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WING MON DAY

2 0 W I N G S - M I X N M AT C H

2050 N. Kansas Ayr Lanes @ Billys 620-626-4400

2 D O ME S TI C D R AW S

LEADER&TIMES
Muhammad Ali dies at age 74 PAGE 6A

SUNDAY June 5, 2016

Arheart celebrates
40 years of service
By ELLY GRIMM
Leader & Times

The Seward County Court Services helps prepare


pre-sentencing investigation reports for all felony
cases, helps supervise adult felony and adult misdemeanor probation cases, and the rare juvenile case.
Since June 1976, Robert Arheart has worked for
the Court Services as the Chief Court Services

N See ARHEART/Page 3A

Not-for-profit
funding requests
due by June 30
City of Liberal

Applications for Not-for-Profit Funding Requests


for the 2017 budget year are available at City Hall at
324 N. Kansas. The applications are due to the City
of Liberal by June 30.
For more information, contact the Administration
Department at 626-2201.

Overlay to
begin Monday

Bee Jays open


with a win

PAGE 8A
Former Bee Jay
manager Adam
Anderson, right,
and Bee Jay Cale
ODonnell unveil
the bronze
statue of Kaiser
Carlile Friday.
The statue will
be permanently
displayed at
Brent Gould
Field. Kaiser was
the batboy for
the Liberal Bee
Jays last season
and was
accidentally
struck by a
practice swing
during the NBC
World Series in
Wichita. He died
the next day, but
the family and
team rallied
togther along
with a city, state
and nation. L&T
photo/Earl Watt

ARHEART

Arheart has been the Chief Court


Services Officer for the 26th Judicial
District since June of 1976

PLAY BALL

Kaiser continues to inspire


By EARL WATT
Leader & Times
The helmet still seems big for the young Kaiser Carlile, but that is
exactly how it was when the 9-year-old hustled after bats and foul
balls a year ago.
The optimistic smile of Kaiser will be shared with future
generations who come to Brent Gould Field on the campus of
Seward County Community College after a bronze statue was
unveiled during opening ceremonies Friday for the Bee Jays season.
Kaiser was serving as Liberals batboy at the NBC World Series
in Wichita in August when he was accidentally struck by a practice
swing. He died the next day.
But his family and the Bee Jays rallied together along with the
cities of Liberal and Wichita, and support poured in from around
the globe.
That support helped the team and family cope with the tragedy.
After four years of coaching the Bee Jays, a long stint for a
summer program coach, Adam Anderson did not return this season
to coach, but he did come back to Liberal to be a part of the
unveiling ceremony Friday.
It was a terrible situation, Anderson said. It took all of us in
the baseball community quite a while to deal with it. Everyone
deals with it in a different way. For me, going back to the school
where I work and getting involved in baseball with our fall practice
really helped. For me to do my job, I would have to get back out
there on the baseball field, and it gave me a new sense of why I love
what I do. The whole baseball community coming together was
really special. It affirms why I love this job and why the Bee Jay
organization is the best around.
After the accident, the Bee Jays continued to battle through the Kaiser Carliles grandmother, Kim Carlile, looks at the statue of her grandson Friday
tournament and eventually finished third in the nation. The KC
night at Brent Gould Field. After losing her grandson to a tragic accident at the NBC
lettering was seen throughout Lawrence Dumont Stadium by fans of
World Series, Kaisers grandfather
all participating teams, and those shirts were also on display around
and her husband Alan Carlile
Brent Gould Field for opening night Friday when the statue was
died within the same year.
unveiled.
She finds comfort, she
said, in returning to
For Anderson, who coached the team through the tragedy, the family encouraged the
Brent Gould Field
players to continue, and they put together a strong run.
to watch the Bee
It speaks to the type of people that were on the team, to their character, the
Jays play. L&T
mental toughness and the passion they felt for Kaiser, and knowing he would
photo/Earl Watt
want them to play hard, he said. So you dont put the emotions aside, but you
deal with the emotions and go out there and play baseball and do it because the
Kaiser
bond he had with them was so strong, and they knew that is what he would want
Carliles
them to be doing.
optimistic

N See KAISER/Page 7A

City of Liberal

The City of Liberal will start the Kansas Avenue


Overlay Project on Monday. The project will start at
15th Street down Kansas Avenue to Pine Street.
Please obey all traffic signs and markings.
New light poles will also be installed on Kansas
Avenue from 11th Street to Pine Street.
The City apologizes for any inconvenience, and
thanks the public for its patience.

Memorial Day decor to


be removed by Tuesday

approach to
the game of
baseball, even
as batboy, will
be on
permanent
display at
Brent Gould
Field when his
likeness in broze
was unveiled
Friday. Carlile was the
teams batboy last season
and died after beig
accidentally struck by
a practice swing at
the NBC
World
Series. L&T
photo/Earl
Watt

City of Liberal

The staff of the Liberal Cemetery and Restlawn


Memorial Gardens would like to remind the public
all flowers and decorations must be removed by
Tuesday. Any items not removed by this date will be
disposed of.

Kaiser Carliles younger sister Keirsie has an emotional moment after the
unveiling of the bronze statue at Brent Gould Field Friday along with her parents
Chad Carlile and Gayle Glenn. L&T photo/Earl Watt

Vol. 130 Iss. 358 16 Pa ges

www.leaderandtimes.com

Liberal, Ka nsas

SUND AY, J U N E 5, 2016

Obituaries

TODAY
Sunny, with a high of 86. Northwest
wind around 7 mph becoming east
northeast in the afternoon.

agendas hospital weather calendar

Tonight: Mostly clear, with a low

e-mail elly@hpleader.com

around 57.

LEADER
&TIMES
FOUNDED 1886

EARL WATT
President and Publisher
earl@hpleader.com

JESSICA CRAWFORD

obituaries
In Loving Memory

News Editor
news@hpleader.com

DENASA RICE
Business/Classified
Manager
denasa@hpleader.com

TREVOR FELDHAUSEN
Composing Manager
ads@hpleader.com

DANNY MORUA
Production Manager

CIRCULATION
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News Room E-mail:
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Classifieds E-mail:
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Advertising E-mail:
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Subscriptions rates for the City
of Liberal in town with tax are:
1 year at $111.60
6 months at $85.34
3 months at $59.08
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1 month at $19.69
Out of town in Kansas with tax
1 year at $179.18
6 months at $119.18
3 months at $73.52
1 month at $31.15
Outside of Kansas with no tax
1 year at $169.40
6 months at $111.32
3 months at $67.76
1 month at $29.04
Delivery areas include inside
Liberal, Ponderosa and inside
Turpin, Okla., Tyrone, Okla. and
Hooker, Okla.

ISN No.
26-2273494
The High Plains Daily
Leader&Times is published every
day except Saturday by Seward
County Publishing Company at
16 S. Kansas Ave., Liberal, KS
67901 and entered under
Periodicals Postage Paid at Post
Office in Liberal, Kan.
The publisher reserves the right
to refuse any contributed
material.

Postmaster: Send address


changes to:
High Plains Daily
Leader&Times, 16 S. Kansas
Ave., Liberal KS 67901.
Phone: (620) 626-0840
Fax: (620) 626-9854

If you miss your


paper, call
626-0840 or
624-2541 from
5 to 7 p.m.
Monday
through Friday
and
9 a.m. to noon
Sunday.

RICHARD DIXON
Richard Cressie Dixon, 87,
of Houston, Texas, and
formerly of Liberal, passed
away on May 28, 2016.
Born March 24, 1929 in
Guymon, Okla., Mr. Dixon
was the son of the late Homer
and Esta Una Dixon.
Richard married his first
wife, Georgianna Sweet, on
Aug. 27, 1950, who passed in
1998.
He is survived by his
devoted wife Charlotte
Hatcher Dixon, whom he
married on Sept. 18, 1999.
Richard had a wonderful
childhood in Guymon with his
family and best friend, Otto
Fritz, where he first enjoyed
lifelong hobbies of fishing,
swimming and hunting.
Richard was a Boy Scout
and attained the rank of Eagle
Scout.
President of his high school
senior class and captain of the
football team, Richard was
also an avid golfer and a proficient woodworker.
A 1952 graduate of the
University of Oklahoma, he
was employed by the
Panhandle Eastern Pipeline
Company, holding various
positions,
management
including
president
of
Anadarko Petroleum Corporation from 1968 until 1971,
when he was appointed Senior
Executive Vice President of
Panhandle Eastern Pipeline
Company, a job he held until
his retirement in 1989.
Richard was preceded in
death by his first wife,
Georgianna Sweet Dixon; his
brothers, James Dixon and
Homer E. Dixon, and sisterin-law, Marie; his sister FloyMarie Mickey Nash and
brother-in-law Howard; his
brother-in-law, Kenny Faris;
sister-in-law, Jane Ellison; and
his grandson, David Dixon.
Richard is survived by his
wife, Charlotte Hatcher
Dixon; sons, Richard P. and
wife, Marian, James Douglas,

and Daniel and wife, Missy;


stepson, Nick Hatcher and
wife, Lisa; grandchildren:
John, Anthony, Lyndsay
Dixie
Dixon,
Jessica
Ferguson and husband, Neal,
Ethan, Hunter, Lee and Elle
Rose Hatcher; great-granddaughter, Ashlin Ferguson;
sisters-in-law, Alice Margaret
Dixon and Eleanor Faris; and
many nieces, nephews, and
great-nieces and nephews.
Memorial services will be at
the First United Methodist
Church at 116 West 3rd Street,
Liberal at 2 p.m. on Tuesday,
June 7, 2016.
The family would like to thank
the Hallmark, in Houston,
Texas, where Richard had resided
for the last two years for their
wonderful care.
In lieu of flowers, the family
would like you to consider
donations to the First United
Methodist Church, 116 W. 3rd
St. Liberal, KS 67901 or the
Alzheimers Association of
Houston, 6055 South Loop
East, Houston, Texas 77087,
(713)
314-1313,
or
www.alz.org.
Paid obituary

hospital
SOUTHWEST MEDICAL
CENTER
FRIDAY
ADMISSIONS
None reported
DISCHARGES
Destiny Boles, Guymon, Okla.
BIRTHS
A son to Destiny Boles of
Guymon, Okla.
Total admissions: 9
Total discharges: 4

agendas
LIBERAL USD NO.
480 BOARD OF
EDUCATION
The next meeting of the
USD No. 480 Board of
Education will be at 6:30
p.m. on Monday, June 6 at
the Education Service Center
at 624 N. Grant.
New Agenda Item
Call to Order
Roll Call
Pledge of Allegiance
Opening Prayer
Approval of Minutes
a. 5/23/16 regular BOE
meeting
Approval of Agenda

Comments on the Floor


a. LNEA report
Reports
a. Superintendent
b. Director of Business
c. Director of HR/PR
Consent Agenda
a. Approval of consent
agenda
b. Level 3 grievance
c. Organizational Meeting
date
d. Staff Travel
e. Early Graduation application
f. Overnight student activity
trips
g. Employments, retirements, resignations and
transfers
Bills
New Business
a. Insurance Property and
Liability
b. Phase 3 Bond Project
c. AimsWeb renewal
d. Smart Net
e. AirWatch
f. Copiers
g. Kronos support
h. Lexia reading intervention
i. Stock supplies
j. Colored copy paper
k. SchoolDude subscriptions for 2016-2017
l. Cleaning for Health
program for Prairie View and
Eisenhower schools
m. Correction of meal
prices/menus for 2016-2017
n. SMS Planning Days
o. Policy Book K final
approval
p. Communities in School
Memorandum of Understanding
Board Comments
Executive Session
Adjournment

SEWARD COUNTY
COMMISSION
The next meeting of the
Seward County Commission
will be at 5:30 p.m. on
Monday, June 6 in the
Seward County
Administration Building in
the commission chambers
Suite 206.
Call to Order
Pledge of Allegiance
Invocation
Citizen Comments

Approve
agenda:
Additions or deletions
Consent Agenda
a. Minutes
b. Payroll
c. Vouchers
d. Escapes and abates
e. Crossing permits
f. Requisitions
New Employees
Presentation of Recruit
Class 16-1
Utility Savings Plus
update
Health Department
vehicle purchase
Grass Drill bid Landfill
Waiver of zoning regula-

2A

TOMORROW

Sunny, with a high near 89. South


southwest wind 7 to 10 mph.

