ODCPL Information

The Library...where all you need is imagination and a
Library card to enter a world of information.

November 2016

Volume 18 Issue 11

416 James Street
Ozark, Alabama 36360
Phone (334) 774-5480
E-mail: olibrary@troycable.net
http://www.odcpl.com
Facebook.com/ozarklibrary

Board of Directors
Earl Hyers
Marie Black
Marian Jenkins
Library Staff
Full Time Staff
Director
Part Time Staff
Genealogy/Reference Librarian
Head Circulation Clerk
Processor
Circulation Clerk
Children’s Librarian
Cataloger
Bookkeeper
IT/WebMaster
IT
Custodian

Imogene Mixson
Beverly Raley
Sandra J. Holmes
Jocelyn Rayford
Holly Burns
Karen Speck
Darnell Johnson
Ruth Rosentrater
Lou Harry
Donna Snell
Michael Walden
Jeff Devine
Victoria Spellman

Statistics for October 2016

Circulation
Attendance
New Materials
Site Visits
Borrowers on Roll
Employment Searches
Internet Users
Genealogy Users
E-Books

6,587
10,036
400
296,640
9,630
3,690
3,024
534
707

Quote of the Month
For books are more than books, they are
the life, the very heart and core of ages past, the
reason why men lived and worked and died, the
essence and quintessence of their lives.
--Amy Lowell

Dale County Genealogical/ Historical Society

The Society will meet Monday, November 7th in the Alice
Doughtie Wing of the Library at 6:00. Everyone is invited
to attend.

LIBRARY HOURS
Tuesday through Thursday
10:00 a.m.— 7:00 p.m.
Friday and Saturday
10:00 a.m.— 5:00 p.m.
Closed on Sunday & Monday

Page 2

FROM THE DIRECTOR
Finally, we are getting some cooler weather! The
days are beautiful, the farmers are harvesting their cotton
and peanuts, and many are preparing their gardens for
fall planting.
Thanks to the Claybank Master Gardeners, our
landscape is looking good. This past Saturday was Make
a Difference Day (MADD) and our devoted group
volunteered their time to trim, prune, weed, mulch, and
generally clean up our area. Thank you!
To start off our holiday season, the Library is
offering fine-free days that will last from now and
continue until January 6, 2017. This means that if you
have overdue materials or outstanding fines, you may
bring in one non-perishable item for each $4.00 you owe.
This is a great way for you to get your fines forgiven and
help those less fortunate in our community. We will
donate the items collected to the Rescue Mission for
distribution.
Remember to mark your calendar for our special
District-wide Town Hall Meeting scheduled for
Wednesday, November 2 from 11:00 until 1:30 in the
West Wing of the Library. Our community will have the
opportunity to say what they think about Alabama’s
public libraries, what they value in libraries, and what
they think libraries should provide. The people who
come down from Montgomery will use your input to
develop the state’s 5-year Plan for Library Development
in Alabama. This is your opportunity to state your
opinion and help us plan for future Library needs.
We continue with our Dialogues on the Experiences
of War with our next meeting scheduled for Thursday,
November 17 at 6:30. If you are a veteran and would
like to participate, give us a call at 774-5480.
The Board and Staff wish all a Happy Thanksgiving.

Thanksgiving
Jocelyn Ross Rayford
Did our Thanksgiving originate with the settlers of
Plymouth, Massachusetts, or the settlers of St.
Augustine (a.k.a. “The Oldest City in the United
States”)?
Most of us assume our “Thanksgiving Day” came
from the colony to the north. However, according to an
article written by Stephanie Pappa of LiveScience, it was
neither. As the United States grew, Jewish, Italians,
Chinese, and many other nationalities poured into our
country. In the 17th and 18th Centuries as they became

