50: 2 Digital Input 120VAC Module Block Diagram

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6.13 Electronic Analog Input Modules


The range of Electronic Analog Input Modules includes modules for measuring voltages and currents. For time-critical measuring of voltage and current, you can use the High Speed modules. The High Feature modules provide a
higher resolution and greater accuracy.
There are also modules available for connecting thermocouples and resistance thermometers or resistors.

6.13.1 2 Analog Voltage Input High Feature Module


The 2 Analog Voltage Input High Feature Module has the following characteristic features:

2 inputs for measuring voltage.


Input ranges:

10VDC, resolution 15 bits + sign.

5VDC, resolution 15 bits + sign.

1VDC to 5VDC, resolution 15 bits.

Isolated from the load voltage L+.


Permitted common-mode voltage between the channels 100VAC.
6.13.1.1 Terminal Assignment

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Figure 6-51 illustrates the terminal assignment of the 2 Analog Voltage Input High Feature Module.

SF

CH0

CH1

M0+ 1

M1+

M0-

M1-

n.c.

n.c.

n.c.

n.c.

ES03985a01

Figure 6-51: 2 Analog Voltage Input High Feature Module Terminal Assignment

6.13.1.2 Block Diagram


1

Backplane Bus

Backplane Bus
Interface Module

P1
P2

ADC

MUX
5
6

ES03986a01

24VDC

L+

MANA

1M
Figure 6-52: 2 Analog Voltage Input High Feature Module Block Diagram

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6.13.2 2 Analog Voltage Input High Speed Module


The 2 Analog Voltage Input High Speed Module has the following characteristic features:

2 inputs for measuring voltage.


Input ranges:

10VDC, resolution 13 bits + sign.

5VDC, resolution 13 bits + sign.

2.5VDC, resolution 13 bits + sign.

1VDC to 5VDC, resolution 13 bits.

Isolated from the load voltage L+.


Permitted common-mode voltage 100VACpp.
Supports clocking operation (isochronal mode).

Minimum possible time for synchronous DP cycle (TDPmin): 2.5ms.

Minimum possible conversion time for the input modules (TCImin): 1.1ms.

6.13.2.1 Terminal Assignment

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Figure 6-53 Illustrates the terminal assignment of the 2 Analog Voltage Input High Speed Module.

SF

CH0

CH1

M0+ 1

M1+

M0-

M1-

MANA 3

MANA

n.c.

n.c.

ES03987a01

Figure 6-53: 2 Analog Voltage Input High Speed Module Terminal Assignment

6.13.2.2 Block Diagram

Backplane Bus

Backplane Bus
Interface Module

P1
P2

ADC

MUX
5
6

ES03988a01

24VDC

L+

MANA
3

1M

Figure 6-54: 2 Analog Voltage Input High Speed Module Block Diagram

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6.13.3 2 Analog Current Input High Feature Module


The 2 Analog Current Input High Feature Module has the following characteristic features:

2 inputs for measuring current.


Input ranges:

20mA, resolution 15 bits + sign.

4mA to 20mA, resolution 15 bits.

Isolated from the load voltage L+.


Permitted common-mode voltage between the channels 100VAC.
Supports two-wire or four-wire measuring transducers.
6.13.3.1 Terminal Assignment
Figure 6-55 Illustrates the terminal assignment of the 2 Analog Current Input High Feature Module.

SF

CH0

2 Conductors
Two-wire Measuring
Transducer

CH1

M0+

M1+

M0-

M1-

+24VDC

+24VDC

-24VDC

-24VDC

mA

4 Conductors
Four-wire Measuring
Transducer
mA

ES03989a01

Figure 6-55: 2 Analog Current Input High Feature Module Terminal Assignment

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6.13.3.2 Block Diagram

Backplane Bus

Backplane Bus
Interface Module

P1
P2

ADC

MUX

2
5
6

ES03990a01

24VDC

L+

MANA

1M

3
7
4
8

Figure 6-56: 2 Analog Current Input High Feature Module Block Diagram

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6.13.4 2 Analog Input RTD Module


The 2 Analog Input RTD Module has the following characteristic features:

2 inputs for resistance thermometers or resistance measurement.


Input ranges:

Resistance thermometers: Pt100, Ni100; resolution 15 bits + sign.

Resistance measurement: 150, 300, 600; resolution max. 15 bits + sign.

Isolated from the load voltage L+.


Linearization of the sensor characteristic curves.
6.13.4.1 Terminal Assignment
The resistance thermometers/resistors are measured in a four-conductor connection. Constant current is fed to the
resistance thermometers/resistors by means of connections IC+ and IC-. The voltage generated at the resistance
thermometer/resistor is measured by means of the connections M+ and M-. This ensures highly accurate measurement results with the four-conductor connection.
With the two/three-conductor connection, corresponding jumpers are applied to the module between M+ and Ic+ or
M- and Ic-. However, a loss of accuracy in the measurement results.
Figure 6-57 illustrates the terminal assignment of the 2 Analog Input RTD Module.

SF

CH0

CH1

M0+

M1+

M0-

M1-

Ico+

Ic1+

Ico-

Ic1-

2 Conductor 3 Conductor 4 Conductor

ES03991a01

Figure 6-57: 2 Analog Input RTD Module Terminal Assignment

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6.13.4.2 Block Diagram

Backplane Bus

Backplane Bus
Interface Module

P1
P2

ADC

MUX

2
5
6

ES03992a01

24VDC

L+

MANA
MUX

1M

3
7
4
8

Figure 6-58: 2 Analog Input RTD Module Block Diagram

6.14 Electronic Digital Output Modules


The range of the Electronic Digital Output Modules includes output modules for 24 VDC and output modules for 24120VDC. A relay module enables the switching of voltages for AC and DC.

6.14.1 2 Digital Output 24VDC Module


The 2 Digital Output 24VDC Module has the following characteristic features:

Digital electronic module with two outputs.


Output current 2A per output.
Rated load voltage 24VDC.
Suitable for solenoid valves, DC contactors, and indicator lights.
Supports clocking operation (isochrone mode).
When you connect the 24VDC rated load voltage to the Power Module by means of a mechanical contact, depending on the circuit the digital outputs carry the 1 signal for approximately 50s. Take this into account if you connect the module to fast counters.

6.14.1.1 Terminal Assignment

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Figure illustrates the terminal assignment of the 2 Digital Output 24VDC Module.

SF

CH0

CH1
2 Conductor

DO0

DO1

24VDC

24VDC

n.c.

n.c.

3 Conductor

ES03993a01

Figure 6-59: 2 Digital Output 24VDC Module Terminal Assignment

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6.14.1.2 Block Diagram

Backplane Bus

P1
P2

Backplane
Bus
Interface
Module

1M
L+

ES03994a01

Reverse Polarity
Protection and
Internal Voltage Supply

2
6
3
7

Figure 6-60: 2 Digital Output 24VDC Module Block Diagram

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6.14.2 4 Digital Output 24VDC Module


The 4 Digital Output 24VDC Module has the following characteristic features:

Digital electronic module with four outputs.


Output current 0.5A per output.
Rated load voltage 24VDC.
Suitable for solenoid valves, DC contactors, and indicator lights.
When you connect the 24VDC rated load voltage to the power module by means of a mechanical contact, depending on the circuit the digital outputs carry the 1 signal for approximately 50s. Take this into account when connecting the module to fast counters.

6.14.2.1 Terminal Assignment


Figure 6-61 illustrates the terminal assignment of the 4 Digital Output 24VDC Module.

SF

CH0
CH2

CH1
CH3

DO0

DO1

DO2

DO3

2 Conductor

ES03995a01

Figure 6-61: 2 Digital Output 24VDC Module Terminal Assignment

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6.14.2.2 Block Diagram

Backplane Bus

Backplane
Bus
Interface
Module

1M
P1
L+
P2

Reverse Polarity
Protection and
Internal Voltage Supply

ES03996a01

3
7
4
8

Figure 6-62: 2 Digital Output 24VDC Module Block Diagram

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6.14.3 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Module


The 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Module has the following characteristic features:

Digital electronic module with two relay outputs.


Output current 5A per output.
Rated load voltage up to 120VDC and up to 230VAC.
Suitable for solenoid valves, DC contactors, and indicator lights.
Isolated from the supply voltage.

CAUTION
The rated supply voltage of the 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Module is 24VDC. The 2
Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Module can only be located in a potential group with
24VDC from the Power Module.
6.14.3.1 Terminal Assignment
Figure 6-63 illustrates the terminal assignment of the 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Module.

SF

CH0

CH1

13

23

14

24

14

24

n.c.

n.c.

ES03997a01

Figure 6-63: 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Module Terminal Assignment

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6.14.3.2 Block Diagram

Backplane Bus

1
Backplane
Bus
Interface
Module

2
3
5

6
P1
P2

1M
L+

Reverse Polarity
Protection
ES03998a01

Figure 6-64: 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Module Block Diagram

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6.14.4 8 Point Digital Output Signal Module


The 8 Point Digital Output Signal Module is used specifically in the Auxiliary Cabinet and features the following
characteristics:

8 outputs, fused and isolated in groups of 4.


2A output current.
120VAC/230VAC rated load voltage.
Suitable for AC solenoid valves, contactors, motor starters, and indicator lights.
Group error display.
6.14.4.1 Terminal Assignment
Figure 6-65 illustrates the terminal assignment and block diagram of the 8 Point Digital Output Signal Module.
5V
SF

1
2
3

SF
M

M
2

1L
1N

Backplane bus
interface

5V
11
12
13

2L
2N

15

17

19
ES03999a01

Channel number
Status display green
Fault indicator red

Figure 6-65: 8 Point Digital Output Signal Module Terminal Assignment and Block Diagram

6.15 Electronic Analog Output Module

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The range of Electronic Analog Output Modules includes modules for measuring voltages. The High Feature modules provide a higher resolution and greater accuracy.

6.15.1 2 Analog Voltage Output High Feature Module


The 2 Analog Voltage Output High Feature Module has the following characteristic features:

2 outputs for voltage output.


Output range:

10V, resolution 15 bits + sign.

1V to 5V, resolution 14 bits.

Isolated from the load voltage L+.


Supports clocking operation (isochrone mode).

Minimum possible time for synchronous DP cycle (TDPmin): 3.75ms.

Minimum possible conversion time for the output module (TCOmin): 1.5ms.

6.15.1.1 Terminal Assignment


Figure 6-66 illustrates the terminal assignment of the 2 Analog Voltage Output High Feature Module.

SF

CH0

CH1
2 Conductor

QV0

QV1

S0+

S1+

MANA

MANA

S0-

S1-

4 Conductor

ES04002a01

Figure 6-66: 2 Analog Voltage Output High Feature Module Terminal Assignment

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6.15.1.2 Block Diagram

Backplane Bus

Backplane Bus
Interface Module

P1
P2

DAC

MANA

2
3
4
5

DAC
L+

MANA

6
7
8

24VDC
MANA

1M

ES04003a01

Figure 6-67: 2 Analog Voltage Output High Feature Module Block Diagram

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6.16 Technical Data


For technical data on the AC800 Processor Unit and Baseplate, refer Table 6-15.
Item
Memory

Value

2MB flash PROM (firmware storage).


16MB of SDRAM (11 MB available for application
program and 5MB used for executable firmware).

Power Dissipation

6W typical
11W typical (including full supply to ModuleBus and CEXbus).

Current Consumption

250 mA typical (430 mA max.)


(excluding supply of ModuleBus and CEX-bus).

Power Input Connector

Four pin, screw connector L+, L-, SA and SB.

Power Supply Requirements

Inputs designated L+ and L- 24 V nominal, variation


between 19.2VDC and 30VDC.

Redundant Power Supply Status Inputs

Inputs designated SA, SB

Max input voltage 30V


Min. input voltage for high level 15V
Max input voltage for low level 8V
These inputs are status inputs. The threshold levels are
logical 0 or 1 input limits, not power fail limits.
Power Reservoir

The processor unit has an internal 5ms power reservoir,


sufficient for the CPU to make a controlled power down.

Protection Rating

IP20 according to EN60529, IEC 529.

Weight

1200g (2.6lbs) (package PM861K01).


2800g (6.1lbs) (package PM861K02).

Dimensions

W 119mm x H 186mm x D 135mm (4.7in x 7.3in x 5.3in)


Width is measured along the DIN-rail, depth from the wall,
and height vertically, including lock mechanism.
Table 6-15: AC800 Technical Data

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6.16.1 Communication Ports and Interfaces


Technical data for communication ports and interfaces is described in Table 6-16.
Item

Value
CN1 and CN2 Ethernet Communication

Communication Speed

10Mbit/s (half duplex)

Signal Levels

IEEE802.3, 10Base-T

Connector

RJ45
COM3 Serial Communication

Communication Speed

Selectable in steps from 75 to 115200 baud. 75, 110,


134.5, 150, 300, 600, 1200, 1800, 2000, 2400, 9600,
19200, 38400, 115200 baud.

NOTICE
This range of transmission rates may be
limited by the communication protocol
used.
Signal Levels

RS232-C

Connector

RJ45

Modem Support

Yes
COM4 Serial Communication

Communication Speed

9600 baud

Signal Levels

RS232-C

Connector

RJ45

Modem Support

No
Electrical Modulebus

I/O Capacity

1 I/O base cluster with up to 12 I/O units.

Supply Current

Max 24V 1.0A (short circuit proof, fuse 2A fast)


Max 5V 1.5A (short circuit proof)

Supply Voltage Variation

24V - follows the input power at L+


Optical Modulebus

I/O Capacity

up to 7 I/O clusters each with 12 units

Connector

Duplex Fiber Optic Cable


Simplex Fiber Optic Cable
Table 6-16: Communication Ports and Interfaces

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Item

Value
CEX Bus

Capacity

Up to 12 communication interfaces

Supply Current

Max 24V - 2.4A (fuse 3.15A fast)


Table 6-16: Communication Ports and Interfaces

6.16.2 Battery

CAUTION
When the External Battery Backup is connected to the AC800, it is connected in parallel
with the AC800 internal battery. This causes both batteries to drain prematurely. To
avoid a reduction in the available memory backup time, remove the AC800 internal battery.
The memory content is backed up with either an internal or External Battery Unit. For back-up time refer to Table 617.
Source

Backup Time

Internal

Minimum 36 hours

External

Minimum 3 weeks
Table 6-17: Backup Time

The backup times in Table 6-17 are valid if the batteries have been installed after a normal CPU power-up, allowing for the memory back-up function to be activated.

6.16.3 LED Indicators


LED
F(ault)

Color
Red

Function
Normal state - OFF
Re-start (INIT) temporarily lit F(ault).
May also be operated by software program.

R(un)

Green

Normal state - ON
Re-start (INIT) temporarily extinguishes R(un). At restart press
the (INIT) push button (3 sec. or more) until R(un) flashes.
May also be operated by software program.

P(ower)

Green

Normal state ON
When lit, indicates that the CPU DC/DC converter is generating
valid +5VDC and +3.3VDC supply voltages.
No software control.
Table 6-18: LED Indicators

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LED
B(attery)

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Color

Function

Green

Normal state ON
Lit when condition of internal or external battery is satisfactory.
The LED is controlled by a software battery voltage test - BATTOK.

NOTICE
The software performs cyclic battery voltage level
tests via a dedicated LED control input. The battery provides back-up power for both the application memory and the real time clock during power
down. The battery is either accessible via the
PM8xx cover panel or externally connected to the
external battery connector. Battery voltage is
checked by the software. Voltage is common for
both the internal and external battery. For this
reason the internal battery should be removed
when using the external battery, since having two
batteries connected in parallel will result in
greatly reduced capacity.
Tx

Yellow

Data Transmission
CN1 + CN2 and COM3 + COM4
Flashes in synchronization with Tx traffic

Rx

Yellow

Data Reception
CN1 + CN2
COM3 + COM4
Flashes in synchronization with Rx traffic

PRIM(ary)

Yellow

Lit in single and redundant configuration.


Indicates Primary CPU in redundant configuration. Controlled by
software.

DUAL

Yellow

Lit when the CPU is running in redundant configuration and synchronized state.
Table 6-18: LED Indicators

6.16.4 Switches and Push Buttons


Name
INIT

Type
Manual Push
Button

Description
Initiates
1. Cold Restart if INIT is held less than 2.5 seconds.
2. Controller Reset if INIT is held more than 3 seconds.

Table 6-19: Switches and Push Buttons

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6.17 Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS)


!

WARNING

Only properly qualified personnel may work on or around this equipment. The successful and safe operation of this equipment is dependent on proper handling, storage and
installation.

CAUTION
The charging current level and the end-of-charge voltage must be adjusted with potentiometers R154 and R143 to the settings recommended in Subtopic. Setting incorrect current and voltage values reduces the life of the battery and may cause irreparable battery
damage.

CAUTION
Only trained personnel may open the unit. Electrostatically sensitive devices (ESD).
The UPS Module is a chassis unit mounted on a DIN rail to provide UPS protection for the AC800 and Operator
Touch Panel.
It buffers a proportion of the load current, maximum of 15A, of 24VDC Load Current Supplies with current ratings of
5A and above.
Input Input L+ on the UPS Module must be connected to output L+ of the 24V DC power supply unit and input
Input M to output M of the power supply unit. The battery module is connected to terminals +Bat and Bat. The
loads to be buffered are supplied via outputs Output L+ and Output M on the UPS Module with the voltage connected to the input. If the 24VDC supply voltage fails or drops below the set cut-in threshold, the battery module,
which is maintained at full charge in continuous supply mode, is connected in to supply the loads.
The battery cut-in threshold, end-of-charge voltage and charging current can be set via three potentiometers. A
switch block is provided for setting a defined buffering (stored energy) time with subsequent disconnection of the
battery, refer to Subtopic 6.17.2.
The operating states of the UPS Module are signaled by three LEDs, two floating changeover contacts and an
RS232 interface, refer to Subtopic 6.18.2.

6.17.1 Technical Data


6.17.1.1 Input Quantities
Rated input voltage: 24VDC.
Operating voltage range: 22VDC to 27.5VDC.
Maximum input current at 24VDC and battery charging: 16.0A DC.
Maximum input current at 24VDC and charged battery: 15.1A DC.

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Maximum battery current in floating operation: 15.1A DC.


Power loss at 24VDC and battery charging: 14.0W.
Power loss at 24VDC and charged battery: 12.5W.
Power loss in floating operation: 12.5W.
6.17.1.2 Output Quantities
Output DC voltage: VA1 = 24VDC.
Output direct current: IA1 = 15A DC.
Output characteristic of charging regulator: The battery module is charged at an adjustable constant current
until the set end-of-charge voltage is reached.

End-of-charge voltage: VA2 = 26.3VDC to 29.2VDC.


Charging current: IA2 = 0.3A DC to 0.7A DC.

6.17.2 Settings
6.17.2.1 Setting the Cut-in Threshold
If the input voltage drops below the selected cut-in threshold voltage, the UPS Module switches over to floating
operation. The loads are then supplied solely by the battery module. The cut-in threshold is set with a screwdriver
on potentiometer R222, refer to Figure 6-68.
Setting range: 18VDC to 26VDC.

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LEGEND
01. X400
02. R143
03. R222
04. R154 (located on the top of
the UPS Module)

Figure 6-68: UPS Module Potentiometers

NOTICE
The UPS Module is delivered with the R222 potentiometer set at 22.5VDC 0.1VDC.
6.17.2.2 Setting the Charging Current
The battery module is charged at a constant current until the selected end-of-charge voltage is reached. The
charging operation is then ended. When setting the charging current, read the instructions for the relevant battery
module in order to select the optimum setting. The charging current is set with a screwdriver on potentiometer
R154, refer to Figure 6-68.
Setting range: 0.3A to 0.7A DC 0.1A.

NOTICE
The UPS Module is delivered with the R154 potentiometer set at 0.7A DC 0.1A.
6.17.2.3 Setting the End-of-Charge Voltage
The end-of-charge voltage depends on the battery type and on the ambient operating temperature of the battery.
Table 6-20 shows the end-of-charge voltages for specific battery modules at different temperatures. It is possible to
interpolate between these values. The voltage is set with a screwdriver on potentiometer R143, refer to Figure 668.
Setting range: 26.3 to 29.2V DC.

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Temperature

Voltage

-10C (14F)

29.0VDC

0C (32F)

28.4VDC

10C (50F)

27.8VDC

20C (68F)

27.3VDC

25C (77F)

27.0VDC

30C (80F)

26.8VDC

35C (95F)

26.7VDC

40C (104F)

26.6VDC

Table 6-20: End-of-Charge Voltage for Battery Temperature

NOTICE
The UPS Module is delivered with the R143 potentiometer set at 27.0VDC 0.1VDC.
6.17.2.4 Setting the Operating State On/Off
To prevent the battery from being discharged unintentionally, for example, when the system power is disconnected, the UPS Module can be switched to operating states On and Off. In the On state, wire jumper inserted
between terminals X2.8 and X2.9, the UPS Module is fully functional according to specification. In the Off state,
jumper open, the UPS Module does not switch over to floating operation when the main supply is disconnected but
remains functional in every other respect.
If the module is switched to Off in floating operation, it ceases to operate in floating mode.
During normal operation, the polling interval for the On/Off setting is 20s.

6.17.2.5 Setting the Buffering Time


It is possible to select whether floating operation will be terminated after a pre-specified period or when the exhaustive discharge threshold of the battery (= maximum buffering time) is reached. The buffering time is set via switch
block X400, refer to Figure 6-68 and Table 6-21. Once the battery has been disconnected, there is no way in which
floating operation can be restarted again by altering the switch setting. Only when the input voltage has recovered
can floating operation be resumed.
P
o
s
i
t
i
o
n

Buffering Times
5

1
5

2
5

3
5

4
5

5
5

6
5

7
5

8
5

9
5

1
0
5

1
1
5

1
2
5

1
3
5

1
4
5

1
5
5

1
6
5

1
7
5

1
8
5

1
9
5

2
0
5

2
1
5

2
2
5

2
3
5

2
4
5

2
5
5

2
6
5

2
7
5

2
8
5

2
9
5

3
0
5

3
1
5

M
a
x

Table 6-21: Adjustable buffering time

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s
i
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Buffering Times
5

1
5

2
5

3
5

4
5

5
5

6
5

7
5

8
5

9
5

1
0
5

1
1
5

1
2
5

1
3
5

1
4
5

1
5
5

1
6
5

1
7
5

1
8
5

1
9
5

2
0
5

2
1
5

2
2
5

2
3
5

2
4
5

2
5
5

2
6
5

2
7
5

2
8
5

2
9
5

3
0
5

3
1
5

M
a
x

Switch Position: On = 1; Off = 0; x = Irrelevant (if switch 1 is in the Off position, the UPS Module buffers the
supply until the exhaustive discharge threshold is reached.)
Table 6-21: Adjustable buffering time

The buffering time is a minimum of 4.5 minutes until discharge to 20.4VDC with a charged battery (3.2Ah) and a
load current of 10A.

6.17.3 Protective and Monitoring Functions


6.17.3.1 Reverse Polarity Protection
The UPS Module is electronically protected against polarity reversal of the input voltage and battery.

6.17.3.2 Overcurrent and Short-Circuit Protection


The UPS Module is protected by the mains fuse (20A, type FKS) against overcurrent and short circuits in normal
operation. The fuse on the battery module protects the UPS Module against overcurrent in floating operation. An
internal current limitation disables floating operation from a battery current of typically 25A to 40A. Automatic
restart attempts are made every 20 seconds.

6.17.3.3 Exhaustive Discharge Protection

CAUTION
Lead-acid batteries may only be discharged down to a certain voltage (exhaustive discharge threshold). Allowing them to discharge further will reduce their service life and
may result in irreparable battery damage.
In order to protect the battery against damage, the UPS Module is shut down in store mode and the loads disconnected from the battery as soon as the battery voltage drops below 18.5VDC in floating operation.

6.17.3.4 Battery test


In order to guarantee reliable floating operation, the battery module must be checked to ensure that it is fully functional. The connected battery module is tested every 4 hours in normal operation. The test is carried out only if the
battery has not operated in floating mode or been disconnected within this 4 hour period. The battery test is not

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performed for applications in which floating operation is activated regularly at shorter intervals. A defective battery
is signaled by a flashing alarm and must be replaced.

6.17.4 Signaling
6.17.4.1 Normal Operation
The input voltage at the UPS Module is higher than the set cut-in threshold. The loads are being fed by the lineside power supply. If a battery module is connected, it is fully charged. In normal operation, the green LED (O.K.) is
illuminated and relay contact X2.3 - X2.4 (O.K.) is closed.

6.17.4.2 Floating Operation


The input voltage is lower than the set cut-in threshold. The loads are being supplied by the battery module. In
floating operation, the yellow LED (Bat) is illuminated and relay contact X2.2 - X2.3 (Bat) is closed. This is the deenergized position when unit is disconnected.

6.17.4.3 Alarm Signal Battery Not Ready


When the Battery Not Ready Signal is active, the red LED (Alarm) is illuminated and relay contact X2.5 - X2.6
(Alarm) is closed. This is the de-energized position when unit is disconnected.
Typical causes for the Battery Not Ready Alarm in normal operation are as follows:

Off operating state.


No battery module connected.
Reversed polarity or defective battery (battery voltage < 18.5VDC).
Open circuit between battery and UPS Module.
The interval for polling the operating states On/Off, reversed polarity, defective battery or no battery module connected, open circuit between battery and UPS Module, and for activating the relevant signal output is 20 seconds
during normal operation.
If the signal flashes in a 1.5 second cycle, this indicates that the battery is defective, but still capable of floating
operation. The specified buffering times cannot be guaranteed in such cases. The battery module must be
replaced.
The Alarm signal in floating operation means that the battery voltage has dropped to
< 20.4VDC and automatic disconnection to protect the battery is imminent. When the battery has been disconnected due to overload, short circuit, exhaustive discharge protection, or buffering time-out, the red LED (Alarm)
goes out, but relay contact X2.5 - X2.6 remains closed.