L&T

Monday night: 20 percent chance of


showers and thunderstorms. Partly cloudy,
with a low around 60.
tions
Road Opening proposal
Fair Board appointment
Request For Qualification proposals (RFQ)
Administrator comments
Commission comments
Suggestion Cards
Adjournment
Minutes
a. Kismet Senior Center
b.
Local
Emergency
Planning Committee
c. Southwest Guidance
Center
d. Southwest Medical
Center

senior notes
Liberal Senior Center
Friendship Meals
Monday, June 6 Macaroni &
cheese with ham, broccoli and
cauliflower, salad, chilled melon,
and milk
Tuesday, June 7 Country
fried steak with gravy, whipped
potatoes, spinach and mushrooms,
blushing pears, and milk
Wednesday, June 8 Chicken
cordon bleu, wild rice, frozen baby
carrots, chilled peaches, and milk
Thursday, June 9 BBQ
chicken, baked beans, macaroni
salad, banana pudding, and milk
Friday, June 10 Crispy fish
filet, baked potato, seasoned
carrots, chunky applesauce, and
milk

Activities
Monday, June 6
8:30 a.m. Aerobics
9 a.m. Strong bodies
1 p.m. Pancake bridge
1 p.m. Chicken Scratch
Tuesday, June 7
9:45 a.m. Bible Study
1 p.m. Train
7 p.m. Bridge
Wednesday, June 8
8:30 a.m. Aerobics
9 a.m. Strong bodies
12 to 1 p.m. Picnic in the
Park
1 p.m. Pitch
Thursday, June 9
9 a.m. to noon SCCC art
classes
1 p.m. Hand and foot
1 to 4 p.m. SCCC art classes
4:30 p.m. Dinner and a movie
Friday, June 10
8:30 a.m. Aerobics
9 a.m. Coffee and rolls
1:30 p.m. Buck bingo
7 to 10 p.m. Happy Steppers
Dance (Oklahoma Cowboys
playing)
Saturday, June 11
Closed

calendar
TODAY
No events listed

MONDAY
Morning transportation for
persons age 55 and older is
available from 9 a.m. to noon and 1
to 4:30 p.m. Monday through
Friday through the Liberal Senior
Center. For more information or
to schedule a ride, call 624-2511.
Celebrate life from 6:30 to 8
p.m. at Assembly of God at 138 S.
Main in Hugoton. Park in the back
lot.
Al-Anon Family Group meets at
8 p.m. at 1405 Cemetery Road in
Hugoton. Call 620-544-2610 or
620-544-2854
for
more
information.
TUESDAY
Morning transportation for
persons age 55 and older is
available from 9 a.m. to noon and 1
to 4:30 p.m. Monday through
Friday through the Liberal Senior
Center. For more information or
to schedule a ride, call 624-2511.
New Community Missionary
Baptist Church hosts a food
cupboard beginning at 5:30 p.m.
every Tuesday. Residents in need
should bring identification to
receive services. The cupboard is
located at the Community
Missionary Baptist Educational
Center.
The Liberal Area Rape Crisis and
Domestic Violence Services
Womens Support Group will meet
at 7 p.m. at 909 N. Clay.
Weight Watchers meeting every
Tuesday evening at 6:30 p.m.
Doors open at 5 for registration
and weigh-ins. Come to 215 S.
Western to Western Avenue
Church of Christ. Questions? Call
580-651-5654.
Residents at Pioneer Manor in
Hugoton play Bingo at 2 p.m.
Community members are invited
to volunteer or play a game with
the residents.
Hugoton Masonic Lodge No.
406 meets at 7:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Morning transportation for
persons age 55 and older is
available from 9 a.m. to noon and 1
to 4:30 p.m. Monday through
Friday through the Liberal Senior
Center. For more information or to
schedule a ride, call 624-2511.

Read the Leader &


Times:
Its DAILY!

S U N D AY, J U N E 5 , 2 0 1 6

News

L&T

news@hpleader.com

3A

Crossroads Center to host


National Little Britches Rodeo
By ROBERT PIERCE
Leader &Times

A B O V E: Bo b A r h e a r t a n d h i s w i f e , M a r c a l a , t a l k to a n d F r a n k a n d N a n c y S c h w a r t z d u r i n g A r h e a r t s
r e c e p t i o n F r i d a y m o r n i n g . T h e r e c e p t i o n w a s to ce l e b r a t e B o b s 4 0 y e a r s o f w o r k i n g w i t h th e S e w a r d
C o u n t y C o u r t Se r v i c e s o f f i c e .
F R O N T P A G E : A p h o t o o f a y o u n g e r Bo b A r h e a r t d u r i n g h i s e ar l y d a y s w o r k i n g w i t h t h e S e w a r d C o u n t y
C o u r t S e r v i c e s o ff ic e . D u r in g h is 4 0 y e a r s o f w o r k i n g in t h e o ff i ce , A r h e ar t s a i d h e h a s s e e n s e v e r al
c han g es i n t he w ay t he wo r k g oe s. L&T photos/Elly Grimm

Arheart ...
O Continued from Page 1A

Officer for the 26th Judicial District. And he began his


career in Seward County thanks to an unlucky chance.
I had come back to visit my parents one weekend in
Elkhart during my senior of college, and ran into Mark
Roberts, who asked me what I was doing, Arheart
explained. I told him I was working at the Kansas
State Industrial Reformatory in Hutchinson, and his
eyes lit up. He was in a bad spot because his co-worker
in Garden City had recently had a heart attack, so
Mark was covering both the Garden City and Liberal
areas. He talked to his supervisor, and I interviewed
with him. Since I was already working with the
Department of Corrections, I was transferred to the
parole end of things, and started work here in Liberal
in June 1976. Ive basically been here since then.
Arhearts job search had begun much earlier,
however. After his first semester of his senior year of
college, he was looking for a job, and contacted a Judge
Duckworth, who told Arheart to come to Liberal meet
with Roberts who, at that time, was serving as the
probation parole officer for Seward County. The two
met up, and Roberts showed Arheart around. Then,
toward the end of the second semester of Arhearts
senior year of college, he interviewed with the
Department of Corrections, for whom he was not
hired at that time.
Nearly a year later, in March, Arheart went to work
with the Department of Corrections, which at that
time was called the Kansas State Industrial Reformatory in Hutchinson. Arheart spent some time with
the KSIR before running into Roberts again and
accepting his current job.
Arheart also admitted there was a very brief period
where he looked into a different line of work. During
that brief time, he realized he was unhappy, and
returned to his job with Court Services.
So what has kept Arheart so happy in his job after 40
years?

First of all, I really enjoy the work, Arheart said.


Second of all, after the brief time when I was looking
at different work, I came to realize this is what I was
supposed to be doing. So I decided if I was supposed
to be doing something else, an opportunity would be
created for me. Otherwise, this is where Im supposed
to be. The people I work with, both co-workers and the
people on probation, they have some interesting
backgrounds, and over the years, Ive met some real
characters.
In his tenure, Arheart has also noticed several
changes in the job. The first huge change he encountered was in 1979 with court unification. Prior to that,
Arheart said, probation services for felony cases were
handled by the Department of Corrections. In 1979,
Arheart continued, Court Services was created as part
of that court unification, so all probation work for
felony cases was then handled out of the district court,
meaning the office no longer handled the parole cases
at that time for the incoming felony interstate compact
cases, just the court cases.
The second big change, Arheart said, was in 1993,
when sentencing guidelines came into play. Prior to
sentencing guidelines, Arheart said, Kansas used an
indeterminate sentencing system, and the office
switched over to the guidelines in 1993, which significantly changed the way cases were processed.
With only a few more years until Arheart has to think
about retirement, he looks forward to continuing
working with his co-workers and clients, as well as
helping training his eventual successor.
When you talk about only being here another
couple years after already being here for 40 years, thats
a relatively short time, Arheart said with a chuckle.
Ive been very fortunate, since I started out, having
some good people as mentors and teachers. Mark
Roberts and Pat Keeley were my first two supervisors,
and Judge Duckworth was the first judge I worked with
until 1993. I learned an awful lot from those people,
not just about the job, but also about how to treat
people, how to work with people, and try to get the
results you want out of a situation without using an
iron fist.

On June 11 and 12, the rodeo


arena at the Seward County
Fairgrounds will have some young
men and women doing their best
to stay on the backs of animals or,
in some cases, tying their legs
together.
These are just some of the
events that will take place as
Crossroads Center presents a
National Little Britches Rodeo on
Saturday afternoon and Sunday
morning at the arena.
This is the second year the local
agency will host an NLBR, and
Crossroads Director Rena Cross
said this years rodeo will feature
belt buckles donated by Liberal
optometrist Dr. Dora Davis.
We are very excited, Cross
said.
Buckles will be awarded in five
divisions Little Wrangler, junior
boys, junior girls, senior boys and
senior girls in a wide variety of
events.
Theyre going to have goat
tying, bull riding, barrels, calf
roping, Cross said. Thats the
basic ones, but I know theyve got
quite a few events.
The initial Crossroads NLBR
took part in large part with rainy
weather, but Cross said conditions
for this years event should be
significantly different.
It looks like its going to be 95
degrees, she said. Make sure
everybody has lots of water.
For those who get hungry while
watching the rodeo, Liberals VFW
post will be providing concessions,
and Cross said other vendors will
be on hand as well.
Southwest Medical Center will
be out there taking blood
pressures, she said.
Seaboard Foods will provide
part of the concessions for the
NLBR with pork, and Sunday
morning will bring breakfast
burritos for spectators.
Admission to the rodeo is $1 or
a non-perishable food item at the
gate. Food donations will go to the
Liberal Food Bank.
The Crossroads rodeo is part of
a nationwide circuit, and Cross
said this provides cowpokes with a
little extra incentive to compete
well.
The better they ride, the more
points they get, she said. This is
a circuit thing. This weekend, I
think theyre doing Dodge City.
The weekend before that, I think it
was Tulsa. Theyre going from

A young lady in the singles version of calf roping prepares to throw


the rope to catch her calf at last years National Little Britches
Rodeo to benefit Crossroads. This years event will take place June
11 and 12 at the rodeo arena at the Seward County Fairgrounds.
L&T photo/Robert Pierce
Tulsa to Dodge City and now to
Liberal. I think theyre pretty
happy about being able to come
back to Liberal and compete.
The Crossroads NLBR is
sponsored locally by
gold
sponsors National Beef, Red
Angus, the Liberal Convention
and Visitors Bureau, American
Title and Abstract Specialists,
Southwest Medical Center, Crazy
House, Alberta Gilbert, Schilens
Oil, Dr. Dora Davis, Liberal Inn
and Jess Koons, M.D. and silver
sponsors J&R Sand and Beaver
County Stockyards.
Saturdays rodeo events will start
at 4 p.m., and Sundays begin at 10
a.m. All of the money raised from
the NLBR will benefit riders with
disabilities.
Now in its 17th year, Crossroads
Center, located on Bluebell Road
east of Liberal, provides therapeutic riding activities to
individuals with disabilities.
Cross said the demand for the
services the agency provides has
grown and remained steady over
the years.
We still have a waiting list, she
said. Im trying to chip away at

that. We just got a brand new west


door on the indoor arena. Im very
tickled. Southwest Glass did that.
Cross said anyone who wants to
see what Crossroads is about can
do so by making an appointment.
If people want to come out and
see us, just try to get a hold of me,
she said.
Crossroads can be reached at
620-624-3133. The agencys
demand for its service is creating
the need for more help too, Cross
added.
I am looking for another person
if they are willing to become
certified, she said. Im the only
person out there certified to teach
classes. Susan Copas is helping
me because she has gone through
the classes before. Mike Bailey is
trying to get certified. If we could
get somebody who is young,
willing to do that, I think with a
two-year contract, Crossroads
would love to pay for getting them
certified.
For the success of the agency,
Cross said she would like to thank
Seward County for believing in the
Crossroads program.

Liberal Memorial Library to extend hours for summer


If the change
proves profitable, it
could extend into
the fall season,
Director Royce
Kitts said
By ELLY GRIMM
Leader & Times
Liberal Memorial Library has
been seeing an increase in patrons
coming through the door, and with
that increase, the library has
decided to expand its hours for the
summer.
The conversation to expand the
librarys hours was recently
rekindled due to a school project,
according to Liberal Memorial
Library Director Royce Kitts.
We had a teacher from USD
480 who wanted to send a student
over to work on a project, and it
was a student who was working,
Kitts explained. When I suggested
to this teacher Maybe they can
come in Monday through Friday,
they told me They work right after
school so they didnt have time to
come then and didnt get off until
like 8 p.m., but we closed at 8.
Then I suggested our Saturday
hours, but this student worked
during then too, so that kind of rekicked off that conversation. But
we didnt have any kind of data,
and my thing is, I dont look at any
type of problem without some
more information behind it.

