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The international and

government affairs journal


of Emirates
Issue 17 | October 2013

Open
Sky

Economic cost of constrained airports

Air travel trends driving Emirates fleet growth

The new first time travellers

Spotlight on Dubai World Central

Emirates releases 2012-13 Environment Report

A new measure of industry fuel efficiency

Canadas mixed signals on competition

They said it best

New Silk Road: Supporting Spains export growth

Emirates recruitment in Spain

10

Five years of the Emirates A380

Airport landing charges in perspective

11

Emirates supports Milans push for transfer traffic

Global finance: Spill-over benefits from airline competition

12

From orphans to academic overachievers

Fast Facts

Economic cost of
constrained airports
Infrastructure constraints are a barrier to economic growth
the effect of someone pulling up the handbrake on the
global economy. It leads to frustrated, untapped demand
and hides the true potential between trading partners and
economic regions.

Cost of the UKs


aviation infrastructure
capacity constraints

15 billion in lost

trade in 2013

8.1
billion hit to

UK GDP by
2021 through
lost tourism
and FDI

The ability of airlines to respond to market demand is increasingly challenged by


infrastructure constraints at many airports globally. In addition, even when slots and
facilities are available, airline planners must address increased demand that exceeds the
capacity of existing flights, but is not yet sufficient to justify adding an additional aircraft.
The stakes of these problems are significant customers and shippers are inconvenienced
by fully booked flights, air services and the tourism-related jobs they support are negatively
impacted, and airlines suffer the opportunity cost of lost revenue.
Emirates mixed fleet of A380s and B777s has enabled it to solve this challenge in an
economical and environmentally responsible way, which balances supply and demand and
also makes maximum use of existing slots. For example, at severely slot-constrained London
Heathrow, Emirates has since operated a total of five daily A380 flights, adding over 5,000
weekly seats. Likewise, at congested JFK Airport in New York, Emirates expanded capacity
in January 2013 from an A380/777-300ER double daily to two A380s. In Los Angeles,
where demand now exceeds capacity on the existing daily B777-300ER service but is not
yet sufficient for a second flight, on December 2, Emirates will up-gauge to an A380 adding
more than 1,000 weekly seats.
Here is a snapshot of pressing infrastructure constraints in the aviation sector that
governments are trying to address.

UK
In the UK, the Airports Commission is currently studying several proposals that will
enable the country to maintain its position as a global aviation hub. Britains main hub
airport, London Heathrow, is currently running at 99% capacity and, as a result, can be
severely impacted by adverse weather or other unexpected events. Frontier Economics and
Oxford Economics, two leading economic consultancies, have estimated that the UK could
potentially be missing out on 15 billion worth of trade in 2013, a figure that could double
by 2030, while the cost to the UK economy could be as high as 8.1bn in GDP or 134,100
jobs by 2021, through lost tourism and foreign direct investment.

London Heathrow Airport


Runways

Operating Capacity (%)

99

Passengers (million)

70

Terminals

Destinations Served

184

Number of Airlines

84

Cost of capacity
constraints

Tourism (by 2021)


Foreign Direct
Investment (by 2021)
Trade (2013)

GDP

3.6bn

Jobs

78,800

GDP

4.5bn

Jobs

55,300
15bn

Australia
Sydney International Airport, Australias largest, is artificially constrained by the 80
movements per hour cap and the curfew between the hours of 11pm to 6am. A Deloitte
Access Economics report demonstrates the potential value of improving infrastructure by
expanding the cap and aligning existing regulations and opening additional gates to support
new generation aircraft.
In a separate paper, Deloitte says that one extra flight per day from Dubai to Sydney is
estimated to add A$342 million to Australias GDP and support 4,400 full time equivalent
(FTE) jobs per year. Merely up-gauging from a B777 to an A380 contributes an additional
A$55mn in GDP and generates an estimated 700 FTE jobs on an annual basis.
By 2060, the cost of not enhancing the aviation infrastructure capacity of Sydney would
result in economic impacts (direct and indirect) of the Australian economy accumulating
to a total of A$59.5bn in foregone expenditure and A$34bn in foregone GDP.
By 2035, the economic impacts could accumulate to as much as A$6bn in foregone
GDP for the Australian economy, and A$8.9bn in foregone expenditure.