Thanksgiving (Continued)
“Americanized”, it was these new citizens who chose the
Plymouth style of giving thanks. Family dinner was made
the center of a holiday that President Lincoln, in the midst
of the Civil War in 1863, proclaimed to be “a day of
Thanksgiving and Praise”, to take place in homes across
the nation. His proclamation took place during the last
week in November, even though “The War Between the
States” was devastating many lives.
Since the nation’s Civil War was fought primarily on
Southern soil, families from the South were slower to
adopt his proclamation, especially in the manner of the
Pilgrims of Massachusetts. When Southern families began
to celebrate the founding of our nation with a special
dinner, they introduced new and delicious dishes from the
bounty they grew. The most popular foods are those that
owe their origin to Southern and African-American
cultural heritage-- they are the sweet potato and rice. It
was the African workers who knew how to cultivate these
crops and cook them into delicious dishes. Rice was often
used as an ingredient for making the stuffing for the turkey
or for making pudding. Sweet potatoes were used instead
of pumpkins for making pies. It is not unusual in Southern
homes to make both pumpkin and sweet potato pies for
family and guests.
Early in the Twentieth Century, marshmallows were
invented. Today baked sweet potatoes are served under a
layer of baked marshmallows. It is now a traditional
Thanksgiving/Christmas dish of the South. Another
Twentieth Century traditional dish is that of green beans
topped by cream of mushroom soup covered by baked
onions. This 20th Century dish is usually everyone’s
favorite.
The oldest tradition of the Southern celebration is
“corn bread”. Deriving from Native American and West
African grains, cornbread was used as a traditional turkey
stuffing, instead of the oysters used by northern families to
stuff their turkeys. Corn bread is served as bread, an
especial treat eaten with butter or gravy.
In the South of today, one of the oldest American foods
still served at a Thanksgiving dinner is a tamale. Tamales
are served for Thanksgiving in Florida and Texas and now,
at the homes of young people. Another old-fashioned food
still popular today is cranberry sauce, normally eaten with
roasted turkey. In fact, even the process of roasting the
turkey is changing; some prefer to deep-fry turkey for
Thanksgiving.
While our food may reflect the region of the country
where we live, as well as its former occupants, “the South”
has kept the 1863 tradition of President Lincoln alive by
celebrating with old and new food traditions created from
its great bounty.

Page 3

NEW MATERIALS
BEST SELLER--FICTION
All Summer Long by Dorothea Benton Frank
Angels’ Share by J.R. Ward
Apartment by Danielle Steel
Because of Miss Bridgerton by Julia Quinn
Belgravia by Julian Fellowes
Black Tide Rising by John Ringo
Black Widow by Daniel Silva
Colorado Christmas by William W. Johnstone
Crazy Blood by T. Jefferson Parker
Daughters of the Bride by Susan Mallery
Deadly Fate by Heather Graham
Defender by Diana Palmer
Dishonorable Intentions by Stuart Woods
Fallout by Harry Turtledove
Flawless by Heather Graham
Forgive Me by Daniel Palmer
Hide Away by Iris Johansen
High Heat by Richard Castle
Home by Harlan Coben
House of Daniel by Harry Turtledove
Ink and Bone by Lisa Unger
Innocents by Ace Atkins
Killer Look by Linda Fairstein
Obsession by Nora Roberts
Once a Rancher by Linda Lael Miller
Precious and Grace by Alexander McCall Smith
BESTSELLER NONFICTION
By Honor Bound (BS 959.7 NOR)
Good or God? (BS 231.8 BEV)
Killing the Rising Sun (BS 940.54 ORE)
Lynching: The Epic Courtroom Battle that Brought
Down the Klan (BS 364.13 LEA)
Sinatra: the Chairman (BS 782.42 KAP)
BEST SELLER—LARGE PRINT
Amish Bride of Ice Mountain by Kelly Long
Anna’s Healing by Vannetta Chapman
Firefly Summer by Nan Rossiter
Ink and Bone by Lisa Unger
Just a Kiss by Denise Hunter
Killing Game by Nancy Bush
Little Red Chairs by Edna O’Brien
Occupied by Craig Parshall
Once Upon a Wine by Beth Kendrick
Road We Traveled by Jane Kirkpatrick
Saffire by Sigmund Brouwer
Second Opinion by Hannah Alexander
Thomas Kinkade’s Cape Light by Katheine Spencer
Widowmaker by Paul Doiron

MEMORIAL/HONORARIUM GIFTS
In Honor of
Lonnell Matthews

Donor
Ozark Literary Club
Donors

Wiregrass United Way
Friends of the Library
Alpha Kappa Chapter
William Chesser
Denise Reyes
Sue Switzer
Berta Blackwell
Wayne Darling
Darrell Spraggins

Jack Cumbie
Ozark Literary Club
Ann Darling
The Bookman
Brenda Glenn
Mary E. Garrett
Larry Mobley
Mrs. Betty S. Brown
Dennis Hatcher