So library staff started doing


some surveys asking people what
hours they would be interested in,
and got 154 responses to those
surveys, which Kitts said was a
great response. For the expanded
hours, the library will be open from
9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through
Thursday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on
Fridays, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on
Saturdays.
With expanding the hours,
several factors had to be taken into
account, including making sure it
could fit into the librarys budget.
During the summer, these are
good enough hours to get people
in, Kitts said. One of the things
we were able to do was we realized
we have the people here, plus

about an hour and a half overlap


between the morning people and
evening people, so what we
thought about was, did we really
need that much overlap? So we
decided about 30 minutes was
more than enough for the morning
people to fill the evening people in
on the day.
Kitts said the new hours are all
sustainable right now, requiring
only a little bit of flexing. Kitts
added the expansion will incur a
little extra expense for the two extra
hours on Saturdays, but staff has
ways to make that work.
One benefit Kitts said of these
extended hours is the idea of being
a cooling station.
It always gets hot here in

Western Kansas, its just a fact,


Kitts said. One of the services we
have, and its not something we
have to do that much to provide, is
being able to provide an atmosphere where people can get some
relief from the heat for a little while
in a comfortable environment. And
these hours are so natural, a lot of
people assumed we were open
these hours already.
In the survey sent out, Kitts
added, more than half the respondents said they would like the

library to be also open on Sundays,


which is an option Kitts said staff
will look at in the future.
Our feeling is the library should
always be open when the
community needs it to be, because
thats typically where people go to
get information or just a book,
Kitts said. What you hate is, when
you want to go somewhere, and
find out theyre unavailable and not
open.
The success of the summer hours
could also determine if these

extend to the fall.


Were going to look at those
numbers in July, look again in
August, and then if it looks like
were getting more people in the
library, thats something well do,
Kitts said. It has to be information-backed for us to do this,
and its one of those things where,
if it fits into our budget, the
majority rules. Well have to see
how everything goes, and Im
always a big fan of making sure the
librarys open as much as possible.

$IWHUP\KXVEDQGSDVVHGDZD\
,GLGQ
WQHHGWKHZRUU\RI
PDQDJLQJDKRPH,VWLOOKDYHP\
LQGHSHQGHQFHJUHDWQHLJKERUVDQG
IULHQGVWRWDONZLWKDQGWKHVWDII
KHUHDUHVRFDULQJ
-,QGHSHQGHQW/LYLQJ5HVLGHQW

D

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Opinion

S U N D AY, J U N E 5 , 2 0 1 6

EARL WATT
President and Publisher

JESSICA CRAWFORD
News Editor

MEMBERS
The Associated Press
Kansas Press Association

L&T

4A

Everyone rises to their level


of incompetence.
LAURENCE J. PETER (1919 - 1988)

Kansas three legged


stool needs mending
Not that long ago, the
political landscape of
Kansas featured three
factions: Conservative
Republicans, moderate
Republicans and
Democrats. Inside the
Statehouse, Democrats
have never been so
plentiful as to afford
distinct wings.
It might not have been the ideal
arrangement, but it worked. When
issues of importance to the GOP
needed passing, the two
Republican wings worked together.
When something was necessary for
all Kansans, the Democrats and
moderate Republicans forged
alliances.
Everything changed in 2010
when a surge of conservative
Republicans won all the statewide
races and the Gov. Sam
Brownback era began. Two years
later Brownback led efforts to
purge the party of as many
moderates as he could.
It worked. Well, as good as one
would expect a three-legged stool
to balance with one massive leg
and two spindly ones. Most voters
didn't notice or care the stool fell
over, and re-elected most
everybody who ran in 2014.
Taking these results as a
mandate, conservative Republicans
reconstructed the state budget
using a similar blueprint. They
enacted new laws that undid the
three-legged stool of revenues,
which were balanced among
property, income and sales taxes.
The income tax leg was sawed
down to a nub while the sales tax
leg grew to record heights.
Unable to balance, the stool fell
over.
People are noticing this time.
Lower-income workers, the underemployed and the unemployed all
saw credits, exemptions and
benefits disappear. Public schools
and universities had cuts in
funding. So did hospitals, mental
health facilities, law enforcement
agencies and arts programs. Early
childhood programs are
disappearing.
So much money has been
swiped from the Department of

SECOND
OPINION

Hays Daily News


May 25
Transportation private contractors
are avoiding the state as projects
get delayed and shelved. State
pension payments are being
skipped, money is being borrowed
to pay for current operating
expenses, IOUs are being issued.
The state's being run on payday
loans and huge interest payments
while the governor and legislative
leaders tell us everything is fine.
And anything that isn't fine is the
fault of lower oil prices or
President Barack Obama.
Everything is not fine and we
know who ruined it. And with all
165 seats of the Kansas Legislature
up for election this year, Kansans
have their remedy at-hand.
Or do they? With the filing
deadline for candidates next
Wednesday, we're not so sure
wholesale change is possible.
Granted, there are 40 contested
primaries on the Republican side.
With their fewer numbers,
Democrats have only six contested
races thus far for the August
election.
But get this. There are 64 candidates filed that have no primary
opposition. Another 64 listed on
the Secretary of State Office's
website have no opposition in the
primary or in November's
general election. Unbelievably,
there are four House districts and
one Senate district that have zero
people running.
More than likely there will be a
flurry of last-minute filings. There
are a number of incumbents
missing from the list.
But we only can hope there are
even more level-headed individuals
with a calling to serve waiting in
the wings. We need carpenters
who understand the necessity of
equal legs to make stools balance.
Piles of splinters are of little use
for anything except starting fires.
Unless Kansas voters reject a
majority of sitting legislators, that
fire is about to be set. Don't let the
state burn to the ground before
you pay attention to what's
happening in Topeka. Then it will
be too late.

Session may be over, but


work not finished in Topeka

Highway 54

You cant talk about Highway 54 without


Jack Taylor and Max Zimmerman being
mentioned. These two men dedicated years
of their lives procuring improvements for the
highway. It was bittersweet this month to
attend a farewell party for Jack as he and
Georgette depart for Lawrence KS to be
closer to kids and to hear of Maxs passing.
Both of these men had a can do attitude
towards the growth of our community. Jack
worked endlessly in business and retail
recruitment as Chamber Executive. Max was
always looking to get Liberal an edge, whether
it was Dorothys House or the Rock Island
Depot restoration. Liberal is poorer without
these champions who served Liberal with
vision and boundless optimism.

The Daily Leader & Times provides a


regular forum for readers ideas and
opinions.
Letters should be sent to the High
Plains Daily Leader, 16 S. Kansas, Liberal,
Kansas 67901.They may also be faxed to
the office at (620) 626-9854; or use our
e-mail address: news@hpleader.com
Letters may endorse individual
candidates if the writer is an area
resident but must stay within the
bounds of good taste. Candidates
cannot use the Op-Ed Page to
promote their campaign.
Letters may address any topic or area
of interest, but cannot be libelous or
contain specific consumer complaints
against a private business.
No more than one letter from

the same individual will be


published within 7 days of a
previous letter on the same topic
unless it is a response to a
rebuttal from another writer.
These items should be legibly printed
or typewritten and should contain the
writers signature, correct address and
telephone number. Only the writers
name and town of residence will be
published.We reserve the right to edit
for length and request that letters not
exceed 500 words.
Letters to the editor are expressions
of our readers opinions. Letters, op-ed
columns and political cartoons do not
necessarily reflect the editorial positions
or opinions of the Leader&Times or its
employees.

Shannon Francis
125th District
Representative

Weigh Station

I got a call last week about a rumor that the


Weigh station east of town on Highway 54
was going to be torn down and rebuilt west of
town at a cost of $1 million.
THIS IS FALSE. The plans for the
Highway 54 expansion call for the existing
weigh station to remain in place as part of a
wide median so it can service both lanes of
traffic. This project is indefinitely delayed
because of the state budget crisis.

Philosophy

Two years ago I promised to put Seward


County First. As your representative I have
worked tirelessly to protect Highway 54
funding and our schools. Education and
infrastructure are essential to our ability to
create good jobs and economic growth in
rural Kansas. It is also important to support
our local governments so they have the tools
for our community to be successful. Topeka
should not be deciding what is best for you.
Government closest to the people is best.
Each of us can run for office and be a part of
our city and county governments as well as
our school districts. My Methodist Bishop,
Scott Jones, has a breakfast each year for
Methodist Legislators. He gave me one piece
of advice Dont forget the big thing is the big
thing. To me, Seward County is the Big
Thing.

Delegate or Trustee

LETTERS POLICY

GUEST
COLUMN

Political Scientists have two theories about


representative democracies. Is your representative a delegate who should act only as a
mouthpiece for the wishes of the people? Or
as Edmund Burke believed, is the
representative a trustee who should have sufficient autonomy to deliberate and act in favor
of the greater common good because they
have studied the issue and have the necessary

Liberal City Commission: City Hall; 324 N. Kansas


Ave.; 626-2202.
Seward County Commission: County
Administration Building 515 N.Washington 626-3300.
Kansas Senator Garrett Love: P.O. Box 1,
Montezuma, KS 67867.Topeka office contact Info:
(785) 296-7359. E-mail: garrett.love@senate.ks.gov.
Kansas Representative Shannon Francis: Topeka
office at 167-W, phone number is 785-296-7655 and
email is shannon.francis@house.ks.gov.
U.S. Representative Tim Huelskamp: 126
Cannon HOB
Washington, DC 20515

knowledge and access to information to make


the best decision? I believe the truth is in the
middle. There are some issues where our
communitys values and beliefs are well known
and it is my responsibility to represent those
values. When the issue is more obscure like
weight limits for LNG fueled tractor trailers,
the trustee model is more appropriate. I
mention this to let you know how important
your thoughts are on the issues facing Kansas.
Topeka does not know what is best for you
and I represent you.

Topeka

Yesterday State General Fund Receipts


came in $66.67 million short of estimates that
had been lowered on April 20th. The
shortage was primarily in individual and
corporate income tax. After the horrendous
budget cuts earlier this month we are now
forecasted to end the year with a negative
balance of around $40 million. The rumor is
the shortage will be made up by cutting
Medicaid expenditures and higher education.
Earlier this month our cut in Medicaid
spending of $39.9 million resulted in a loss of
matching federal funds of $49.8 million.
Much of the Medicaid spending in Kansas
goes to rural hospitals and nursing homes for
seniors and disabled. I fear the effect this
may have on our rural hospitals and nursing
homes. Im not sure anyone in the
Governors office really knows what to do but
to continue to cut spending.

School Finance

The Friday before Memorial Day the


Kansas Supreme Court ruled the equity fix for
Local Option Budgets was unconstitutional.

Wednesday the Legislature reconvened for


our closing session called Sine Die. This is
usually a formality. House Leadership made
an attempt to pass another solution for the
court to review. Senate Leadership felt more
time was needed to develop a solution so the
legislature closed without addressing the
issue. In fairness, it is probably not wise to
ram a haphazard solution through both
houses of the legislature in a 12-hour period.
There is no way anyone could have really
known the unintended consequences of the
legislation. What is frustrating is many of us
were sure the prior solution would be ruled
unconstitutional so why didnt we have
something ready to go? Too many people are
playing politics on this issue. We need to
fund our schools.
Here is where I think the rub is: The ruling
from the court has to do with equalization of
the local option budget (LOB). In a perfect
world the LOB is only for extra stuff like
robotics teams, swimming poolsquality of
life things. In reality it is used for everyday
operating expenses. The courts have ruled
that education is the states obligation and
every Kansas Taxpayer regardless of where he
lives should pay the same for education as a
taxpayer in a similar financial situation in
another part of the state. This is a hard thing
to do. Each school district can raise up to
30% -33% of their budget by using LOB. In
2014 the poorest school district had a
valuation of $21,854 per student. The richest
school district had a valuation of $547,862
per student. So, 1 mill for LOB in the poorest
district would raise $21.85 per student and
$547.86 per student for the richest school
district. The net effect is if you live in the
school district with Wolf Creek Nuclear Plant
you have great schools and low property taxes.
If you live in Liberal where one mill raises
$33.91 per student you have high property
taxes for schools. Too Much Information
Where the legislature gets bogged down is
this: If we equalize with the formula prior to
the block grant, the Johnson County Schools
lose around $4.5 million and USD 480 gains
around $273,000 in state equalization money.
This is politically unpopular with
representatives from rich school districts and
costs $40 million we dont have. To hold
everyone harmless (no one loses any
money) the state has to put in around $50
million we dont have. So the legislature
continues to pass bills that are
unconstitutional because taxpayers from poor
school districts are being taxed higher than
those from wealthy school districts, we dont
have the money to fix it and/or the political
will to take millions of dollars of equalization
money from rich school districts.

GETTING IN TOUCH
Phone: (202) 225-2715
Fax: (202) 225-5124. Salina Office (785) 309-0572.
E-mail: http://huelskamp.house.gov.
U.S. Senator Jerry Moran: 4 Russell Courtyard
(Temp), District of Columbia 20510-1604 Phone: (202)
224-6521. Fax: (202) 228-6966; E-mail:
http://www.moran.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/e-mailjerry
U.S. Senator Pat Roberts: 100 Military Plaza, Suite
203, P.O. Box 550, Dodge City, KS 67801. Fax: (620)
227-2264; Phone: (620) 227-2244; E-mail:
pat_roberts@senate.gov.