6.17.5 Connection and Terminal Assignments

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Terminals

Function

Cable Cross
Section

Cable
Length

X1.1

Input voltage DC24V

1.0 - 4mm2

X1.3

Output voltage DC24V

17 - 11 AWG

X1.2/X1.4

Input/output voltage DC0V

X1.5/X1.6

Battery module DC24V

X2.2,3,4

Signal: Normal operation / Floating operation

0.5 - 2.5mm2

up to 3m

X2.5,6,7

Signal: Battery not ready / ready

20 - 13 AWG

up to 3m

X2.8/X2.9

On/Off jumper (no jumper =Off)

X3

RS 232 interface

up to 2m

up to 2.5m

up to 3m

Table 6-22: Connection and Terminal Assignment

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6.18 Ethernet Electrical Lean Switch


With the Ethernet Electrical Lean Switch product generation, fast ethernet networks can be set up with a small
number of ports in an industrial environment. Nodes can only be attached to the network over twisted-pair ports.

6.18.1 Possible Attachments


The following possible attachments exist on the Ethernet Electrical Lean Switch, refer to Figure 6-69:

Two RJ-45 jacks for connecting Data Terminal Equipment (DTE).


Two ports with insulation-piercing contacts for the direct attachment of IE FastConnect (FC) cables.

Figure 6-69: Ethernet Electrical Lean Switch

Table 6-23 describes the properties of the RJ-45 jacks and Insulation Piercing contacts.
Connector
Two electrical
ports (RJ-45
jacks)

Properties
10/100Mbps (half/full duplex)
TP connector technology (RJ-45 jack with MDI-X
pinning)
Max. cable length 10 m (TP Cord or TP XP Cord)
In conjunction with IE FC Outlet RJ-45, a total cable
length of a maximum of 100 m is permitted.
Table 6-23: Properties

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Connector

Properties

Two electrical
ports with insulation-piercing contacts

10/100Mbps (half/full duplex) (with MDI-X pinning)


Permitted cable types:

IE FC TP standard cable with a length of


maximum 100m.

IE FC TP marine cable with a length of maximum 85m.

IE FC TP trailing cable with a length of maximum 85m.


The specified IE FC cable lengths are reduced by
10m if an IE FC outlet is used.
Table 6-23: Properties

6.18.2 Ports and Displays


6.18.2.1 Pinning
On the Ethernet Electrical Lean Switch, the TP ports are implemented as RJ-45 jacks and as insulation-piercing
contacts with the MDI-X pinning (Medium-Dependent Interface Auto-crossover) of a network component.

NOTICE
TP Cords or TP-XP Cords with a maximum length of 10m can be connected to the RJ-45 TP
port. In conjunction with IE FC Outlet RJ-45, a total cable length of 100m is permitted. IE FC TP
cable with a maximum length 100m can be connected to the TP ports with insulation-piercing
contacts.
6.18.2.2 Auto-negotiation
Auto-negotiation means the automatic detection of the functionality of the port at the opposite end. Using autonegotiation, repeaters or DTEs can detect the functionality available at the port of a partner device allowing automatic configuration of different types of device. With auto-negotiation, two components connected to a link segment can exchange parameters and set themselves to match the supported communication functionality.

NOTICE
The Ethernet Electronic Lean Switch is a Plug and Play device that does not require settings
to be made when it is installed.
6.18.2.3 MDI/MDIX Auto-crossover Function
The advantage of the MDI/MDI-X auto-crossover Function is that straight-pinned cables can be used throughout
and crossover cables are unnecessary. This prevents malfunctions resulting from mismatching send and receive
wires. Installation is much easier. The Ethernet Electronic Lean Switch chips all support the MDI/MDI-X auto-crossover function.

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NOTICE
Ports of partner stations not supporting auto-negotiation must be set to 100Mbps/half duplex or
10Mbps half duplex.
6.18.2.4 Power Supply
The power supply is connected using a 3-pin plug-in terminal block with a screw locking mechanism. Refer to Figure 6-70.
L1+ M

PE

+24VDC

01

ES04038a01

Figure 6-70: Power Supply Connection

CAUTION
The power supply unit to supply the Ethernet Electrical Lean Switch must comply with
NEC Class 2, voltage range 18VDC - 32VDC, current requirement 150mA. Never connect
the ELS to AC power supplies or DC power supplies greater than 32VDC.

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6.19 Profibus Optical Bus Terminal


The Profibus Optical Bus Terminal (Profibus OBT) is a network component for use in optical Profibus DP-V1 fieldbus networks. It allows the attachment of a single device without an integrated optical interface to the optical Profibus DP-V1.
The Profibus OBT is used in the Universal Control System in the following areas:

Control Cabinet
RPC Cabinet
Lube Room
Filtration System
Lower Control Cabinet

6.19.1 Interfaces
The Profibus OBT has the following interfaces for attachment to Profibus DP-V1 segments, Refer to Figure 6-71:

02

LEGEND
01. Channel 1
02. Channel 3
03. Channel 2

01

03

ES04043a01

Figure 6-71: Profibus OBT Interfaces

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Channel 1 (CH1) is an electrical RS-485 interface. This is implemented as a 9-pin D SUB female connector.
A single Profibus DP-V1 node can be connected via this channel or a PC, PG or OP can be connected to
the Profibus OBT. The maximum permitted segment length is 100m. The copper segment should, however,
be kept as short as possible since disturbances can be coupled into the optical Profibus DP-V1 from this
segment.

Channel 2 (CH2) and channel 3 (CH3) are optical interfaces. They are designed as duplex sockets. The end
of a two-fiber plastic or PCF fiber-optic cable with two simplex connectors is connected to each of these
duplex sockets.
The Profibus OBT also has a block with three terminals for connecting the 24VDC power supply and, if necessary,
a grounding conductor.

6.19.2 Optoelectric Signal Conversion and Signal Regeneration


The Profibus OBT converts the RS-485 level signal received at channel 1 into an optical signal level that is then
output via channel 2 and channel 3.
Signals received in channel 2 or 3 are converted to electrical signals and

Output on channel 1 as an electrical signal.


Changed back to an optical signal and then output again on the other optical channel.
The receive channels have no echo. In other words, received signals are not sent back on the same channel.
The Profibus OBT regenerates the signals in amplitude and time. This allows up to 126 modules to be cascaded in
an optical bus. The cascading depth is limited solely by the monitoring times of the attached devices. The propagation delay per Profibus OBT is 6 bit times.

6.19.3 Automatic Transmission Rate Detection


The Profibus OBT supports all Profibus DP-V1 transmission rates (12Mbps, 6Mbps, 3Mbps, 1.5Mbps, 500Kbps
and 187.5Kbps, 93.75Kbps, 45.45Kbps, 19.2Kbps, 9.6Kbps).
The transmission rate is detected automatically. No settings are necessary.

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6.19.4 Supported FO Fiber Types


The Profibus OBT supports the fiber types listed in Table 6-24:
Supported FO

Distance Between Devices

Plastic FO 980m/1000m with 2


fibers and maximum of 200dB/km
cable attenuation

0.1 m to 50 m

PCF FO 200m/230m with 2 fibers


and maximum of 10dB/km cable
attenuation

0 m to 300 m

Table 6-24: Supported Fiber Optics

The specified distances between the devices assume that the partner devices use the same optical components as
the Profibus OBT.
The transmission rate is independent of the type of fiber used and the cable length. It can be up to 12Mbps.

6.19.5 Displays
The Profibus OBT has 4 LEDs for displaying the various states. Refer to Figure 6-72.

Figure 6-72: Profibus OBT

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6.19.5.1 L+ 24V (Green)


Unlit: No power supply or internal power supply is defective or short-circuited.
Flashes: Power supply present; Transmission rate not yet set.
Lit green: Transmission rate set, power supply O.K.

6.19.5.2 CH1, CH2, CH3 (Channel 1 to 3, Yellow)


Unlit: No data being received.
Lit yellow: Data being received.

6.19.6 Operator Controls


The Profibus OBT does not have operator controls. Care must simply be taken that the Profibus DP-V1 connecting
cable attached to Channel 1 is terminated at both ends.

6.19.7 Optical Bus


The Profibus OBT is operated in conjunction with the Interface Modules associated with the Remote I/O Systems
on the optical PROFIBUS DP-V1 in the form of an optical bus.
Individual Profibus DP-V1 nodes with an RS-485 interface are connected to channel 1 of the Profibus OBT via a
maximum 100m long Profibus cable with bus connectors fitted at both ends. The terminating resistors on the bus
connectors must be activated. An active or passive Profibus DP-V1 node can be connected.
The Profibus OBT can be included at any point in the optical bus. If it is included at the start or end, the unused
optical channel must be closed with the rubber plug supplied. This prevents contamination of the optical elements
and disturbances caused by light entering the module.
The connection forming the optical bus is a two fiber plastic FO cable (maximum length 50m) or PCF FO cable
(maximum length 300m). The fiber optic cables have two simplex connectors at each end.
The fiber optic connection between two devices is established by connecting the optical sender of one device with
one fiber to the optical receiver of the other device and the optical receiver of the one device to the optical sender
of the other device (cross-over connection).
If a Profibus OBT or a fiber optic cable fails, the entire network becomes two subnets. Depending on the location of
the problem, individual devices may no longer be accessible.
The Profibus OBT does not support the creation of single-fiber rings, of monitored optical busses or redundant ring
structures.

6.19.8 Installation

CAUTION

Do not look directly into the opening of the optical transmitter diode. The emitted light
could injure your eyes.

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6.19.8.1 Installation and Removal


Fit the upper catch of the Profibus OBT onto the Standard DIN Rail and push in the lower part as shown in
Figure 6-73 until it audibly clicks into position.

ES04045a01

Figure 6-73: Installation of the Profibus OBT on a Standard DIN Rail

The module is removed by pulling down the locking bar.


6.19.8.2 Connecting the Power Supply
The Profibus OBT Terminal Block layout is shown in Figure 6-74.

PE

L+

ES04046a01

Figure 6-74: Profibus OBT Power Supply Terminal Block

PE = Ground Terminal
M and L+ = Power Supply

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6.19.8.3 Connecting the Optical Cables

01 02 03 04

LEGEND
01. CH2, optical receiver
02. CH2, optical sender
03. CH3, optical receiver
04. CH3, optical sender

ES04047a01

Figure 6-75: Optical Channels CH2 and CH3

Connect the individual Profibus OBT using a duplex FO cable, fitted with two pairs of simplex connectors.
Make sure that in each case an optical input is connected to an optical output (crossover).
Make sure that there is reliable strain relief for the FO cable and do not bend the cable beyond the minimum
bending radius.

Close unused FO sockets with the plastic plugs provided. Extraneous light, particularly when it is extremely
bright can cause disturbances on the Profibus DP-V1 network.

Remember the minimum and maximum length of the FO cable and the permitted fiber types specified in
Table 6-24 and in the technical specifications.

Make sure that no dust can enter the optical components. Dust in optical components can make them unusable.

The fibers of the cable must be flush with the front surface of the connector.

NOTICE
If the fiber protrudes beyond the surface of the connector, the connector must not be inserted
into the socket otherwise the optical components can be permanently damaged.
6.19.8.4 Connecting the Electrical RS485 Cable

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Channel CH1 is used to connect a single Profibus DP DTE. CH1 is designed as an electrical RS 485 interface with
a 9-pin sub D female connector. The maximum cable length between the Profibus OBT and DTE is 100m. Since
this involves a point-to-point connection, the terminating resistors in the Profibus DP-V1 connectors must be activated at both ends of the cable.
Use only shielded twisted pair cables as the RS 485 cable for Profibus DP-V1.

CAUTION
Do not connect RS 485 cables when all or part of the cable is outside the shovel. Lightning in the area can otherwise destroy the Profibus OBT.
Remove the RS 485 cable from the Profibus OBT if there is no node connected to the other end of the cable. Noise
can lead to problems on the Profibus DP-V1 network.

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6.20 Profibus Resolver Interface Module


The Profibus Resolver Interface Module (PRIM) is a four resolver input module that communicates on Profibus.
The four resolvers connected to the PRIM can either be configured as four single turn resolvers, two single turn
resolvers and one multi-turn resolver, or two multi-turn resolvers.
The PRIM uses 21 input and 10 output words to communicate on the Profibus network. It indicates an error and will
not communicate with the network if the Profibus system is configured for any other number of input and output
words.

6.20.1 Input Words


The Input Words are data sent from the PRIM to the network. Table 6-25 shows the input data format for the PRIM.
Word
Number

Single Turn Resolver

Multi-turn Resolvers

Channel 1 Status

Channel 1 Status

Channel 1 upper 3 digits position

Channel 1 Position

Channel 1 lower 3 digits position

Channel 1 Velocity

Channel 1 velocity

Channel 2 Status

Channel 2 Position

Channel 2 Velocity

Channel 3 Status

Channel 2 Status

Channel 2 upper 3 digits position

10

Channel 3 Position

Channel 2 lower 3 digits position

11

Channel 3 Velocity

Channel 2 velocity

12

Channel 4 Status

13

14

Channel 4 Position

15

Channel 4 Velocity

16

Stop Time

17

Stop Position

18

19

20

Table 6-25: Input Data from the PRIM

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The Stop Time and Stop Position Input Parameters are only available on channel 1 if it is configured as a single
turn resolver. These parameters are calculated on the 1 to 0 transition, ON to OFF, of the brake input.
It is possible to configure the PRIM to interface with one multi-turn and two single turn resolvers at the same time.
If channel 1 multi-turn is being used, the channel 1 and 2 single turn data will be replaced by the channel 1 multiturn data. If channel 2 multi-turn is being used, the channel 3 and 4 single turn data will be replaced by the channel
2 multi-turn data. It is not necessary to use the channel 1 multi-turn data before using the channel 2 multi-turn data.
If a command is issued to program either of the single turn channels associated with a multi-turn channel, the data
of both single turn channels will replace the multi-turn channels data. For example, if multi-turn channel 1 is being
used, and single turn channel 2 is programmed, then single turn channel 1 and channel 2 data will replace multiturn channel 1 data in the input registers.

6.20.2 Status Word Layout


The status word for each channel will reflect errors occurred while programming that channel. The ACK bit is
located only in the channel 1 status data. A command error or message ignored error will be displayed in all status
words. Refer to Figure 6-76.

15 14 13 12 11

10

0
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14

ES04048a01

LEGEND
01. Configuration error (bit 0)
02. Transducer Type Error (bit 1)
03. Number of Turns Error (bit 2)
04. Full Scale Count Error (bit 3)
05. Linear Offset Error (bit 4)
06. Preset Value Error (bit 5)
07. Command Error (bit 6)
08. Message Ignored (bit 7)

09. Motion Direction (bit 8)


0=increasing 1 = decreasing
10. Velocity at 0 bit (bit 9)
11. Resolver Type (bit 10)
0 = single turn 1 = multi-turn
12. Transducer Fault (bit 13)
13. Module Fault (bit 14)
14. ACK bit (bit 15) channel 1 status only
Figure 6-76: Status Word Layout

6.20.2.1 Configuration Error


Set if any of the unused bits in the configuration word are set.

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6.20.2.2 Transducer Type Error


Multi-turn Programming Error only. This bit is set if the transducer type is not equal to 100, 180, 1000, or 1800 if the
PRIM is configured for AMCI transducers, or 128 if the PRIM is configured for Autotech transducers. This bit will
always be reset when the PRIM is being used as a single turn resolver.

6.20.2.3 Number of Turns Error


Multi-turn Programming Error only. This bit is set if the number of turns is invalid for the transducer type selected.
This bit will always be reset when the PRIM is being used as a single turn resolver.

6.20.2.4 Full Scale Count Error


Set if the Full Scale Count is outside of the range of:

2 to 8192 for Single turn resolvers.


2 to (4096 * Number of Turns) for 100 or 180 turn transducer.
2 to (409.6 * Number of Turns) for 1000 or 1800 turn transducer.
2 to (1024 * Number of Turns) for an Autotech 128 turn transducer.
6.20.2.5 Linear Offset Error
Set if the linear offset is outside of the range of:

0 to (32767 - Full Scale Count) for single turn resolvers.


0 to 999,999 for multi-turn resolvers.
6.20.2.6 Preset Value Error
Set if the preset value is outside of the range of Linear Offset to (Linear Offset -(Full Scale Count -1)).

6.20.2.7 Command Error


Set if any unused bits in the command word are set, if you try to program a channel that is not present, if you try to
program more than one channel at a time, or if you attempt to preset single channels 2 or 4 when they have been
configured as multi-turn channels.

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6.20.2.8 Message Ignored


If an error occurs when programming a parameter, the only way to clear the error is by setting the Clear Error bit or
by reprogramming the parameter to an acceptable value. This bit is set if neither of these actions occur in the programming cycle immediately after the one that caused the error.

6.20.2.9 Motion Direction


This bit will be 0 if the counts are increasing or 1 if the counts are decreasing. The bit will remain in its last state
when there is no motion.

6.20.2.10 Velocity at Zero


This bit will be set if there has been no motion for 125ms.

6.20.2.11 Resolver Type


This bit will be reset if the input channel is configured to be used with single turn resolvers and set if the input channel is configured to be used with multi-turn resolvers.

6.20.2.12 Transducer Fault


This bit will be set if a transducer Fault has been detected.

6.20.2.13 Module Fault


This bit is set if there is a fault with the PRIM, such as an EEPROM error.

6.20.2.14 Acknowledge Bit


This bit is set when the transmit bit is set. This bit is present only in the channel 1 status data.

6.20.3 Output Data


The Output Words are data from the network to the PRIM. The format of the output data is shown in Table 6-26.
Only one channel can be programmed at a time. However, multiple Apply Preset command bits can be set at the
same time and it is also possible to Program the channel and Apply the Preset value with one programming cycle.
Word
Number

Single Turn Resolver

Multi-turn Resolvers

Control

Control

Configuration

Configuration

Upper 3 Digits Full Scale Count

Full Scale Count

Lower 3 Digits Full Scale Count

Upper 3 Digits Linear Offset

Linear Offset

Lower 3 Digits Linear Offset

Table 6-26: Output Data to the PRIM

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Word
Number

Single Turn Resolver

Multi-turn Resolvers

Upper 3 Digits Preset Value

Preset

Lower 3 Digits Preset Value

Transducer Type

Number of Turns

Table 6-26: Output Data to the PRIM

Words 8 and 9, the transducer type and number of turns parameter, apply only for multi-turn channels and are not
used for single turn resolvers. When programming single turn resolvers, words 8 and 9 are dont cares.
When programming multi-turn transducers for Autotech, channel 1 must be programmed before channel 2
because channel 1 configures the PRIM for Autotech transducers.

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6.20.4 Control Word Layout


Figure 6-77 provides a graphical representation of the Control Word layout.

15 14 13 12 11

10

0
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10

11
12

ES04049a01

LEGEND
01. Apply Preset single channel 1 or multi-turn
channel 1 (bit 0)
02. Apply Preset single channel 2 (bit 1)
03. Apply Preset single channel 3 or multi-turn
channel 2 (bit 2)
04. Apply Preset single channel 4 (bit 3)
05. Program single channel 1 (bit 4)

06.
07.
08.
09.
10.
11.
12.

Program single channel 2 (bit 5)


Program single channel 3 (bit 6)
Program single channel 4 (bit 7)
Program multi-turn channel 1 (bit 8)
Program multi-turn channel 2 (bit 9)
Clear Errors (bit 14)
Transmit Bit (bit 15)

Figure 6-77: Control Word Layout

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Shovel Control Systems

6.20.5 Configuration Word Layout


Figure 6-78 provides a graphical representation of the Configuration Word layout.

15 14 13 12 11

10

0
01
02
03
04

05

ES04050a01

LEGEND
01. Direction 0=CW, 1=CCW
02. Transducer Fault Latch 0=yes, 1=no
03. Tachometer Response 0=120ms, 1 = 24ms

04. Resolver Type 0=AMCI, 1=Autotech


(channel 1 only, affects all channels)
05. Channel LED Enable 0=disable, 1=enable
channel 1 enabled by default

Figure 6-78: Configuration Word Layout

6.20.5.1 Transducer Type Range


Single Turn: dont care.
Multi-turn = 100, 180, 1000, 1800 for AMCI or 128 for Autotech
6.20.5.2 Number of Turns Range
Single Turn: dont care.
100 turn = 100, 50, 25, 20, 10, 5, 4, 2, or 1.
Multi-turn

180 turn = 180, 90, 60, 45, 36, 30, 20, 18, 15, 12, 10, 9, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.

1000 turn = 1000, 500, 250, 200, 100, 50, 40, 20, 10.

1800 turn = 1800, 900, 600, 450, 360, 300, 200, 180, 150, 120, 100, 90, 60, 50, 40, 30, 20, 10.

128 turn = 128, 64, 32, 16, 8, 4, 2, 1.

6.20.5.3 Full Scale Count Range


2 to 8192 for Single Turn resolvers.
2 to (4096 * Number of Turns) for 100 or 180 turn transducer.
2 to (409.6 * Number of Turns) for 1000 or 1800 turn transducer.

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2 to (1024 * Number of Turns) for an Autotech 128 turn transducer.


6.20.5.4 Linear Offset Range
0 to (32767 - Scale Factor) for single turn resolvers.
0 to 999,999 for multi-turn resolvers.
6.20.5.5 Preset Range
Linear Offset to (Linear Offset + (Full Scale Count -1)).

6.20.6 Programming Sequence


Step 1:

The ladder logic program writes the data into the output registers.

Step 2:

The ladder logic program then sets the transmit bit.

Step 3:

When the PRIM detects the 0 to 1 transition of the transmit bit, it will respond by setting any error bits and
the Acknowledge bit in the input registers.

Step 4:

When the ladder logic program sees that the acknowledge bit is set, it will examine any error bits, and
then reset the transmit bit.

Step 5:

The PRIM will reset the Acknowledge bit.

Step 6:

The programming sequence is now complete.

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6.20.7 Hardware Overview


02

03

04

05

01

06

ES04051a01

10

09

LEGEND
01. Resolver Status LEDs
02. Resolver 1 and 2 Connector
03. Input Status LEDs
04. Resolver 3 and 4 Connector
05. Input Connector

08
06.
07.
08.
09.
10.

07

Power Connector
Profibus Connector
Termination Switch
Station Address Selection
Profibus Status LEDs

Figure 6-79: Hardware Overview

6.20.7.1 Resolver Status LEDs


Table describes the function of the four resolver status LEDs.

LED 1 = Resolver 1.
LED 2 = Resolver 2.
LED 3 = Resolver 3.
LED 4 = Resolver 4.
LED Pattern

Function

Off

LED Disabled

Solid Green

Resolver OK

Flashing Green

Clearable Transducer Fault

Table 6-27: Resolver Status LEDs

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LED Pattern

Function

Flashing Red

Non Clearable Transducer Fault

Solid Red

Module Fault
Table 6-27: Resolver Status LEDs

6.20.7.2 Resolver 1 and 2 Connector


Pin Number

Single Turn Function

AMCI Multi-turn
Function

Autotech Multi-turn
Function

R1 both channels

R1

R1

R2 both channels

R2

R2

Shields

Shields

Shields

S1 & S2 both channels

S3F, S2F, S1C, S2C

S3C, S4C, S1F, S2F

S4 channel 1

S3C

S2C

S3 channel 1

S4C

S1C

S4 channel 2

S1F

S4F

S3 channel 2

S4F

S3F

Table 6-28: Resolver 1 and 2 Connector

6.20.7.3 Input Status LEDs


LED 1 = Lit when the Brake Input is receiving power.
LED 2 = Lit when Input 2 is receiving power (The function of this input has not been defined).
6.20.7.4 Resolver 3 and 4 Connector
Pin Number

Single Turn Function

AMCI Multi-turn
Function

Autotech Multi-turn
Function

R1 both channels

R1

R1

R2 both channels

R2

R2

Shields

Shields

Shields

S1 & S2 both channels

S3F, S2F, S1C, S2C

S3C, S4C, S1F, S2F

S4 channel 1

S3C

S2C

S3 channel 1

S4C

S1C

S4 channel 2

S1F

S4F

S3 channel 2

S4F

S3F

Table 6-29: Resolver 1 and 2 Connector

6.20.7.5 Input Connector

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Shovel Control Systems

Pins

Function

1 to 2

Brake Input

3 to 4

Undefined Input

Table 6-30: Input Connector

The inputs are bipolar. Connecting one of the inputs pins to 10VDC - 30VDC and the other to ground, will cause
the input to activate.

6.20.7.6 Power Connector


Pin

Function

+24Vdc

DC Common

Shields

Table 6-31: Power Connector

The PRIM requires 500mA of current at 24VDC for proper operation.

6.20.7.7 Profibus Connector


The PRIM uses a 9 pin female D-sub connector to communicate with the Profibus network.

6.20.7.8 Termination Switch


This switch is used to avoid reflections on the bus line. If the PRIM is used as the first or last module in a network,
the termination switch must be in the on position. Otherwise it must be in the off position.

6.20.7.9 Station Address Selection


The PRIM has two rotary switches used to set its address on the network. Any station from 0 to 99 can be
selected. Switch 1 sets the one digit and switch 2 sets the 10s digit of the address. For example, if the PRIM is to
be installed at station 46, switch 1 would be set to 6, and switch 2 would be set to 4.

NOTICE
Changing the station address only takes affect at power up. Changing the address while power
is applied to the PRIM will generate a minor fault.

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6.20.7.10 Profibus Status LEDs


Table describes the function of the four Profibus Status LEDs.
LED
1

Pattern

Function

Red

The PRIM is Offline and no data exchange is possible.

Off

The PRIM is Online.

Green

The PRIM is Online and data exchange is possible.

Off

The PRIM is Off line.

Flashing Red 1Hz

Error in configuration: in and/or out length set during initialization of the PRIM is not equal to the length set during the
configuration of the network.

Flashing Red 2Hz

Error in User Parameter data: The length/contents of the


user parameter data set during initialization of the PRIM is
not equal to the length/contents set during configuration of
the network.

Flashing Red 4Hz

Error in initialization of the Profibus communication ASIC.

Off

No diagnostic present.

Off

Not used.
Table 6-32: Profibus Status LEDs

6.20.8 Baud Rate


The PRIM supports the following network baud rates:

9.6kbits/sec
19.2kbits/sec
93.75kbits/sec
187.5kbits/sec
500kbits/sec
1.5Mbits/sec
3Mbits/sec
6Mbits/sec
12Mbits/sec

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6.20.9 Power Up Delay


There is an eight second delay between power up and when the PRIM begins to communicate with the network.

6.21 Power Rail Booster


The Power Rail Booster, refer to Figure 6-80, is used to implement a Profibus connection via collector wires as
they occur. In order to ensure secure transfer via the collector wires the data entering via the Profibus DP-V1 interface from the various bus stations are amplified to a noise-free level and launched on the conductor bar. Data
entering via the conductor bar with noise-free level are converted correspondingly to Profibus DP-V1 signals.