Sydney International Airport


Runways
Passengers (million)
Terminals

3
35.6
3

Destinations Served

97

Number of Airlines

46

Value of an additional
daily A380 flight from
Dubai to Sydney:

A$342 million to

Australias
GDP

4,400
FTE jobs

per year

Benefit of up-gauging
from B777 to A380:

A$55
million in GDP
700
additional FTE

jobs on an
annual basis

Europe
European aviation infrastructure, especially airports, face fundamental capacity constraints.
According to Eurocontrol, an estimated 12% of total demand might not be accommodated
by 2035, leading to a capacity crunch at European airports.
Airline and airport groups such as AEA, EBAA and ACI Europe have noted that the economic
impact estimated will be dramatic. By 2035, insufficient airport capacity will cost Europe
230bn in lost GDP, they estimated. They urged EU institutions, national governments and
regional communities to take a deeper interest in the issue of airport capacity.

US

230 billion

in lost European GDP due to


aviation infrastructure capacity
constraints by 2035

US airport delays are caused by a myriad of factors ranging from infrastructure constraints
to air traffic control delays to peak scheduling. The total cost of air transportation delays in
2007 in the US was $32.9bn, according to an FAA-sponsored analysis.
This included $8.3bn in costs to airlines, $16.7bn in costs to passengers, $3.9bn from lost
demand and a $4bn hit to US GDP.
New Yorks severely slot-constrained JFK, Newark and LaGuardia airports are a special
concern, with one study estimating over $2.6bn in losses to the local economy in 2008 and
projecting a staggering $79bn in losses for 2008-2025 (plus 5,600 full-time jobs not
created) in the absence of corrective action.

$32.9bn cost of US air transportation delays in 2007


$8.3 billion to airlines
$16.7 billion to passengers
$3.9 billion from lost demand
$4 billion to US GDP
3

Air travel trends driving


Emirates fleet growth
One reason for Emirates growth plans is a fundamental
appreciation of traffic trends, which forecast strong growth
in the developed and developing worlds in the coming years.
This growth is being fuelled by rising incomes, growing populations and increased trade. Here
are some projections for countries that will be among the top 10 global economies in 2030:

1,500

>7.5 billion

900

>3 billion

600

China

US

India

UK

Brazil

2012

2030

2025

2012

2030

2020

2012

2030

2020

2012

2030

2020

2012

2030

2020

2012

2030

2020

2012

300

Germany

2015
2011
2018
2031

Passengers (millions)

1,200

Russia
Global

Source: CAAC, FAA, MOCA, UK DfT, Brazilian Association of Airlines, Infraero, German Airport Association
ADV, German MoT and Airbus.

The new first time travellers


The global middle class is forecast to swell from 1.8 billion
to 4.9 billion between 2010 and 2030, and most of the 3
billion people to join the middle class will live in Asia.
This expansion will be a great leveller, banishing current demarcations about the developed
world and the developing world, and will create new trade routes almost wholly different
from those that exist today. These new trading lanes will spur significant demand for
corporate air travel. In addition, hundreds of millions of these new middle class consumers
will become first time travellers, taking an international flight for the first time.

Size of the global middle class


2010:

1.8

billion

2030:

4.9

billion

66% of the global middle class will reside in Asia-Pacific in 2030

Global middle class spending power


2010 :
4

$21

trillion

2030 :

$56

trillion
Source: OECD

Spotlight on
Dubai World Central
Dubai World Central (DWC) is in the spotlight this month as
it reaches some important milestones.

Passenger airlines
Wizz Air
Jazeera Airways

Cargo airlines
Hungarys Wizz Air is due to become the first scheduled passenger airline to operate from
the new airport in Dubai when it opens for passenger flights on October 27, followed by
Kuwaits Jazeera Airways.
The flights are made possible by the airport, officially named Al Maktoum International at
Dubai World Central, becoming certified for passenger operations last month as well as the
recent completion of the airports first passenger terminal.