Tips on contacting elected officials:

I Identify who you are and where you live make


it clear you are a constituent. Include phone and
address so your official can contact you.

I Keep to one topic per letter or call. If


appropriate, refer to the specific ordinance, bill or
date pertaining to the subject.

I Be clear about what you hope your elected


official will do.
I Remain polite, even when disagreeing.

S U N D AY, J U N E 5 , 2 0 1 6

News
WEEKLY STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS

NYSE

10,487.94

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

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Demandw
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Name

AT&T Inc
AMD
AirProd
Alibaba
Anadarko
Apple Inc
BP PLC
BakrHu
BkofAm
B iPVixST
Baxalta n
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BrcdeCm
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HarleyD
HomeDp
iShJapan
iShChinaLC

Div

1.92
...
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...
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Wendys Co
WmsCos
Yahoo

Div

.84
1.70
1.73
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5.60
...
3.20
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3.56
1.84
...
1.44
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...
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...
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...
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-6.3
-11.2
+10.0

Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards. lf = Late filing
with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50 percent within
the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. un =
Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi = When issued. wt = Warrants. Gainers and Losers must be
worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in hundreds of shares. Source: The
Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

MONEY RATES

Prime Rate
Discount Rate
Federal Funds Rate
Treasuries
3-month
6-month
5-year
10-year
30-year

Last
3.50
1.00
.25-.50

0.28
0.40
1.24
1.70
2.51

Pvs Week
3.50
1.00
.25-.50
0.30
0.44
1.37
1.86
2.69

Australia
Britain
Canada
Euro
Japan
Mexico
Switzerlnd

CURRENCIES

Last

1.3582
1.4515
1.2927
.8813
106.68
18.6087
.9767

Pvs Day
1.3846
1.4429
1.3113
.8970
108.91
18.6593
.9911

British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show


dollar in foreign currency.

5A

L&T

news@hpleader.com

WEEKLY DOW JONES


CLOSED -86.02

Dow Jones industrials


Close: 17,807.06
1-week change: -66.16 (-0.4%)

MON

19,000

TUES

2.47

48.89

-31.50

WED

THUR

FRI

18,000
17,000
16,000
15,000

Name
American Funds AmBalA m
American Funds CapIncBuA m
American Funds CpWldGrIA m
American Funds FnInvA m
American Funds GrthAmA m
American Funds IncAmerA m
American Funds InvCoAmA m
American Funds WAMutInvA m
Dodge & Cox Income
Dodge & Cox IntlStk
Dodge & Cox Stock
Fidelity Contra
Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m
Metropolitan West TotRetBdI
PIMCO TotRetIs
Vanguard 500Adml
Vanguard InstIdxI
Vanguard InstPlus
Vanguard IntlStkIdxIPls
Vanguard MuIntAdml
Vanguard TotBdAdml
Vanguard TotIntl
Vanguard TotStIAdm
Vanguard TotStIIns
Vanguard TotStIdx
Vanguard WelltnAdm

MUTUAL FUNDS

Total Assets
Total Return/Rank
Pct
Min Init
Obj ($Mlns)
NAV 4-wk
12-mo
5-year Load
Invt
MA 52,330 24.72 +1.3
+3.8/A
+9.9/A 5.75
250
IH
70,870 58.65 +1.5
0.0/A
+6.5/A 5.75
250
WS 52,139 44.29 +1.8
-4.9/B
+6.4/C 5.75
250
LB 45,865 52.67 +2.5
+2.3/A +11.1/C 5.75
250
LG 73,421 42.00 +3.2
0.0/B +11.8/B 5.75
250
AL 72,774 21.08 +1.3
+1.2/A
+8.2/A 5.75
250
LB 56,857 35.45 +2.0
+1.4/A +11.6/B 5.75
250
LV 50,828 39.97 +1.8
+2.2/A +11.8/A 5.75
250
CI
44,854 13.69 +0.3
+3.1/D
+3.7/B
NL
2,500
FB 55,225 36.12 +2.3
-18.6/E
+1.7/C
NL
2,500
LV 54,581 163.49 +2.8
-5.0/D +11.1/A
NL
2,500
LG 76,886 98.48 +1.8
+0.7/A +12.1/B
NL
2,500
LB 55,064 74.07 +2.0
+1.5/A +12.4/A
NL
10,000
CA 44,611
2.16 +0.9
-4.8/E
+5.0/B 4.25
1,000
CI
48,435 10.89 +0.3
+3.0
+4.5
NL
3,000,000
CI
58,024 10.24 +0.7
+3.7/C
+3.4/C
NL
1,000,000
LB 162,119 194.39 +2.0
+1.5/A +12.4/A
NL
10,000
LB 110,189 192.48 +2.0
+1.5/A +12.4/A
NL
5,000,000
LB 94,344 192.49 +2.0
+1.5/A +12.4/A
NL 200,000,000
FB 59,080 98.52 +1.2
-10.4/C
+1.0/D
NL 100,000,000
MI 45,848 14.45 +0.1
+6.0/B
+4.5/B
NL
50,000
CI
67,107 10.98 +0.7
+5.0/A
+3.4/C
NL
10,000
FB 81,878 14.72 +1.1
-10.5/C
+0.9/D
NL
3,000
LB 134,864 52.40 +2.2
-0.1/B +12.0/B
NL
10,000
LB 65,772 52.41 +2.2
-0.1/B +12.0/A
NL
5,000,000
LB 99,141 52.38 +2.2
-0.2/B +11.8/B
NL
3,000
MA 70,388 66.03 +1.3
+2.6/A
+9.1/A
NL
50,000

CA -Conservative Allocation, CI -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Foreign Large Value, IH -World
Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Allocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV - Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specialty-heath, WS -World
Stock, Total Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt:
Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Morningstar.

Kansas looks at shuffling funds to close new budget gap


By JOHN HANNA
AP PoliticalWriter

TOPEKA Kansas is looking at


shuffling funds within state government to
cover a projected short-term, $45 million
deficit before its current budget year ends
on June 30, an aide to Republican Gov.
Sam Brownback said Friday.
Spokeswoman Eileen Hawley said
Brownbacks budget staff may divert fees
held in dozens of special funds by state
agencies into the states main bank
account. Hawley said the governor doesnt
expect to cut spending to close the gap
and doing so would be difficult anyway so
close to the end of the fiscal year, with most
agencies funds already spent.
Tax collections fell $74.5 million short of
expectations in May, creating the deficit in
the state general fund. It is the states main
bank account, financing about $6.2 billion
in spending on aid to public schools and
general government programs during the
current and next fiscal years.
But state government has a total budget
exceeding $15 billion and collects special
fees and revenues in scores of smaller
funds. Transferring money from them into
the states main bank account can make its
bottom line look better, and Hawley said
Brownbacks budget staff is looking at the
rules governing those smaller funds.
Decisions will not be finalized until we
have a better understanding of the June
revenue picture, she said in an emailed
statement.
Sen. Laura Kelly, of Topeka, the ranking

Democrat on the Senate Ways and Means


Committee, said the shuffling of funds fits
Brownbacks practice of using short-term
fixes and just leaping from one crisis to
another.
There will have to be a lot of hoophopping to get us to the next fiscal year,
she said.
Another potential short-term fix is
delaying state aid payments due to public
schools later this month, though Hawleys
statements did not mention the possibility.
Those payments are expected to total more
than $320 million.
Tax collections have failed to meet
expectations 10 of the past 12 months and
22 of the past 30 months. Brownback has
said he wants to examine the revenueprojecting process and announced Friday
that Sam Williams, a retired chief financial
officer of a Wichita-based advertising and
public relations firm, will lead the effort.
Kansas has struggled to balance its
budget since the Republican-dominated
Legislature slashed personal income taxes
in 2012 and 2013 at Brownbacks urging in
an effort to stimulate the economy. More
recently, Brownbacks administration has
blamed slumps in agriculture, energy
production and aircraft manufacturing for
disappointing revenues.
The state already has diverted funds from
highway projects and cut higher education
spending to balance the current budget.
Last month, Shawn Sullivan, the governors
budget director, announced $97 million in
spending reductions for the fiscal year
beginning July 1.

In this Jan. 12
file photo,
Kansas Gov.
Sam Brownback
speaks to the
legislature in
Topeka. The
Kansas Supreme
Court on Friday,
May 27 rejected
some education
funding changes
enacted by the
Legislature
earlier this year
and threatened
to order the
state's public
schools closed if
lawmakers
don't act by
June 30. AP
Photo/Orlin Wagner,
File
The state had expected to build up a
small cushion of cash reserves before the

Military: Precision flying teams


are worth the risk, cost
By DAN ELLIOTT
Associated Press

DENVER Both of the U.S.


militarys high-drama, high-dollar
flying teams suffered crashes on the
same day this week, but supporters
say the Air Force Thunderbirds and
the Navy Blue Angels are worth the
money and the risk because theyre
vital to recruitment and help
citizens feel good about their
military.
Its our No. 1 recruiting tool,
said retired Air Force Col. Pete
McCaffrey, a pilot with the
Thunderbirds from 1992 to 1995.
Most people dont get to see the
military up close, but when they see
the elite air squadrons perform, it
gives them a sense of pride in their
military and their country, and I
think now we need that more than
ever, McCaffrey said Friday.

A Blue Angels F/A-18 crashed


Thursday
near
Nashville,
Tennessee, while taking off for a
practice session ahead of a
weekend air show. The pilot,
Marine Capt. Jeff Kuss, was killed.
Also Thursday, a Thunderbirds F16 crashed outside Colorado
Springs, Colorado, but that pilot,
Maj. Alex Turner, ejected safely.
The Thunderbirds had just
performed over the open-air graduation ceremony at the nearby Air
Force Academy, where President
Barack Obama spoke.
The military hasnt publicly
discussed the cause of either crash.
Both are under investigation.
The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds have had dozens of crashes in
their long histories, and a total of at
least nine pilots been killed during
performances or practices since
1985.

The teams are pricey, too. The


Thunderbirds have an annual
operating budget of $35 million,
said Air Force Staff Sgt. Katie
Maricle, a spokeswoman for the Air
Combat Command. A Navy
spokesman couldnt immediately
provide the Blue Angels budget.
But the military insists the teams
are important to the services and
the nation.
The Thunderbirds are a huge
part of U.S. Air Force history and
they are such a vital element of
connecting our nation to our Air
Force, Maricle said.
Michael Kennedy, a retired Air
Force lieutenant colonel, said the
Thunderbirds and Blue Angels help
servicemen and women share their
pride with the public.

end of June 2017, so that the shortfall in


Mays tax collections doesnt create

another deficit for the next fiscal year, just


the current one.

S U N D AY, J U N E 5 , 2 0 1 6

6A

L&T
L&T

News

news@hpleader.com

Russell Child Development


Center awarded for efforts
Special to the L&T

In this Sept. 13, 2012, file photo, retired boxing champion Muhammad Ali, center, waves alongside his wife
Lonnie Ali, left, and his sister-in-law Marilyn Williams, right, after receiving the Liberty Medal during a
ceremony at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia. Ali, the magnificent heavyweight
champion whose fast fists and irrepressible personality transcended sports and captivated the world, has
died according to a statement released by his family Friday. He was 74. AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File

Muhammad Ali, who riveted the


world as The Greatest, dies
Revered by millions
worldwide and reviled by
millions more, Ali cut
quite a figure, 6-foot-3
and 210 pounds in his
prime, he died Friday at
the age of 74
ByTIM DAHLBERG
AP BoxingWriter
He was fast of fist and foot lip,
too a heavyweight champion
who promised to shock the world
and did. He floated. He stung.
Mostly he thrilled, even after the
punches had taken their toll and his
voice barely rose above a whisper.
He was The Greatest.
Muhammad Ali died Friday at
age 74, according to a statement
from the family. He was hospitalized in the Phoenix area with
respiratory problems earlier this
week, and his children had flown in
from around the country.
Its a sad day for life, man. I
loved Muhammad Ali, he was my
friend. Ali will never die, Don
King, who promoted some of Alis
biggest fights, told The Associated
Press early Saturday. Like Martin
Luther King his spirit will live on,
he stood for the world.
A funeral will be held in his
hometown of Louisville, Kentucky.
The city plans a memorial service
Saturday.
Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer
ordered flags lowered to half-staff
to honor Ali.
The values of hard work,
conviction and compassion that
Muhammad Ali developed while
growing up in Louisville helped him
become a global icon, Fischer said.
As a boxer, he became The
Greatest, though his most lasting
victories happened outside the
ring.
With a wit as sharp as the
punches he used to whup
opponents, Ali dominated sports

for two decades before time and


Parkinsons disease, triggered by
thousands of blows to the head,
ravaged his magnificent body,
muted his majestic voice and ended
his storied career in 1981.
He won and defended the heavyweight championship in epic fights
in exotic locations, spoke loudly on
behalf of blacks, and famously
refused to be drafted into the Army
during the Vietnam War because of
his Muslim beliefs.
Despite his debilitating illness, he
traveled the world to rapturous
receptions even after his oncebellowing voice was quieted and he
was left to communicate with a
wink or a weak smile.
He was the greatest fighter of all
time but his boxing career is
secondary to his contribution to the
world, promoter Bob Arum told
the AP early Saturday. Hes the
most transforming figure of my
time certainly.
Revered by millions worldwide
and reviled by millions more, Ali
cut quite a figure, 6-foot-3 and 210
pounds in his prime. Float like a
butterfly, sting like a bee, his
cornermen exhorted, and he did
just that in a way no heavyweight
had ever fought before.
He fought in three different
decades, finished with a record of
56-5 with 37 knockouts 26 of
those bouts promoted by Arum
and was the first man to win heavyweight titles three times.
He whipped the fearsome Sonny
Liston twice, toppled the mighty
George Foreman with the rope-adope in Zaire, and nearly fought to
the death with Joe Frazier in the
Philippines. Through it all, he was
trailed by a colorful entourage who
merely added to his growing
legend.
Rumble, young man, rumble,
cornerman Bundini Brown would
yell to him.
And rumble Ali did. He fought
anyone who meant anything and
made millions of dollars with his
lightning-quick jab. His fights were
so memorable that they had names
Rumble in the Jungle and
Thrilla in Manila.