Figure 6-80: Power Rail Booster

The used Profibus DP-V1 baud rate is recognized automatically by the device. Data rates of between 9,600 bits/s
and 500kbits/s are valid for transfer via collector wires.
Each Power Rail Booster segment can feed up to 125 slaves.
For a safe data transfer, there are, beside the Power Rail Booster, no additional filters or termination elements necessary.

6.21.1 Permissible Cable Length


The permissible cable length for transferring data with the Power Rail Booster depends on the set data transfer
rate.
Table 6-33 lists the respective maximum cable lengths as a function of the transfer rate. No requirements are
placed on the minimum cable length.

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Transfer Rate

Maximum Cable Length

9600 bits/s

1,200 m

19,200 bits/s

600 m

45,450 bits/s

250 m

93,750 bits/s

125 m

187,500 bits/s

62.5 m

500,000 bits/s

25 m

Table 6-33: Maximum Cable Length

6.21.2 Contact Resistance


Soiling or oxidation contact resistances, which are in part considerable, can arise between the sliders and rail. In
order to ensure that the data transfer is carried out error-free, these contact resistances may not lie above the values shown in Table 6-34. The specified resistances represent the sum of the resistances of the two double sliders
to the rails.
Number
of Slaves

Maximum Data Transfer Rate, Cable Capacity, and Length


9.600 Bits
200nF
1200m

19.200 Bits
150nF
600m

45.450 Bits
100nF
250m

93.750 Bits
70nF
125m

187.500 Bits
30nF
62,5m

500.000 Bits
10nF
25m

up to 2
slaves

3000

900

800

800

700

250

up to 3
slaves

2000

700

700

700

500

200

up to 5
slaves

1500

500

500

500

300

150

up to 10
slaves

900

300

300

300

200

100

up to 20
slaves

500

200

200

200

100

up to 50
slaves

200

150

150

100

up to 125
slaves

100

100

100
Table 6-34: Contact Resistance

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6.22 Branching Unit


The branching unit is the interface between the AC800 unit and the Digital Drives. Refer to Figure 6-81.

ES04216a01
Figure 6-81: Branching Unit

This section examines the procedures for setting:

Communication speed
Optical power values
Operation mode
Unit address

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6.22.1 Setting of Communication Speed


DriveWindow default setting is 1 Mbit/s, refer to Figure 6-82. P&H Mining Equipment setting is 4 Mbit/s. To select
the correct communication speed perform the following steps.

ES04217a01

Figure 6-82: Communication Speed


Step 1:

Remove cover from branching unit. Refer to Figure 6-83.

ES04219a01

Figure 6-83: Branching Unit - Cover Removed


Step 2:

Place jumper over pins 5 and 6 to select 4 Mbit/s. Refer to Figure 6-84.

ES04218a01
Figure 6-84: Communication Speed - Jumper Position
Step 3:

Once jumper is positioned, setup is complete.

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6.22.2 Setting of Optical Power Value


This section looks at setting the Optical Power Values, refer to Figure 6-85 and Figure 6-86.

ES04211a01

Figure 6-85: Optical Power Values

ES04210a01
Figure 6-86: Optical Power Value Selection
Step 1:

Remove cover from branching unit. Refer to Figure 6-83.

Step 2:

Using Table 6-35, position jumpers for each optical connection.


Channel

Connection

Jumper Position

Channel 8

X11

Pins 7&8 (Disabled)

Channel 7

X10

Pins 3&4 (Medium)

Channel 6

X09

Pins 3&4 (Medium)

Channel 5

X08

Pins 3&4 (Medium)

Channel 4

X07

Pins 3&4 (Medium)

Channel 3

X06

Pins 3&4 (Medium)

Channel 2

X05

Pins 3&4 (Medium)

Channel 1

X04

Pins 3&4 (Medium)

Table 6-35: Optical Power Value - Jumper Positions

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Channel

Connection

Jumper Position

Channel 0

X03

Pins 7&8 (Disabled)

Master

X02

Pins 3&4 (Medium)

Table 6-35: Optical Power Value - Jumper Positions


Step 3:

Once jumpers are positioned, setup is completed.

6.22.3 Operation Mode Selection


DriveWindow uses the DDCS-protocol.Refer to Figure 6-87.

ES04212a01

Figure 6-87: Operation Mode


Step 1:

Remove cover from branching unit. Refer to Figure 6-83.

Step 2:

Place jumper over pins 1 and 2 to select DDCS protocol. Refer to Figure 6-88.

ES04213a01
Figure 6-88: Operation Mode - Jumper Position
Step 3:

Once jumper is positioned, setup is complete.

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6.22.4 Address Selection


Switch 1 (S1) is the DIP switch for selecting the Branching Units address. Refer to Figure 6-89.

ES04214a01

Figure 6-89: Branching Unit Address Selection


Step 1:

Remove cover from branching unit. Refer to Figure 6-83.

Step 2:

Position DIP switches left to right (top to bottom) in accordance with Table 6-36.
DIP Switch

Position

Switch 8

0 (Off)

Switch 7

1 (On)

Switch 6

1 (On)

Switch 5

1 (On)

Switch 4

1 (On)

Switch 3

1 (On)

Switch 2

0 (Off)

Switch 1

0 (Off)

Table 6-36: S1 Switch - Positions


Step 3:

Once switches are positioned, setup is complete.

Step 4:

Re-install branching unit cover.

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6.23 Terminal Assignments


6.23.1 Power Rail Interface
Terminal assignment of the Power Rail Interface is shown in Table 6-37.
Pin Number

Name

Function

A1

Conductor Bar A, First Slider

A2

Conductor Bar A, Second Slider

B1

Conductor Bar B, First Slider

B2

Conductor Bar B, Second Slider

Table 6-37: Power Rail Interface Terminal Assignment

6.23.2 Signaling Contact


Terminal assignment of the Signaling Contact (SF Out) is shown in Table 6-38.
Pin Number

Name

Function

11

Common Connection

12

NC Contact

14

NO Contact

Table 6-38: Signaling Contact (SF Out) Terminal Assignment

6.23.3 Power Supply


Terminal assignment for the power supply DC24V is shown in Table 6-39.
Pin Number

Name

Function

1,2

L1+, L2+

24VDC

3,4

M1. M2

Ground

Table 6-39: Power Supply DC24V Terminal Assignment

6.23.4 Profibus DP Connector


Terminal Assignment for the Profibus DP-V1 connector is shown in Table 6-40.
Pin Number

Name

Function

N. C.

Reserved

N. C.

Reserved

RxD / TxD P

Data line B

Table 6-40: Profibus DP-V1 Connector Terminal Assignment

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Pin Number

Name

Function

RTS

Request To Send

M5V

Data reference potential (from node)

P5V

Supply plus (from node)

N. C.

RXD/TXD-N

N. C.

Reserved
Data line A
Reserved

Table 6-40: Profibus DP-V1 Connector Terminal Assignment

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Drive Control Module

Section 7

Drive Control Module


7.1 Control Cabinet
The Control Cabinet contains the electronic systems and components for controlling the shovel motions. The Control Cabinet on the Electric Mining Shovel contains the following subassemblies:

External maintenance meters, switches, push buttons and circuit breakers.


Armature Control Drive Control Modules.
Field control Drive Control Modules.
AC800 Controller.
Remote I/O Modules.

7.1.1 External Components


The Control Cabinet contains external components used by MinePro Service Personnel to assist in shovel maintenance. There are two separate areas of external indicating and/or control devices found on the cabinet.

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AIR FLOW

METER SELECTOR

TEST SELECTOR

CROWD/
PROPEL
HOIST

SWING

10

20

30

40

50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120

130

2000
140

150

3500

1000

1000

2000

3000

3000

3500

700

600

300 200 100 0 100 200 300 400


500 400
500

10

OFF

RPC

FIELD AMPS

ARM. AMPS

FIELD
TEST
600

ARM.
TEST

700

10

RUN

DC VOLTS

HOIST HOURS

FLD. CURRENT

ARM. CURRENT

SWING HOURS

CROWD HOURS

CONTROL
TEST
AUX.
TEST

PROPEL HOURS

CSCB

CCIOCB

RSCB

AXSTCB

ARM. VOLTS

OPERATION
LOCATION
LOCAL

OP. COOP

LUBE/PLS

RUN

CONTROL
FAULT RESET

TEST SCREEN

PROGRAM

RUN

ENABLE

EMERGENCY
STOP

ES04090a01

Figure 7-1: Control Cabinet Front Door Controls

The Control Cabinet contains analog meters which display motor Field Current, Armature Current and Armature
Voltage. The Armature Voltage Meter also doubles as a voltmeter to be used in conjunction with the Meter Selector
Switch. Elapsed time meters accumulate the operating times for the Hoist, Crowd, Swing and Propel motions after
their brakes are released.
Two selector switches are provided. The Test Selector Switch sets or defines the operational mode of the shovel.
The Test Selector Switch can be set to the following positions:

CAUTION
Do not change the Mode Selector Switch position while the shovel is running. Damage to
the shovel electronics may occur. Shut the shovel down before changing modes of operation.
Run - This is the normal position for operation of the shovel.
Armature Test - This position is used to perform motor armature testing. Only armature current is applied to
the motors during this test.

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Field Test - This position is used to perform motor field testing. Only field current is applied to the motors
during this test.

Control Test - This position is used in testing the control system of the shovel. No current is applied to the
motors, only control voltages are present in the control system during this test.

Auxiliary Test - This position is used to test all shovel auxiliary motors and systems.
The Meter Selector Switch selects the motion to be displayed on the analog meters. The RPC Step Indication
Level can also be displayed on the Armature Voltage Meter when selected with this switch. Refer to Figure 7-2.

METER SELECTOR
HOIST

CROWD/
PROPEL

SWING

10

20

30 40

50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120

130

140

150

3500

3000

2000

1000

1000

2000

3000

3500

700

600

300 200 100 0 100 200 300 400


500
500 400

10

OFF

RPC

FIELD AMPS

ARM. AMPS

DC VOLTS

FLD. CURRENT

ARM. CURRENT

ARM. VOLTS

600

700

10

ES04091a01

Figure 7-2: Control Cabinet Meter Panel

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Also located on the Control Cabinet door is the Operation Location keyswitch which is used to select where the
shovel can be operated from, Local or Operator Cab. Refer to Figure 7-3.

OPERATION
LOCATION
LOCAL

CONTROL
FAULT RESET

OP. COOP

LUBE/PLS
RUN

TEST SCREEN

PROGRAM

RUN

ENABLE

ES
TO

P
TO

ES

ES

EMERGENCY
STOP

ES
T

ES04092a01

Figure 7-3: Control Cabinet Front Panel Push Buttons

The Control Fault Reset push button provides input to the control system for clearing fault conditions.
The Lube/PLS keyswitch is used to access programming screens on the Touch Panel for the Lube System Timing
and Programmable Limit Switches.
The Test Screen keyswitch is used to access the Commissioning Test Screen on the Touch Panel during shovel
commissioning and testing.
The Emergency Stop push button (E-Stop) is used in shutting down the entire shovel in emergency conditions.

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Drive Control Module

The Control Cabinet door contains the Control Supply Circuit Breaker (CSCB), Control Cabinet I/O Circuit Breaker
(CCIOCB), Relay Supply Circuit Breaker (RSCB), and Auxiliary Starter Circuit Breaker (AXSTCB). Refer to Figure
7-4.

CSCB

CCIOCB

ON

ON

15

20
OFF

RSCB

OFF

AXSTCB

ON

ON

15

20
OFF

OFF

ES04093a01

Figure 7-4: Control Cabinet Door Circuit Breakers

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7.1.1.1 Internal Components


The front door of the control cabinet open to reveal the Drive Control Modules, various relays, fuses, Motion Feedback Board, AC outlets, Test Reference Panel, TripRite Drive, Remote I/O components, Ethernet Switch, and
AC800 components. Refer to Figure 7-5.
18
14

15

16

19

20

21

22

17
20Z1271D6
Z1271D6S

20Z1271D6
Z1271D6S

AIR FLOW

13
12

PANEL GND 1

PANEL GND 2

CWD/PROPEL
FIELD DRIVE

SWING
FIELD DRIVE
79H2046

79H2046F

79H2046

HOIST
FIELD DRIVE

79H2046F

ATTENTION
OBSERVE PRECAUTIONS
FOR HANDLING
ELECTROSTATIC
SENSITIVE
PARTS

88F

88F

HST/PROPEL 1
ARM. DRIVE

CWD/PROPEL 1
ARM. DRIVE

11

CI854

SB821

CI854

AC800

TB807

TB850

10
D1

26410003

26410003

264174F
2/O

2/O MCM
264174S

W1

26410003

264174F
2/O

V1

264174F
2/O

26410003

264174S
2/O MCM

C1 U1

264174S
2/O MCM

26410003

264174F
2/O

264174F
2/O

D1

26410003

26410003

264174F
2/O

26410003

C1 U1
26410003

W1

V1
26410003

2/O MCM
264174S

V1

264174F
2/O

26410003

264174F
2/O

264174S
2/O MCM

C1 U1

2/O MCM
264174S

W1
26410003

D1

23

26410003

26410003

26410003

VAFB

264174F
2/O

09
08

OPER REF

IAFB

IFFB

TH1

TH2

TH3

TH4

TC1

TC2

TC3

TC4

TS1A

TS2A

TS3

TS4

(PROGRAMABLE)

HOIST

ETHERNET SWITCH

CROWD

50T

225A - 4/0
79Z1880D7

SWING

48F

79Z566D4 3x3x16.50

79Z566D4 3x3x16.50
24T

07

PE U1 V1 W1

SWING
ARM. DRIVE

PE

OBSERVE PRECAUTIONS
FOR HANDLING
ELECTROSTATIC
SENSITIVE
PARTS

X100
A
ATTENTION

DANGER

ATTENTION

OBSERVE PRECAUTIONS
FOR HANDLING
ELECTROSTATIC
SENSITIVE
PARTS

06

OBSERVE PRECAUTIONS
FOR HANDLING
ELECTROSTATIC
SENSITIVE
PARTS

S1

X101

X103

25

PELIGRO

05

10

15

20

25

30

34

225A - 4/0
79Z1880D7

SIEMENS
I/O
1

POWER SUPPLY

225A - 4/0
79Z1880D6

POWER SUPPLY

RAIL
BOOSTER

LABEL

PE U2 V2 W2

OBT

24

ATTENTION

225A - 4/0
79Z1880D6

HOIST 2
ARM. DRIVE

26

NEXUS
RESOLVER

79Z566D4 3x3x16.50

79Z566D4 3x3x16.50

3AUA266001B162

R1
R3

R2
X1

X3
1

R4

R6

R5

R8

79Z3208D1

79Z3208D1

79Z3208D1
225A - 4/0
79Z1880D7

R7
BG52480001-1 TO 8

R10

27

12

R9

04

R12

BATTERY
R14

R13

BG52480001-1 TO 8

ISLATROL
FILTER

R16
R15

20A PWR SUPPLY


SINGLE PH

UPS

X4
1

X2

R18
225A - 4/0
79Z1880D6

R20

R17

03

R11

R19
4

BG52480001-1 TO 8

5
6

R24

R22
R21

28

R23

R26
R25

3AUA478001B86
47886F

95F

02

35F

01
ES04094a01

44

43

42 41 40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32

LEGEND
01. Fuses
02. Relays
03. Motion Feedback Board
04. RCV
05. CCFR
06. MTCR
07. RCV
08. Hoist #2 Drive
09. Swing Drive
10. Remote I/O
11. Test Reference Panel
12. Hoist/Propel #1 Drive
13. Crowd/Propel #2 Drive
14. Ethernet Switch

15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.

Thermostat
Battery Backup Module
Profibus Interface Module
Profibus Interface Module
AC800
Swing Field Drive
Crowd/Propel Field Drive
Hoist Field Drive
TripRite Drive
Line Reactor
Varistor
Resistor
Resistor
Resistor
Varistor

31

30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.

30

29

Varistor
DTTB Control Relay
Power Supply
Power Supply
Battery
Power Rail Booster
UPS
Optical Bus Terminal
20A Power Supply
Resolver Interface Module
Islatrol Filter
GFI Receptacle
PSR
Drive Synchronizing Xfrmr
MCR

Figure 7-5: Control Cabinet with Doors Open

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Drive Control Module

7.1.2 Control Cabinet Operation


Some of the items in the Control Cabinet are discussed in other sections of this Electrical Manual. Refer to the following sections for a detailed description:

AC800, Profibus Interface Modules and Battery Backup - Section 6.


Remote I/O and Power Supplies - Section 6.
Ethernet Switch, Power Rail Booster, UPS, Optical Bus Terminal, and Resolver Interface Module - Section
9.

Refer to the TripRite Advanced Dipper Trip Manual for information on the TripRite Drive and associated
components.

7.1.2.1 Motion Feedback Circuit Board


The Motion Feedback Circuit Board contains precision high voltage resistors used to provide armature voltage
feedback to the Armature Drive Control Modules. The circuit board contains the following types of resistors:

8M 0.5%
100K 1%
499K 1%

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The resistors are arranged in voltage divider networks. The voltage divider networks are separated into five sections specific to each motion. Refer to Figure 7-6, Figure 7-7, and Figure 7-8.

Hoist #1/Propel #1
Armature Voltage
Feedback

Hoist #2 Armature
Voltage Feedback

ES2048_01

Figure 7-6: Hoist #1/Propel #1 and Hoist #2 Armature Voltage Feedback

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Drive Control Module

Swing Armature
Voltage Feedback

Swing #1 and #2
Voltage Difference

ES03072a01

Figure 7-7: Swing Armature Voltage and Voltage Difference Feedback

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Crowd/Propel #2
Armature Voltage
Feedback

ES2051_01
Figure 7-8: Crowd/Propel #2 Armature Voltage Feedback

7.1.2.2 Control Cabinet Fan Relay


The Control Cabinet Fan Relay is controlled by a 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Module of the Remote I/O System in the Control Cabinet. Refer to Figure 7-9.
120VAC
E22A01A33
2RO
1

Neutral

2.22.31

2
3
4
CCFR
Control Cabinet
Fan Relay

5
6
7
ES04073a01

Figure 7-9: Control Cabinet Fan Relay

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Drive Control Module

The Control Cabinet fan is programmed to energize anytime the field drives are active. The 2 Relay Output
24VDC-120VDC Module outputs 120VAC to energize CCFR. When CCFR energizes, normally open contacts
associated with CCFR close routing 3 240VAC to the Control Cabinet Fan. Refer to Figure 7-10.
3 240VAC

CCFR

V1

CCFR

V2

U1

U2

CCFR
W1

Control Cabinet
Fan

W2
2

ES04074a01

Figure 7-10: Control Cabinet Fan

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7.1.2.3 Main Transformer Contactor Relay (MTCR)


The Main Transformer Contactor Relay is energized by a 2 Relay Output 24VDC-120VDC Module at shovel start.
Refer to Figure 7-11.
120VAC
E22A01A32
2RO
1

Neutral

2.22.30
MTCR

Main Transformer
Contactor Relay

2
3
4

5
6
7
8
ES04064a01

Figure 7-11: Main Transformer Contactor Relay

When MTCR is de-energized, normally open contacts associated with MTCR remain open preventing the Main
Transformer Contactor, MTC from energizing. With MTC de-energized, 3 VAC is not applied to the Main Transformer primary.
When energized, the normally open contacts associated with MTCR close providing a path to energize the Main
Transformer Contactor. Refer to Figure 7-12 and Figure 7-13.
120VAC

Neutral
24VDC
Control

MTCR

MTCR

To Remote I/O
Systerm
MTC

ES04065a01

Figure 7-12: Main Transformer Contactor

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Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Drive Control Module

120VAC

Neutral
24VDC
Control

MTCR

MTCR

To Remote I/O
Systerm
MTC

ES04065b01

Figure 7-13: Main Transformer Contactor

When MTCR contacts close, initial start up current flow is through MTC coils and the Control. When MTC energizes, the Control routes current flow through series resistors. The series resistors limit the current flow through
MTC establishing a holding current to maintain MTC energized.
When MTC energizes, normally open auxiliary contacts associated with MTC close routing 24VDC to 4 Digital
Input 24VDC Module of the Remote I/O System in the Control Cabinet. Refer to Figure 7-14. This input informs the
AC800 Controller that MTC is energized and high voltage is applied to the Main Transformer.
24VDC

GND
E22A01A09
4DI 24VDC

MTC

2.22.7

Main Transformer
Contactor

2
3
4

(OPT.)

6
7
8

ES04096a01

Figure 7-14: MTC Input to Remote I/O System

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When MTC energizes, normally open contacts associated with MTC close applying high voltage to the primary of
the Main Transformer. Refer to Figure 7-15. .

1
2

2
1A

H2

1A
1A

1A

1A

X2

H1

X1

H2

X2

H1

X1

1A

MTC
MTC
MTC

ES04084a01

7 5 3 1

MSN

N2

2 4 6 8

7 5 3 1

MS11

MS21

7 5 3 1

2 4 6 8

MS12

MS22

2 4 6 8

MS13

MS23

Figure 7-15: Main Transformer Contactor

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Drive Control Module

7.1.2.4 Test Reference Panel


The Test Reference Panel, refer to Figure 7-16, includes test jacks to monitor the following signals:

OPER REF

VAFB

IAFB

IFFB

(PROGRAMABLE)

TH1

TH2

TH3

TH4

TC1

TC2

TC3

TC4

TS1A

TS2A

TS3

TS4

HOIST

CROWD

SWING

ES04095a01

Figure 7-16: Test Reference Panel

Armature Voltage Feedback (Vab) for each motion.


Armature Current Feedback (Iab) for each motion.
Field Current Feedback (Ifb) for each motion.
Operator Reference for each motion.

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7.1.2.5 Main Phase Sensing Relay (PSR)


The Main Phase Sensing Relay (PSR), refer to Figure 7-17, monitors the Control Supply secondary of the Auxiliary/Field Transformer for proper phase sequencing. The relay energizes when phase sequencing is correct. A normally open contact associated with PSR closes telling the PLC that phase sequencing is correct. Refer to Figure 718.
3 VAC
SB

CSCB

Main Phase
Sensing Relay

PSR

ES04063a01

Figure 7-17: Main Phase Sensing Relay

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Drive Control Module

+24VDC
E22A01A03
4DI 24VDC
1

PSR

2.22.1
Main Phase
Sensing Relay

3
4

5
6
7
8
E22A01A04
4DI 24VDC
1

2.22.2

2
3
4

5
6
7
8
ES04062a01

Figure 7-18: Main Phase Sensing Relay PLC Input

PSR is factory set to drop out at 170VAC between phases. If PSR senses incorrect phase sequence, it will remain
de-energized. The normally open contact associated with PSR, at the input of the 4 Digital Input 24VDC Module,
will remain open and prevent the shovel from starting. A Main Phase Sensing Relay fault will be displayed on the
Touch Panel Fault Screen.

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Two Status LEDs are located on PSR. During normal conditions the NORM LED will be illuminated. When incorrect phase sequence is detected the TRIP LED will be illuminated. Refer to Figure 7-19.

3
PHASE
POWER MONITOR

NORM

TRIP

3
2

4 5
1 8

6
7

ES2034_01

Figure 7-19: Main Phase Sensing Relay

7.2 Drive Control Module (DCM)


The Electric Mining Shovel utilizes the Centurion Digital Drive System. Refer to Figure 7-20. It consists of four
armature controllers and three field controllers. The components of the Centurion Digital Drive system are
explained in this section.

ES0700_01

Figure 7-20: Drive Control Module

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Drive Control Module

7.3 Control and Communications Board (SDCS-AMC-DC)


7.3.1 General
The Control and Communications Board SDCS-AMC-DC has the following functionalities:
Communications:
a. Data is transmitted and received via fiber optic communication ports.
b. Communication with the CON2 board via X10
Software Controller:
a. Speed Regulator
b. Torque Reference

7.3.2 Circuit Board Layout


The board is equipped with three optical channels. (The maximum data transmission speed is 4 Mb for each optical
channel). Refer to Figure 7-21.

SDCS-AMC-DC

TxD
CH 0

D400

green

X10

5V o.k.

RxD
TxD
CH 2
RxD
TxD
CH 3
D200

RxD
Prg. running
Fault

D105

green

conductive support

red

ES0701_01

Figure 7-21: SDCS-AMC-DC Board

Channel 0 - is used to communicate data from the overriding control (i.e. AC80 or the AC800 controller) to
the drive.

Channel 2 - (Master-Follower) is used to operate two or more drives dependent on each other. Commands
and values needed for this application are produced on this board.

Channel 3 - Is prepared to connect the PC tool for commissioning and maintenance.

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There are three LEDs on the SDCS-AMC-DC board. They are as follows:

Program Running (Prg. Running) - green LED.


Fault (Fault) - red LED.
5VDC OK - green LED.
Connector Assignment:

X10 is used for power from the CON2 board and Communication.

NOTICE
Make sure to verify AMC-DC board version compatibility prior to loading software.

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Drive Control Module

7.4 Control Board SDCS-CON-2


7.4.1 General
The control board is based on the 80186EM microprocessor and Application Specific Integrated Circuit
(ASIC).Most of the measurements and control functions for the Drive Control Module are done in the ASIC.The
SDCS-CON-2 Board has the following functionalities:

Communication with control panel (RS 485).


Communication with field exciters (RS 485).
Measurement.
Watchdog function.
A/D and D/A-conversion control.
Thyristor firing pulse generation.
Communication between the Hoist1/Propel1 and Hoist 2 Armature DCMs.

7.4.2 Watchdog Function


The control board has an internal watchdog. The watchdog controls the running of the control board program
(+24VDC signal). If the watchdog trips, it has the following effects:

Writing to FPROM is disabled.


Thyristor firing control is reset and disabled.
Digital outputs are forced low.
Programmable analogue outputs are reset to zero, 0V.

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7.4.3 Memory Circuit and Backup


The control board has Flash prom memory circuits and capacitor backup that provide the following:

Program system and parameter values are stored in Flash PROM D33.
Application and parameter values are saved in the Flash PROM D35.
Items Stored in Static Ram Circuits:

Fault / Alarm messages and the time they occurred,

operating hours

Backup Capacitor (1F), which lasts a minimum of 8 hours.

It takes about 30 minutes to charge the backup capacitor.