Emirates SkyCargo
Atlas Air
Saudi Arabian Airlines
AF-KLM-Martinair Cargo
Etihad Airways

Next month, the airport will be the site of the 13th edition of the biennial Dubai Air Show
running from November 17-21. The air show draws 50,000 visitors and 1,500 journalists and
had previously been held at Dubai International.
DWC is envisioned as a long-term solution to Dubai Internationals looming airport capacity
crunch, and is expected to one day feature five runways and capacity to handle over 160
million passengers per year.
However, DWCs billing by some as the worlds largest airport is incorrect. Today, the airport
offers one runway and capacity for up to 7 million passengers per year. Since its opening in
June 2010 it has been operating solely as an airport for cargo and general aviation flights.
Instead, Dubai Airports has embarked on a progressive, structured and pragmatic approach
to maximise the existing use of Dubai International. Enhancements are planned to increase
capacity and accommodate demand growth until around the 2020 timeframe, when
passenger numbers are projected to reach 103.5 million exceeding Dubai Internationals
maximum capacity of 100 million passengers.
This will necessitate multi-billion dollar investments at DWC and one day, the airport is
expected to become the primary hub for Dubai and the 150 airlines currently serving it. As a
result, the airports planners are developing office, residential and industrial developments in
and around the airport to help defray the infrastructure costs.

Dubai International 2020 forecast

103.5
million projected passenger numbers
100
million maximum capacity

Dubai
World
Central

Dubai
International
Airport
5

Emirates releases 2012-13


Environment Report
In September, Emirates
released its third annual
Environment Report,
revealing improvements
in its fuel efficiency and
reduction in the rate of CO2
emissions as the airline
added new, modern aircraft
and retired older, less
efficient ones.

15.7% ahead of IATA

industry
average in
terms of fuel
efficiency

16% ahead of IATA

industry
average in
terms of CO2
emissions

Covering the 2012-2013 fiscal year, the


audited report analysed environmental
performance data from a range of Group
activities, including airline operations,
dnatas cargo and ground handling
businesses and a wide range of commercial
activities on the ground from engineering
to catering.

100% increase in

recycling
volumes

6 years

Emirates average
fleet age vs
IATA average
of 11.7 years

THE EMIRATES GROUP

ENVIRONMENT
REPORT2012-13

The report was verified by PwC and


disclosed Emirates remains 15.7%
ahead of the IATA industry average in
terms of fuel efficiency and 16% ahead in CO2 emissions efficiency, largely due to its young,
fuel efficient fleet. The report and its supporting methodology can be downloaded from
www.emirates.com/environment.
1

A new measure of industry


fuel efficiency
Emirates has introduced a new fuel efficiency metric, called
Operational Fuel Efficiency Factor (OFEF), with the intention
that this should become standard across the airline industry.
Currently, most fuel efficiency measurements are based upon the ratio between fuel
consumption (F) and mass (M), multiplied by distance (D). However, the interpretation of
each of these parameters can be subject to customisations and commercial decisions by
airline operators.
As a result, Emirates has developed a new metric based on this formula:
(Zero Fuel Weight) x (Great Circle Distance)
(Block Fuel)
Zero Fuel Weight (ZFW), in tonnes, equals the total weight of the aircraft before take-off
without the fuel. It includes passengers, crew, baggage, cargo and catering
Great Circle Distance (GCD), in kilometres, equals the shortest distance between the
published Aerodrome Reference Points (ARP) of the origin and destination airports
Block Fuel (BF), in litres, equals the fuel consumed during the flight, from gate to gate
This new metric measures all undertaken fuel saving opportunities by an aircraft operator
as well as providing direction to improve their daily operations. It is applicable to all types of
aviation business: full economy, three-class configurations, cargo, executive and new aircraft,
and all types of flights including positioning, delivery and maintenance.
More information on this new fuel efficiency metric can be found in Emirates latest
environment report at www.emirates.com/environment.
6

