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Interdependence with Fruit

Name: Rebecca Johnson


Time Allotted: 30 minutes
Grade Level: 3rd grade
Subject(s): Social Studies
Intentional Room Set Up: Students must have access to desks or small group workspace
Materials Required: (create a bulleted list, including texts -- books and articles-- using APA format)

Large labeled map of America


Real fruits from different states
Assessment rubrics (appendix A)
Cutout pictures of fruits (appendix B)
Assessment worksheets (appendix C)
True/False questionnaire (appendix E)
Checklist with the students names
Mini stop and go signs
Sticky notes
Problem solving music
Ability to play music (computer, phone etc)
Printout of the word interdependent (appendix F)

Michigan Content Expectations: Math Common Core State Standards (CCSS)


3. E2.0.1 Using a Michigan example, explain how specialization leads to increased interdependence (e.g.
cherries grown in Michigan area sold in Florida; oranges grown in Florida area sold in Michigan).

Objectives:
1. The learner will use an example of food that is eaten in Michigan but produced elsewhere to support
their knowledge of interdependence between states through non-visual representation at a proficient
level according to the rubric found in appendix A.
Child-friendly objective: I can use an example of food that we eat in Michigan that is grown
somewhere else to support my thoughts.
2. The learner will explain how specialization leads to increased interdependence on the assessment
worksheet (appendix C) at a proficient level according to the rubric found in appendix A.
Child-friendly objective: I can explain how growing a lot of one food makes everyone
interdependent.
Assessment, Data & Intervention:
Objective 1: use an example
Informal Formative Assessment: The teacher will continuously perform this type of assessment by
seeing that no one has held up his or her mini stop sign. Additionally, during instruction time the teacher
will ask students to hold up their mini signs and show whether they want to keep going (go) or need a
little review (stop).
Formal Formative Assessment: The teacher will mark on a checklist the student pairs who traded their
apple fruit pieces for oranges.
Intended Data Gathered & Specific Intervention Plan:
If 10% did not understand Individual conferences. The teacher will meet with each student
individually and ask him or her to explain, using the large U.S. map, why certain pictures are in
certain states. Through this continued process of questioning and student explanation the teacher

will be able to diagnose the difficulty that this student is having with the lesson and will re-teach
accordingly.
If 11-35 % did not understand Small Group the teacher will facilitate deeper thinking on the
example of the trade between Florida and Michigan. These students will demonstrate the pair and
share activity again by splitting into two groups. They must then quickly find another partner from
the other group to trade with. Afterwards students will put into their own words what just
happened. If they needed oranges, how did they get one? Next, students will transfer their verbal
explanation into 2D non-verbal representation by using their cutout fruit and the map to show
Michigan apples swapping for Floridas oranges. In this way information will be acted out,
verbalized and then demonstrated in a 2D non-linguistic representation. This will help all students
conceptualize the interdependence.
If 36% or more did not understand Revisit Florida & Oranges. The class will split into two
groups. Every child will get two pieces of fruit, either apples or oranges. They must then quickly
find another partner from the other group to trade with. Afterwards students will put into their own
words what just happened. If they needed oranges, how did they get one? How did they depend on
each other? What happened when they did not find a friend? Next, students will transfer their
verbal explanation into 2D non-verbal representation by using their cutout fruit and the map to
show Michigan apples swapping for Floridas oranges. In this way information will be acted out,
verbalized and then demonstrated in a 2D non-linguistic representation. This will help all students
conceptualize the interdependence.
Formal Interim/Summative Assessment: Students will draw a picture on their assessment worksheet
demonstrating trading and interdependence.
Intended Data Gathered & Specific Intervention Plan:
If 10% did not understand Individual conferences. The teacher will meet with each student
individually and ask him or her to explain, using the large U.S. map, why certain pictures are in
certain states. Through this continued process of questioning and student explanation the teacher
will be able to diagnose the difficulty that this student is having with the lesson and will re-teach
accordingly.
If 11-35 % did not understand Group collaboration. This small group of students will brainstorm
together how to solve the problem presented by the worksheet given in appendix E. This sheet
includes a map of the United States and the fruits that are involved in the problem. This may
remove the intimidation of a blank page and having to draw everything. It also helps gets the ball
rolling and will scaffold student into being able to draw the whole thing on their own. Seeing the
map will also trigger their memory of the very first problem the class worked through (The
Dilemma) when the map was used as a visual aid.
If 36% or more did not understand - the whole class will physically act out the word problem in
appendix D using the little cutout pieces as props and grouped tables that represent different states.
This will turn a hypothetical word problem into a concrete story with pictures of physical objects
that represent something that the students understand. From this acting demonstration students will
use the props and characters to actually solve the problem and really understand the need for states
to work together. They will follow through by completing the worksheet (appendix D)