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Drive Control Module

7.4.4 Circuit Board Layout


X37

S2*

A1
B1

X14
A1
B1

Back up
capacitor

X33

CPU
2
1

X18

X17

2
1
2
1

H1

X21
A1
B1

X11
21

D33
21

D35

X12

ASIC

X13
5

X34

X16

DDCC+
B1
A1

All supports are conductive


connected to GND

S4 * 21
X3

B1
A1

X1
grey TxD

R2716

10 1

X2

6
5

V260

S1*3
10 1

X4

blue RxD

24
23
22

2
1

10 1

X5

10 1

X6

X7

ES0703_01

Figure 7-22: SDCS-CON-2 Board Layout

7.4.5 Connector and Switch Assignment

X37 power supply connection to POW1 Board.

X11 connection to AMC board

X12 Current & Voltage feedback and 3 phase synchronization via PIN 61board (Armature DCM) or
PIN205/21board (Field DCM).

X13 Firing pulse signals to PIN 61board (Armature DCM) or PIN205/21board (Field DCM).

X16 RS 485 communication between Armature and Field DCMs.

X33 & X34 RS 485 communication to the Control & Display Panel (CDP-312)

X3 Analog Inputs

X4 Analog Outputs

X6 Digital Inputs

X7 Digital Outputs

V260 Digital Drive Control System (DDCS) communication between Hoist 1 and Hoist 2 Armature
DCMs

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S2 used for programing:

Not Used:

X14,X18,X17,X21,X1,X2,X5,S1,S4

7.4.6 Seven Segment Display


A seven-segment display (H1) is located on the control board and shows the state of the drive. Refer to Figure 723.

0.7s 0.7s 0.7s


ROM memory test error

Program is not running

Normal situation

During download sequence

Alarm

Fault
ES0705_01

Figure 7-23: SDCS-CON-2 Seven Segment Display (H1)

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Drive Control Module

7.5 SDCS-POW-1 Power Supply Board


7.5.1 General
The SDCS-POW-1 is designed for Drive Control Module and is mounted on the electronic support. This board is
used for all types of modules independent from current or voltage range. Refer to Figure 7-24.
AC supply
1

SDCS-POW-1

DO8

X99

230 V

115 V

X96

SW1

*
Backup supply
for SDCS-POW-1

+
-

line potential !

X95

M1

T 10

26

14
A
B

X37
1

13

A
B

15V
24V

X5 X4 X3

*
ES0706_01

Figure 7-24: SDCS-POW-1 Power Supply Board Layout

The SDCS-POW-1 works on a switched mode basis in fly back configuration. It generates all necessary DC voltages for the SDCS-CON-2 board and all other electronic boards.

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7.5.2 Connector and Switch Assignment:


SW1 Input voltage can be selection, either 230VAC or 115VAC. This will be set for 230VAC for most P&H
applications.

X99 AC supply Input


X96 Digital Output (DO8), used keep the Diverter inactive until the Armature DCMs are fully initialized.
X37 Connection to CON2 board
Not used on P&H applications

X3, X4, X5,X95

Refer to Table 7-1 for the AC supply voltages:


Supply Voltage

115VAC

230VAC

Tolerance

-15% / +10%

-15% / +10%

Frequency

45Hz ... 65Hz

45Hz ... 65Hz

Power Consumption

120VA

120VA

Power Loss

60W

60W

Inrush Current

20A / 20ms

20A / 20ms

Mains Buffering

minimum 30ms

minimum 30ms

Table 7-1: SDCS-POW-1 Supply Voltages

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Drive Control Module

7.6 Power Interface SDCS-PIN-21 Board (Field Controllers)


7.6.1 General
Refer to Figure 7-25 for the SDCS-PIN-21 board layout. The SDCS-PIN-21 board provides the following functions:

Firing pulse circuits with pulse transformers.


Measurement of the field current.
Snubber circuit for thyristors protection (consists of RC circuits and MOV elements).
AC and DC high ohmic voltage measurement.
Scaling for rated current, zero current detection and HW voltage type coding.
Interface for heat sink temperature measurement with a PTC sensor.
Fuses for over-voltage protection and voltage measuring.

P104

U1

T22

X92

V1

X93

W1 X95 D1

F103

X91

C1
F101

1
2
3

X94

F102

T24

P103

P101

P100

P102

T14
T12

T26

SDCS-PIN-21

X5

T11 line
potential
T15

X6

T16
R112

R114

R116

35

T13

X13

T25

W21
W22

8
9

35

T21

R113
W19
W20

1
16

R111
W17
W18

16

W10

W80
W81
W82

R115
X12

1
2
3

X22

X3

T23

W15

X4

X121 (IACT)
X120 (GND)

PTC

U1 V1 W1

ES0708_01

Figure 7-25: SDCS-PIN-21 Board Layout

The protection of the power part is performed by RC (Resistive/Capacitive) circuits and MOVs (Metal Oxide Varistors). Snubber circuits are wired up in parallel to each thyristor directly without fuses in between. In addition to that,

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MOV elements are wired up in between the phases and protected by the fuses F101 and F103 (Bussmann KTK-R6A). The AC voltage measurement is taken from behind the fuse.

7.6.2 Connector Assignment.


X4 and X3 Current Feedback.
X94 and X95 Voltage Feedback.
X12 Current and Voltage feedback to the CON2 board.
X13 Firing pulses from the CON2 board
X2 External Fan.

The SDCS-PIN-21 Board is application specific. Certain calibration factors are adjusted with the removal of jumpers on this card. Refer to Table 7-2 for the DC Digital Retrofit specific jumper application.
Motion

W10

W15

W17

Hoist

Crowd

Swing

W18

W19

W20

W21

W22

W80

W81

W82

Table 7-2: SDCS-PIN-21 Jumper Application

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Drive Control Module

7.7 Power Interface SDCS-PIN-205 Board (Field Controllers)


7.7.1 General
The SDCS-PIN-205, reference Figure 7-26, circuit card replaces the SDCS-PIN-21 card in the field drive modules.
These circuit boards are application specific, certain calibration factors are adjusted with the removal of jumpers
and/or resistors on the card.

SDCS-PIN-20X
line
potential!

X94

C1

T24
1
2
3

F101

P125

P124

X95

F103

P128

P129

D1

X93

X91

T22

MOV

T14

W1

U1

1
2
3

T12

T26

P123

X5

X92

T11

F102

X6

T16

V1

P122

T15

P131

P127

P126

P130

35

T13

X22

X3

R151
R149
R150

R179
R178
R177

X12

T21

X4

35

T25
T23

R176
R175
R174
R173
R172
R171
R170
R169
R168
R167
R166
R165
R164
R163
R162
R161
R160

W82

8
9

W81

X13

R248
R249
R250
R251
R252

1
16

W80

9
W10

16

X121 (IACT)
X120 (GND)

PTC

ES1160_01
U1 V1 W1

Figure 7-26: SDCS-PIN-205 Power Interface Board

All 3 phase converters, which are now equipped with the board SDCS-PIN-21 Power Interface Board will be
equipped with the SDCS-PIN-205 Power Interface Board in future. The new board is compatible with the old one
and will serve as a spare part for drives.
The reasons for the SDCS-PIN 205 board are as follows:

The power losses of the power part have been dramatically reduced and therefor the efficiency of the converters is much higher.

Less spare parts. One board replaces 6 boards plus some resistors and capacitors

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Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Actions:
1. It is planned to use the SDCS-PIN-205 board for all the 3 phase DCS converters presently equipped with the
SDCS-CON-2 board and independent of their software version and drive function. This affects all converters
with a current rating from 100A up to 700A independent of their voltage rating.
2. There will be two versions of the SDCS-PIN-205 board:

SDCS-PIN-205 for converters with 500V nominal voltage.

SDCS-PIN-206 for converters with 600V nominal voltage.

3. Converters equipped with the new board can be identified by the serial number. Every serial number can be
split into 2 parts, separated by a letter. Up to now an A is used. In the future a B will appear in the middle of the
serial number; the number will look like this: xxx xxByyyyyyy, if the SDCS-PIN-205 board is used.
4. The SDCS-PIN-205 board can be used as a spare part for older converters, but not always vice versa.

7.7.2 Compatibility / Differences of SDCS-PIN-21 compared to SDCS-PIN-205


Board Construction. The new board in general has got the same features as the old one. Some functions have
been designed differently.
1. Hardware coding: additional resistors are used to code the hardware.
2. Armature current measuring circuit: is basically the same; the method of setting the nominal current is different
and now done by a number of paralleled resistors; they serve as a jumper and have to be cut, if the board is
used as a spare board.
3. Thyristor protection and snubber circuit: are done by different means. The AC lines are taken up to the board
with fuses within the lines, rectified by a diode bridge and feed to a RC network with decharging resistor; small
RC networks are connected in parallel to the thyristors. This configuration results in much lower losses and a
higher efficiency of the converter.
Exchangeability Of Boards/Spare Part: Converters with 100A 1dn 350A and Uline
500V:

SDCS-PIN-21 or
SDCS-PIN-205 can be used as spare part.
1. Make sure to set the correct setting of the jumpers (resistors), if a board should be moved from one DCS converter to another DCS converter.

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Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Drive Control Module

7.8 Power Interface SDCS-PIN-61 Board (Armature Controllers)


7.8.1 General
Refer to Figure 7-27 for the SDCS-PIN-61 board layout. The SDCS-PIN-61 board provides the following functions:

Firing pulses to the pulse transformers.


Voltage and Current Feedback
Diverter Interface
Fused protection for firing pulses and AC synchronization.

Figure 7-27: SDCS-PIN-61 Board Layout

7.8.2 Connector Assignment:


X3 3phase synchronization input and Voltage Feedback
X5 Current Feedback
X4 Diverter Interface

X1 Firing pulse output to Forward Bridge

X2 Fire pulse output to Reverse Bridge


X13 Firing pulse input from the CON 2 board
X12 Current & Voltage feedback and 3 phase synchronization to CON2.

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Mine Air Systems

Section 8

Mine Air Systems


8.1 Heater / Air Conditioner and Defroster
8.1.1 Introduction
The Electric Mining Shovel has a Mine Air Systems heating/air conditioning system as standard equipment. Other
systems are available as optional equipment.
Heating/air conditioning units on P&H Electric Mining Shovels are normally located next to the Operators Coop on
the machinery house roof. They are connected to the coop by duct work. A second air conditioner unit is used to
cool the right hand room where the PLC and other heat sensitive electronic controls are located. Refer to Figure 81.

Figure 8-1: Mine Air Systems Units

The Mine Air Systems units are equipped with a scroll compressor and have a built-in pressurizer (blower).
Heated or cooled air is directed into the Operators Coop through numerous louvered openings. The louvers may
be opened or closed by pressing on the louver blades. The openings may be turned to change the direction of the
air flow.
The optional combination windshield defroster and floor heater unit is not integrated into the Mine Air Systems
units. See Subtopic 8.1.4 for details.
A standard Control Unit is provided with the Mine Air system and is detailed in Subtopic 8.1.2. The optional Mine
Logic Controller is detailed in Subtopic 8.1.3.

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8.1.2 Standard Control Unit


The Mine Air System is controlled by a standard controller. One control unit will be located inside the Operators
Coop and controls the Mine Air unit that supplies the Coop. A second unit is located inside the Right Hand Room
and controls the Mine Air unit that supplies that room. Refer to Figure 8-2.

ON
30
10

50

70
90

-10

110

-30

130

OFF
PRESSURIZER

COOL / OFF / HEAT

COOLING CONTROL
HIGH
ON

LOW
FAN SPEED

9
0

10

(HOT)

HEAT CONTROL

MINE AIR SYSTEMS

ES2155_01

Figure 8-2: Standard Control Unit

This control is an analog control system with clear descriptions and pictures for ease of use.
A description of the analog controls and their function follows.

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Mine Air Systems

COOL / OFF / HEAT

ES2156_01
Figure 8-3: Cool/Off/Heat Rocker Button

1. COOL / OFF / HEAT rocker button. Refer to Figure 8-3. This button selects the operation of the Mine Air System. It also turns the Mine Air System off when not required.

9
0

10

(HOT)

HEAT CONTROL
ES2157_01
Figure 8-4: Heat Control

2. HEAT CONTROL potentiometer. Refer to Figure 8-4. This potentiometer is used to control the level of heat
output from the Mine Air System. The level is incremented from 0 to 10, 10 being the hottest setting.

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50

30
10

70
90

-10

110

-30

130

COOLING CONTROL
ES2158_01
Figure 8-5: Cooling Control

3. COOLING CONTROL potentiometer. Refer to Figure 8-5. This potentiometer is used to control the level of
cooling output from the Mine Air System.

ON
OFF
PRESSURIZER

ES2159_01
Figure 8-6: Pressurizer Toggle Switch

4. PRESSURIZER toggle switch. Refer to Figure 8-6. Toggling this switch activates or deactivates the pressurizer.

HIGH
LOW
FAN SPEED

ES2160_01
Figure 8-7: Fan Speed Toggle Switch

5. FAN SPEED toggle switch. Refer to Figure 8-7. Toggling this switch will change the fan speed between Low
and High.

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Mine Air Systems

8.1.3 Mine Logic Controller


The optional controller for the Mine Air System is called the Mine Logic Controller. This control unit will be located
in the same areas as the Standard Controller when this option is purchased. Refer to Figure 8-8.

Figure 8-8: Mine Logic Controller

This control is a digital control system complete with large adjustment buttons with clear descriptions and pictures
for ease of use.
A large Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) Screen displays current operation mode (heat or cool), system pressurizer
status, coop temperature, fan speed, and coop temperature set point. The display is capable of displaying temperatures in either degrees F or degrees C. Figure 8-9 shows an example of the LCD Screen

Cool Pressurizer On
Cab Temp 75o F Fan Lo
Setpoint 72o F
ES0561_01

Figure 8-9: LCD Screen

A description of the keypad control buttons and their function follows.

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Figure 8-10: Power On/Off Button

1. POWER ON/OFF button. Refer to Figure 8-10. Push this button to turn the unit on. If the unit is on, push this
button to turn it off.

Figure 8-11: Heat/Cool Button

2. HEAT/COOL button. Refer to Figure 8-11. Push this button to toggle between heat or air conditioner.

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Mine Air Systems

Figure 8-12: Temperature Up and Temperature Down Button

3. TEMP UP and TEMP DOWN buttons. Refer to Figure 8-12. Push these buttons to raise or lower the temperature set point. Pushing both buttons together will toggle the display between oF and oC.

Figure 8-13: Pressurizer Button

4. PRESSURIZER button. Refer to Figure 8-13. Pushing this button activates the pressurizer.

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Figure 8-14: Fan Speed Button

5. FAN SPEED button. Refer to Figure 8-14. Pushing this button will toggle the fan speed between Low and High.

8.1.4 Floor Heater/Defroster (Optional)


The optional combination floor heater and windshield defroster unit is not integrated into the Mine Air Systems
units. The floor heater/defroster is located below the floor of the Operators Coop, in either the Right Hand Room or
Left Hand Room depending on if the Coop is located on the right or the left. Air for the floor heater/defroster is
ducted up to both the right and left hand consoles from the floor. The defroster has openings the full length of the
windshield on both right and left sides. The floor heater has one round adjustable louver located in front of both the
right and left hand consoles. The louvers are located at the appropriate height above the floor to allow the heat to
be directed on the operators feet.
The control switch for the floor heater/defroster is located on the left hand console. Switch positions will allow for
different fan speeds and heater output levels, refer to Figure 8-15.

FLOOR HEATER/DEFROSTER
OFF

HI BLOWER
ONLY
HI BLOWER
HI HEAT
LO BLOWER
ONLY

HI BLOWER
MED HEAT

LO BLOWER
LO HEAT

ES0544_01

Figure 8-15: Floor Heater/Defroster Switch

As another option a small radiant heater/defroster may be included in a P&H mining shovel. This unit is sometimes
referred to as the Coop Draft Barrier Heater and is mounted under the Operators foot rest. A rocker switch on the
Right Hand Console turns this radiant heater on and off.

8.1.5 Component Layout

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Reset

Mine Air Systems

C1

C2

C3

C4

C5

C6

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

OL2

OL3 OL4

OL5

OL6

SCR

F9

XFR

-+
J2
CR3 CR5

CR1 CR4

CR2

J1

J3

ES2141_01

P1

P2

LEGEND
C1. Heater Contactor.
C2. Pressurizer Contactor.
C3. Low Speed Contactor.
C4. High Speed Contactor.
C5. Condensor Contactor.
C6. Compressor Contactor.
OL2.Pressurizer Overload.
OL3.Low Speed Overload.
OL4.High Speed Overload.
OL5.Condensor Overload.
OL6.Compressor Overload.
J1. MLC Relay Inputs.
J2. MLC Relay Outputs.
J3. MLC Relay Outputs.
CR1.Control Relay - Heat.
CR2.Control Relay - Pressurizer.
CR3.Control Relay - Low
Speed.
CR4.Control Relay - High
Speed.

F8
F7
F6
F5
F4
F3
F2
F1

P3

P4

P5

P6

CR5.Control Relay - Cooling.


SCR.Heat Regulator.
F1-F2.Fuse - Transformer.
F3-F5.Fuse - Motors.
F6-F8.Fuse - Heaters.
F9. Fuse - Control Transformer.
XFR.Transformer.
P1. Recirculating Fan/Heaters
Connector.
P2. Evap Side Controls Connector.
P3. Main Power Supply Connector.
P4. MLC Controls Connector.
P5. Refrig/Cond Controls Connector.
P6. Comp/Cond Fan Connector.

Figure 8-16: Control Cabinet Component Layout

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INSIDE COVER

PLC BOARD
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 J5

J7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

J11

CTS
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 J4

LCDP

470 5W

SC
J6 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

LCD
12

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18

SC

J10
CC
LCDP
9SP
J8 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 J9

ES2143_01

LEGEND
J4. Output Terminal Block.
J5. Output Terminal Block.
J6. Input Terminal Block.
J7. Input Terminal Block.
J8. Signal Converter Terminal Block.
J9. MLC Power Terminal Block.
J10.MLC Power Terminal Block.

J11. LCD Power Terminal Block.


SC. Momentary Switch Control Cable.
CC. Contrast Control Dial.
LCD.Liquid Crystal Display.
LCDP.Liquid Crystal Display Port.
9SP.DB9 (9 Pin) Serial Port.
CTS.Cab Temperature Sensor.

Figure 8-17: Mine Logic Controller (MLC) Component Layout

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Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Mine Air Systems

8.2 Maintenance
8.2.1 Maintenance Areas
The Mine Air System will be trouble-free and give excellent service if a few simple maintenance up-keep procedures are followed.
Maintenance consists of three main areas:

Changing filters.
Cleaning the coils with compressed air.
Checking fasteners and fittings for tightness and inspect unit for structural damage or stress cracks.
8.2.1.1 Changing Filters
There are two types of filters to be changed if you have the pressurizer option. They are as follows:

WARNING

Prior to performing any filter change, remove power to the unit. High voltage exists
within the unit which, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury. Follow all
lockout/tagout procedures.
Pressurizer. This is the small component connected via flexible hose to the main unit. It has a pre-filter dust cup
filter, and a final cartridge filter. Your pre-filter is the self cleaning type and does not require maintenance.
Every time maintenance is performed, remove the dirt cup by the spring clips at the end, dump the cup out.
Change the filter cartridge if too dirty.
Plenum. Change the filters on a regular basis.

8.2.1.2 Condensor Coils


This is the end of the unit with the open grills, and is where the heat from the cab is rejected outdoors. There is a
coil made of copper (the condenser coil) that needs to be kept clean and as free of dust as possible).
The following procedure tells how to clean the condensor coil.

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WARNING

Prior to performing the following procedure, remove power to the unit. High voltage
exists within the cabinet which, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury.
Follow all lockout/tagout procedures.
Step 1:

Remove power from the unit, follow all specific lockout/tagout procedures.

Step 2:

Open hinged top cover, slide cover sideways off the hinges and set carefully to the side away from the
unit.

Step 3:

Using compressed air, blow the dirt from outside, through the stainless grating, through the coil and back
into the case.

Step 4:

When all dust and debris has been blown through, use the compressed air to blow as much dust from
inside of the case as possible.

Step 5:

Carefully reassemble the top cover and restore power to re-start the unit.

8.2.1.3 Recirculation Unit


The Recirculation unit is located at the end with the larger top cover. The inside of this unit should stay clean and
relatively dust free because it is in the filtered airflow.
Check that the coil and heater elements are clean and free of dust. Compressed air can be used but may cause
dust to be blown into the operators cab. Remember to change the plenum filters after using compressed air to
clean unit.

WARNING

Prior to performing the following items, remove power to the unit. High voltage exists
within the cabinet which, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury. Follow all
lockout/tagout procedures.
Attempt to move the compressor, the receiver, the Heat Regulator controller and both motors. If any movement is felt, check mounting bolts at the loose component's base and on any support bands. Check all
welds on main sub-frame in base of unit. Call the local MinePro Services office if any broken welds or structural failures are evident.

Check and tighten, if necessary, the six mounting bolts between the sub-frame, the condenser and the
mounting channels. The bolts should be torqued to 35 Ft. Lbs.

Check and tighten, if necessary, the six mounting bolts between the subframe in the Blower/Heater pack
and the mounting channels. The bolts should be torqued to 35 Ft. Lbs.

Check that all motors spin freely by hand. Replace motor if any grinding, squeaking, or roughness if felt.
Check that power and controller cable connectors are locked in place and that cables are not chaffing or
scuffing on edges or being pressed against cooling coil fins.

Clean coils. Refer to Subtopic 8.2.1.2.

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Mine Air Systems

Check refrigerant sight glass. The indicator in the center should be green.
Close covers and verify the latch is secure.
Check that the electrical box lid is tightly closed and that all fastening bolts are tight.

8.2.2 Preventive Maintenance


The following is a recommendation for performing preventive maintenance on the Mine Air System. Refer to Table
8-1, Table 8-2, Table 8-3, Table 8-4 and Table 8-5.

WARNING

Prior to performing any preventive maintenance, remove power to the unit. High voltage
exists within the cabinet which, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury.
Follow all lockout/tagout procedures.
Daily

Check the Power Monitor - Reset it by turning the power on


at the controller.

Inspect and empty the Precleaner if required. This is not


required on self cleaning units.
Table 8-1: Preventive Maintenance - Daily

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Every 250
Hours

Change the return air filters and discard. The filters are not
cleanable and cannot be reused.

Inspect the pressurizer filter. Replace it every second PM or


when it becomes too dirty.

Inspect the condenser coil and blow it out with compressed


air if it becomes too dirty. Refer to Subtopic 8.2.1.2.

Inspect all electrical connections. Tighten if necessary.


Reset the heating high limit switch if required.
Check the drain trap vacuum valves, in place soft/opening
and sealing. Clean if required.

Check all controller functions.


Inspect all diffusers and louvres, replace any broken ones as
required.

Adjust the airflow for best seasonal operation. Check with


the operator and review unit operation.
Table 8-2: Preventive Maintenance - Every 250 Hours

Every 500
Hours

Change the pressurizer filter, wipe out all housing internal


surfaces, and verify that all latches are tight.

Check the rubber vacuum valve on the bottom of the pressurizer canister in place and soft/opening and sealing.

Verify that all fasteners are tight inside the unit and on the
unit mounting rails. Check for stress cracks.
Table 8-3: Preventive Maintenance - Every 500 Hours

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Section 8, Mineair.fm

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Seasonal
Pre-Cooling

Mine Air Systems

Check and clean the evaporator coil as required. Use water


or spray cleaner.

Check and clean condensate drains, ensure elbows and vacuum valves are in place and functional.

Inspect the condenser coil and blow it out with compressed


air if it becomes too dirty. Refer to Subtopic 8.2.1.2.

Check that condenser fan blades are tight, that it rotates


freely and motor bearings are smooth and quiet.

Check and tighten all electrical connections for the condenser fan motor and compressor.

Start the cooling cycle by lowering climatrol setpoint below


cab temperature. Check and verify the operation of all components.

Check the compressor and verify correct operation. Check


the oil level, the seal for leaks, the belts and clutch operation.

Verify that the refrigerant sight glass moisture indicator is


green and the glass is clear.
Table 8-4: Preventive Maintenance - Seasonal Pre-Cooling

Seasonal
Pre-Heating

Check the operation of the heating coil by incrementing the


setpoint to maximum and confirming temperature increase.
Bleed any air.

Check that the heating contactor is pulled in. If it is not, verify that the high limit klixons are closed and the fuses are
good.

Verify that the LED is flashing on the ramp controller.


Table 8-5: Preventive Maintenance - Seasonal Pre-Heating

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8.3 Troubleshooting
8.3.1 General
The modular design of the Mine Air Systems Unit allows for two options if a problem exists with either the electrical
or mechanical functions. The options are as follows:

The entire unit can be replaced with an identical unit in under thirty minutes at the next convenient break in
production when a technician and hoist can be scheduled.
If a spare unit is not available it is recommended that a cap be placed on the weather guard roof top flanges
until the unit can be replaced.
This option provides the following benefits:

Minimizes the down time.

Permits the time consuming removal and storage of refrigerant.

Allows a full service check up to be performed in a shop environment by qualified personnel or contractor.

The problem can be diagnosed and solved on the spot. Because of shovel down time considerations and
the refrigeration code, problems solved in the field should be limited to the following categories:

Fuses and Breakers.

Heating high limits.

Pressure sensors.

Modular components like the Mine Logic Controller, Pressurizer, or the Relay box.

Condenser coil cleaning.

Electric elements.

Motor, fan blades and wheels.

The following diagrams are provided to assist in the troubleshooting process. Refer to Figure 8-18 if the unit is not
cooling and Figure 8-19 or Figure 8-20 if the unit is not heating. Start in the green field and continue until the problem is resolved.
If these diagrams do not resolve the problem, contact the local MinePro Services Office for more assistance.

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Are both C5 and C6


energized?

Are both the


compressor
and fan motor
operating?

YES

NO

Reset overload. Check


motor operation and
current draw.

YES

Is either C5 or C6
overload tripped?

Mine Air Systems

YES

Is the rotation
on both components
correct?

YES

Is the indoor fan


motor operating?

NO

NO

NO

Check motors for open,


shorted or grounded
windings.

Reverse the rotation


at the motor connection
terminal.
DO NOT correct it at
the electrical box.

Check the indoor


fan circuit for proper
operation.