But it was as much his antics


and his mouth outside the ring
that transformed the man born
Cassius Clay into a household
name as Muhammad Ali.
I am the greatest, Ali
thundered again and again.
Few would disagree.
Ali spurned white America when
he joined the Black Muslims and
changed his name. He defied the
draft at the height of the Vietnam
war I aint got no quarrel with
them Viet Cong and lost 3 1/2
years from the prime of his career.
He entertained world leaders, once
telling Philippines President
Ferdinand Marcos: I saw your
wife. Youre not as dumb as you
look.
He later embarked on a second
career as a missionary for Islam.
Boxing was my field mission, the
first part of my life, he said in
1990, adding with typical
braggadocio, I will be the greatest
evangelist ever.
Ali couldnt fulfill that goal
because Parkinsons robbed him of
his speech. It took such a toll on his
body that the sight of him in his
later years trembling, his face
frozen, the man who invented the
Ali Shuffle now barely able to walk
shocked and saddened those
who remembered him in his prime.
People naturally are going to be
sad to see the effects of his
disease, Hana, one of his
daughters, said, when he turned 65.
But if they could really see him in
the calm of his everyday life, they
would not be sorry for him. Hes at
complete peace, and hes here
learning a greater lesson.
The quiet of Alis later life was in
contrast to the roar of a career that
had breathtaking highs along with
terrible lows. He exploded on the
public scene with a series of
nationally televised fights that gave
the public an exciting new
champion, and he entertained
millions as he sparred verbally with
the likes of bombastic sportscaster
Howard Cosell.

GARDEN CITY Russell Child Development


Center has received the Silver Level Breastfeeding
Employees Support Award from the Kansas Breastfeeding Coalition and its Business Case for Breastfeeding program.
The award is based on proven and established
standards to benefit employers and employees. It
recognizes businesses that provide support services to
their breastfeeding employees, to include education
as well as the time and space for employees to nurse
and/or pump breastmilk at their workplace. The
award, the second ranking of three sponsored by the
Coalition, was presented by Brenda Bandy, director of
the Business Case for Breastfeeding program in
Kansas.
According to Bandy, Russell Child Development
Center received the award for achieving a high level of
support to their employees as outlined in the
Coalitions criteria. She said they provide a silver
level pumping room, allow flexible time to pump, and
have instituted a policy of breastfeeding support.
Pointing out that many breastfeeding mothers
abandon breastfeeding when they return to work
because they lack the support and appropriate facilities at their place of employment, Bandy said, We
want to help change that unfortunate situation. She
cited research showing that adequate support for

breastfeeding employees benefits businesses through


savings in health care expenses, reduced turnover
rates, lower absenteeism, and increased employee
loyalty. Employers that have established support
services for breastfeeding employees have reported a
$3 for $1 return on investment plus realizing a more
productive working environment.
Many Kansas employers recognize the benefits of
supporting their breastfeeding employees. We want
to shine the spotlight on as many employers as we can
for doing their part to make returning to work while
breastfeeding easier in hopes that will encourage more
businesses to follow suit, says Martha Hagen, a
Kansas WIC state breastfeeding coordinator and
Kansas Breastfeeding Coalition Board Chair.
Businesses that provide support services for their
breastfeeding employees can be considered for a
Breastfeeding Employees Support Award at the
bronze, silver and gold levels. Applications are
available
at
http://www.kansasbusinesscase.com/for_employers/e
mployer_awards.
The Business Case for Breastfeeding is a program
to assist employers in developing or enhancing
support services for their breastfeeding employees.
The Kansas Breastfeeding Coalition is a non-profit
501(c) 3 with the mission of working collaboratively to
promote and protect breastfeeding in order to
improve the health of Kansas families.

Texas selfie Officials: Woman caught


statue
young deer, tried to sell it
surprisingly
not a hit on
social media
SUGAR LAND, Texas (AP)
While you might think a bronze
statue immortalizing two girls
taking a selfie would be met with
approval on social media, that
doesnt appear to be the case.
The city of Sugar Land, Texas,
says the statue recently installed
in a city plaza is meant to depict a
common activity in the area. It
says the donated sculpture was
reviewed and approved by a pair
of citizen committees and the
City Council.
Social media hasnt been as
welcoming. The stature has drawn
the ire of many on Twitter .
Others dont seem to think its
so bad. Theyre signaling their
approval by, of course, posting
selfies with the sculpture .

HOPLAND, Calif. (AP)


Authorities say a Northern
California woman was arrested
after she scooped up a fawn from
a rural road and attempted to sell
the animal on Craigslist.
The San Francisco Chronicle
reports Thursday that 28-year-old
Lacy Jean David of Ukiah posted
the ad Tuesday asking $300 for
the baby deer. She posted a photo
with the ad.
State game wardens set up a

sting to meet her and buy the


deer. She says she picked up the
creature in Mendocino County at
about 2 a.m. It is illegal to pick up
a fawn and sell it online.
David was arrested at the sting
on an unrelated warrant for failure
to appear in a prior drug case. She
was released on bail later in the
day.
The fawn is in good health and
remains at a rehabilitation facility.

Liberal Now Has


General Public
Transportation!!!
Buses operate
Monday - Friday
6AM - 6PM
First Come First Serve
(620)626-0100

Funded in part by KDOT


Public Transportation Program

S U N D AY, J U N E 5 , 2 0 1 6

News

L&T

news@hpleader.com

7A

Klug, former mentor UCLA gunman


had targeted helped him graduate
By AMANDA LEE MYERS
and JUSTIN PRITCHARD
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES The kindly professor


whom the gunman blamed for his ruin had,
in truth, quietly seen to his academic
success.
As a shy graduate student struggling to
secure his Ph.D., Mainak Sarkar had
bristled at the doubts expressed by
professors at UCLAs engineering
department. His dissertation, they told
him, simply was not good enough.
Sarkars mentor had his own doubts, but
after Sarkar submitted a new document
professor William Klug asked his colleagues
to wave his student through to graduation.
We could easily have said, Its not
enough, you need to do more, said
professor Jeff Eldredge, Klugs colleague
and close friend. We just said, Ugh, lets
get him out of here.
That was 2013. This week, Sarkar
returned.
After killing his estranged wife in a
Minneapolis suburb, Sarkar packed two
guns, drove from Minnesota to Los
Angeles, parked in his old neighborhood,
took a bus to campus and shot Klug in the
professors office Wednesday before taking
his own life.
Though Sarkar seemed to have genuine
affection for his mentor while in school,
more recently an animosity grew. In
March, Sarkar posted online that Klug had
made me really sick after stealing
computer code from him. Colleagues said
only a deranged person could conclude
someone of Klugs character would defraud
a student.
Thats whats so frustrating about this.

He turned into a completely different


person in these last few days or weeks or
whatever, Eldredge said.
Sarkars descent may go back further
than that. He held his last known job in
2014 the same year he separated from
his wife, Ashley Hasti, according to Hastis
grandmother.
Sarkar, 38, had entered mid-life with a
foundation of success, a walls worth of
academic degrees from top universities and
a new wife in his chosen country.
He came to the U.S. on a student visa in
2001 after earning a degree in aerospace
engineering from the Indian Institute of
Technology at Kharagpur.
In India, former classmates and teachers
described a solid student who gave no
indication of aggression.
He attended Stanford University from
fall 2003 until spring 2005, when he
received a masters degree in aeronautical
and astronautical engineering.
A year later, he moved south to the
University of California, Los Angeles and
began working under Klug.
Even before his death, Klug had been
hailed as a caring father and gifted
educator who inspired his students.
Hundreds gathered to honor him at oncampus vigils.
Klugs outgoing personality contrasted
with Sarkars introversion.
He was a little bit of a loner, said Ajit
Mal, an engineering professor who taught
Sarkar in one of his earliest classes at
UCLA.
As Klugs career and family blossomed in
his native Southern California, Sarkar
struggled to finish his studies.
While at UCLA, Sarkar was a nice guy
going through the same anxieties and

A photo of Professor William S. Klug is seen at the foot of UCLA's Bruin Bear statue Los Angeles Friday. A former UCLA
graduate student killed a woman in Minnesota before carrying two semi-automatic pistols and a grudge back to Los Angeles,
where he fatally shot the young professor on Wednesday he once called a mentor and then killed himself. AP Photo/Damian
Dovarganes
struggles as anyone else, recalled
Eldredge, the mechanical and aerospace
engineering professor who helped review
and later approved Sarkars dissertation.
Eldredge called Klug an exceptional
person and teacher who had a gentle way
giving feedback to students. Even so,
Sarkar didnt take criticism well when he
submitted a dissertation that advisers
returned, requesting significant revisions.

He was rather combative in his


responses, Eldredge said. Hed say, I
dont know how to answer that or I
dont know what that means. He was
just very stubborn.
The deaths this week left behind devastated families, a shaken university
community, and many unanswered
questions.

Chief among them is what led him to


violence.
Apparently hes harbored those
feelings (against Klug) over the past
three years since his graduation but
weve not been able to determine any
trigger event that would have led to this
or his murder of his wife, Los Angeles
police Capt. William Hayes said.

Kansas Cannon
players take a
knee during
the unveiling of
the Kaiser
Carlile statue
Friday. The
visitors showed
support by
wearing jerseys
with the KC
emblem on
their chests in
honor of
Liberal Bee Jay
batboy Kaiser
Carlile. L&T
photo/Earl Watt
The Liberal Bee Jays take a knee along with this years coach, Carlos Lezcano, Friday night during the
unveiling of the Kaiser Carlile memorial. Fridays game was the first played in Liberal for the Bee Jays
after the tragic accident at the NBC World Series in Wichita last year that claimed the life of Kaiser
Carlile. L&T photo/Earl Watt

Kaiser ...
O Continued from Page 1A

Making the trip back to Liberal,


Anderson was able to see familiar
faces, and the continued support
and bond that was created over
four years along with a relationship
forged with a family of the teams
batboy continued to help provide a
road back for those who were a part
of the 2015 team, even if the road
will always have the smile and the
positive relationships built to help
deal with an irreplaceable loss.
The years I coached here, if it
werent for the people in this
community and organization, I
probably wouldnt have been here,
Anderson said. But seeing the
faces and the people, the family
members, it was tremendous. It
brings back some great memories
and some emotions, but at the
same time being a part of this
ceremony, the family welcoming
me back, it was remarkable for me,
and my wife being able to make the
trip. We wouldnt have missed this
ceremony for the world.
After the covering was removed,
the family took a moment to come
up to the statue. Kaisers dad Chad
reached out and touched the
likeness of his son, and his grandmother Kim Carlile seemed to look
her grandson in the eyes again.
Not only did Kim lose her
grandson last year, but her husband
and Kaisers grandfather Alan died
three months later.
The two had brought their

children and later their grandchildren to watch the Bee Jays


throughout the decades, and
seeing her grandsons image
enshrined in bronze both reminded
Kim of the tragedy and of the
groundswell of support that
followed.
It was overwhelming, she said.
It was a beautiful statue, (sculptor
Matt Glenn) did an awesome job.