Donations for Building Improvement Fund
Bette Byrd
Dr. Robert Crosby
Mary Garrett

HOLIDAY SCHEDULE
November 11-12—Closed for Veteran’s Day
November 24-26—Closed for Thanksgiving
December 23-26—Closed for Christmas
December 30-31—Closed for New Year’s
January 1-2—Closed for New Year’s

Have A Happy Veteran’s
Day, Happy Thanksgiving,
Merry Christmas, and A
Very Happy New Year!
Dialogues on the Experience of War
Join us on November 17th at 6:30pm in the
West Wing of the Library for discussion on the
movie The Big Parade.

FROM THE FRIENDS
By Chris Wisham, President
We have a Buy One Get One Free (BOGO) book sale coming up on Saturday, November 5th. It will be held
from 9am till 12 noon at the library. There is still time to swing by the library and pick up your yard sign. We would
like to thank a small group of students from Carroll High School for helping out the book room ladies with the set-up
and the take down of all the books and tables needed to host the book sale. This is the last scheduled book sale of the
year. Early plans have the big plant, book, and bake sale set to be held in March of 2017.
On October 11th the Friends of the Library (FOL) hosted our last community event of the year. We served a
light lunch to accompany the presentation. We had Vernon Johnson, the Administrative Director of the Dale
Medical Center, give a talk on “The Future of the Dale Medical Center and the Medicaid funding crisis”. In the last
5 years 10 rural hospitals have closed in Alabama. Dale Medical Center (DMC) operates with a 1% profit margin
which makes replacing medical equipment, adding new departments, or more staff very difficult. If DMC were to
ever close it would result in the loss of over 400 jobs. DMC is more than just a 50 plus bed hospital. It has
medically related units like the Surgery Center, Stat Med, hospice, New Day, a swing bed rehab unit, home health,
drug rehab and addiction unit, and an urgent care center, just to name a few associated enterprises. It is without a
doubt that the many doctor offices and pharmacies here in Ozark would be greatly reduced in number with the loss of
DMC.
We can proudly say that out of over 6,000 plus hospitals in the United States, The Dale Medical Center rated in
the top 10% in patient care and satisfaction in regards to its Emergency Room (ER) operations. The ER is to so
many people the face of a hospital. I myself was diagnosed at Stat Med with an infection and sent over to DMC. I
spent a week in the hospital and was very pleased with the treatment and services that I received during my stay at
The Dale Medical Center.
The next board meeting of the Friends of the Library will be held at 10:30 am at the library on Wednesday,
November 9th. A slate of new officers for 2017 has been decided upon and will be presented to the general
membership on January 30th for election. The events committee will also present its proposed calendar of events to
the board.
`

NOVEMBER 2016

````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

1

2 Town Hall
Meeting—11
Noon—AA

3
10:30—Story Time
4:30—Story Time

4
Noon—AA
2—IPad & Smart
Phone Class
6:30—NAR-ANON

5 FOL Book Sale—9
9-10—Computer Class

10
10:30—Story Time
2:30—Writers Forum
4:30—Story Time

11 Noon—AA
6:30—NAR-ANON

12

Veteran’s Day
Library Closed

Library Closed

17 10:30—Story Time
4:30—Story Time
6:30—Dialogues on
the Experience of
War

18 Noon—AA
2—IPad & Smart
Phone Class
6:30—NAR-ANON

19

24
Happy Thanksgiving

25
Noon—AA

26

6:30—NAR-ANON

Library Closed

Noon—Color Therapy

6

13

20

7
10—Book Work Day
Noon—AA
6—Gen/His Society

8
Noon—AA
7—AA

14
10—Book Work Day
Noon—AA

15
Noon—AA

21
10—Book Work Day
Noon—AA

9
10:30—FOL Board
Noon—AA
Noon—Color Therapy

Noon—FOL Program

7—AA

22
Noon—AA
7—AA

16
9—Library Board
Noon—AA
Noon—Color Therapy

23
Noon—AA
Noon—Color Therapy

6—Concerned Citizens

27

28
10—Book Work Day
Noon—AA

Library Closed

29
Noon—AA
7—AA

30
Noon—AA
Noon—Color Therapy

Library Closed

10—Art Class—children

1—Pokémon

9-10—Computer Class
10—Art Class—children

1—Pokémon