YES

Contact your local


MinePro Services
Office.

NO
Is 24VAC
present between
terminal J2 wire #34
and ground

YES

Check the wiring circuit


from the relay board
to the contactors.
Check for an open
overload switch or
inoperative contactor
coil.

YES

Replace CR5.
If problem is not
resolved, replace the
relay board.

YES

Is 24VDC
present between
wires #6 and #15
of J1?

NO
Is 24VAC
present between
terminals J1 wire #000
and J2 wire
#34?
NO
Is 24VDC
present between
wires #15 and #16
of terminal J1?

NO
Replace the
relay board.

YES

Replace CR5.
If problem is not
resolved, replace the
relay board.

YES

The circuit is not


complete between the
MLC and the relay
board. Check the
circuit for loose wires
or a faulty connection.

YES

Check MLC settings


and make sure the unit
is set for cooling and
the setpoint is lower
than the cab
temperature. If all
settings are correct,
replace the MLC.

YES

Perform continuity
checks to make sure
a path exists between
the pressure switches,
relay board and the
MLC.

NO
Is the red
LED illuminated at
output #10 of MLC?

NO
Are both
green LEDs
illuminated at input
#7 and #8?
NO
Is there
continuity between
terminals TS-1 and
TS-2?
NO
Pressure switch fault.
Contact your local
MinePro Services
Office.

ES2135_01

Figure 8-18: Mine Air Systems Troubleshooting - No Cooling

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Is the heat
contactor, (C1)
energized?

The HL140 or HL160


safety switch is open.
Remove the blower
pack to verify.
NO

NO

Is either C3-4 or
C4-4 contacts
closed?

YES

NO

Is 24VAC
present at terminal
J2-1?

YES

Is there
continuity between
terminal J2-1 and TS-3?
Is the circuit
closed?

YES

Is 24VDC
present between
terminals J1-7
and J1-21?

YES

Check for a bad


connection or a loose
wire.

NO

Check the auxilliary


contacts or the
fan circuit.

Check F9 on the
transformer.

Is 24VAC
present at terminal
J1-1?

YES

NO

NO

Is 24VAC
present at the
transformer?

Is 24VDC
present between
terminals J1-21
and J1-22?

Either the control relay


(CR1) or the relay
board is faulty. Replace
YES
the relay, if the problem
still exists, replace the
relay board.

YES

Is the
green LED for output
1 illuminated?
(J4-1)

NO

NO

NO

Check F1 and F2.


Check the main
power supply.

There is a faulty
power supply. Replace
the relay board.

Check MLC settings


and/or replace the
MLC.

YES

There is a faulty
connection at P4-1,
P7-1 or the control
cable

ES2136_01

Figure 8-19: Mine Air Systems Troubleshooting - No Heating - C1 Deenergized

Is the heat
contactor, (C1)
energized?

Check the auxilliary


contacts at C1 (C1-4).
Inoperative switch,
bad contacts or loose
connections.

YES

YES

Is 6VDC and/or
4-20mA pesent at
SCR?

YES

NO

NO

Is 6VDC and/or
4-20mA pesent at
terminal J3-7?

Is there
380/460VAC across
terminals 1, 2 and 3 of
SCR?

NO

There is a faulty
circuit on the relay
board.

YES

Is there
a current reading
found at SCR output?
(wires 106,
206,306)

Is 6VDC and/or
4-20mA pesent at
terminal J1-20?

YES

YES

The heating circuits


are OK. Check IFM, air
flow and filters.
Contact the local
MinePro Services
Office for assistance.

Is there
380/460VAC across
terminals 4, 5 and 6 of
SCR.

NO

NO

Check the heat


contactor (C1) and
fuses F6, F7 and F8.

Replace SCR control.

YES

Check the connections


at P1, terminals d, e
and f. Remove the
blower pack and
check heaters.

NO

Is 6VDC and/or
4-20mA pesent at
terminal J8-1?

YES

There are faulty


connections. Check
P7, P4 and the cable.

YES

Check MLC settings.


If necessary, replace
the MLC.

NO

Is SAS
functioning normally?

NO

ES2137_01

Replace the sensor.

Figure 8-20: Mine Air Systems Troubleshooting - No Heating - C1 Energized

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Section 8, Version 02 - 10/06

-8.18-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 8, Mineair.fm

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 8, Mineair.fm

-8.19-

3 313

209

11

3 317

217

Motor

215

1 315

Compr. 115

Motor

Cond. 117

High
Speed

13 311

211

111

1 309

Motor 12

Motor

113
1
213
2

Low
Speed 109

Motor

Press.

Heaters

Heaters

Heaters

P6 c

P6 b

P6 a

P6 f

P6 e

P6 d

P1 c

P1b

P1a

P1 i

P1h

P1g

P3 f

P3e

P3d

P1 f

P1e

P1d

OL6-3 C6-3

OL6-2 C6-2

OL6-1 C6-1

OL5-3 C5-3

OL5-2 C5-2

OL5-1 C5-1

OL4-3 C4-3

OL4-2 C4-2

OL4-1 C4-1

OL3-3 C3-3

OL3-2 C3-2

OL3-1 C3-1

OL2-3 C2-3

OL2-2 C2-2

OL2-1 C2-1

308

208

108

316

216

116

314

214

114

312

212

112

310

210

110

304

204

206

306

104

106

SCR

C1-3

C1-2

C1-1

F8

F7

F6

L1

305

205

105

L2

F3

L3

F4

F5

P3 c

300

P3 b

200

P3 a

100

ES2138_01

302

202

102

P3 g

202

F1

F2

J3-8

J3-6

J3-4

J1-6

J3-2

201

301

62

28

21

29

001

F9

000

P5 c

LPC

HPC

Transformer

380VAC

460VAC

P5 e

P2 b

J1-2

Reset

OAS

SCR
signal

J2-4

J2-6

CR4

CR5

OL6

J1-16

13
14

J1-19
J1-20
J3-7
35

12

J1-18
J3-5

11

J1-15

10

J1-12 6

J1-11 5

J1-10 4

J1-9 3

J1-8 2

J1-7 1

J1-22 16

J1-21 15

85

84

81

J1-14

CR5

N/A

CR4

CR3

CR2

CR1

OL5

OL4

OL3

88

87

P414

P413

P412

P411

P4 7

P4 9

P4 8

P410

P4 6

P4 5

P4 4

P4 3

P4 2

P4 1

P416

P415

86

HL1

J3-3

34

33

31

OL2

HL2

80

22

J1-17

P2

P2

J3-1

J1-5

J1-3

J2-3

CR3
32

J2-2

FS

CR2

J2-1 37

P2

CR1

23

24

25

C1-4

64

P5 a

P5 b

P5 d

P2 a

J1-1

70

15

89

19

18

17

16

P714

P713

P712

P711

P7 7

P7 9

P7 8

P710

P7 6

P7 5

P7 4

P7 3

P7 2

P7 1

P716

P715

C6

C5

C4

C3

C2

P2

14

13

12

11

10

16

15

J8-1

J5-6

J5-5

J5-3

J6-8

J7-2

TEMP UP

FAN

PRESS

HEAT/COOL

J10-2

J5-4

J6-7

14

ON/OFF

R1

R2

C1

TEMP DOWN
J6-6

J6-5

J6-4

J6-3

J6-2

J6-1

J8-6

J8-4

J10-1

91

92

J8-3

J8-5

J5-7

J5-2

J5-1

J4-4

J4-3

J4-2

J4-1

J9-2 CTS

J9-1

MECH IL

90

C3-4

C4-4

J11-2

J11-1

LCD BACKLIGHT

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual


Mine Air Systems

Figure 8-21: Electrical Wiring Diagram

Peak Services
Section 8, Version 02 - 10/06

J1

Peak Services
Section 8, Version 02 - 10/06

24VDC

1
2

VIN VOUT
GND

24VDC

24VAC

1.85A

24VAC

47K

10K

J1

12K

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

ES2142_01

24VAC

24VAC

24VAC

24VAC

-8.2024VAC

24VAC

CR5

24VDC

N/A

24VDC

CR4

24VDC

CR3

24VDC

CR2

24VDC

CR1

24VDC

N/A
SAS
OAS
HI PR
LO PR
RESET
4-20mA
24VDC
GND

8
9
7
11
12
13
14
15
16

OAS 24
OAS GND 21
HEAT 1
PRESS 2
LO FAN 3
HI FAN 4
N/A 5
COND/COMP 6

24VAC 000
GND 001
SAS 25

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

3
4
5
6

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

J2

J2

J2

J1

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

CR4

CR1

N/A

CR2

CR5

CR3

J3

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

J2

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

HL1&2
PRESS
LO SPEED
HI SPEED

23
29
22
28
5
6
35
62

HI PR
SAS GND
LO PR
HP/LP GND
RESET
RESET GND
4-20 mA
4-20mA GND

34 COND/COMP

37
31
32
33

Mine Air Systems


Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Figure 8-22: MLS Relay Board Circuit Diagram

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 8, Mineair.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Miscellaneous Electrical

Section 9

Miscellaneous Electrical
9.1 General
This Topic contains electrical information that is important to the technical upkeep of the P&H Mining Equipment
Inc. electric mining shovel, but is not specific to any of the other main sections of this manual.

9.2 Power Quality Meter


9.2.1 General Information
The Power Quality Meter (PQM), refer to Figure 9-1, provides continuous monitoring of the three phase 600VAC
bus bar components. It provides metering for current, voltage, real power, reactive power, apparent power, energy
use, cost of power, power factor and frequency. Programmable setpoints and 4 assignable output relays allow control functions to be added for specific applications. This includes basic alarm on over/ under current or voltage,
unbalance, demand based load shedding, and capacitor power factor correction control.

STATUS:
ALARM
PROGRAM

-Alarmcondition
present
-Setpoint
programmingis
enabled
SIMULA TION -Simulated
valuesbeing
usedfortest/training
SELF TEST
-internal
fault
detected,
service
required

COMMUNICA TE:

RELA YS:

Formonitoring
communication
activity:
TX1 COM1 transmit
data
RX1 COM1 receive
data
TX2 COM2 transmit
data
RX2 COM2 receive
data

ALARM
AUX1
AUX2
AUX3

Alarmcondition
present.
See display
forcause.

Auxiliary
relay
activated
by
programmable
function.

DISPLAY
40 character
illuminated
display
for
programming,
monitoring,
status,
fault
diagnosis,
userprogrammable
messages
and setpoints.
Programmableautoscan
sequenceforunattended
operation.
ACTUAL

STORE

SETPOINT

RESET

DOOR:
Doorcoverskeysand computerport
when notinuse.

MESSAGE

PQM Power QualityMeter

STATUS

KEYP AD:
Rubberkeypadisdusttight
and
splashproof.

COMMUNICA TE

RELA YS

ALARM

TX1

ALARM

PROGRAM

RX1

AUX1

SIMULA TION

TX2

AUX2

SELF TEST

RX2

AUX3

VALUE

SETPOINT KEY :
Programall
setpoints.
Tamperproof
settings
withpasscodeand accessjumper
prevent
unauthorized
setpoint
changes.

COMPUTER

INTERFACE:

RS232 comm portforconnecting


toa PC.
Use fordownloading
setpoints,
monitorin
datacollection,
printing
reports.

ES1264_01
Figure 9-1: Power Quality Meter

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 9, Misc Elec.fm

-9.1-

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Section 9, Version 02 - 10/06

Miscellaneous Electrical

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

As a data gathering device for the Electric Mining Shovel integrating process, instrument and electrical requirements, all monitored values are available via one of two digital RS485 communication ports running Modbus protocol. If analog values are required for direct interface to a PLC, any of the monitored values can be output as a 4 20mA (or 0 - 1mA) signal to replace up to 4 separate transducers. Other service personnel can connect a third
comm port (RS232) to a PC from the front panel for simultaneous access of information.
With increasing use of electronic loads such as computers, ballast's or variable frequency drives, the quality of the
power system is important. With the harmonic analysis option, any phase current or voltage can be displayed and
the harmonic content calculated. Knowledge of the harmonic distribution allows action to be taken to prevent overheated transformers, motors, capacitors, neutral wires and nuisance breaker trips. Redistribution of system loading
can also be determined. Waveform and data printouts are available from the PQM to assist in problem diagnosis.
Economical system monitoring or control is possible by selecting the non display chassis model as a system component and adding required options to obtain the desired level of functionality.

9.2.2 Features and Applications


The following features are applicable to the PQM:

Monitor: A, V, VA, W, VAR, Kvarh, KVAh, PF, Hz.


Demand metering: W, VAR, A, VA.
Setpoints for alarm or control from most measured values including: unbalance, power factor, frequency,
voltage and current.

4 output relays / 4 switch inputs for flexible control configuration.


4 isolated analog outputs replace transducer for PLC interface.
1 (4 - 20mA) analog input.
Modbus communication.
Three comm ports (two rear RS485 ports and one front RS232 port) for access by process, electrical, maintenance and instrument personnel.

Harmonic analysis for power quality review and problem correction.


40 character display and keypad for local programming.
PQMPC software for setpoint entry or monitoring from a PC.
Simulation mode for testing and training.
Compact design for panel or chassis mount.
AC/DC control power.
The PQM can be used in the following applications:

Metering of distribution feeders, transformers, generators, capacitor banks, and motors.

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Section 9, Version 02 - 10/06

-9.2-

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 9, Misc Elec.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Miscellaneous Electrical

Medium and low voltage 3 phase systems.


Commercial, industrial, utility.
Flexible control for demand load shedding, power factor, etc. . .
Power quality analysis.
9.2.2.1 Standard Features
Metering
True RMS monitoring of Ia , Ib , Ic , In , Van , Vbn , Vcn , Vab , Vbc , Vca , voltage/current unbalance, power factor,
line frequency, watts, VARS, VA, Wh, Varh, VAh, and demand readings for A, W, VARS, and VA. Maximum and
minimum values of measured quantities are recorded and are date and time stamped.
A 40-character display with brightness control is used for programming setpoints and monitoring values and status.

Alarms
Alarm conditions can be set up for all measured quantities. These include overcurrent, undercurrent, neutral current, current unbalance, voltage unbalance, phase reversal, over frequency, under frequency, power factor, switch
inputs, etc. . . The alarm messages display in English is in a simple and easy to understand format.

Communication
The PQM is equipped with one standard RS485 port utilizing the Modbus or DNP 3.0 protocols. This can be used
to integrate process, instrumentation, and electrical requirements in a plant automation system by connecting PQM
meters together to a DCS or SCADA system. A PC running PQMPC can change system set-points and monitor
values, status, and alarms. Continuous monitoring minimizes process downtime by immediately identifying potential problems due to faults or changes from growth. Refer to Figure 9-2.
The PQM also includes a front RS232 port, which may be employed to perform such tasks as:

Data monitoring.
Problem diagnosis.
Viewing event records.
Trending.
Printing settings and/or actual values.
Loading new firmware into the PQM.
9.2.2.2 PQMPC Software
All data continuously gathered by the PQM can be transferred to a third party software program for display, control,
or analysis through the communications interface. The PQMPC software makes this data immediately useful and
assists in programming the PQM. Some of the tasks that can be executed using the PQMPC software package
are:

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 9, Misc Elec.fm

-9.3-

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Section 9, Version 02 - 10/06

Miscellaneous Electrical

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

3 PHASE
3/4 WIRE BUS
0 - 600V DIRECT
>600V CT/VTs
AC/DC
CONTROL
POWER

CTs

VTs

4 SWITCH
INPUTS FOR
CONTROL

MAIN
SCADA
INSTRUMENTATION
ELECTRICAL
MAINTENANCE

COM 1
4
OUTPUT
RELAYS

COM 2

4
TRANSDUCER
OUTPUTS

RS232
PORT

ALARM
CONTROL
1
2
3
4

4-20mA
PLC
or
RTU

ES1265_01

Figure 9-2: PQM Single Line Diagram

Read metered data.


Monitor system status.
Change PQM setpoints on-line.
Save setpoints to a file and download into any PQM.
Capture and display voltage and current wave shapes for analysis.
Record demand profiles for various measured quantities.
Troubleshoot communication problems with a built in communications debugging tool.
Print all graphs, charts, setpoints, and actual data.

9.2.3 PQM Specifications


1. Current inputs, refer to Table 9-1.
Specification

Value

Conversion

True RMS, 64 samples/cycle

CT Input

1A and 5A secondary

Burden

0.2 VA

Overload

20 x CT for 1s, 100 x CT for 0.2s


Table 9-1: Current Input Table

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Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 9, Misc Elec.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Miscellaneous Electrical

Specification

Value

Range

1-150% of CT pri

Frequency

Up to the 32nd harmonic

Accuracy

0.2% of full scale


Table 9-1: Current Input Table

2. Voltage inputs, refer to Table 9-2.


Specification

Value

Conversion

True RMS, 64 samples/cycle

VT Pri/sec

Direct or 120-72000:69-240

Input Range

20-600VAC

Full Scale

150/600VAC

Frequency

Up to the 32nd harmonic

Accuracy

0.2% of full scale


Table 9-2: Voltage Inputs

3. Sampling modes, refer to Table 9-3.


Samples/cycle

Inputs Sampled
at a Time

Duration
(Cycles)

Metered Values

64

All

Trace Memory

16

All

Continuous

256

Harmonic Spectrum

Table 9-3: Sampling Modes

4. Switch inputs, refer to Table 9-4.


Type

Dry Contacts

Resistance

1000 max ON resistance

Output

24VDC @ 2mA (pulsed)

Duration

100ms minimum
Table 9-4: Switch Inputs

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 9, Misc Elec.fm

-9.5-

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Miscellaneous Electrical

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

5. Analog outputs, refer to Table 9-5.


Output
0-1mA
(T1 Option)

4-20mA
(T20 Option)

Max Load

2400

600

Max Output

1.1mA

21mA

Table 9-5: Analog Outputs

6. Analog input, refer to Table 9-6.


Range

4-20mA

Accuracy

1% of full scale reading

Internal Burden Resistance

250

Table 9-6: Analog Input

7. Output relays, refer to Table 9-7.


Voltage

Resistive

Inductive

Resistive

Inductive

Make/Carry

Break

Continuous

0.1sec

30VDC

5A

30A

5A

125VDC

5A

30A

0.5A

250VDC

5A

30A

0.3A

30VDC

5A

30A

5A

125VDC

5A

30A

0.25A

250VDC

5A

30A

0.15A

120VAC

5A

30A

5A

250VAC

5A

30A

5A

120VAC

5A

30A

5A

250VAC

5A

30A

5A

Table 9-7: Output Relays

8. Measured values, refer to Table 9-8.


Parameter

Accuracy
(% of full scale)

Range

Voltage

0.2%

20% to 100% of VT

Current

0.2%

1% to 150% of CT

Table 9-8: Measured Values

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Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 9, Misc Elec.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Parameter

Miscellaneous Electrical

Accuracy
(% of full scale)

Range

V Unbalance

1%

0 to 100%

I Unbalance

1%

0 to 100%

KW

0.4%

0 to 999,999.99KW

KVAR

0.4%

0 to 999,999.99KVAR

KVA

0.4%

0 to 999,999.99KVA

KWh

0.4%

232 KWh

Kvarh

0.4%

232 Kvarh

KVah

0.4%

232 KVah

PF

1.0%

0.00-1.00

FREQUENCY

0.02Hz

20.00-70.00 Hz

KW DEMAND

0.4%

0-999,999.99KW

KVAR DEMAND

0.4%

0-999,999.99KVAR

KVA DEMAND

0.4%

0-999,999.99 KVA

AMP DEMAND

0.2%

0-7500 AMPS

AMPS THD

2.0%

0.0-100.0%

VOLTS THD

2.0%

0.0-100.0%

Table 9-8: Measured Values

9. Undervoltage monitoring, refer to Table 9-9.


Required Voltage

>20V applied in all phases

Pickup

0.50-0.99 in steps of 0.01xVT

Dropout

103% of pickup

Time Delay

0.5-600.00 in steps of 0.5s

Phases

Any one/Any two/Any three (programmable) have to be pickup to operate

Accuracy Timing

Per voltage input

Accuracy

-0 / +1s
Table 9-9: Undervoltage Monitoring

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 9, Misc Elec.fm

-9.7-

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Section 9, Version 02 - 10/06

Miscellaneous Electrical

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

10. Overvoltage monitoring, refer to Table 9-10.


Pickup

1.01-1.25 in steps of 0.01xVT

Dropout

97% of pickup

Time Delay

0.5-600.0 in steps of 0.5s

Phases

Any one/Any two/Any three (programmable) have to be pickup


to operate

Accuracy Timing

Per voltage input

Accuracy

-0 / +1s
Table 9-10: Overvoltage Monitoring

11. Under Frequency monitoring, refer to Table 9-11.


Required Voltage
Pickup

> 30V applied in phase A

Dropout

Pickup + 0.03Hz

Time Delay

0.1-10.0 in steps of 0.1s

Accuracy

0.02 Hz

Timing Accuracy

3 cycles

20.00-70.00 in steps of 0.01 Hz

Table 9-11: Underfrequency Monitoring

12. Over Frequency monitoring, refer to Table 9-12.


Required Voltage
Pickup

> 30V applied in phase A

Dropout

Pickup - 0.03Hz

Time Delay

0.1-10.0 in steps of 0.1s

Accuracy

0.02 Hz

Timing Accuracy

3 cycles

20.00-70.00 in steps of 0.01 Hz

Table 9-12: Overfrequency Monitoring

13. Power Factor monitoring, refer to Table 9-13.


Required Voltage
Pickup

> 30V applied in phase A

Dropout

0.50 lag - 0.50 lead in steps 0.01

Time Delay

0.5 - 600.0 in steps of 0.5s

Timing Accuracy

-0 / +1s

0.50 lag - 0.50 lead in steps of 0.01

Table 9-13: Power Factor Monitoring

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Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 9, Misc Elec.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Miscellaneous Electrical

14. Demand monitoring, refer to Table 9-14.


Measured Values

Phase A/B/C/N Current (A)


3 Real Power (KW)
3 Reactive Power (Kvar)
3 Apparent Power (KVA)

Measurement Type

Thermal Exponential
90% response time
(programmable): 5-60 min,
steps of 1 min
Block Interval
(programmable): 5-60 min,
steps of 1 min
Rolling Demand time interval
(programmable): 5-60 min,
steps of 1 min

Pickup

A: 10-7500 in steps of 1
KW: 0.1-6500.0 in steps of 0.1
Kvar: 0.1 to 6500.0 in steps of 0.1
KVA: 0.1 to 6500.0 in steps of 0.1
Table 9-14: Demand Monitoring

15. Pulse output, refer to Table 9-15.


Parameters

+KWh, -KWh, +Kvar and KVAh

Interval

1-65000 in steps of 1

Pulse Width

100-2000ms in steps of 10ms

Min Pulse Interval

500ms

Accuracy

100ms
Table 9-15: Pulse Output

16. Communications, refer to Table 9-16.


Com1 / Com2 Type:

RS485 2 wire, half duplex, isolated

Com3 Type:

RS232 (9 pin)

Baud Rate:

1200-19.2K

Protocol:

ModBus RTU
Table 9-16: Communications

Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 9, Misc Elec.fm

-9.9-

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Miscellaneous Electrical

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Functions:

Read/write setpoints
Read actual values
Execute commands
Table 9-16: Communications

17. Control Power, refer to Table 9-17.


Input

90 - 300VDC or 70-265VAC, 50/


60Hz

Power

Nominal 10VA
Maximum 20VA

Holdup

(100ms typical )(@ 120VAC /


125VDC)
Table 9-17: Control Power

9.2.4 Operation
9.2.4.1 General Operation
The local operator interface for setpoint entry and monitoring of measured values is through the front panel as
shown in Figure 9-3 . Control keys are used to select the appropriate message for entering setpoints or displaying
measured values. Alarm and status messages are automatically displayed when required. Indicator LEDs provide
important status information at all times. An RS232 communications port is also available for uploading or downloading information to the PQM.

ACTUAL

STORE

SETPOINT

RESET

LEGEND
01. Status
02. Communicate
03. Relays
04. Display
05. Setpoint Key
06. Keypad
07. Computer Interface
08. Door

MESSAGE

PQM Power QualityMeter

STATUS

COMMUNICA TE

RELA YS

ALARM

TX1

ALARM

PROGRAM

RX1

AUX1

SIMULA TION

TX2

AUX2

SELF TEST

RX2

AUX3

VALUE

ES1264a_01
Figure 9-3: PQM Front Display

Peak Services
Section 9, Version 02 - 10/06

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Copyright 2006 P&H Mining Equipment, Inc.


Section 9, Misc Elec.fm

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Miscellaneous Electrical

Status
Alarm. Alarm condition present.
Program. Setpoint programming is enabled.
Simulation. Simulated values being used for test/training.
Self Test. Internal fault detected, service required.
Communicate
For monitoring communication activity.

TX1. COM1 transmit data.


RX1. COM1 receive data.
TX2. COM2 transmit data.
RX2. COM2 receive data.
Relays
Alarm. Alarm condition present, see display for details.
AUX1/AUX2 and AUX3. Auxiliary relay activated by programmable function.
Display
40 character illuminated display for programming, monitoring, status, fault, diagnosis, user programmable messages and setpoints. Programmable auto scan sequence for unattended operation.

Setpoint Key
Program all setpoints. Tamper proof settings with passcode and access jumper prevent unauthorized setpoint
changes.

Keypad
Rubber keypad is dust tight and splash proof.

Computer Interface
RS232 communication port for connecting to a PC. Use for downloading setpoints, monitoring, data collection and
printing reports.

Door
Door covers keys and computer port when not in use.

9.2.4.2 Display

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All messages are displayed in English on the 40-character vacuum fluorescent display, refer to Figure 9-4. This
display is visible under varied lighting conditions. When the keypad and display are not actively being used, the
screen displays a default status message. This message appears if no key has been pressed for the time programmed in the S1 PQM SETUP\PREFERENCES\DEFAULT MESSAGE TIME setpoint. Note that alarm condition
messages automatically override the default messages.

ES1266_01
Figure 9-4: PQM Display Readout

9.2.4.3 Status Indicators


The status indicators, refer to Figure 9-5, provide a quick indication of the overall status of the PQM. These indicators illuminate if an alarm is present, if setpoint access is enabled, if the PQM is in simulation mode or if there is a
problem with the PQM itself.