There is so much support, it is


overwhelming.
For Kim, returning to the field
was just what she needed.
We start another season of the
Liberal Bee Jays, she said. It
keeps us busy. You have to keep
yourself focused and busy.
With Kaiser being the batboy last
season, she got to know the 2015
team in a special way, but she said

that is what the Bee Jay program


has done for many families over the
years.
We became very close with the
team last year, Kim said. This
whole Bee Jays and Liberal it is
a family thing. It brings families
out, brings people together, and
those players become part of our
families, too. It is an uplifting thing
to come watch these kids play.
Kim spent a lot of time with
Kaiser and his younger sister
Keirsie. She went to the hospital
after the accident, and even there
she kept up with the team. After
the loss, she watched as her
grandsons memory rallied a global

baseball community.
I have to commend Wichita,
she said. That town pulled
together and helped us tremendously. I think of all the support we
have had, it helps. There are people
that really care. It seems like a coldhearted world these days, then
something happens like this and
you see people reaching out. It
makes you think. You see situations, and I will look at it in a
different way.
And she will never forget the
team that embraced her grandson
and made him one of their own.
That team, it was special, she
said. When it happened, they

pulled together. Ive never seen a


team so focused and driven to
finish the way they did.
Kim has seen the Bee Jay organization up close for decades, with
her family members like Bob and
Don Carlile playing key roles in the
early years.
It has been here for so long, she
said. Going back to the
fairgrounds, before we played out
here at Seward County, it has
always been a real family-oriented
sport, and I think this town loves
the Bee Jays. Our family is blessed
from the support. I think the whole
situation has brought more people
out here, and I hope it continues.

HIG H PLAINS

SUNDAY

Sportszone

JUNE 5, 2016

8A

PLAY
BALL!

Liberal second baseman Jake Kivett


leaps over the top of shortstop
Donny Ortiz ona sharply hit ground
ball by the Kansas Cannons. Both
teams pushed runners across the
plate with regularity, but the Bee Jays
were able to hold on for the 17-14
win. L&T photo/Earl Watt

Bee Jays open


with 17-14 win
By EARL WATT
Leader &Times
A steady stream of pitchers from both
sides made their way on and off of the
mound at Brent Gould Friday in the first
game of the season for the Liberal Bee Jays
and Kansas Cannons, but better fielding by
the Bee Jays led to a 17-14 win.
The Cannons committed nine fielding
errors while the Bee Jays had one, and
Liberal took advantage of those secondchance opportunities to put together to huge
innings including a six-run first to go along
with seven more in the seventh inning.
After Copy Cooper pitched a scoreless
first, Brandon Urquizo led off with a single
for the Bee Jays and eventually crossed home
plate off a hit by Kyle Knauth to score the
first run of the season and give the Bee Jays
a 1-0 lead.
A pair of defense miscues allowed the Bee
Jays to keep the inning alive, and by the time
the Cannons had recorded the third Bee Jay
out of the game, Liberal had a 6-0 lead.
Cooper had trouble in the second, and the
Cannons pushed a run across the plate
before leaving the bases loaded at the end of
the second.
Liberal added two more runs in the
bottom of the third while the Cannons
searched for a pitcher that could record outs.
But even when the Cannons were able to
get the Bee Jays to hit infield grounders, the
Cannons struggled to keep the ball on the
dirt, and Liberal took what appeared to be a
dominating 8-1 lead.
But the Bee Jays also struggled to get lock
down pitching, and the Cannons pushed
three runs across the plate in the fourth
inning to trim Liberals lead to 8-4.
The fifth inning wa the first in the game

where neither team scored, and Bee Jay


relievers put up another scoreless inning in
the top of the sixth.
The Bee Jays pushed two more runs across
the plate in the sixth, and again the Bee Jays
appeared to have provided a comfortable
cushion.
But the Cannons continued to fire back in
the top of the seventh, and after loading the
bases they lofted singles into the bee Jay
outfield to score a pair of runs, and after
another Bee Jay pitching change, the
Cannons continued to reach base. By the
time the Bee Jays recorded the third out, the
Cannons had scored five runs and cut the
Liberal lead to 10-9.
But the Bee Jays responded in the bottom
of the seventh with a huge inning, once again
aided by Cannon fielding errors as well as
solid hits.
Liberal made up all five runs and added
two more, scoring seven in the inning and
taking a 17-9 lead.
For only the second time in the game, the
eighth inning went scoreless on both sides,
and the Bee Jays headed to the ninth to seek
the final three outs and get the opening win.
But again the Cannons did not relent, and
they continued to put together hits to go
along with some walks and a defensive
miscue, and the Cannons cut the lead by
scoring five runs.
With the tying run at home, the Cannons
hit a smash to second, and the Bee Jays were
abel to record the final out to secure the 1714 win.
The cannons outhit the Bee Jays 18-12,
but the nine errors proved too many.
The two teams combined to use 10
pitchers in the slugfest.
The two teams completed a two-game set
late Saturday night.

ABOVE: Liberal Bee Jay


manager Carlos Lezcano
meets with starting pitcher
Cody Cooper and catcher
Felipe Rodriguez in the
second inning Friday night.
Lezcano made many more
trips to the mound
throughout the night before
the Bee Jays finally held on
for a 17-14 win.

LEFT: Brandon Urquizo (1)


bumps fists with Donny Ortiz
after scoring the first run of
the season for the Bee Jays in
the first inning Friday night at
Brent Gould Field. The Bee
Jays went on to win in a
slugfest, 17-14. L&T
photos/Earl Watt

Royals drop second straight, 6-1 to Indians


By BRIAN DULIK
Associated Press
CLEVELAND (AP) Edinson Volquez headed
straight from the mound to the video room. He
couldnt wait to watch what he did wrong.
The right-hander allowed five runs and threw two
wild pitches in 6 1/3 innings on Friday night, propelling
the Cleveland Indians to a 6-1 victory over the Kansas
City Royals.
Yan Gomes and Tyler Naquin both homered off
Volquez (5-5), who has only won twice in his last eight
starts after opening the year with three wins.
Ive got to work on my mechanics, thats what I
saw, Volquez said. My fastball command wasnt there
and I was all over the place. I made a couple of
mistakes and they made me pay with the home runs.
Its nothing I cant fix, so Ill be working on that in the
next couple of days.
The loss was Kansas Citys second straight and sliced
its lead in the American League Central to one-half
game over the Indians. The defending World Series
champions dropped the series opener 5-4 when Joakim
Soria allowed two runs in the bottom of the ninth
Thursday.
Catcher Drew Butera hit his second homer in two
days to account for the Royals lone run, while
shortstop Alcides Escobar collected his 1,000th major
league hit with a sixth-inning single.
Third baseman Cheslor Cuthbert had Kansas Citys
only other hit off Indians right-hander Danny Salazar
(6-3), who struck out nine in eight dominant innings.
Salazar threw 98 mph on his 112th pitch, Royals
manager Ned Yost said incredulously. You take a 96,
98 fastball and add an incredible split like he has,
theres not much you can do. He was really good

Im so happy to get 1,000 hits in Major League


Baseball, said Escobar, who has 841 hits with Kansas
City after beginning his career with Milwaukee. I was
just trying to put the ball in play and do my best every
time I batted. My teammates all congratulated me for
it, so it was really nice.

NEW DREW

Butera is making the most of his opportunity to play


every day, hitting .400 (8 of 20) with two home runs
and six RBIs over the last eight games. The 32-year-old
backstop has never batted above .198 in a season, but
is hitting .308 this year. We knew Drew was real, real
good behind the plate, but hes been phenomenal
offensively of late, Yost said.

TRAINERS ROOM

Kansas City Royals starting pitcher Edinson Volquez delivers in the first inning of a baseball game against the
Cleveland Indians, Friday in Cleveland. AP Photo/Tony Dejak
tonight.
Volquez fell to 2-6 with an 8.12 ERA in nine career
outings against the Indians. Cleveland banged out four
consecutive hits and scored three runs in the third,
aided by two wild pitches, one of which scored Mike
Napoli from third base.
I thought Eddy settled in pretty good after the third

inning, but the damage was done, Yost said. He only


gave up one run after that, and the nice thing was he
gave us some length by pitching into the seventh.
Escobar singled to center to become the 31st
Venezuelan-born player with 1,000 hits. He is the 10th
active shortstop to reach the milestone, which he
celebrated in the dugout between innings.

Royals: All-Star C Salvador Perez (left thigh bruise),


who has not played since a May 28 collision with
Cuthbert, is expected to see action behind the plate
this weekend.
Indians: C Roberto Perez (right thumb fracture) is
rehabilitating at the teams training complex in
Goodyear, Arizona. He has been on the 60-day DL
since May 1.

UP NEXT

Royals: RHP Ian Kennedy threw seven shutout


innings in a 7-0 win at Cleveland on May 7. He is 1-0
with a 3.15 ERA in three starts against the Indians.
Indians: RHP Josh Tomlin suffered his first loss since
Sept. 15, 2015 in his last outing. He surrendered eight
runs in 3 2/3 innings against Texas.

SWliving

I have never cared much for fish - it floats in the


belly as much as in the pond. Erica Eisdorfer

FAMILY FEATURES

ove cooking on the grill, but want to do more


than basic burgers and the same-old barbecue
chicken? Try cooking up some delicious grilled
dishes with great tasting, all-natural Mrs. Dash
you might be surprised how easy it is to add big flavor,
without adding salt to your grilling favorites.
Mrs. Dash bold seasonings and zesty marinades
are just some of the ways you can spice up burgers,
chicken and vegetables on the grill. The unique herb
and spice combinations transform an ordinary cookout
into something to brag about.
For more mouthwatering grilling recipes, visit
www.mrsdash.com.

Caribbean Pork Kabobs

Serves: 9
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cooking Time: 10 to 15 minutes
1/2 cup pineapple juice
3 tablespoons Mrs. Dash Caribbean Citrus
Seasoning Blend, divided
1 pound pork tenderloin, cut into small cubes
1 sweet onion, cut into cubes
1 red bell pepper, cut into cubes
1/2 fresh pineapple, peeled, cut into cubes
Mix pineapple juice and 2 tablespoons seasoning blend in a
small bowl.
Pour 3/8 cup (6 tablespoons) of the pineapple juice mixture over the pork in a separate bowl and the remaining over
the vegetables. Stir to coat evenly.
Cover and refrigerate for about 1 hour.
Thread pork pieces onto 9 skewers, alternating with
onion, pepper and pineapple cubes. Sprinkle on remaining
1 tablespoon seasoning blend.
Grill or broil for 10 to 15 minutes or until pork is thoroughly cooked.

Salmon Fillets with


Raspberry Citrus Sauce

Serves: 4
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cooking Time: 10 to 11 minutes
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
1 cup water
2/3 cup couscous
1/2 cup chopped green onions
1 pound skinned salmon fillets, 1 inch thick
2 tablespoons Mrs. Dash Garlic & Herb
Seasoning Blend
3/4 cup fresh squeezed orange juice
1 cup minced shallots
2 tablespoons raspberry preserves
2 teaspoons fresh grated peeled ginger
2 tablespoons raspberry vinegar
1/4 cup fresh raspberries, optional garnish
To toast almonds, place in a small skillet over medium heat,
shaking often until golden all over, approximately 4 minutes.
Preheat broiler. Bring water to a boil in medium saucepan
and remove from heat. Stir in couscous and green onion.
Rinse and pat dry salmon fillets, then sprinkle seasoning
blend on each side. Place fillets on a broiler pan coated with
non-stick spray. Broil 5 minutes per side, 5 to 6 inches from
heat source.
Over medium heat, bring orange juice and shallots to a
slight boil in a small saucepan. Lower heat and whisk in
raspberry preserves, ginger and vinegar; keep warm while
salmon is cooking.
Fluff couscous with fork and place equal amounts on 4
dinner plates. Lay a piece of salmon on top. Drizzle citrus
sauce over salmon and sprinkle almonds on top. Garnish top
with raspberries, if desired.

SUND AY, JUNE 5, 2016

L&T

1B

Chipotle Burgers with Spicy Onions

Serves: 4
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cooking Time: 20 minutes
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 large red onion, peeled and thinly sliced
2 tablespoons Mrs. Dash Southwest Chipotle
Seasoning Blend, divided
1 pound extra lean ground beef
1/4 cup fresh cilantro, chopped
2 egg whites, or egg substitute equivalent to 1 egg
4 toasted hamburger buns
Sliced tomatoes, optional
Lettuce, optional
Heat oil in large non-stick skillet, add onion and cook until
golden and tender, about 10 minutes. Stir in 1 tablespoon
seasoning blend, mix thoroughly and remove from heat.
Gently mix ground beef, 1 tablespoon seasoning blend,
cilantro, and egg whites or egg substitute. Mix well, and
shape into 4 burgers.
Preheat grill to medium-high heat and grill burgers for
8 to 10 minutes, turning once. Toast buns and top with
burger and spicy onions. Garnish with tomato and lettuce,
if desired.