Canadas mixed signals


on competition
Canada is rightly pursuing a policy that will allow greater
foreign competition in the wireless telecommunications
sector.
The response from the dominant domestic providers sounds familiar to those who follow
debates about international air access in the worlds protected aviation markets: doomsday
prophecies of job losses, allegations of unfair competition from international companies and
a nationalistic call to protect and promote industrial champions.
Fortunately, the Canadian Government is holding firm and standing up for the consumer
interest over this predictable fear-mongering. In commenting on the lobbying by the
domestic incumbents, Prime Minister Stephen Harper stated [W]e certainly understand
that these are important Canadian companies that make a good contribution to our economy
and our society That said, the ultimate responsibility of government is not to act in the
interests of companies but to act in the broader public interest.
Industry Minister James Moore added on his website that Canadian consumers know
instinctively that more competition will serve their families well through better service and
lower prices.
The consumer interest should always be paramount in discussions about competition,
whether for telecommunications, aviation or any other sector. Consumers always win when
competition is enhanced, something they inherently understand including with aviation.

Benefits of wireless
competition
Better service
Lower prices
Consumer demand

R
R
R

Benefits of airline
competition
Better service
Lower prices
Consumer demand

R
R
R

For example, an April 2013 poll from the Consumers Association of Canada found that
77% of Canadians believe allowing more foreign airlines to fly to Canada will lead to more
competition for their travel dollar and better travel options the same type of benefits the
Canadian Government envisions for the wireless sector.

How to fight international competition


Air Canada.com: The dispute between Canada and the UAE over air traffic rights boils
down to the importance of a level playing field for competition between the domestic
carriers of each country and between the major hub airports of each country.
Bell Canada: Bell, Telus and Rogers have all clearly stated many times that the
Canadian industry has no issue with Verizons entry into Canada but they just want a
level playing field.

Consumers want choice for air travel or any other service

They said it best...


Open Sky brings you the best quotes on liberalisation,
alliances, aeropolitical protection, free and fair trade,
economic policy and global business.

Travel is an industry that helps to keep our economy moving and helps connect us to the
world in a time of increasing global interdependence. Boundaries are dissolving, but travel
is still one of the best ways to understand whats happening. - Hillary Clinton, former
Secretary of State, U.S. Senator and First Lady
There is a level playing field we get screwed everywhere.
Willie Walsh, CEO, International Airlines Group

Jeff Smisek,
CEO United Airlines

I would compare the policies of


United Arab Emirates, which has
done a terrific job recognizing the
value of transportation, of travel.
Theyre quite supportive. And by
support, I dont mean subsidies.
I mean understanding the value
and the jobs this industry drives.

The Middle East is a critically important market for New Zealand and the increased capacity
on this route demonstrates the attractiveness of Dubai as a destination for New Zealanders.
It will also help stimulate trade between our two countries The additional capacity this
third A380 brings is equivalent to an extra 100,000 seats on the route, and an additional
$100 million to our economy, every year Adrian Littlewood, Chief Executive Officer,
Auckland Airport
On my last flight on Emirates, I took 15 pages of notes!
Alexandre de Juniac, Chairman and CEO, Air France-KLM
The transatlantic market, for its part, is all but a triopoly now, dominated by oneworld,
SkyTeam and Star joint ventures. Airline Weekly
Today, the big three alliances have 59 members between them. Efforts to swell their ranks
will not be helped by members growing penchants for eloping with their nearest and
dearest. The Economist
Canadian consumers know instinctively that more competition will serve their families well
through better service and lower prices. James Moore, Canadian Minister for Industry
If the government really believed in putting consumers first, it wouldnt confine itself to
wireless telephony. It would also be opening the domestic market in airlines, in agriculture, in
banking, all of which remain protected backwaters. Andrew Coyne, columnist,
National Post
Transport Canada should get an award from the Seattle Chamber of Commerce for driving
so much business to that city over Vancouver through its policy of restricting access of
foreign carriers to the Canadian market.
Bruce Cran, President, Consumers Association of Canada
Liberalisation gave airlines the possibility to freely define their networks and their prices
which led to the creation of new commercial offerings based on innovative products. This
enabled a real democratization of air transport.
French General Commission on Strategy and Economic Foresight
Regional governments are focusing their attention on developing civil aviation, but we need
to develop with them together, integrating planning for airport construction and rational
layout, while strengthening the strategic role of civil aviation in national and regional
economic and social development.
Li Jiaxiang, Vice Minister of Transport, Administrator of the CAAC
Regulators are micro-managing our businesses, telling us how we may advertise our
services, how long we must hold a reservation that has not been paid for and how we are to
manage operational disruptions regardless of the cause. These regulations impose a huge
penalty on the economy and ultimately raise the cost of air travel for all consumers.
Tony Tyler, IATA DG and CEO