STATUS

COMMUNICA TE

RELA YS

ALARM

TX1

ALARM

PROGRAM

RX1

AUX1

SIMULA TION

TX2

AUX2

SELF TEST

RX2

AUX3

ES1267_01

Figure 9-5: PQM - Status Indicators

Alarm
When an alarm condition exists, the ALARM indicator (red) will be on.

Program
The PROGRAM indicator (amber) will be on when setpoint access is enabled.

Simulation

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The SIMULATION indicator (amber) will be on when the PQM is using simulated values for current, voltage, analog
input, switches and analog outputs. While in simulation mode, the PQM will ignore the measured parameters
detected at its inputs and will use the simulated values stored in the S5 TESTING \ SIMULATION setpoints group.

Self Test
Any abnormal condition detected during PQM self-monitoring, such as a hardware failure, causes the SELF TEST
indicator (red) to be on. Loss of control power to the PQM also causes the SELF TEST indicator to turn on, indicating that no metering is present.

9.2.4.4 Communication Indicators


The COMMUNICATE indicators, refer to Figure 9-5, monitor the status of the RS485 communication ports. When
no serial data is being received through the rear serial ports terminals, the RX1/2 indicators are off. This situation
occurs if there is no connection, the serial wires become disconnected, or the master computer is inactive. If there
is activity on the serial port but the PQM is not receiving valid messages for its internally programmed address, the
TX1/2 indicators remain off. This condition can be caused by incorrect message formats (such as baud rate or
framing), reversed polarity of the two RS485 twisted-pair connections or the master not sending the currently programmed PQM address. If the PQM is being periodically addressed with a valid message, the RX1/2 indicator will
turn on followed by the TX1/2 indicator.

TX1 - Communicate
The PQM is transmitting information via the COM1 RS485 communications port when lit (green indicator).

RX1 - Communicate
The PQM is receiving information via the COM1 RS485 communications port when lit (green indicator).

TX2 - Communicate
The PQM is transmitting information via the COM2 RS485 communications port when lit (green indicator).

RX2 - Communicate
The PQM is receiving information via the COM2 RS485 communications port when lit (green indicator).

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9.2.4.5 Relay Indicators


The status of the output relays is displayed with these indicators, refer to Figure 9-5.

Alarm - Relays
The ALARM relay is intended for general purpose alarm outputs. This red indication is on while the ALARM relay is
operating. If the ALARM is programmed as unlatched, this indicator flashes as long as the alarm condition persists.
When the condition clears, the ALARM indicator (red) turns off. If the alarm relay has been programmed as
latched, the alarm condition can only be cleared by pressing the RESET key or by issuing a computer-reset command.

AUX1 - Relays
The AUX 1 relay is intended for control and customer specific requirements. The AUX 1 indicator is on while the
AUXILIARY 1 relay is operating.

AUX2 - Relays
The AUX 2 relay is intended for control and customer specific requirements. The AUX 2 indicator is on while the
AUXILIARY 2 relay is operating.

AUX3 - Relays
The AUX 3 relay is intended for control and customer specific requirements. The AUX 3 indicator is on while the
AUXILIARY 3 relay is operating.

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9.2.4.6 Keys - Front Panel


The Front Panel Keys allow the user to enter and access the PQM. Refer to Figure 9-6.

ACTUAL

STORE

SETPOINT

RESET

MESSAGE

VALUE

ES1268_01
Figure 9-6: Front Panel Keys

Setpoint - Key
Setpoints are arranged into groups of related messages called setpoint pages. Each time the SETPOINT key is
pressed, the display advances to the first message of the next page of setpoints. Pressing the SETPOINT key
while in the middle of a setpoints page advances the display to the beginning of the next page. The MESSAGE UP/
DOWN keys are used to move between messages within a page.

Actual - Key
Measured values and collected data messages are arranged into groups of related messages called actual values
pages. Each time the ACTUAL key is pressed, the display advances to the first message of the next page of actual
values. Pressing the ACTUAL key while in the middle of a page of actual values advances the display to the beginning of the next page. The MESSAGE UP/DOWN keys are used to move between messages within a page.

Store - Key
When programming setpoints, enter the new value using the VALUE UP/DOWN keys, followed by the STORE key.
Setpoint programming must be enabled for the STORE key to store the edited value. An acknowledgment message will flash if the new setpoint is successfully saved in non-volatile memory. The STORE key is also used to add
and remove user defined default messages.

Reset - Key

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The RESET key is used to clear the latched alarm and/or auxiliary conditions. Upon pressing the key, the PQM will
perform the appropriate action based on the condition present as shown in the Table 9-18.
Condition Present

Message Displayed

None

PQM Action Performed


no action taken

Alarm

Reset not possible, alarm


still present.

ALARM indicators and


alarm relay remain on
because condition is
still present.

Aux relay

Reset not possible, AUX


condition exists.

AUXILIARY indicator(s) and aux relay(s)


remain on because
condition is still
present.

Alarm and Aux relay

Reset not possible, alarm


still present.

AUXILIARY and ALARM


indicators and alarm
and aux relays remain
on because condition is
still present.

Latched alarm (condition no longer


exists)

no message displayed, and ALARM


indicators and the
alarm relay turned off

Latched aux relay


(condition no longer
exists)

no message displayed, and AUXILIARY


indicator and the
appropriate aux
relay(s) turned off

alarm and latched


aux relay (aux condition no longer exists)

no message displayed, and appropriate AUXILIARY


indicator(s) and aux
relay(s) turned off

aux relay and


latched alarm (alarm
condition no longer
exists)

no message displayed, and ALARM


indicators and alarm
relay turned off.

Table 9-18: PQM Indications and Information

The RESET key, along with the STORE key, is also used to remove user defined fault messages.

Message Up/Down/Left/Right
To move between message groups within a page use the MESSAGE UP/DOWN keys. The MESSAGE DOWN key
moves toward the end of the page and the MESSAGE UP key moves toward the beginning of the page. A page
header message will appear at the beginning of each page and a page footer message will appear at the end of
each page. To select messages within a subgroup press MESSAGE RIGHT. To back out of the subgroup, press
MESSAGE LEFT to access the previous message or MESSAGE DOWN to go to the next subgroup. Refer to Figure 9-7.

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SETPOINT

SETPOINT

]]SETPOINTS
]]S1 PQM SETUP

MESSAGE

MESSAGE

]]SETPOINTS
]]S2 SYSTEM SETUP

M
E
S
S
A
G
E

MOVES BACK
WITHIN SUBGROUP

MOVES FOR W ARD


WITHIN SUBGROUP

MESSAGE 

MOVES TO
PREVIOUS
SUBGROUP

] PREFERENCES
]

DEF AULT MESSAGE


1.0MINUTES

DEF AULT MESSAGE


BRIGHTNESS: 60%

MESSAGE 
MESSAGE

MESSAGE

TIME

MESSAGE

MOVES
TO NEXT
SUBGROUP

MESSAGE 

] COM1 RS485
] SERIAL POR T

MODBUS COMMUNICA TION


ADDRESS: 1
MESSAGE 

MESSAGE

MESSAGE

COM1 BAUD RA TE:


9600 BAUD
COM 1 PARITY:NONE

ES1269_01
Figure 9-7: Message Key Operation

Value Up/Down
Setpoint values are entered using the VALUE UP/DOWN keys. When a setpoint is displayed calling for a yes/no
response, each time VALUE UP or VALUE DOWN is pressed, is pressed, the Yes becomes a No, or the No
becomes a Yes. Similarly, for multiple choice selections, each time VALUE UP or VALUE DOWN is pressed, the
next choice is displayed. When numeric values are displayed, each time VALUE UP is pressed, the value
increases by the step increment, up to the maximum. Hold the key down to rapidly change the value.

9.2.4.7 Data Entry Methods


Keypad Entry

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Press the SETPOINT key once and the first page of setpoints is displayed. Press SETPOINT several times to
move to the top of successive pages. A header message with two bars in the first two character positions is the
start of a new page. The page number and page title appear on the second line. All setpoint page headers are
numbered with an 'S' prefix. Actual value page headers are numbered with an A prefix.
The messages are organized into logical subgroups within each Setpoints and Actual Values page as in seen Figure 9-8.

]]
]]

]
]

PAGE HEADER
MESSAGE

SUBGROUP HEADER
MESSAGE

MESSAGE WITHIN
SUBGROUP

ES1270_01

Figure 9-8: Data Entry Page Layout

Press the MESSAGE LEFT/RIGHT key when displaying a subgroup to access messages within that subgroup.
Otherwise select the MESSAGE UP/DOWN keys to display the next subgroup.

Computer Entry
When running PQMPC, setpoint values are grouped together on a screen. The data is organized in a system of
menus.

SCADA Entry
MOD-BUS COMMUNICATIONS. A SCADA system connected to the RS485 terminals can be custom programmed to make use of any of the communication commands for remote setpoint programming, monitoring, and
control.

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9.2.4.8 Programming
Setpoint Entry Methods
Prior to operating the PQM, it is necessary to enter setpoints defining system characteristics and alarm settings via
one of the following methods:
1. Front panel, using the keys and display.
2. Rear terminal RS485 port COM1 or COM2, or front RS232 port and a computer running the PQMPC communication program available from GE Power Management or from a SCADA system running user-written software.
Any of the above methods can be used to enter the same information. However, a computer makes entry considerably easier. Moreover, a computer allows setpoint files to be stored and downloaded for fast, error-free entry. To
facilitate this process, the PQMPC programming software is available from GE Power Management. With this software installed on a portable computer, all setpoints can be downloaded to the PQM.
Setpoint messages are organized into logical groups or pages for easy reference, refer to Figure 9-9. Messages
may vary some-what from those illustrated because of installed options. Also, some messages associated with disabled features are hidden. This context sensitive operation eliminates confusing detail. Before accurate monitoring
can begin, the setpoints on each page should be worked through, entering values either by local keypad or computer.

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SETPOINT

Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

SETPOINT

SETPOINT

]] SETPOINTS
]] S1 PQM SETUP

]] SETPOINTS
]] S2 SYSTEM SETUP

MESSAGE

SETPOINT

SETPOINT

]] SETPOINTS
]] S3 OUTPUT RELAYS

MESSAGE

]] SETPOINTS
]] S4 ALARMS/CONTROL

MESSAGE

]] SETPOINTS
]] S5 TESTING

MESSAGE

MESSAGE

] PREFERENCES
]

] CURRENT/VOLTAGE
] CONFIGURATION

] ALARM RELAY
]

] CURRENT/VOLTAGE
]

] TEST RELAYS & LEDS


]

] SETPOINT ACCESS
]

] ANALOG OUTPUT 1
]

] AUXILIARY RELAY 1
]

] TOTAL HARMONIC
] DISTORTION

] CURRENT/VOLTAGE
] SIMULATION

] COM 1 RS485
] SERIAL PORT

] ANALOG OUTPUT 2
]

] AUXILIARY RELAY 2
]

] FREQUENCY
]

] ANALOG OUTPUTS
] SIMULATION

] COM 2 RS485
] SERIAL PORT

] ANALOG OUTPUT 3
]

] AUXILIARY RELAY 3
]

] POWER
]

] ANALOG INPUT
] SIMULATION

] FRONT PANEL RS232


] SERIAL PORT

] ANALOG OUTPUT 4
]

] POWER FACTOR
]

] SWITCH INPUTS
] SIMULATION

] DNP 3.0
] CONFIGURATION

] ANALOG INPUT
]

] DEMAND
]

] FACTORY
] USE ONLY

] CLOCK
]

] SWITCH INPUT A
]

] PULSE INPUT
]

] CALCULATION
] PARAMETERS

] SWITCH INPUT B
]

] TIME
]

] CLEAR DATA
]

] SWITCH INPUT C
]

] MISCELLANEOUS
]

] EVENT
] RECORDER

] SWITCH INPUT D
]

] TRACE MEMORY
]

] PULSE OUTPUT
]

] PROGRAMMABLE
] MESSAGE

] PULSE INPUT
]

] PRODUCT OPTIONS
]

] DATA LOGGER
]

ES1271_01

Figure 9-9: Setpoint Message Organization

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9.2.4.9 PQM Setup


Settings to configure the PQM itself are entered on this page. This includes user preferences, the RS485 and
RS232 communication ports, loading of factory defaults, and user programmable messages.
A. Preferences, refer to Figure 9-10.

SETPOINT

]] SETPOINTS
]] S1 PQM SETUP

]] SETPOINTS
]] S2 SYSTEM SETUP

MESSAGE
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] PREFERENCES
]
MESSAGE

DEFAULT MESSAGE TIME


1.0 MINUTES
DEFAULT MESSAGE
BRIGHTNESS: 60%

MESSAGE

MESSAGE

DISPLAY FILTER
CONSTANT: 4

Range: 0.1 to 120.0, OFF


Step: 0.1 min.
Range: 0 to 100%
Step: 20%
Range: 1 to 10
Step: 1

ES1272_01

Figure 9-10: PQM Setup

Default Message Time

Up to 10 default messages can be selected to automatically scan sequentially when the PQM is left unattended. If
no keys are pressed for the default message time set with this setpoint, then the currently displayed message is
automatically overwritten by the first default message. After 3 seconds, the next default message in the sequence
displays if more than one is selected. Alarm messages always override the default message display. Note that any
setpoint or measured value can be selected as a default message.

Default Message Brightness

The brightness of the displayed messages can be varied with this setpoint. This brightness will be used when the
default messages are being displayed. The brightness defaults back to 100% when:

an alarm is present.

any one of the keys on the PQM keypad is pressed.

the PQM is turned off and on.

a text display message is sent through the serial port.

When DEFAULT MESSAGE TIME is set to OFF, the brightness adjusts to the programmed level after 5 minutes
have elapsed, since the PQM keys were last pressed assuming no alarm is present. If no default messages are
programmed, the currently message remains displayed and the display brightness adjusts to the programmed level
after the programmed time in the DEFAULT MESSAGE TIME setpoint has elapsed.

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Display Filter Constant

Display filtering may be required in applications where large fluctuations in currents and/or voltages are normally
present. This setpoint allows the user to enter the PQM filter constant to average all metered values. If the DISPLAY FILTER CONSTANT setpoint is set to 1, the PQM updates the displayed metered values approximately
every 400ms. Therefore, the display updating equals DISPLAY FILTER CONSTANT * 400ms.
B. Setpoint Access, refer to Figure 9-11.

SETPOINT

]] SETPOINTS
]] S1 PQM SETUP

]] SETPOINTS
]] S2 SYSTEM SETUP

] PREFERENCES
]
MESSAGE
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] SETPOINT ACCESS
]
MESSAGE

Range: DISABLE, ENABLE

SETPOINT ACCESS:
DISABLE
MESSAGE

ENTER SETPOINT
ACCESS CODE:

Range: 1 to 999
Step: 1

MESSAGE

SETPOINT ACCESS ON
FOR:
5 min.

Range: 1 to 300 min. or UNLIMITED


Step: 1

CHANGE SETPOINT
ACCESS CODE:
NO
ENTER NEW ACCESS
CODE:
0
RE-ENTER NEW ACCESS
CODE:
0

Range: NO, YES


Range: 1 to 999
Step: 1
Range: 1 to 999
Step: 1

ENCRYPTED ACCESS
CODE:
376
ES1273_01

Figure 9-11: PQM Setup/Setpoint

To enable setpoint access, follow the steps as outlined in Figure 9-12:

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STORE

STORE

SETPOINT ACCESS:
ENABLE

ENTER SETPOINT
ACCESS CODE:

SETPOINT ACCESS ON
FOR:
5 min.

1
CORRECT
CODE

INCORRECT
CODE

INCORRECT CODE

Figure 9-12: Setpoint Access

The factory default access code for the PQM is 1.


If three attempts are made to enable the SETPOINT ACCESS with an incorrect code, the setpoint access setpoint
will change to DISABLED and the above procedure must be repeated.
Once setpoint access is enabled, the PROGRAM status indicator turns on. Setpoint alterations are allowed as long
as the PROGRAM status indicator remains on. Setpoint access is be disabled and the PROGRAM status indicator
turns off when:

The time programmed in S1 PQM SETUP \ SETPOINT ACCESS \ SETPOINT ACCESS ON


FOR is reached

The control power to the PQM is removed

The factory setpoints are reloaded

To permanently enable the setpoint access feature, enable setpoint access and then set SETPOINT ACCESS ON
FOR to UNLIMITED. Setpoint access remains enabled even if the control power is removed from the PQM.

NOTICE
Setpoints can be changed via the serial ports regardless of the state of the setpoint access feature or the state of an input switch assigned to setpoint access.
To change the setpoint access code, enable setpoint access and perform the steps as outlined in Figure 9-13.

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STORE

CHANGE SETPOINT
ACCESS CODE: YES

STORE

ENTER SETPOINT
ACCESS CODE:

RE-ENTER SETPOINT
ACCESS CODE:
4

ES1275_01

Figure 9-13: Changing Setpoint Access Code

If an attempt is made to change a setpoint when setpoint access is disabled, the SETPOINT ACCESS: DISABLED
message is displayed to allow setpoint access to be enabled. Once setpoint access has been enabled, the PQM
display will return to the original setpoint message.
If the control option is installed and one of the switches is assigned to SETPOINT ACCESS, the setpoint access
switch and the software setpoint access will act as a logic AND. That is, both conditions must be satisfied before
setpoint access will be enabled. Assuming the setpoint access switch activation is set to closed, the flash messages in Table 9-19 will appear depending upon the condition present when the store key is pressed.
Conditions

Message Displayed

Access Code

Switch Input

Incorrect

Open

Setpoint access off,


enter access code.

Incorrect

Closed

Setpoint access off,


enter access code.

Correct

Open

Correct

Closed

Cannot alter setting,


access switch disabled.
New setpoint stored.

Table 9-19: Flash Messages

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C. PQM Setup/Communication Ports, refer to Figure 9-14.

SETPOINT

]] SETPOINTS
]] S1 PQM SETUP

]] SETPOINTS
]] S2 SYSTEM SETUP

] PREFERENCES
]
] SETPOINT ACCESS
]

MESSAGE

] COM1 RS485
] SERIAL PORT

MODBUS COMMUNICATION
ADDRESS:
1

Range: 1 to 255; Step 1


Range: 1200, 2400, 4800,
9600, 19200

COM1 BAUD RATE:


9600 BAUD

MESSAGE
MESSAGE

Range: NONE, EVEN,


ODD

COM1 PARITY: NONE

MESSAGE

] COM2 RS485
] SERIAL PORT

COM2 BAUD RATE:


9600 BAUD
COM2 PARITY: NONE

MESSAGE

Range: 1200, 2400, 4800,


9600, 19200
Range: NONE, EVEN,
ODD

MESSAGE

MESSAGE

] FRONT PANEL RS232


] SERIAL PORT

RS232 BAUD RATE:


9600 BAUD
RS232 PARITY: NONE

Range: 1200, 2400, 4800,


9600, 19200
Range: NONE, EVEN,
ODD

ES1277_01

Figure 9-14: RS484/RS232 Serial Ports

MODBUS Communication Address

Enter a unique address from 1 to 255 for the PQM. The selected address is used for all three serial communication
ports. A message sent with an address 0 is a broadcast message to which all PQMs will listen but not respond.
Although addresses do not have to be sequential, no two PQMs can have the same address or there will be conflicts resulting in errors. Generally, each PQM added to the link will use the next higher address, starting from
address 1.

Baud Rate

Enter the baud rate for each port: 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, or 19200 baud. All PQMs and the computer on the
RS485 communication link must run at the same baud rate. The fastest response is obtained at 19200 baud. Use
slower baud rates if noise becomes a problem. The data frame consists of 1start bit, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit and a
programmable parity bit. The BAUD RATE default setting is 9600.

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Parity

Enter the parity for each communication port: EVEN, ODD, or NONE. All PQMs on the RS485 communication link
and the computer connecting them must have the same parity.
D. PQM Setup/DNP Communications, refer to Figure 9-15.

SETPOINT

]] SETPOINTS
]] S1 PQM SETUP

]] SETPOINTS
]] S2 SYSTEM SETUP

] PREFERENCES
]
] SETPOINT ACCESS
]
] COM1 RS485
] SERIAL PORT
] COM2 RS485
] SERIAL PORT
] FRONT PANEL RS232
] SERIAL PORT
MESSAGE
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] DNP 3.0
] CONFIGURATION

Range: NONE, RS232,


COM1, COM2

DNP PORT: NONE


DNP SLAVE ADDRESS:
0

DNP TURNAROUND TIME:


0 ms

ES1278_01

Range: 0 to 255; Step 1


Range 0 to 100 ms; Step 10

Figure 9-15: PQM Setup / DNP Communications

DNP Port

Select the appropriate PQM port to be used for DNP protocol. The COM2 selection is only available if T1 or T20
option is installed in the PQM. Each port is configured as shown in Figure 9-14: SETPOINTS PAGE 1 - PQM
SETUP / COMMUNICATION PORTS .

DNP Slave Address

Enter a unique address from 0 to 255 for this particular PQM. The address selected is applied to the PQM port currently assigned to communicate using the DNP protocol. Although addresses do not have to be sequential, no two
PQMs that are daisy chained together can have the same address or there will be conflicts resulting in errors. Generally each PQM added to the link will use the next higher address.

DNP Turnaround Time

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Set the turnaround time to zero if the RS232 port is being used. The turn-around time is useful in applications
where the RS485 converter without RTS or DTR switching is being employed. A typical value for the delay is 30 ms
to allow the transmitter to drop in the RS485 convertor.
E. PQM Setup/Clock, refer to Figure 9-16.

SETPOINT

]] SETPOINTS
]] S1 PQM SETUP

]] SETPOINTS
]] S2 SYSTEM SETUP

] PREFERENCES
]
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] FRONT PANEL RS232


] SERIAL PORT
] DNP 3.0
] CONFIGURATION
MESSAGE
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] CLOCK
]

SET TIME hh:mm:ss


12:00:00 am
DATE->
SET DATE mm:dd:yyyy
Jan 01, 1996

ES1281_01

Figure 9-16: PQM Setup/Clock

Set Time/Date

These messages are used to set the time and date for the PQM software clock.
The PQM software clock retains an accurate time for power interruptions lasting up to one hour. A CLOCK NOT
SET alarm can be enabled so that an alarm will occur on the loss of clock data. The time and date are used for all
time-stamped data. If the clock has not been set, a "?" will appear on the right-hand side of the displayed time for
all time-stamped data. Follow the steps shown below to set the new time and date. See Figure 9-17.

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MESSAGE

SET TIME hh:mm:ss


12:00:00 am
DATE->

MESSAGE

SET TIME hh:mm:ss


03:00:00 am
DATE->

SET TIME hh:mm:ss


03:35:00 am DATE->

VALUE
MESSAGE

USE THE VALUE


KEYS TO SELECT
THE UNDERLINED
QUANTITIES

STORE

MESSAGE

SET DATE mm:dd:yyyy


Jan 01, 1996

NEW TIME
HAS BEEN STORED

SET TIME hh:mm:ss


03:35:55 am
DATE->

MESSAGE
MESSAGE

SET DATE mm:dd:yyyy


Oct 01, 1996

STORE

SET DATE mm:dd:yyyy


Jan 01, 1997

NEW DATE
HAS BEEN STORED

ES1279_01

Figure 9-17: Set Time/Date

9.2.4.10 Metering Quantities and Demand


The PQM can be programmed to calculate metering quantities and demand by various methods.

SETPOINT

]] SETPOINTS
]] S1 PQM SETUP

]] SETPOINTS
]] S2 SYSTEM SETUP

] PREFERENCES
]
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] CLOCK
]

MESSAGE

EXTRACT FUNDAMENTAL:
DISABLE

] CALCULATION
] PARAMETERS

Range: ENABLE, DISABLE

CURRENT DEMAND TYPE:


THERMAL EXPONENTIAL

Range:THERMAL EXPONENTIAL, ROLLIN


INTERVAL, BLOCK INTERVAL

CURRENT DEMAND TIME


INTERVAL: 30 min

Range: 5 to 180 min.; Step: 1 m

POWER DEMAND TYPE:


THERMAL EXPONENTIAL

Range:THERMAL EXPONENTIAL, ROL


INTERVAL, BLOCK INTERVAL

POWER DEMAND TIME


INTERVAL: 30 min

Range: 0 to 180 min.; Step:

ENERGY COST PER kWh:


10.00 cents
TARIFF PERIOD 1
START TIME:
0 min.

Range: 0.01 to 500.00 cents


Step: 0.01 cents
Range: 0 to 1439 min.; Ste

TARIFF PERIOD 1 COST


PER MWH: 10.00 cents

Range: 0.01 to 500.00 cen


Step: 0.01 cents

TARIFF PERIOD 2
START TIME:
0 min.

Range: 0 to 1439 min.;

TARIFF PERIOD 2 COST


PER MWH: 10.00 cents
ES1282_01

TARIFF PERIOD 3
START TIME:
0 min.
TARIFF PERIOD 3 COST
PER MWH: 10.00 cents

Range: 0.01 to 500.00


Step: 0.01 cents
Range: 0 to 1439 min.
Step: 1 min.
Range: 0.01 to 500.
Step: 0.01 cents

Figure 9-18: PQM Setup / Calculation Parameters

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Miscellaneous Electrical

A. Extract Fundamental
The PQM can be programmed to calculate all metering quantities using true RMS values or the fundamental component of the sampled data. When this setpoint is set to DISABLE, the PQM will include all harmonic content, up to
the 32nd harmonic, when making metering calculations. When this setpoint is set to ENABLE, the PQM will extract
the fundamental contribution of the sampled data only and use this contribution to calculate all metering quantities.
Many utilities base their metering upon fundamental, or displacement, values. Using the fundamental contribution
allows one to compare the quantities measured by the PQM with the local utility meter.
B. Demand
The PQM calculates demand using the three methods described in Figure 9-19.

METHOD

DESCRIPTION

Thermal
Exponential

This selection emulates the action of an analog peak-recording thermal demand meter.
The PQM measures the average quantity (RMS current, real power, reactive power, or
apparent power) on each phase every minute and assumes the circuit quantity remains
at this value until updated by the next measurement. It calculates the "thermal demand
equivalent" based on the following equation:

d (t ) = D ( 1 e

kt

) d = demand value after applying input quantity for time t (in min.)