Objective 2: evaluate expression


Informal Formative Assessment: The teacher will continuously perform this type of assessment by
seeing that no one has held up his or her mini stop sign. Additionally to initiate this assessment the

teacher will ask students to show her their signs (go will mean they understand and stop will signify
that they need more help)
Formal Formative Assessment: The teacher will formally assess students understanding of this
objective during the part of the lesson titled Real Life Example when the students respond to a students
verbal analysis of trade with their stop and go signs. (Go means they agree, stop means that they
disagree).
Intended Data Gathered & Specific Intervention Plan: Data will initially be qualitative but will be
turned into quantitative data through analyzing how many students correctly solved the problem, and
then put into percentages.
If 10% did not understand = Individual oral conference. This will allow the teacher to reteach the
content in a meaningful way, diagnose mistakes and provide immediate feedback. It may be that
there was a roadblock with the format of the assessment or a lack of intentionality in their drawing.
Through this oral conference the teacher may be able to assess student knowledge in a more
authentic way.
If 11-35 % did not understand = The teacher will give a true/false oral mini quiz to the small group
of students who did not pass the formal assessment to get students thinking about key questions
that will help them understand the concept of interdependence. These students will use their mini
stop signs to indicate true (green) or false (red). See appendix E for the questions/answers that will
be asked.
If 46% did not understand - The teacher will facilitate a true or false game found in appendix E as
a whole class. See appendix E for the specific questions that will be asked.
Formal Interim/Summative Assessment: In the closure activity, students will describe the effect of
specialization without using the term interdependence. This means that they will put this concept into
their own words.
Intended Data Gathered & Specific Intervention Plan:
If 10% did not understand = Individual oral conference. This will allow the teacher to
reteach the content in a meaningful way, diagnose mistakes and provide immediate
feedback. It will also free certain students from demonstrating their knowledge in written
form. For some students, eliminating this roadblock by talking out the information could
be a more authentic form of assessment.
If 11-35 % did not understand = Small group collaboration time. Students will use the
united states map and cutout fruit pieces to physically demonstrate help visualize the
predicament of each state specializing in one produce. They will then brainstorm ideas to
solve the problem of living in Michigan and wanting to make blueberry pie. The
guidelines for this assignment are found in appendix D. The top half of the worksheet, the
drawing, mostly assesses the first objective, therefore much of the discussion time will
center on the second half of the sheet where students have to explain how this system
works. then draw their thoughts following the worksheet found in appendix D.
If 46% or more students did not understand - the whole class will physically act out the
word problem in appendix D using the little cutout pieces as props and grouped tables
that represent different states. This will turn a hypothetical word problem into a concrete
story with pictures of physical objects that represent something that the students
understand. From this acting demonstration students will use the props and characters to
actually solve the problem and really understand the need for states to work together.
They will follow through by completing the worksheet (appendix D)

Instructional Procedure: What information do students (and or a guest teacher) need?


Anticipatory Set: (Allotted Time: 2 min)
Students will be given a variety of fruit. All labeled with different states. They will be asked to put on their
detective caps and investigate. They will write on a sticky note any questions they have, anything they find
interesting. The students will share their observations and questions. Naturalistic, interpersonal, intrapersonal,
visual, kinesthetic
Instruction: (Allotted Time: 25 min)
Visualizing Food Origins
The students will then place the fruit together on the map according to the country
they were grown in. This will give them a visual of where these fruit come from.
California grapes
Florida oranges
New Jersey blueberries
Hawaii pineapples
Michigan apples
The Dilemma
T: Okay so heres my problem. I really, really, really want Hawaiian pizza. What
does Hawaiian pizza have on it class?
S: pineapple.
T: Right! But where are pineapples grown?
S: In Hawaii.
T: Oh no! What am I going to do? In Michigan we grow a lot of apples but I
cant eat only apples. How am I going to get the pineapple that I need for my
Hawaiian pizza? Talk in your small groups about what we could do. (play problem
solving music)
(After small group discussion time students will share their ideas)
T: great thinking class! Somehow we have to talk to Hawaii and figure out a trade.
We have a lot of apples, and they have a lot of pineapple. Lets do a little swaperoo!
The teacher will demonstrate using the cutout fruits how Michigan swaps an apple
for a pineapple. Can someone explain what we just did in their own words?
S: we didnt have something so we talked to other states to get it. Then we traded
what we did have for what we wanted.
T: Do we agree with this class?
(Expound on this idea)
Real Life Example
Pass out all the papers to one group and pencils to another. Okay class so what
were going to need paper and pencils for this next activity because we are going to
draw what we just learned. Oh, oh wait. You have all the paper & you have all the
pencils. Hmmmm. What are we going to do?
S: share/trade.
T: why would you say that? If another member of our class has something we need
we become interdependent on each other. That means that we both need each other.
What does that mean?
S: 1 cannot complete the assignment without student 2 and student 2 also needs
student complete the assignment.