New Silk Road: Supporting


Spains export growth
The New Silk Road, connecting Spain to markets on the
other side of the globe via Dubai, is helping the country to
grow its exports.
Spain is posting strong export figures which are supporting the countrys economic recovery.
Deputy Trade Minister Jaime Garcia-Legaz Ponce recently predicted exports will hit recordlevels in 2013 as the country continues to improve its competitiveness.
Emirates SkyCargo is a key link in the chain that connects Spain to the rest of the world.
Operating from Madrid, Barcelona and Zaragoza goods travel to Dubai and beyond with most
exports going to countries such as Australia, China, India, and Indonesia. Spain is well known
for its textile and footwear industry, being the home of some of the most famous high-street
fashion chains in the world, and it is therefore unsurprising that these goods top the ranking
of the most exported commodities.
Emirates cargo volume for all Spanish origin points has grown 44% over the last 12 months
year-on-year. Part of this growth was taken up by some very special on-board guests. This
summer, Emirates shipped nearly 700 falcons from Barcelona to Dubai. And for an exhibition
in Brisbane, Australia showcasing masterpieces from the Prado Museum in Madrid, Emirates
transported what was the largest and most significant international loan the Madrid Prado
museum had ever undertaken. It is also the first time the Prados material was displayed in
the Southern Hemisphere. Quite the honour.
Zaragoza Barcelona
Madrid

Beijing

Falcons
Fashion

Dubai

Footwear

Mumbai

Art

Jakarta

Brisbane

Emirates recruitment in Spain


At a time when Spain is recovering from the financial
crisis, Emirates has increased its recruitment of Spanish
employees from across the country, mainly for cabin crew.
Oviedo

Bilbao

Vigo
Zaragoza
Madrid
Valencia
Alicante
Seville

Granada
Malaga

Murcia

Girona
Barcelona

Emirates has conducted


cabin crew recruitment
campaigns in Madrid,
Barcelona, Alicante,
Bilbao, Girona, Gran
Canaria, Granada,
Malaga, Marbella,
Murcia, Oviedo, Seville,
Tenerife, Valencia, Vigo
and Zaragoza.

373 Spanish cabin crew


43 staff employed

in Spain

Emirates cabin crew


campaigns held in
16 Spanish cities

Marbella

Tenerife Gran Canaria

Five years of the Emirates A380


In August, Emirates celebrated the fifth anniversary of
A380 operations.
Emirates has been indelibly associated with Europes largest passenger aircraft since April
2000 when it became the first carrier to announce plans to purchase the super-jumbo.
As the largest customer for the A380, Emirates is therefore the largest supporter of
European aerospace manufacturing jobs tied to the aircraft programme, which is spread
across Airbus manufacturing centres in France, Germany, England and Spain.