D = input quantity (constant)


k = 2.3 / thermal 90% response time

Demand (%)

100
80
60
40
20
0

12

15

18

21

24

27

30

Time (min)
The above graph shows the thermal response characteristic for a thermal 90% response
time of 15 minutes. A setpoint establishes the time to reach 90% of a steady-state value,
just as the response time of an analog instrument (a steady-state value applied for twice
the response time will indicate 99% of the value).
Block Interval This selection calculates a linear average of the quantity (RMS current, real power,
reactive power, or apparent power) over the programmed demand TIME INTERVAL. Each
new value of demand becomes available at the end of each time interval.
Rolling
Demand

This selection calculates a linear average of the quantity (RMS current, real power,
reactive power, or apparent power) over the programmed demand TIME INTERVAL (in the
same way as Block Interval). The value is updated every minute and indicates the
demand over the time interval just preceding the time of update.

ES1354_01
Figure 9-19: Demand

C. Current Demand Type


Three current demand calculation methods are available: thermal exponential, block interval, and rolling demand,
refer to Figure 9-19. The current demand for each phase and neutral is calculated individually.
D. Current Demand Time Interval

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Enter the time period over which the current demand calculation is to be performed.
E. Power Demand Type
Three phase real/reactive/apparent power demand calculation methods are available: thermal exponential, block
interval, and rolling demand (see Figure 9-19). The three phase real/reactive/apparent power demand is calculated.
F. Power Demand Time Interval
Enter the time period over which the power demand calculation is to be performed.
G. Energy Cost Per KWh
Enter the cost per KWh that is charged by the local utility.
H. Tariff Period Start Time
Enter the start time for each of the three tariff period calculations.
I. Tariff Period Cost Per MWH
Enter the cost per MWh for each of the three tariff periods.

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Miscellaneous Electrical

9.2.4.11 Clear Data


SETPOINT

]] SETPOINTS
]] S1 PQM SETUP

]] SETPOINTS
]] S2 SYSTEM SETUP

] PREFERENCES
]

] CALCULATION
] PARAMETERS
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

MESSAGE

CLEAR ENERGY
VALUES: NO

] CLEAR DATA
]

Range: YES, NO

CLEAR MAX DEMAND


VALUES: NO
CLEAR ALL DEMAND
VALUES: NO
CLEAR MIN/MAX
CURRENT VALUES: NO

Range: YES, NO

Range: YES, NO

Range: YES, NO

CLEAR MIN/MAX
VOLTAGE VALUES: NO
CLEAR MIN/MAX
POWER VALUES: NO

Range: YES, NO

Range: YES, NO

Range: YES, NO

CLEAR MIN/MAX
FREQUENCY VALUES: NO

Range: YES, NO

CLEAR MAX THD


VALUES: NO

Range: YES, NO

CLEAR PULSE INPUT


VALUES: NO
CLEAR EVENT RECORD:
NO
LOAD FACTORY DEFAULT
SETPOINTS: NO

Range: YES, NO

Range: YES, NO

ES1355_01

Figure 9-20: PQM Setup - Clear Data

A. Clear Energy Values


Enter YES to clear all the energy used data under the actual values subgroup A1 METERING \ ENERGY. The
TIME OF LAST RESET date under the same subgroup is updated to the current date upon issuing this command.
B. Clear Max Demand Values
Enter YES to clear all the max power and current demand data under the actual values subgroup A1 METERING \
DEMAND. The time and date associated with each message will be updated to the current date upon issuing this
command.

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C. Clear All Demand Values


Enter YES to clear all the power and current demand data under the actual values subgroup A1 METERING \
DEMAND. The time and date associated with each message will be updated to the current date upon issuing this
command.
D. Clear Min/Max Current Values
Enter YES to clear all the min./max current data under the actual values subgroup A1 METERING \ CURRENT.
The time and date associated with each message will be updated to the current date upon issuing this command.
E. Clear Min/Max Voltage Values
Enter YES to clear all the min./max voltage data under the actual values subgroup A1 METERING \ VOLTAGE.
The time and date associated with each message will be updated to the current date upon issuing this command.
F. Clear Min/Max Power Values
Enter YES to clear all the min./max power data under the actual values subgroup A1 METERING \ POWER. The
time and date associated with each message will be updated to the current date upon issuing this command.
G. Clear Min/Max Frequency Values
Enter YES to clear all the min./max frequency data under the actual values subgroup A1 METERING \ FREQUENCY. The time and date associated with each message will be updated to the current date upon issuing this
command.
H. Clear Max Thd Values
Enter YES to clear all the max THD data under the actual values subgroup A3 POWER ANALYSIS \ TOTAL HARMONIC DISTORTION. The time and date associated with each message will be updated to the current date upon
issuing this command.
I. Clear Pulse Input Values
Enter YES to clear all the pulse input values under the actual values subgroup A1 METERING \ PULSE INPUT.
The time and date associated with this message will be updated to the current date upon issuing this command.
J. Clear Event Record
Enter YES to clear all of the events in the Event Record. This will eliminate all previous events from the Event
Record and create a CLEAR EVENTS event as the new event number 1. The Event Recorder can be cleared only
if it is enabled in S1 PQM SETUP \ EVENT RECORDER \ EVENT RECORDER OPERATION.
K. Load Factory Default Setpoints
When the PQM is shipped from the factory all setpoints will be set to factory default values. These settings are
shown in the setpoint message reference figures. To return a PQM to these known setpoints select YES and press
the STORE key while this message is displayed. The display will then warn that all setpoints will be lost and will
ask whether to continue. Select yes again to reload the setpoints. It is a good idea to first load factory defaults
when replacing a PQM to ensure all the settings are defaulted to reasonable values.

9.2.4.12 Event Recorder


A. Event Recorder Operation

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Miscellaneous Electrical

SETPOINT

]] SETPOINTS
]] S1 PQM SETUP

]] SETPOINTS
]] S2 SYSTEM SETUP

] PREFERENCES
]

] CLEAR DATA
]

MESSAGE
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

EVENT RECORDER
OPERATION: DISABLE

] EVENT RECORDER
]

Range: ENABLE, DISABLE

ES1356_01
Figure 9-21: PQM Setup - Event Recorder

The Event Recorder can be disabled or enabled using this setpoint. When the Event Recorder is disabled no new
events are recorded. When the Event Recorder is enabled new events are recorded with the 40 most recent events
displayed in A3 POWER ANALYSIS \ EVENT RECORDER. All data within the Event Recorder is stored in non-volatile memory.

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9.2.4.13 Monitoring
Actual Values Viewing - Page 1
Any measured value can be displayed on demand using the ACTUAL key, refer to Figure 9-22. Each time the
ACTUAL key is pressed, the beginning of a new page of monitored values is displayed. These are grouped as A1
METERING, A2 STATUS, A3 POWER ANALYSIS, and A4 PRODUCT INFO. Use the MESSAGE keys in the
same fashion to move between actual value messages. A detailed description of each displayed message in these
groups is given in the sections that follow.

ACTUAL

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A1 METERING

ACTUAL

ACTUAL

ACTUAL

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A2 STATUS

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A3 POWER ANALYSIS

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A4 PRODUCT INFO

MESSAGE

MESSAGE

MESSAGE

MESSAGE

] CURRENT
]

] ALARMS
]

] POWER QUALITY
] VALUES

] SOFTWARE VERSIONS
]

] VOLTAGE
]

] SWITCHES
]

] TOTAL HARMONIC
] DISTORTION

] MODEL INFORMATION
]

] PHASORS
]

] CLOCK
]

] DATA LOGGER
]

] POWER
]

] PROGRAMMABLE
] MESSAGE

] EVENT RECORDER
]

] ENERGY
]
] DEMAND
]
] FREQUENCY
]
] PULSE INPUT
] COUNTERS
] ANALOG INPUT
]

ES1357_01
Figure 9-22: Actual Values Message Organization

A. Actual Values: Metering/Current

A: B: C: Current

Refer to Figure 9-23. Displays the current in each phase corresponding to the A, B, and C phase inputs. Current
will be measured correctly only if the CT PRIMARY is entered to match the installed CT primary and the CT secondary is wired to match the 1 or 5 A input. If the displayed current does not match the actual current, check this
setpoint and wiring.

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ACTUAL

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A1 METERING

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A2 STATUS

MESSAGE
MESSAGE

MESSAGE

] CURRENT
]

A = 100
C = 100

B = 100
AMPS

Iavg=
Vavg=

100 AMPS
120 V L-N

NEUTRAL CURRENT =
0 AMPS
CURRENT UNBALANCE =
0.0%
Ia MIN = 100 AMPS
12:00:00am 01/01/95
Ib MIN = 100 AMPS
12:00:00am 01/01/95
Ic MIN = 100 AMPS
12:00:00am 01/01/95
In MIN = 100 AMPS
12:00:00am 01/01/95
I U/B MIN = 0.0%
12:00:00am 01/01/95
Ia MAX = 100 AMPS
12:00:00am 01/01/95
ES1283_01

Ib MAX = 100 AMPS


12:00:00am 01/01/95
Ic MAX = 100 AMPS
12:00:00am 01/01/95
In MAX = 100 AMPS
12:00:00am 01/01/95
I U/B MAX = 0.0%
12:00:00am 01/01/95

Figure 9-23: Actual Values - Metering/Current

Iavg/Vavg

Displays the average of the three phase currents and three voltages is displayed in this message. This line is not
visible if the VT WIRING setpoint is set to SINGLE PHASE DIRECT. L-N is displayed when VT WIRING is set to 4
WIRE WYE (3 VTs), 4 WIRE WYE DIRECT, 4 WIRE WYE (2 VTs), or 3 WIRE DIRECT. L-L is displayed when VT
WIRING is set to 3 WIRE DELTA (2 VTs).

Neutral Current

Neutral current can be determined by two methods. One method measures the current via the neutral CT input.
The second calculates the neutral current based on the three phase currents; using the instantaneous samples, I a
+ I b + I c = I n . If the sum of the phase currents does not equal 0, the result is the neutral current. When using the
CT input, the neutral current reading will be correct only if the CT is wired correctly and the correct neutral CT primary value is entered. Verify neutral current by connecting a clamp-on ammeter around all 3 phases. If the neutral
current appears incorrect, check the settings in S2 SYSTEM SETUP \CURRENT/VOLTAGE CONFIGURATION
and verify the CT wiring.

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Current Unbalance

Displays the percentage of current unbalance. Current unbalance is calculated as:

Im - Iav x 100%
Iav
Equation

Where:
Iav = average phase current = ( Ia + Ib + Ic) / 3
Im = current in phase with maximum deviation from Iav

NOTICE
Even though it is possible to achieve unbalance greater than 100% with the above formula, the
PQM will limit unbalance readings to 100%.
If the average current is below 10% of the CT PRIMARY setpoint, the unbalance reading is forced to 0%. This
avoids nuisance alarms when the system is lightly loaded. If the simulation currents are being used, the unbalance
is never forced to 0%.

Ia, Ib, Ic, ln Minimum

The minimum current magnitudes as well as the time and date at which these minimum values were measured are
displayed in these messages. This information is stored in non-volatile memory and will be retained during a loss of
control power. The setpoint S1: PQM SETUP\CLEAR DATA\CLEAR MIN/MAX CURRENT VALUES is used to
clear this value.

I U/B Minimum

Displays the minimum current unbalance and the time and date of its measurement. This information is stored in
non-volatile memory and is retained during loss of control power. The S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR
MIN/MAX CURRENT VALUES setpoint clears this value.

Ia, Ib, Ic, In Maximum

Displays the maximum current magnitudes and the time and date of their occurrence.
This information is stored in non-volatile memory and is retained during loss of control power. The S1 PQM SETUP
\ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR MIN/MAX CURRENT VALUES setpoint clears these values.

I U/B Maximum

Displays the maximum current unbalance and the time and date of its measurement. This information is stored in
non-volatile memory and is retained during loss of control power. The S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR
MIN/MAX CURRENT VALUES setpoint command clears this value.
B. Actual Values: Metering/ Voltage

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ACTUAL

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A1 METERING

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A2 STATUS

MESSAGE
MESSAGE

MESSAGE

Van = 120
Vcn = 120

] VOLTAGE
]

Iavg=
Vavg=

Vbn = 120
V
100 AMPS
120 V
L-N

AVERAGE LINE
VOLTAGE =
208 V
VOLTAGE UNBALANCE =
0.0%
Van MIN =
12:00:00am

100 V
01/01/95

Vbn MIN =
12:00:00am

100 V
01/01/95

Vcn MIN =
12:00:00am

100 V
01/01/95

Vab MIN =
12:00:00am

173 V
01/01/95

Vbc MIN =
12:00:00am

173 V
01/01/95

Vca MIN =
12:00:00am

173 V
01/01/95

V U/B MIN =
0.0%
12:00:00am 01/01/95
Van MAX =
12:00:00am

140 V
01/01/95

Vbn MAX =
12:00:00am

140 V
01/01/95

Vcn MAX =
12:00:00am

ES1285_01

140 V
01/01/95

Vab MAX =
12:00:00am

242 V
01/01/95

Vbc MAX =
12:00:00am

242 V
01/01/95

Vca MAX =
12:00:00am

242 V
01/01/95

V U/B MAX =
5.1%
12:00:00am 01/01/95

Figure 9-24: Actual Values - Metering / Voltage

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Van, Vbn, Vcn, Voltage

Displays each phase voltage corresponding to the A, B, and C voltage inputs. This voltage will be measured correctly only if the VT RATIO, VT NOMINAL SECONDARY, and VOLTAGE WIRING setpoint values match the
installed VTs. If the displayed voltage does not match the actual voltage, check the setpoints and wiring. This message appears only if the VT WIRING is configured for a wye input.

Iavg/Vavg

Displays the average of the three phase currents/ voltages. This value is not visible if the VT WIRING setpoint is
set to SINGLE PHASE DIRECT. L-N is displayed when VT WIRING is set to 4 WIRE WYE (3 VTs), 4 WIRE WYE
DIRECT, 4 WIRE WYE (2 VTs), or 3 WIRE DIRECT and L-L is displayed when VT WIRING is set to 3 WIRE
DELTA (2 VTs).

Vab, Vbc, Vca, Voltage

Displays each line voltage corresponding to the A, B, and C voltage inputs. The measured voltage is correct only if
the VT RATIO, VT NOMINAL SECONDARY, and VOLTAGE WIRING setpoints match the installed VTs. If the displayed voltage does not match the actual voltage, check the setpoints and wiring.

Average Line Voltage

Displays the average of the three line voltages. This value is not visible if the VT WIRING setpoint is set to SINGLE
PHASE DIRECT.

Voltage Underbalance

Displays the percentage voltage unbalance. Voltage unbalance is calculated as shown below. If the VOLTAGE
WIRING is configured for a WYE input, voltage unbalance is calculated using phase quantities. If the VT WIRING
is configured as a DELTA input, voltage unbalance is calculated using line voltages.

Vm - Vav x 100%
Vav
Equation2

Where:
Vav = average phase voltage = (Van + Vbn + Vcn) / 3 for WYE and 3 WIRE DIRECT connections.
or
Vav = average line voltage (Vab + Vbc + Vca) / 3 for 3 WIRE DELTA/2 VTs connection.
Vm = voltage in a phase (or line) with maximum deviation from Vav.

NOTICE
Even though it is possible to achieve unbalance greater than 100% with the above formula, the
PQM will limit unbalance readings to 100%.

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Miscellaneous Electrical

If the average voltage is below 10% of VT RATIO VT NOMINAL SECONDARY VOLTAGE for 3 WIRE DELTA/2
VTs, 4 WIRE WYE/3 VTs, and 4 WIRE WYE/2 VTs connections, or below 10% of VT RATIO NOMINAL DIRECT
INPUT VOLTAGE for 4 WIRE WYE/DIRECT and 3 WIRE DIRECT connections, the unbalance reading is forced to
0%. This is implemented to avoid nuisance alarms when the system is lightly loaded. If the simulation voltages are
being used, the unbalance is never forced to 0%.

Van, Vbn, Vcn Minimum

Displays the minimum phase voltage magnitudes and the time and date of their occurrence. This information is
stored in non-volatile memory and is retained during loss of control power. The S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \
CLEAR MIN/MAX VOLTAGE VALUES setpoint clears these values.

Vab, Vbc, Vca Minimum

Displays the minimum line voltage magnitudes and the time and date of their occurrence. This information is stored
in non-volatile memory and is retained during loss of control power. The S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR
MIN/ MAX VOLTAGE VALUES setpoint clears these values.

V U/B Minimum

Displays minimum voltage unbalance and the time and date of its measurement. This information is stored in nonvolatile memory and is retained during loss of control power. This value is cleared with the S1 PQM SETUP \
CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR MIN/MAX VOLTAGE VALUES setpoint.

Van, Vbn, Vcn Maximum

Displays the maximum phase voltage magnitudes and the time and date of their occurrence. This information is
stored in non-volatile memory and is retained during loss of control power. The S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \
CLEAR MIN/MAX VOLTAGE VALUES setpoint clears these values.

Vab, Vbc, Vca Maximum

Displays the maximum line voltage magnitudes and the time and date of their occurrence. This information is
stored in non-volatile memory and is retained during loss of control power. The S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \
CLEAR MIN/ MAX VOLTAGE VALUES setpoint clears these values.

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V U/B Maximum

Displays the maximum voltage unbalance and the time and date of its measurement. This information is stored in
non-volatile memory and is retained during loss of control power. The value is cleared with the S1 PQM SETUP \
CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR MIN/MAX VOLTAGE VALUES setpoint.
C. Actual Values: Power

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A1 METERING
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

MESSAGE

] POWER
]

THREE PHASE REAL


POWER =
1000 kW
THREE PHASE REACTIVE
POWER =
120 kvar
THREE PHASE APPARENT
POWER =
1007 kVA
THREE PHASE POWER
FACTOR =
0.99 LAG
PHASE A REAL
POWER =
1000 kW
PHASE A REACTIVE
POWER =
120 kvar
PHASE A APPARENT
POWER =
1007 kVA
PHASE A POWER FACTOR
=
0.99 LAG
PHASE B REAL
POWER =
1000 kW
PHASE B REACTIVE
POWER =
120 kvar
PHASE B APPARENT
POWER =
1007 kVA
PHASE B POWER FACTOR
=
0.99 LAG
PHASE C REAL
POWER =
1000 kW
PHASE C REACTIVE
POWER =
1000 kW
PHASE C APPARENT
POWER =
1000 kW
PHASE C POWER FACTOR
=
0.99 LAG

CONTINUED ON
NEXT PAGE

THREE PHASE REAL


POWER =
10.00 MW
ES1287_01

Figure 9-25: Actual Values: Power (Sheet 1 of 3)

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CONTINUED FROM
PREVIOUS PAGE

Miscellaneous Electrical

THREE PHASE REACTIVE


POWER = 1.20 Mvar
THREE PHASE APPARENT
POWER = 10.07 MVA
3
kW MIN =
12:00:00am

1000
01/01/95

3
kvar MIN =
120
12:00:00am
01/01/95
3
kVA MIN =
1007
12:00:00am
01/01/95
MESSAGE

3
PF MIN =
12:00:00am

MESSAGE

0.99 LAG
01/01/95

3
kW MAX =
12:00:00am

1000
01/01/95

3
kvar MAX =
120
12:00:00am
01/01/95
3
PF MAX =
12:00:00am
A
kW MIN =
12:00:00am

0.99 LAG
01/01/95
1000
01/01/95

A
kvar MIN =
120
12:00:00am
01/01/95
A
kVA MIN =
1007
12:00:00am
01/01/95
A
PF MIN =
12:00:00am
A
kW MAX =
12:00:00am

0.99 LAG
01/01/95
1000
01/01/95

A
kvar MAX =
120
12:00:00am
01/01/95
A
kVA MAX =
1007
12:00:00am
01/01/95
CONTINUED ON
NEXT PAGE

A
PF MAX =
12:00:00am

0.99 LAG
01/01/95

ES1288_01

Figure 9-26: Actual Values: Power (Sheet 2 of 3)

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CONTINUED FROM
PREVIOUS PAGE

B
kW MIN =
1000
12:00:00am 01/01/95
B
kvar MIN =
120
12:00:00am 01/01/95
B
kVA MIN =
1007
12:00:00am 01/01/95
B
PF MIN = 0.99 LAG
12:00:00am 01/01/95
B
kW MAX =
1000
12:00:00am 01/01/95
B
kvar MAX =
120
12:00:00am 01/01/95

MESSAGE
MESSAGE

B
kVA MAX =
1007
12:00:00am 01/01/95
B
PF MAX = 0.99 LAG
12:00:00am 01/01/95
C
kW MIN =
1000
12:00:00am 01/01/95
C
kvar MIN =
120
12:00:00am 01/01/95
C
kVA MIN =
1007
12:00:00am 01/01/95
C
PF MIN = 0.99 LAG
12:00:00am 01/01/95
C
kW MAX =
1000
12:00:00am 01/01/95
C
kvar MAX =
120
12:00:00am 01/01/95
C
kVA MAX =
1007
12:00:00am 01/01/95
C
PF MAX = 0.99 LAG
12:00:00am 01/01/95
ES1289_01

Figure 9-27: Actual Values: Power (Sheet 3 of 3)

Three Phase A/B/C Real Power

The total RMS three phase real power as well as the individual phase A/B/C real power is displayed in these messages. The phase A/B/C real power messages will be displayed only for a WYE or 3 WIRE DIRECT connected
system. The PQM shows direction of flow by displaying the signed value of kW.

Three Phase A/B/C Reactive Power

The total RMS three phase reactive power as well as the individual phase A/B/C reactive power is displayed in
these messages. The phase A/B/C reactive power messages will be displayed only for a WYE or 3 WIRE DIRECT
connected system. The PQM shows direction of flow by displaying the signed value of kvar.

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Miscellaneous Electrical

Three Phase A/B/C Apparent Power

The total RMS three phase apparent power as well as the individual phase A/B/C apparent power is displayed in
these messages. The phase A/B/C apparent power messages will be displayed only for a WYE or 3 WIRE DIRECT
connected system.

Three Phase A/B/C kW Minimum

The minimum three phase real power as well as the minimum individual phase A/B/C real power is displayed in
these messages. The time and date at which these minimum values were measured is also displayed in these
messages. This information is stored in non-volatile memory and will be retained during a loss of control power.
The phase A/B/C minimum real power messages will be displayed only for a WYE connected system. The setpoint
S1 PQM SETUP \CLEAR DATA \CLEAR MIN/MAX POWER VALUES is used to clear these values.

Three Phase A/B/C kvar Minimum

The minimum three phase reactive power as well as the minimum individual phase A/B/C reactive power is displayed in these messages. The time and date at which these minimum values were measured is also displayed in
these messages. This information is stored in non-volatile memory and will be retained during a loss of control
power. The phase A/B/C minimum reactive power messages will be displayed only for a WYE connected system.
The setpoint S1 PQM SETUP \CLEAR DATA \CLEAR MIN/MAX POWER VALUES is used to clear these values.

Three Phase A/B/C kVA Minimum

The minimum three phase apparent power as well as the minimum individual phase A/B/C apparent power is displayed in these messages. The time and date at which these minimum values were measured is also displayed in
these messages. This information is stored in non-volatile memory and will be retained during a loss of control
power. The phase A/B/C minimum apparent power messages will be displayed only for a WYE connected system.
The setpoint S1 PQM SETUP \CLEAR DATA \CLEAR MIN/MAX POWER VALUES is used to clear these values.

Three Phase A/B/C PF Minimum

The minimum three phase lead or lag power factor as well as the mini-mum lead or lag individual phase A/B/C
power factor is displayed in these messages. The time and date at which these minimum values were measured is
also displayed in these messages. This information is stored in non-volatile memory and will be retained during a
loss of control power. The phase A/B/C minimum lead or lag power factor messages will be displayed only for a
WYE connected system. The setpoint S1 PQM SETUP \CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR MIN/MAX POWER VALUES is
used to clear these values.

Three Phase A/B/C kW Maximum

The maximum three phase real power as well as the maximum individual phase A/B/C real power is displayed in
these messages. The time and date at which these maximum values were measured is also displayed in these
messages. This information is stored in non-volatile memory and will be retained during a loss of control power.
The phase A/B/C maximum real power messages will be displayed only for a WYE connected system. The setpoint S1 PQM SETUP \CLEAR DATA \CLEAR MIN/MAX POWER VALUES is used to clear these values.

Three Phase A/B/C PF Maximum

The maximum three phase lead or lag power factor as well as the maximum lead or lag individual phase A/B/C
power factor is displayed in these messages. The time and date at which these maximum values were measured is
also displayed in these messages. This information is stored in non-volatile memory and will be retained during a

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loss of control power. The phase A/B/C maximum lead or lag power factor messages will be displayed only for a
WYE connected system. The setpoint S1 PQM SETUP \CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR MIN/MAX POWER VALUES is
used to clear these values.

ES1290_01

Figure 9-28: Power Measurement Conventions

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Miscellaneous Electrical

D. Actual Values: Metering/Energy

ACTUAL

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A1 METERING

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A2 STATUS

MESSAGE
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

3
POS REAL ENERGY
=
32745 kWh

] ENERGY
]

3
NEG REAL ENERGY
=
32745 kWh
3
POS REACT ENERGY
=
32745 kvarh
3
NEG REACT ENERGY
=
32745 kvarh
3
APPARENT ENERGY
=
32745 kVAh
REAL ENERGY LAST 24h
=
1245 kWh
REAL ENERGY COST =
$12575.34
REAL ENERGY COST =
$125.01 / DAY
TARIFF PERIOD 1 COST
$0.00
TARIFF PERIOD 2 COST
$0.00
TARIFF PERIOD 3 COST
$0.00

ES1291_01

TARIFF PERIOD 1 NET


ENERGY:
0
kWh
TARIFF PERIOD 2 NET
ENERGY:
0
kWh
TARIFF PERIOD 3 NET
ENERGY:
0
kWh
TIME OF LAST RESET:
12:00:00am 01/01/95

Figure 9-29: Actual Values - Metering/Energy

3 POS Real Energy

This message displays the positive watthours (in kWh) since the TIME OF LAST RESET date. Real power in the
positive direction will add to this accumulated value, and real power in the negative direction will add to the negative watthour value. The setpoint S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR ENERGY VAL-UES is used to clear
this value. The displayed value rolls over to 0 once the value 4294967295 (FFFFFFFFh) has been reached.

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3 NEG Real Energy

This message displays the negative watt-hours (in kWh) since the TIME OF LAST RESET date. Real power in the
negative direction will add to this accumulated value, and real power in the positive direction will add to the positive
watt-hour value. The setpoint S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR ENERGY VALUES is used to clear this
value. The displayed value will roll over to 0 once the value 4294967295 (FFFFFFFFh) has been reached.