3 min
Visual- spatial
Bodily-kinesthetic
Intrapersonal
4 min
Logical-mathematical
Musical-rhythmic
Intrapersonal
Visual-spatial
Verbal-linguistic

3 min
Visual-spatial
Kinesthetic
Intrapersonal
Verbal-linguistic
Logical-mathematical

T: Right! They both need each other. Scientists call this interdependent Now
we know what dependent means right? What might interdependent mean?
S: (share ideas)
(Students share ideas)
Interdependence
Using the printout of the word (appendix F) the teacher will introduce this
vocabulary term, (S)he will connect it to the students prior knowledge of the word
dependent.
T: dependent means one thing is dependent on something else, but in the United
States (use the large map) is Michigan only dependent on Florida for oranges?
What does Florida need? How would that help us find the answer, the definition of
interdependence?
S: because they both need each other its more than dependent
T: Interdependence is where two things need each other. Its not just a one-way
street.
Pair & Share what it means in their own words. Two students will share their
definitions.
T: Do we agree with this class? (Take photo of stop/go signs for formative
assessment)
What if
T: what is a different food that we eat in Michigan that is grown somewhere else?
S: oranges from Florida
T: what would it look like for Michigan to get oranges from Florida? Use the large
map and real fruit to show the dilemma. What if I wanted to make a fruit salad with
oranges and apples. Instead of telling me with words. Show me really quickly.
While students are thinking repeat the question. Pair and share with a partner use
the cutouts to demonstrate what we could do. One person can be Michigan with
apples, and their partner will have
S: oranges!
(Teacher will mark those that act out trading for formative assessment for objective
1)
T: How would life be different if we grew our own oranges? Use the large map to
demonstrate what it would look like. Redistribute the cutouts so that every student
had one of every fruit. Now ask them to make fruit salad and show you what they
would do. What happened class?
S: We wouldnt need to work together. Trading with other states makes us work
together.
T: Would we need to talk to Florida about anything? Maybe, maybe not. Does our
need for food force us to talk to other states? Why?
S: because they have something that we want.
T: Right! And now instead of trying to grow every single food that we want, we
can focus on growing one thing well and then trading it for the other things we
need. Because we grow a lot of one thing, we are now interdependent on the other
states.

3 min
Verbal-linguistic
Intrapersonal
Logical-mathematical
Visual-spatial

7 min
Intrapersonal
Kinesthetic
Logical-mathematical
Verbal-linguistic
Visual-spatial

5 min
Assessment
Students will be asked to explain how Michigan growing a lot of apples changes
the way it interacts with the other states. T: We used the word independent earlier, Visual-spatial
use your own words to explain what this means. What happens when each state
Verbal-linguistic
makes a lot of one thing?
The students will use the other side to draw a picture of this. They must use the
fruit they choose to show this trading process in their visual.
Closure: (3 min)
Students will reap the benefits of interdependence by eating fruit from another state, oranges! This is simple yet
fun way to use students sensory outlets to reinforce the positive consequences of working with other states.
While they are eating, the teacher will address any misconceptions they have about the market.
T: Does your mom really call Hawaii and make a trade to get pineapples? No! She gets them from the grocery
store. But the store has to get them all the way from Hawaii. Michigan and Hawaii truly are interdependent on
each other because of the fruit we both grow. In the next couple of years you will learn more about how this
complicated system works. But for right now, this is a great understanding of the importance of working
together.

References
Satran, J. (2015, January 16). Two Simple Maps that Reveal How American Agriculture Actually Works. The
Huffington Post. Retrieved from: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/16/largest-crop-each-
state_n_6488930.html
Clipart Panda. (2014). (Unnamed Fruit and U.S. Map Clipart). ClipartPanda.com Retrieved from:
http://www.clipartpanda.com/

Appendix A

Objective 1

Use an example of
interdependence

Objective 2

Explain how
specialization
leads to
interdependence

Mastery

Proficient

Not Proficient

The student drew a


visual that
demonstrated the
concept of
interdependence and
trade. Their drawing
was both detailed
and accurate.

The student drew a


picture that
represents
interdependence
and/or trade
between states but
did not go into great
detail.

The student either


did not draw a
picture or the
picture does not
reflect how states
are interdependent
with each other.

The student used his


The student
or her own words to
explained how
accurately explain
specialization leads
how specialization
to interdependence
leads to
but did not fully put
interdependence.
it into their own
Key words to look
words but instead,
for: need, want, work simply reiterated the
together, trade, etc. teachers definition.

The student did not


explain how
specialization leads
to interdependence

Appendix B

Appendix C
This fruit does not
work with the
assessment because
it is grown in
Michigan

Appendix D

Hi! My name is Sarah and I live in Michigan. I am so excited because today I am going to
make blueberry pie. My only problem is, we grow a lot of apples in Michigan. How can
we get blueberries so that I can make my favorite pie?
Draw your ideas:

In your own words, describe the solution you came up with. How does this support what we learned
about interdependence?

Appendix E: Red light, Green light (True or false)


Babies need their moms T
Babies are dependent on their moms T
(Stop and have students explain their answer)
Babies are dependent on their moms F
(Pair and share discuss why not)
Babies and moms are dependent on each other F
Babies and moms are interdependent F

Michigan grows a lot of apples T
Michigan needs more apples F
(what does Michigan need class? Oranges, pineapples etc.)
Michigan is dependent on Florida for oranges T
Florida is dependent on Michigan for apples _ T
(this question may be difficult so have students pair and share their ideas)
So if Michigan needs Florida and Florida needs Michigan, Michigan and Florida are interdependent T

Appendix F

Interdependent