35
21
37

A380

IN FLEET

A380

DESTINATIONS

Emirates

A380

20,000
ROUND TRIP
FLIGHTS

265

MILLION
PASSENGERS FLOWN

1,900

KILOMETRES

HONG KONG-BANGKOK
SHORTEST A380 FLIGHT

AIRPORTS VISITED

Years of

18

11,023

KILOMETRES

DUBAI-NEW YORK JFK


LONGEST A380 FLIGHT

669 A380
MILLION

KILOMETRES
FLOWN

FLIGHT DECK CREW

7,124 A380
CABIN CREW

Airport landing charges


in perspective
Dubai is not the cheapest airport Emirates flies to, nor the
most expensive. On average, Middle East airports feature
lower charges than in Europe, which has some of the highest.
What airlines are charged for handling, landing and parking charges, or are perceived to
pay, has from time to time become a contentious political issue. But often lost in this
debate is an airlines cost mix for charges based on its fleet composition.
Because Emirates operates wide-bodied, heavy aircraft on long-haul sectors, the cost per
flight is on average considerably higher than other airlines, as airports charge higher fees for
heavier aircraft. Thus, for example, the average European network airline, with huge shorthaul operations and lower associated over-flight, handling, landing and parking charges, will
have lower costs on a per flight basis. Whats more, some European airports offer discounted
rates for intra-EU flights discounts that do not exist for carriers operating regional flights
to/from Dubai International Airport.
Air France-KLM, for example, paid $4.2 billion on landing and handling charges in 2012,
compared with $1.5 billion for Emirates. This can be explained by their much larger flight
schedule - 1.5 million flights over the period, compared with 143,000 for Emirates. Thus
on a per flight basis, the figures suggest Emirates paid about four times more per flight on
landing, handling and parking across its network than did Air France-KLM.

10

Emirates supports Milans push


for transfer traffic

Fifth freedom
flights are a
fraction of
Emirates total
passenger network:
they accounted for
10% of ASKs in
2003 but only 5%
in 2013
- CAPA

Emirates new service between Dubai and New York JFK via Milan opened October 1 and
will support Italys ViaMilano project aimed at developing Milan Malpensa Airport as a
transfer hub.
The services were authorised by ENAC, the Italian Civil Aviation Authority, on an extrabilateral basis. It comes at a time when the airport is courting new frequencies and
operators to support a 15 billion expansion project.
Why Milan-JFK? Emirates is offering a unique product on an underserved route. Alitalia
decided to focus international operations at Rome, Lufthansa ceased its Lufthansa Italia
subsidiary in 2011, and Delta Air Lines recently reduced its seasonal summer operations
from Atlanta to Milan.
With the Emirates service, Milan-New York, with 35 weekly flights, is now on par with services
from similar European airports such as Zurich, while Frankfurt is connected with 49 weekly
flights and Paris CDG with 74 weekly flights to New York.
In addition, Emirates will introduce the only first class offering on the route and the only
service to offer consistent, year-round daily service, whereas other airlines serving the route
such as United Airlines and American Airlines reduce operations during the winter.
The route will also benefit from Emirates codeshare and interline partners JetBlue and
easyJet.
Fifth freedom operations from Europe to the US are not unusual where market demand
exists, and several carriers are exercising fifth freedom traffic rights via Europe to New York
in particular.
The US Governments Open Skies policy has endorsed the concept of fifth freedom
operations since its inception in the 1990s. Providing carriers with the commercial flexibility
to operate fifths if market conditions warrant is a standard element of all US Open Skies
agreements, and US carriers led by Delta at Tokyo Narita avail themselves of the opportunity
to rely on them.
Deltas extensive fifth freedom routes in Asia include daily services between Tokyo Narita
and Bangkok, Beijing, Hong Kong, Manila, Shanghai, Singapore and Taipei; and five weekly
services between Nagoya and Manila.

266 tonnes

weekly cargo capacity on Emirates


flights between Milan-JFK

Fifth freedom intermediate and beyond operations between


Europe and the US are not unusual

Singapore Airlines (Singapore-Frankfurt-JFK, Singapore-Moscow-Houston)


Jet Airways (Mumbai-Brussels-Newark)
Kuwait Airways (Kuwait-London Heathrow-JFK)
Pakistan International Airlines (Karachi-Lahore-Manchester-JFK)
Air New Zealand (Auckland-Los Angeles-London Heathrow)
Air Tahiti Nui (Papeete-Los Angeles-Paris CDG)
Uzbekistan Airways (Tashkent-Riga-JFK)

Global finance: Spill-over


benefits from airline competition
Protectionist arguments about competition between airlines
often miss the important spill-over benefits from the airline
industry.
Since 1996, Emirates has borrowed US$36.5 billion from lending institutions worldwide,
led by US$15.5bn in Europe and US$10bn in the US, providing an economic stimulus to the
financial sectors in both regions.