3 POS React Energy

This message displays the positive varhours (in kvarh) since the TIME OF LAST RESET date. Reactive power in
the positive direction will add to this accumulated value, and reactive power in the negative direction will add to the
negative varhour value. The setpoint S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR ENERGY VALUES is used to clear
this value. The displayed value will roll over to 0 once the value 4294967295 (FFFFFFFFh) has been reached.

3 NEG React Energy

This message displays the negative varhours (in kvarh) since the TIME OF LAST RESET date. Reactive power in
the negative direction will add to this accumulated value, and reactive power in the positive direction will add to the
positive varhour value. The S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR ENERGY VALUES setpoint clears this
value. The displayed value will roll over to 0 once the value 4294967295 (FFFFFFFFh) has been reached.

3 Apparent Energy

This message displays the accumulated VAhours (in kVAh) since the TIME OF LAST RESET date. The setpoint
S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR ENERGY VALUES clears this value. The displayed value will roll over to
0 once the value 4294967295 (FFFFFFFFH) has been reached.

Real Energy Last 24h

This message displays the accumulated real energy (in kWh) over the last 24-hour period. The 24-hour period
used by the PQM is started when control power is applied. The PQM updates this value every hour based on the
previous 24-hour period. This information will be lost if control power to the PQM is removed.

Real Energy Cost

This message displays the total cost for the real energy accumulated since the TIME OF LAST RESET date. The
setpoint S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR ENERGY VALUES clears this value.

Real Energy Cost Per Day

This message displays the average cost of real energy per day from time of last reset to the present day. The cost
per kWh is entered in the S1 PQM SETUP \ CALCULATION PARAMETERS \ENERGY COST PER KWH setpoint.

Time of Last Reset

This message displays the time and date when the energy parameters were last cleared. The setpoint S1 PQM
SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR ENERGY VALUES clears the energy values.
E. Actual Values: Metering/ Demand

Phase A/B/C Neutral Demand

This message displays the phase A/B/C/N current demand (in Amps) over the most recent time interval.

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Miscellaneous Electrical

ACTUAL

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A1 METERING

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A2 STATUS

MESSAGE
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] DEMAND
]

PHASE A CURRENT
DEMAND = 125 A
PHASE B CURRENT
DEMAND = 125 A
PHASE C CURRENT
DEMAND = 125 A
NEUTRAL CURRENT
DEMAND = 25 A
3
REAL POWER
DEMAND = 1000 kW
3
REACTIVE POWER
DEMAND = 25 kvar
3
REAL APPARENT
DEMAND = 1007 kVA
Ia MAX DMD = 560 A
12:00:00am 01/01/95
Ib MAX DMD = 560 A
12:00:00am 01/01/95
Ic MAX DMD = 560 A
12:00:00am 01/01/95

ES1292_01

In MAX DMD = 560 A


12:00:00am 01/01/95
3
kW MAX = 1000
12:00:00am 01/01/95
3
kvar MAX = 25
12:00:00am 01/01/95
3
kVA MAX = 1200
12:00:00am 01/01/95
Figure 9-30: Actual Values - Metering/Demand

3 Real Power Demand

This message displays the 3 phase real power demand (in kW) over the most recent time interval.

3 Reactive Power Demand

This message displays the 3 phase reactive power demand (in kvar) over the most recent time interval.

3 Apparent Power Demand

This message displays the 3 phase apparent power demand (in kVA) over the most recent time interval.

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A/B/C/N Current Max Demand

This message displays the maximum phase A/B/C/N current demand (in Amps) and the time and date when this
occurred. The setpoint S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR MAX DEMAND VALUES is used to clear this
value.

3 KW Max

This message displays the maximum three-phase real power demand (in kW) and the time and date when this
occurred. The setpoint S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR MAX DEMAND VALUES clears this value.

3 Kvar Max

This message displays the maximum 3 phase reactive power demand (in kvar) and the time and date when this
occurred. The setpoint S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR MAX DEMAND VALUES is used to clear this
value.

3 KVA Max

This message displays the maximum 3 phase apparent power demand (in kVA) and the time and date when this
occurred. The setpoint S1 PQM SETUP\CLEAR DATA\CLEAR MAX DEMAND VALUES is used to clear this
value.

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Miscellaneous Electrical

F. Actual Values: Metering/Frequency

ACTUAL

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A1 METERING

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A2 STATUS

MESSAGE
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] FREQUENCY
]

FREQUENCY = 60.00 Hz
FREQ MIN = 59.98 Hz
12:00:00am 01/01/95
FREQ MAX = 60.01 Hz
12:00:00am 01/01/95

ES1293_01

Figure 9-31: Actual Values - Metering/Frequency

Frequency

This message displays the frequency (in Hz). Frequency is calculated from the phase A-N voltage (when setpoint
S2 SYSTEM SETUP \ CURRENT /VOLTAGE CONFIGURATION \ VT WIRING is WYE) or from phase A-B voltage
(when setpoint S2 SYSTEM SETUP \ CURRENT/VOLTAGE CONFIGURATION \ VT WIRING is DELTA). A value
of 0.00 is displayed if there is insufficient voltage applied to the PQM's terminals (less than 30V on phase A).

Frequency Min

This message displays the minimum frequency measured as well as the time and date at which the minimum frequency occurred. The S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR MIN/MAX FREQUENCY VALUES setpoint clears
these values.

Frequency Max

This message displays the maximum frequency measured as well as the time and date at which the maximum frequency occurred. The S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR MIN/MAX FREQUENCY VALUES setpoint clears
these values.

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G. Actual Values: Metering/ Pulse Counter

ACTUAL

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A1 METERING

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A2 STATUS

MESSAGE
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] PULSE COUNTER
]

PULSE INPUT 1 =
0 Units
PULSE INPUT 2 =
0 Units
PULSE INPUT 3 =
0 Units
PULSE INPUT 4 =
0 Units
PULSE INPUT 1+2+3+4
= 0 Units

ES1294_01

TIME OF LAST RESET:


12:00:00am 01/01/95
Figure 9-32: Actual Values - Metering/Pulse Counter

Pulse Input 1

This message displays the accumulated value based on total number of pulses counted since the last reset. One
switch input pulse is equal to the value assigned in the S2 SYSTEM SETUP \ PULSE INPUT \ PULSE INPUT 1
VALUE setpoint. The units shown after the value are as defined in the S2 SYSTEM SETUP \ PULSE INPUT \
PULSE INPUT UNITS setpoint. The displayed value will roll over to 0 once the value 4294967295 (FFFFFFFFh)
has been reached. To use this feature, the "C" (control) option must be installed and one of the PQM switch inputs
must be assigned to PULSE INPUT 1 function. The switch input will then count the number of closures or openings
depending upon how the switch is configured. See setpoints page S2 SYSTEM SETUP \ SWITCH INPUT A/B/C/D
for details on programming the switch inputs. The minimum timing requirements are shown below in Figure 9-33.

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SWITCH ACTIVATION = O PEN

SWITCH ACTIVATION = C LOSED

Miscellaneous Electrical

STATUS

STATUS

STATUS

OPEN

CLOSED

OPEN

CLOSED

OPEN

CLOSED

ES1295_01
150 ms

150 ms

Figure 9-33: Pulse Input Timing

Pulse Input 2

See the PULSE INPUT 1 description above and replace all references to PULSE INPUT 1 with PULSE INPUT 2.

Pulse Input 3

See the PULSE INPUT 1 description above and replace all references to PULSE INPUT 1 with PULSE INPUT 3.

Pulse Input 4

See the PULSE INPUT 1 description above and replace all references to PULSE INPUT 1 with PULSE INPUT 4.

Pulse In 1+2+3+4

The totalized pulse input value is displayed here. The pulse inputs totalized is based on the S2 SYSTEM SETUP \
PULSE INPUT \ PULSE INPUT TOTAL setpoint.

Time of Last Reset

This message displays the time and date when the pulse input values were last cleared. The S1 PQM SETUP \
CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR PULSE INPUT VALUES setpoint clears the pulse input values.
H. Actual Values: Metering/ Analog Input

Analog Input

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ACTUAL

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A1 METERING

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A2 STATUS

MESSAGE
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] ANALOG INPUT
]

MAIN/ALT ANALOG INPUT


20.1 mA

MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] END OF PAGE A1
]
Figure 9-34: Actual Values - Metering/Analog Inputs

This message displays the measured 4 to 20 mA analog input scaled to the user defined name and units. The analog input can be configured via a switch input and output relay to multiplex two analog input signals. The displayed
user defined name and units will change to the corresponding values depending upon which analog input is connected. Refer to chapter 4, Analog Input, for information regarding user defined names and units as well as analog
input multiplexing.

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Miscellaneous Electrical

9.2.4.14 Monitoring - Actual Values Page 2 (A2)

ACTUAL

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A1 METERING

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A2 STATUS

MESSAGE
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] ANALOG INPUT
]

MAIN/ALT ANALOG INPUT


20.1 mA

MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] END OF PAGE A1
]
Figure 9-35: Actual Values Page 2 - Status/Alarms (Page 1 of 3)

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CONTINUED FROM
PREVIOUS PAGE

MESSAGE
MESSAGE

CONTINUED ON
NEXT PAGE

PHASE C CURRENT
DEMAND ALARM
DATA LOG 1
ALARM
DATA LOG 2
ALARM
NEUTRAL CURRENT
DEMAND ALARM
POSITIVE REAL POWER
DEMAND ALARM
NEGATIVE REAL POWER
DEMAND ALARM
POSITIVE REACTIVE
POWER DEMAND ALARM
NEGATIVE REACTIVE
POWER DEMAND ALARM
APPARENT POWER
DEMAND ALARM
SWITCH INPUT A
ALARM
SWITCH INPUT B
ALARM
SWITCH INPUT C
ALARM
SWITCH INPUT D
ALARM
SELF-TEST FAILURE
ALARM
SERIAL COM1 FAILURE
ALARM
SERIAL COM2 FAILURE
ALARM
CLOCK NOT SET
ALARM
MAIN ANALOG INPUT
ALARM
ALT ANALOG INPUT
ALARM
CRITICAL SETPOINTS
NOT STORED
CURRENT THD
ALARM
VOLTAGE THD
ALARM
ES1298_01

Figure 9-36: Actual Values Page 2 - Status/Alarms (Page 2 of 3)

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Miscellaneous Electrical

CONTINUED FROM
PREVIOUS PAGE

PULSE INPUT 1
ALARM
PULSE INPUT 2
ALARM

MESSAGE
MESSAGE

PULSE INPUT 3
ALARM
PULSE INPUT 4
ALARM
TOTALIZED PULSES
ALARM
TIME
ALARM

ES1299_01

Figure 9-37: Actual Values Page 2 - Status/Alarms (Page 3 of 3)

A. Status/Alarms Page
The alarm messages appear only when the alarm threshold has been exceeded for the programmed time. When
an alarm is assigned to an output relay, the relay can be set to be unlatched or latched. When the alarm is set as
unlatched, it automatically resets when the alarm condition no longer exists. If the alarm is set as latched, a keypad
reset or a serial port reset is required.

CAUTION
The SELF TEST ALARM occurs if a fault in the PQM hardware is detected. This alarm is
permanently assigned to the alarm output relay and is not user configurable. If this
alarm is present, contact the P&H Mining Excavator and Shovel Electrical Service Engineering Representative.

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B. Status/Switches Page
ACTUAL

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A2 STATUS

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A3 POWER ANALYSIS

MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] SWITCHES
]

MESSAGE

SWITCH INPUT A
STATE: CLOSED
SWITCH INPUT B
STATE: CLOSED
SWITCH INPUT C
STATE: CLOSED
SWITCH INPUT D
STATE: CLOSED

ES1336_01

Figure 9-38: Status/Switches Page

Switch Input A/B/C/D State

To assist in troubleshooting, the state of each switch can be verified using these messages. A separate message
displays the status of each input identified by the corresponding name. For a dry contact closure across the corresponding switch terminals the message will read CLOSED.

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C. Status/Clock Page

ACTUAL

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A2 STATUS

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A3 POWER ANALYSIS

MESSAGE
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] CLOCK
]

TIME: 12:00:00am
DATE: JAN 01 1996
ES1337_01
Figure 9-39: Status/Clock Page

Time/Date

The current time and date is displayed in this message. The PQM uses an internally generated software clock
which runs for at least one hour after the control power has been removed. To set the clock, see setpoints page S1
PQM SETUP \ CLOCK. An alarm, S4: ALARMS/CONTROL \ MISCELLANEOUS \ CLOCK NOT SET ALARM, is
available so that if power has been removed for longer than 1 hour and the clock value has been lost.
D. Status/Programmable Message Page

ACTUAL

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A2 STATUS

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A3 POWER ANALYSIS

MESSAGE
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] PROGRAMMABLE
] MESSAGE

PHONE: 905-294-6222
GEindustrial.com/pm

MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] END OF PAGE A2
]
ES1338_01
Figure 9-40: Status/Programmable Message Page

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Programmable Message

A 40-character user defined message is displayed. The message is programmed using the keypad or via the serial
port using PQMPC. See S1 PQM SETUP \ PROGRAMMABLE MESSAGE for programming details.

9.2.4.15 Monitoring - Actual Values Page 3 Power Analysis (A3)


ACTUAL

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A3 POWER ANALYSIS

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A4 PRODUCT INFO

MESSAGE
MESSAGE

MESSAGE

] POWER QUALITY
] VALUES

Ia CREST FACTOR =
1.233
Ib CREST FACTOR =
1.008
Ic CREST FACTOR =
1.000
Ia THDF = 0.944
Ib THDF = 0.999

ES1339_01

Ic THDF = 0.988

Figure 9-41: Power Analysis/Power Quality Values

A. Ia/Ib/Ic Crest Factor


The crest factor describes how much the load current can vary from a pure sine wave while maintaining the system's full rating. A completely linear load (pure sine wave) has a crest factor of 1.414 (1/0.707), which is the ratio of
the peak value of sine wave to its rms value. Typically, the crest factor can range from 1.414 to 2.5.
B. Ia/Ib/Ic THDF
Transformer Harmonic Derating Factor (THDF), also known as CBEMA factor, is defined as the crest factor of a
pure sine wave ( ) divided by the measured crest factor. This method is useful in cases where lower order harmonics are dominant. In a case where higher order harmonics are present, it may be necessary to use a more precise
method (K-factor) of calculating the derating factor. This method also does not take into consideration the losses
associated with rated eddy current in the transformer. The PQMPC software provides the K-factor method of calculating the derating factor, which is defined on a per unit basis as follows:

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Miscellaneous Electrical

h max

K = I h x h2
h=1

Equation3

Where:
Ih = RMS current at harmonic h, in per unit of rated RMS load current
C. Power Analysis/Total Harmonic Distortion

ACTUAL

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A3 POWER ANALYSIS

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A4 PRODUCT INFO

MESSAGE
MESSAGE

MESSAGE

] TOTAL HARMONIC
] DISTORTION

ES1341_01

PHASE A CURRENT THD=


5.3 %
PHASE B CURRENT THD=
7.8 %
PHASE C CURRENT THD=
4.5 %
NEUTRAL CURRENT THD=
15.4 %
VOLTAGE Van THD =
1.2 %
VOLTAGE Vbn THD =
2.0 %
VOLTAGE Vcn THD =
2.0 %
VOLTAGE Vab THD =
2.0 %
VOLTAGE Vbc THD =
1.1 %
Ia MAX THD =
5.9 %
12:00:00am 01/01/95
Ib MAX THD =
7.8 %
12:00:00am 01/01/95
Ic MAX THD =
4.5 %
12:00:00am 01/01/95
In MAX THD = 15.4 %
12:00:00am 01/01/95
Van MAX THD = 1.2 %
12:00:00am 01/01/95
Vbn MAX THD = 2.0 %
12:00:00am 01/01/95
Vcn MAX THD = 2.0 %
12:00:00am 01/01/95
Vab MAX THD = 2.0 %
12:00:00am 01/01/95
Vbc MAX THD = 1.1 %
12:00:00am 01/01/95

Figure 9-42: Total Harmonic Distortion

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Phase A/B/C/N Current THD

These messages display the calculated total harmonic distortion for each current input.

Voltage Van/Vbn/Vcn/ Vab/Vbc THD

These messages display the calculated total harmonic distortion for each voltage input. Phase to neutral voltages
will appear when the setpoint S2 SYSTEM SETUP\CURRENT/VOLTAGE CONFIGURATION \VT WIRING is
stored as WYE. Line to line voltages will appear when the setpoint S2 SYSTEM SETUP \ CURRENT/ VOLTAGE
CONFIGURATION \ VT WIRING is stored as DELTA.

Ia/Ib/Ic/In Max THD

The maximum total harmonic value for each current input and the time and date, which the maximum value
occurred, are displayed. The S1 PQM SETUP \CLEAR DATA \CLEAR MAX THD VALUES setpoint clears this
value.

Van/Vbn/Vcn/ Vab/Vbc Max THD

These messages display the maximum total harmonic value for each voltage input and the time and date at which
the maximum value occurred. The setpoint S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR MAX THD VALUES is used
to clear this value. Phase to neutral voltages will appear when the set-point S2 SYSTEM SETUP \ CURRENT/
VOLTAGE CON-FIGURATION \ VT WIRING is set to WYE. Line to line voltages will appear when the setpoint S2
SYSTEM SETUP \ CURRENT/VOLTAGE CONFIGURATION \ VT WIRING is set to DELTA.
D. Power Analysis/Data Logger

ACTUAL

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A3 POWER ANALYSIS

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A4 PRODUCT INFO

MESSAGE
MESSAGE

MESSAGE

] DATA LOGGER
]

DATA LOG 1: STOPPED


0% FULL
DATA LOG 2: STOPPED
0% FULL

ES1342_01
Figure 9-43: Actual Values - Data Logger

Data Log 1

This message display the current status of the Data Logger 1. The Data Logger can be set up and run only from
PQMPC.

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NOTICE
It is possible to stop the data logger from the PQM front panel using the S2 SYSTEM SETUP/
DATA LOGGER/STOP DATA LOGGER 1 setpoint.

Data Log 2

See DATA LOG 1 description above and replace all references to DATA LOGGER 1 with DATA LOGGER 2.
E. Power Analysis/Event Recorder

ACTUAL

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A3 POWER ANALYSIS

]] ACTUAL VALUES
]] A4 PRODUCT INFO

MESSAGE
MESSAGE
MESSAGE

] EVENT RECORDER
]

1: CLEAR RECORDS
12:00:00am 01/01/96
2: POWER OFF
12:00:00am 01/01/96

MESSAGE

3: POWER ON
12:00:00am 01/01/96

MESSAGE

] END OF PAGE A3
]
ES1343_01
Figure 9-44: Actual Values - Event Recorder

Event Recorder

The PQM Event Recorder runs continuously and records the number, cause, time, date, and metering quantities
present at the occurrence of each event. This data is stored in non-volatile memory and is not lost when power to
the PQM is removed. The Event Recorder must be enabled in S1 PQM SETUP \ EVENT RECORDER \EVENT
RECORDER OPERATION. The Event Recorder can be cleared in S1 PQM SETUP \ CLEAR DATA \ CLEAR
EVENT RECORD. Data for the 40 most recent events is stored. Event data for older events is lost. Note that the
event number, cause, time, and date is available in the messages as shown in the following Table 9-20, but the
associated metering data is available only via serial communications.

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Centurion System Electrical Maintenance Manual

Event Number, Event Cause, Time, Date

These messages displays the 40 most recent events recorded by the event recorder. Refer to Table 9-20.
EVENT NAME

DISPLAYED EVENT
NAME

Undercurrent Alarm/Control Pickup

UNDERCURRENT

Undercurrent Alarm/Control Dropout

UNDERCURRENT

Overcurrent Alarm/Control Pickup

OVERCURRENT

Overcurrent Alarm/Control Dropout

OVERCURRENT

Neutral Overcurrent Alarm/Control Pickup

NEUTRAL

Neutral Overcurrent Alarm/Control Dropout

NEUTRAL

Undervoltage Alarm/Control Pickup

UNDERVOLTAGE

Undervoltage Alarm/Control Dropout

UNDERVOLTAGE

Overvoltage Alarm/Control Pickup

OVERVOLTAGE

Overvoltage Alarm/Control Dropout

OVERVOLTAGE

Current Unbalance Alarm/Control Pickup

CURRENT U/B

Current Unbalance Alarm/Control Dropout

CURRENT U/B

Voltage Unbalance Alarm/Control Pickup

VOLTAGE U/B

Voltage Unbalance Alarm/Control Dropout

VOLTAGE U/B

Phase Reversal Alarm/Control Pickup

PHASE REVERSAL

Phase Reversal Alarm/Control Dropout

PHASE REVERSAL

Power Factor Lead 1 Alarm/Control Pickup

PF LEAD 1

Power Factor Lead 1 Alarm/Control Dropout

PF LEAD 1

Power Factor Lag 1 Alarm/Control Pickup

PF LAG 1

Power Factor Lag 1 Alarm/Control Dropout

PF LAG 1

Power Factor Lead 2 Alarm/Control Pickup

PF LEAD 2

Power Factor Lead 2 Alarm/Control Dropout

PF LEAD 2

Power Factor Lag 2 Alarm/Control Pickup

PF LAG 2

Power Factor Lag 2 Alarm/Control Dropout

PF LAG 2

Positive Real Power Alarm/Control Pickup

POS KW

Table 9-20: List of Possible Events

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EVENT NAME

DISPLAYED EVENT
NAME

Positive Real Power Alarm/Control Dropout

POS KW

Negative Real Power Alarm/Control Pickup

NEG KW

Negative Real Power Alarm/Control Dropout

NEG KW

Positive Reactive Power Alarm/Control Pickup

POS Kvar

Positive Reactive Power Alarm/Control Dropout

POS Kvar

Negative Reactive Power Alarm/Control Pickup

NEG Kvar

Negative Reactive Power Alarm/Control Dropout

NEG Kvar

Underfrequency Alarm/Control Pickup

UNDRFREQUENCY

Underfrequency Alarm/Control Dropout

UNDRFREQUENCY

Overfrequency Alarm/Control Pickup

OVERFREQUENCY

Overfrequency Alarm/Control Dropout

OVERFREQUENCY

Positive Real Power Demand Alarm/Control Pickup

3 +KW DMD

Positive Real Power Demand Alarm/Control Dropout

3 +KW DMD

Negative Real Power Demand Alarm/Control


Pickup

3 - KW DMD

Negative Real Power Demand Alarm/Control


Dropout

3 - KW DMD

Positive Reactive Power Demand Alarm/Control


Pickup

3 +Kvar DMD

Positive Reactive Power Demand Alarm/Control


Dropout

3 +Kvar DMD

Negative Reactive Power Demand Alarm/Control


Pickup

3 -Kvar DMD

Negative Reactive Power Demand Alarm/Control


Dropout

3 -Kvar DMD

Apparent Power Demand Alarm/Control Pickup

3 KVA DEMAND

Apparent Power Demand Alarm/Control Dropout

3 KVA DEMAND

Phase A Current Demand Alarm/Control Pickup

Ia DEMAND

Phase A Current Demand Alarm/Control Dropout

Ia DEMAND

Phase B Current Demand Alarm/Control Pickup

Ib DEMAND

Table 9-20: List of Possible Events

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EVENT NAME

DISPLAYED EVENT
NAME

Phase B Current Demand Alarm/Control Dropout

Ib DEMAND

Phase C Current Demand Alarm/Control Pickup

Ic DEMAND

Phase C Current Demand Alarm/Control Dropout

Ic DEMAND

Neutral Current Demand Alarm/Control Pickup

In DEMAND

Neutral Current Demand Alarm/Control Dropout

In DEMAND

Switch Input A Alarm/Control Pickup

SW A ACTIVE

Switch Input A Alarm/Control Dropout

SW A ACTIVE

Switch Input B Alarm/Control Pickup

SW B ACTIVE

Switch Input B Alarm/Control Dropout

SW B ACTIVE

Switch Input C Alarm/Control Pickup

SW C ACTIVE

Switch Input C Alarm/Control Dropout

SW C ACTIVE

Switch Input D Alarm/Control Pickup

SW D ACTIVE

Switch Input D Alarm/Control Dropout

SW D ACTIVE

Pulse Input 1 Alarm/Control Pickup

PULSE IN 1

Pulse Input 1 Alarm/Control Dropout

PULSE IN 1

Pulse Input 2 Alarm/Control Pickup

PULSE IN 2

Pulse Input 2 Alarm/Control Dropout

PULSE IN 2

Pulse Input 3 Alarm/Control Pickup

PULSE IN 3

Pulse Input 3 Alarm/Control Dropout

PULSE IN 3

Pulse Input 4 Alarm/Control Pickup

PULSE IN 4

Pulse Input 4 Alarm/Control Dropout

PULSE IN 4

Totalized Pulses Alarm/Control Pickup

PULSE TOTAL

Totalized Pulses Alarm/Control Dropout

PULSE TOTAL

Current THD Alarm/Control Pickup

CURRENT THD

Current THD Alarm/Control Dropout

CURRENT THD

Voltage THD Alarm/Control Pickup

VOLTAGE THD

Voltage THD Alarm/Control Dropout

VOLTAGE THD

Table 9-20: List of Possible Events

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EVENT NAME

DISPLAYED EVENT
NAME

Main Analog Input Alarm/Control Pickup

AN INPUT MAIN

Main Analog Input Alarm/Control Dropout

AN INPUT MAIN

Alternate Analog Input Alarm/Control Pickup

AN INPUT ALT

Alternate Analog Input Alarm/Control Dropout

AN INPUT ALT

Self Test Failure Alarm Pickup

SELF TEST

Self Test Failure Alarm Dropout

SELF TEST

COM1 Failure Alarm Pickup

COM 1 FAILURE

COM1 Failure Alarm Dropout

COM 1 FAILURE

COM2 Failure Alarm Pickup

COM 2 FAILURE

COM2 Failure Alarm Dropout

COM 2 FAILURE

Clock Not Set Alarm Pickup

CLOCK NOT SET

Clock Not Set Alarm Dropout

CLOCK NOT SET

Critical Setpoints Not Stored Alarm Pickup

PARAM NOT SET

Critical Setpoints Not Stored Alarm Dropout

PARAM