Old Fashioned Cole Slaw

Serves: 12
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Chill Time: 2 to 3 hours
5 cups shredded cabbage
1 cup shredded carrots
8 radishes, sliced
1/4 cup chopped green onion
1/4 cup olive oil
3 tablespoons cider vinegar
2 1/2 tablespoons Mrs. Dash Original Blend
2 teaspoons sugar
2 tablespoons lemon juice
Combine cabbage, carrots, radishes and onion in large bowl; set aside.
Combine oil, vinegar, seasoning blend, sugar and lemon juice in small bowl;
mix well.
Pour dressing over cabbage mixture; toss to mix well.
Chill for 2 to 3 hours.
Toss again before serving.

SUND AY, JUNE 5, 2016

2B

L&T

SWliving

news@hpleader.com

A book about fire that delivers chills


Your family has a good contingency plan.
You all know what to do if theres
a blaze or a flood. You know where
to go, what to grab if theres time,
and what not to do. Youve
practiced at least in your mind.
But what if your Plan A fails? In
The Fireman, the new novel by
Joe Hill, thats the burning
question.
Harper Willowes Grayson
couldnt quite believe that shed
gotten infected.
As a nurse, she knew the
dangers. She knew that those who
got Dragonscale died horrible
deaths in fire that consumed them
from within. Millions of people
world-wide had been reduced to
ash, and shed taken strong precautions against Draco incendia
trychophyton but there it was: a
filigree trail snaked black-and-gold
around her hips and up her arms. A
sign of infection. A death sentence.
Her husband, Jakob, had
sentenced her to death already,
though, hadnt he? He forced
Harper into agreeing to a suicide
pact, should either of them fall sick.
Would he really make her go along
with it, now that Harper was
pregnant?
The answer was yes, but on the
day Jakob became crazed with fear
and tried to kill her, Harper learned
that her months as a nurse offered
her something unique: the
friendship of a tall, mysterious
man, scaled up and wearing
firemans gear.
She had once helped the
firemans ailing nephew and, in
return, the fireman vowed to save
her life. He whisked her away to an
abandoned summer camp, leaving
her in the care of other survivors
whod learned to harness their
Dragonscale; theyd also taken
measures to avoid Cremation

THE
BOOKWORM SEZ

The future is now

TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER
Crews that sprang up to annihilate
scale sufferers. Camp residents
would keep Harper and her
unborn baby safe.
But was she safe there, or did the
camp offer its own set of dangers?
As Harper learned more about her
savior and about the people of the
camp, she began to have her
doubts but she couldnt leave.
If Jakob learned that she was still
alive, hed try to extinguish her for
good.
Overall, I was quite satisfied with
The Fireman, though it did have
its huh? moments.
Because, perhaps, of its size, it
seemed that author Joe Hill let his

story run away with itself


sometimes. Conversations became
overly-long and clichd, there were
minor head-scratchers here and
there, I noticed that one character
went uncharacteristically missing
for awhile, and some plots were too
pat. And yet
And yet, I almost ripped a few
pages in an effort to turn them
faster because Hill doesnt let up
on the heart-thumpers much.
Every time you think you can

breathe (or laugh, because Hill also


has a fiery sense of humor), youre
yanked back into a story thats hairraising, sleep-squashing, and just
about believable enough to make
you check your own skin for scale.
That means that fans of postApocalyptic novels, zombie TV
shows, and good old-fashioned
scream-fest novels should scream
for this one. Who knew that a book
called The Fireman could chill
you so thoroughly?

Prevent and manage diabetes


Course on
diabetes
offered soon
Regular physical activity plays a
key role in managing diabetes. It
can also help you prevent or delay
the onset of diabetes. Proper meal
management is also essential, along
with taking medications as
prescribed and managing stress
effectively.
Why is physical activity so
important? Your cells become more
sensitive to insulin when you are
active, which allows insulin to work
more effectively. Also, during
exercise, your cells remove glucose
from the blood using a mechanism
totally spate from insulin.
The bottom line is that exercising
consistently can lower blood
glucose and improve youre A1C,
which could reduce the amount of
medication needed to manage your
diabetes.
Lifestyle habits are also powerful
in preventing diabetes.
The
number of Americans with
diagnosed diabetes has increased
four-found since 1980 a trend we
have the ability to change.
Here are key tips for preventing
diabetes:
Maintain a healthy weight.
One of the leading risk factors for
type 2 diabetes is obesity. If you
are overweight, dropping just 5 to
10 percent of your weight cuts your
risk of developing diabetes in half.
Eat plenty of fruits and
veggies. Studies show that eating
a variety of fruits and vegetables
may cut your diabetes risk by as
much as 22 percent.
Avoid sugary beverages.
Replace sweet drinks, such as soda,
lemonade or fruit juice, with water,
tea, and other non-sugary options.
Get moving. Regular physical
activity can help you achieve and
maintain a healthy weight and cut
your diabetes risk.
Reduce TV time. There is a
correlation between the amount of
time spent watching television and
diabetes risk. The assumption is
that people who watch TV are not
physically active and are likely
consuming unhealthy snacks as
well.

CONSUMER SCIENCES
LIVING WELL

KATHY BLOOM

Diabetes education
offered soon...
Right Bite Diabetes class will be
offered by K-State Research and
Extension and Southwest Medical
Center soon.
The free three-session course will
help participants learn to control or
prevent diabetes and other
diseases.
Participants will review a variety
of lessons including: portion
control, food label reading, use of
various sweeteners, choosing
carbohydrates wisely, increasing
fiber, choosing the right fats, and
control of high blood pressure.
Cooking demos by local
celebrities Elizabeth Irby and
Susan Lukwago as well as recipe
sampling will also be offered.
Both the person living with
diabetes, as well as a relative or care
giver who assist in preparing meals
or health monitoring is welcome to
attend.
Participants need to attend all
three sessions. Course dates are set
for the last three Mondays in June;
the 13th, 20th and 27th from 6:30
8 p.m. at the Seward County
Activity Center.
Register ASAP as space is limited
by calling the Extension Office at
624-5604. Registration deadline is
this Wednesday, June 8.
For more information on health
and
wellness,
email
sw@listserv.ksu.edu call 620-6245604 or stop by 1081 Stadium Rd,
Liberal.

Glycemic index is defined as a system that


ranks foods on a scale from 1 to 100 based on
their effect on blood-sugar levels. It was
originally designed to help people with diabetes
control their blood sugar levels.
There are certain foods like white bread,
cookies, and white potatoes that make your
blood sugar rise quickly. Carbs that produce a
steadier rise in blood sugar are wheat breads
and whole grain pastas that also contain fiber
and help you feel full longer. When you eat
low GI foods youre not as hungry, and you
feel more satisfied.
High GI foods are categorized as 70 or
higher and include white rice, white bread,
pretzels, white bagels, white baked potatoes,
crackers and sugar-sweetened beverages.
Medium GI foods range between 56-69 and
include bananas, grapes, ice cream, raisins
and corn. Low GI foods fall into the category
of 55 and under and these are considered the
healthiest, examples include oatmeal, peanuts,
peas, carrots, kidney beans, hummus, skim
milk, most fruits (except pineapple and
watermelon have a high GI).
Source: www.earthdoctor.com

I might be showing my age a


bit much, but when I was little
and watched my favorite
television show Star Trek, the
thing I loved most was the
technology.
Everything they used seemed
so far into the future that we
would never live in such a world
that was described in that show.
Fast forward about 50 years.
(Yes. Star Trek made its television
debut 50 years ago in 1966.
One good example is the
communicator. In the show it was
a small handheld device that let
crewmembers talk to each other
and with the starship Enterprise.
What was once a distant
fantasy is now the ubiquitous
objects called cell phones that we
all carry around and fixate on all
the time. Allowing for instant
communication around the world
at the push of a button.
For those that were favorites of
the Star Trek Doctor McCoy, you
might remember the Tricorder
device. The device was carried by
a shoulder strap with a wand that
could be passed over a patient
and the Doctor would be able to
offer a diagnosis of the health of
the crewperson.
We have as of yet, made it
quite to that instant diagnosis
part of the Tricorder, but we have
begun to see wearable medical
devices that track our heart rate,
blood pressure, distance walked
in steps, and a variety of metrics
that can be used to gauge overall
health.
But the device that always won
my heart was the Replicator.
Captain Kirk would walk up and
say Hot Chocolate and the
Replicator would open its door
and there was a cup of Hot
Chocolate.
The Replicator could create
seemingly anything that could be
requested. For me the future
could firmly be placed as starting
the day I could have a device
make something for me at the
push of a button.
Well, that day is here. Kind of.
In May of this year, the library
was the recipient of a grant
through the State Library of
Kansas that awarded us a 3D
printer at the completion of a one
day training workshop in
Hutchinson.
Seven libraries in Kansas were
lucky enough to receive a 3D
printer.
Selection was largely based on
the ability of the receiving library
to learn how to use the printer
and how to make it available to
the public.
Here at the library, we have
been busy learning the ins and
outs of the software and the
printer itself and have gotten to a
place where we can now start
putting together a couple of
training classes for our patrons
and the community at large.
We will post those times and
days when we get them
scheduled.
The important thing that I
stress with the 3D printer is that
is not as quick as a Replicator
from Star Trek.
You have to design the object
you want the 3D printer to print.
A good way to describe how it
prints is to think of an igloo.
You build the first layer of the
igloo and then you put another
layer on top of that all the way up

LIBRARY DIRECTOR

ROYCE KITTS

until you have a complete igloo.


3D printing is much the same. It
lays down a thin layer of plastic
and then continues to add layers
until the object is complete.
Once you have designed the
object, then you can move over to
the printer to get it printed. I
would say if there is one downfall
to the technology at this point is
the length of time it takes.
It can take some objects 20
minutes to print for things that
are about the size of a cookie, up
to three hours for something the
size of a coffee cup.
If you are interested in learning
more about 3D printing while we
figure out when to have our
training sessions, here are a
couple of online resources that
will help get you started.
The first is Thingiverse at
www.thingiverse.com. Thingiverse collects 3D objects created
by other 3D printing enthusiasts.
You can search for what you
want to print and hopefully find
what you need. If not you can an
object that is close and manipulate the object in a 3D software
program and save yourself hours
of design time.
The second is Tinkercad at
www.tinkercad.com. Tinkercad is
a 3D design and printing tool
that is online based.
Tinkercad is great for those
new to computer design and 3D
design by streamlining the design
process into easy to complete
steps.
The third and final resouces is
AutoDesk
123D
at
www.123dapp.com. This is a
combination of already made
projects and design software.
AutoDesk is a trusted
company in 3D design and when
you get more into, looking for the
AutoDesk name is a way to make
sure you are getting something
good to work with.
Well, there you have it.
Hopefully, you know someone
who would be excited to work
with 3D printing and might have
an idea or two in mind. If you do,
please have them contact Royce
at director@lmlibrary.org
As you can see, the future is
upon is. With the right tools and
technology, we can all Live long
and prosper. (My apologies for
that.)

SUND AY, JUNE 5, 2016

SWliving

L&T

news@hpleader.com

Senior center hosts old


fashion summer cookout
Summer has finally arrived and
no better way to spend a Sunday
afternoon than enjoying friends
and food.
On Sunday, June 12, we invite
you to the Community Senior
Center (701 N Grant Ave. in
Liberal) where laughter is free.
Bring friends and neighbors and
enjoy a delicious lunch with
homemade food and maybe, a
little entertainment.
This old fashion cookout will
include burgers on the grill, potato
salad, bake beans, chips, dessert
and lemonade. Plan your Sunday
lunch with us as we will served
from 1 3 p.m. A free will offering
will be taken and the proceeds will
benefit our Community Senior
Center.
My next topic is exciting, and I
need your help. I received notice
from Dave Geist, executive
director of SouthWest Kansas
Area
Agency
on
Aging
(SWKAAA) concerning the 2016
Keeping Seniors in the Game!
This is in conjunction with the
National Baseball Congress to
honor active and energetic seniors
and promote the work Area
Agencies on Aging/ADRCs do to
connect seniors and caregivers to
important services.
The KSITG goal is to identify
and recruit 16 people from all
parts of Kansas who are age 80 or
better to be honored at featured
games of the National Baseball
Congress World Series in Wichita.
These honorees will throw the
first pitch at an evening game of
the tournament.
These games will be held every
evening in Wichita from July 29
through Aug. 13. All feature
games happen at 7 p.m. at
Lawrence-Dumont stadium.
Teams from communities across
the United States play in the
tournament.
Requirements are as follows: be
at least 80 years old; have made
significant contributions to their
communities and ideally be
nominated by an Area Agency on
Aging; be willing to travel to
Wichita and be at Lawrence-

The Associated Press

Regier Sappenfield
Engagement
DARLENE FORD
Dumont stadium at least a half
hour before their pitch at 7 p.m.
provide a photo and information
about themselves to Ashton
Moore for a write up that will be
given to the National Baseball
Congress for the announcement
at the time of their pitch; agree to
having photos taken that might be
used for publicity purposes; share
the excitement of this fun opportunity to celebrate the 82nd
anniversary of the NBC World
Series and to represent their
communities; Seward County
Council on Aging; and Area
Agencies in the United States in
the Keeping Seniors In the
Game! initiative.
KSITG honored pitchers can
plan to have a good seat at the
game for themselves and at least
three other persons.
This sounds like an awesome
experience. I vision the opportunity to take either a van or the
Center Bus to the event allowing
additional participation and
support from our community. To
nominate a qualified individual,
call me at 620.624-2511. I look
forward to your call.
Have a great week.