Emirates aircraft funding


1996-2013
Middle East
US$5.2bn

US
US$10bn
Africa
Asia
US$110m US$657m

Europe
US$15.5bn

Bonds
US$5bn

11

From orphans to
academic overachievers
Four children from Beyond the Orphanage in Addis Ababa
are celebrating excellent results on their university
entrance exams.
The Ethiopian organisation, which serves children in need by reaching out to orphans through
their drop-in centre, is sponsored by the Emirates Airline Foundation.
Beyond the Orphanage provides tutoring for kids after school as well as a library and
computer centre. It also offers counseling for children and a medical clinic. In addition, they
help to buy clothes and teach practical skills, aiding in career development.
Thanks to the support of the Emirates Airline Foundation and the generosity of Emirates
customers, the children here are blossoming with belief, said Geoff Hucker, the
organisations founder.

Fast Facts

Aircraft in fleet
Number of destinations
Passengers (2012-13)
Cargo (2012-13)
Passenger Seat Factor (2012-13)
Employees - Airline (2012-13)
Emirates dedicated lounges
Number of on-board meals a day
Emirates flights daily
Financial Auditor
Financials (Airline - 2012-13)
Fuel Costs (Airline - 2012-13)
First flight
Longest flight
New passenger routes (2013-14)

206
135
39.4 million
2.08 million tonnes
80%
47,678
35
150,000
420 (arrivals and departures)
PwC
Revenue US$19.39 billion, profit US$622 million
US$7.6 billion
25 October 1985
Dubai - Los Angeles (16 hours 20 minutes)
Haneda, Stockholm, Manila-Clark, Milan-New York,
Conakry, Sialkot, Kabul, Kiev, Taipei and Boston

A380 fleet
Boeing fleet

37 (on order 53)


132 (on order 64)

St. Petersburg

Stockholm

Gothenburg
Moscow
Glasgow
Copenhagen
Newcastle
Manchester Hamburg
Dublin
Amsterdam
Birmingham
Warsaw
Dusseldorf
London
Kiev
Liege
Prague
Paris
Frankfurt
Zurich
Vienna
Geneva Munich
Lyon Milan Venice
Nice
Zaragoza
Rome
Istanbul
Madrid
Barcelona
Lisbon
Athens
Tunis
Algiers
Larnaca
Malta
Casablanca
Tripoli
Cairo

Seattle
Toronto
Chicago
San Francisco
Los Angeles

Boston
New York
Washington, DC

Dallas/Fort Worth

Graphic illustration only, not a complete representation or to scale. 2013. Emirates. All rights reserved.

Houston

Dakar

Khartoum

Kano

Djibouti
Addis Ababa

Conakry
Abidjan

Accra Lagos

Luanda

Dubai

Chennai
Bengaluru
Kozhikode
Kochi
Thiruvananthapuram Colombo

Eldoret
Nairobi

Dar es Salaam

Lusaka
Harare

Tokyo
Osaka

Shanghai

Middle East Network


Erbil

Taipei
Hong Kong

Clark
Manila
Bangkok
Ho Chi Minh City

Phuket
Kuala Lumpur
Singapore

Seychelles

Medina
Jeddah

Jakarta

Mauritius

Johannesburg

Brisbane

Route Map
October 2013

Perth
Adelaide
Melbourne

Sydney
Auckland

Christchurch

Passenger Routes
Freighter Routes
Passenger & Freighter Routes
---- Proposed Passenger Routes for 2014

Please visit our website for more information on our international and government affairs and environment activities
www.emirates.com or write to us igea@emirates.com

12

Dammam
Bahrain
Doha

Riyadh

Sanaa

Lilongwe

Durban

Tehran

Baghdad
Beirut
Amman Damascus
Basra
Kuwait

Rio de Janeiro

Cape Town
Buenos Aires

Seoul

Mal
Entebbe

Viracopos
So Paulo

Beijing
Peshawar
Islamabad
Sialkot
Lahore
Delhi
Karachi
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