Frank and Alta Rogers will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary
on Saturday, June 11.
All friends of the couple are welcome to attend the celebration, which
will be from 6 to 8 p.m. at the couples residence at 5561 D Road,
Tyrone, Okla.
Frank and Alta united in marriage on June 20, 1966, in Spearman,
Texas.
Frank retired from XTO Energy in 2006. Alta worked many years as a
hairdresser.
Together, they remain active in the community and manage several
rental properties in the Tyrone community.
Frank and Alta are parents to son Lance and wife Sheela Rogers and
grandparents to Chantz, Ryon, Gunner and Cianna.

RYAN KISNER

DAR recognizes
USD 483 principals
USD 483
Kismet Elementary School
Principal Jerrilynn Wood and
Plains
Elementary
School
Principal Ryan Kisner were each
presented
certificates
by
Jacqualine Dunham, Dodge City
Chapter of the Daughters of the
American Revolution.
She delivered the certificates for
Kaye Watkins, Kansas DAR
Chairman Service for Veterans.
They were signed by Kansas DAR
Regent Brenda Dooley.
The certificates were given for
outstanding achievement in

Tourist
and elk get
too close

LIBERAL SENIOR CENTER


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Rogers


50th Wedding Anniversary

JERRILYNN WOOD

3B

supporting the veterans at Kansas


Soldiers Home at Fort Dodge.
The students at both schools
provided Christmas gifts and
made Valentines for the veterans.
Both schools held an inspiring
Veterans Day Program that
honored the local veterans.
The patriotic songs and gifts
were heartwarming. These
students let our veterans know
that they have not been forgotten.
Their many acts of kindness
showed appreciation to veterans,
who sacrificed to keep our country
free.

The parents of Jake Regier and Monti Sappenfield announce the couples engagement and upcoming marriage.
Monti is the daughter of Billy and Debbie Sappenfield of Cheyenne, Okla. Monti is the granddaughter of
Pastor David and Linda Cranfield of Atwood, Okla.
Jake is the son of Kerry and Stacey Regier of Forgan, Okla. Jake is the grandson of Florence Regier, Turpin,
Okla., and Jack and Sandra Vandeveer, Sharon
The couple is planning a July 9 ceremony near Turpin.

A woman looking to take a


picture of an elk during a visit
to Yellowstone National Park
got a lot closer than she
expected when it charged at
her.
Video posted on Facebook
by tour guide Jody Tibbitts
captures audio of him trying to
warn the woman to back away
before the elk rushes at her.
The elk ended up stopping
short and backing away.
A National Park Service
spokesman tells ABC News
those looking to get close-up
photos of animals can
endanger themselves and
wildlife.
The park service says visitors
should stay at least 100 yards
from bears and wolves and at
least 25 yards from all other
wildlife.

Artists use creativity to help Seward County


Kansas Childrens Service League
The fifth annual Chairish the
Children event was held at the
Liberal Country Club April 23.
One artist in particular has a
special connection to this event. In
her youth most people identified
Sarah Cooley, creator of The
Jungle Book chair, as an athlete.
And few knew she found comfort
in art. She felt honored to participate in Chairish due to her
affection for art and the fact that
she was adopted as an infant by
Jack and Linda Cooley.
Jack currently serves as KCSLs
Liberal Community Leadership
and Development Council Chair.
As a mother, Sarah recognizes the
unconditional love she receives
from her adoptive family is just as
sincere as the love she has for her
own biological son but feels it still
made a drastic difference in her
life.
Approximately
45
locals
attended the dinner and auction to
support KCSLs Seward County
programs by bidding on 10 chairs
and one table.
Artists donated their time and
talents to paint and craft the chairs
specifically for this event. Some of
the designs were inspired by
childrens movies like The Lion
King and The Lorax and others

had playful themes such as music,


crayons and baseball.

Celebrating 40 years of
Prevent Child Abuse
Kansas
KCSL is celebrating 40 years of
Prevent Child Abuse Kansas and
began with a successful Child
Abuse Prevention (CAP) month in
April.
We kicked off with a statewide
event in Topeka April 8 in collaboration with the Kansas Department
for Children and Families. Gov.
Sam Brownback spoke at Christ
the King Early Childhood
Education Center and School, and
students planted blue pinwheels
the national symbol for child abuse
prevention.
Kellie Henderson shared her

personal story of overcoming child


abuse. Brownback also signed the
state proclamation for CAP month.
April 8 was also national Wear Blue
Day bringing more awareness to
child abuse prevention efforts.
Community partners helped
raise funds and awareness
throughout April for CAP month.
Starbucks participated in the
pinwheel campaign at 11 stores
located in Derby, Hutchinson,
Mission, Salina and Wichita.
Each store purchased 100
pinwheels to display and
distributed informative bookmarks
about protective factors.
For the 2017 campaign, plans
are already underway to expand to
more Starbucks locations in
Northeast Kansas. Dillons Food
Stores partnered again this year
and housed in-store coin collection

boxes and provided radio ads and


outdoor billboards; A-OK Pawn
and Retail planted pinwheels, and
employees donated diapers; Kappa
Delta students from the University
of Kansas displayed pinwheel
gardens all over campus; Emprise
Bank employees paid to wear blue
jeans to work April 8 and donated
proceeds to KCSL; and Sporting
KC hosted a Wear Blue night at
their April 13 soccer game.
Even though April is over, child
abuse prevention efforts continue
year-round.
KCSL thanks everyone who
helped us spread awareness during
CAP Month We still have
plenty of pinwheel materials if you
would like to continue bringing
awareness to your community. Just
fill out our online form here or call
877-530-5275.

S U N D AY, J U N E 5 , 2 0 1 6

4B

New food labeling; exercise and cancer risk reduction


BY MICHAEL ROIZEN, M.D., AND MEHMET OZ, M.D.
Q: Everyones cheering about the
new nutritional labeling for added sugars. But dont we already have that?
George G., Marietta, Ohio
A: This new nutritional label will offer
important information, and a lot of
processed food manufacturers fought it.
But it isnt initially taking take effect
until July 26, 2018; small manufacturers
have until 2019. In the meantime, look
on the ingredients label (the nutrition and
ingredients labels are separate) for words
like maltose, dextrose, sugar, high fructose corn syrup and about 100 others that
indicate the food contains added sweeteners!
Once the changes come into effect,
youll be able to see the more in-depth
details on the nutrition label about sweeteners in packaged foods you buy. And we
bet youll be surprised by what you see!
Added sweeteners (both sugars and
syrups) are found in 75 percent of packaged foods, and 77 percent of all calories
purchased in the United States in 20052009 contained caloric sweeteners!
Knowing how much of these dangerous
ingredients are in your food can help you
dodge bodywide inflammation and
lessen your risk for everything from obesity and diabetes to heart disease, dementia, depression and a lousy sex life.
The new labels also will have more
realistic serving sizes and give you a better idea of how many calories youre
likely to consume. Why does this matter?
We live in an age of Portions Gone Wild.
Will the new labels really make a difference? A recent study shows that 48
percent of people read labels before they
buy. Thats down from 65 percent when
labels were first introduced. And 48 percent say theyre concerned with the
healthfulness of the food they buy
down 13 percent from 2013. But we cant
stop trying to halt the obesity epidemic
thats threatening the country economically and physically! So read those labels
and ingredients lists, dive into 5-9 servings of fruit and veggies daily, and get
walking, headed for 10,000 steps a day
with no excuses, like life got in the
way. Then you can label yourself
HEALTHY.
Q: My gynecologist is on a real exercise campaign, saying it can greatly
reduce my risk for cervical or breast
cancer. I think that because I am a lit-

tle overweight, shes just saying this to


scare me into trimming down. Is there
any proof that exercise reduces cancer
risk? Patricia L., Davenport,
Florida
A: Brava for your gyno! Thats great
advice, and recent studies back her up.
One, published online by JAMA Internal
Medicine, pooled cited data on 1.4 million people and found that folks who got
greater amounts of physical activity outside of work had a 42 percent lower risk
of esophageal adenocarcinoma; 26 percent lower for lung cancer; 23 percent
lower risk of liver and kidney cancer; 22
percent lower for gastric cardia cancers;
21 percent lower for endometrial cancer;
20 percent for myeloid leukemia; 17 percent for myeloma; 16 percent for colon
cancer; 15 percent for head and neck cancer; 13 percent lower for rectal and bladder cancer; 10 percent lower for breast
cancer. And, that was mostly regardless
of body size or smoking history.
Another recent study, out of the
Roswell Park Cancer Institute, found that
women who got less than four days of
physical activity a month were two and a
half times more likely to develop cervical
cancer than women who reported getting
regular physical activity.
So to take advantage of this great
cancer-dodging news! We recommend a
walking routine five to six days a week,
heading for 10,000 steps daily. Your best
bet: Use a fitness tracker or pedometer,
enlist a walking buddy and get good
shoes! As you increase your distance and
speed, add interval training. As you feel
more physically confident, try swimming, bicycling or playing tennis. Then
add resistance exercise for 30 minutes a
week at the gym or at home with stretchy
bands or hand weights. For tips on getting more physically active, check out
sharecare.com.
***
Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of The Dr.
Oz Show, and Mike Roizen, M.D. is
Chief Wellness Officer and Chair of
Wellness Institute at Cleveland Clinic.
Email your health and wellness questions
to Dr. Oz and Dr. Roizen at
youdocsdaily(at sign)sharecare.com.
2016 Michael Roizen, M.D. and Mehmet Oz,
M.D.
Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

S U N DAY, J U N E 5 , 2 0 1 6

Classifieds

L&T

5B

For classifieds 24 hours a day, visit

www.leaderandtimes.com

To place an ad
Public Notice
Public Notice
THE FOLLOWING VEHICLE(s) will be sold at public auction for cash at TBS,
Inc. 729 E. Pancake Blvd.,
Liberal, Kansas. On Friday
June 10th, 2016 @ 10a.m.
1996 Ford Taurus S/W

VIN#1FALP58S8TG162133

1983 Honda RS
Motorcycle

VIN#JH2RC1309DM012329

(First published in the High


Plains Daily Leader & Times,
Liberal, Kansas, on June 5,
2016)t1

Any person or firm having


a legitimate claim against
goods stored by
Stacy Rinehart

at ABC Storage, 605


Terminal Road must submit proof of claim on or
before
06/09/2016
otherwise goods will be
sold for non-payment of
rent.
ABC Storage
605 Terminal Road
Liberal, Kansas 67901

Employment
Help Wanted

Randys Professional
Painting
is now hiring experienced painters. Must
have valid Drivers
License.
Call Randy
620-482-2447

Immediate opening for


penriders. Responsibilities
include riding pens and
doctoring. Must supply
own horses. Company
pays all horse expenses.
We offer a hourly wage
and a competitive benefit
package including paid
family health insurance
and retirement plan.
Sublette Feeders
Contact: George Paris
620-668-5501
EOE

626-0840

Driver Trainees Needed!


Become a driver for
Stevens Transport! Earn
$800 Per Week PAID CDL
TRAINING! Stevens covers all costs! 1-888-7492303 drive4stevens.com
Maintenance Technician

The Yarco Companies is a


full-service multi-family
real estate firm that delivers highly specialized
Property
Management
Services, and focuses primarily
an
Affordable
Housing. We have an
immediate opening for an
experienced Maintenance
Technician to join our
property
management
team. We are looking for
an energetic, motivated,
customer focused individual with the ability to succeed in a fast paced, constantly changing environment. Candidate will be
responsible for assisting at
two apartment communities. Responsibilities will
include daily resident
maintenance
requests,
preparing apartments for
move in and helping to
maintain the grounds and
common
areas.
Candidates must have a
working knowledge of
appliance repair, electrical,
plumbing, carpentry, painting and dry wall repair.
HVAC certification is
required. Must have reliable transportation; pass a
background check, drug
screen, physical and have
a valid drivers license and
auto insurance. We offer a
highly competitive compensation package which
includes Medical, Dental,
Vision, Life Insurance and
401k.
Please Apply in Person
Monday-Friday 8am4:30pm
The Cottages of Liberal
2260 Sierra Drive
Liberal, KS

High Plains Educational


Cooperative is looking for
special education teachers. If you know someone
who has a teaching
license or a heart for
kids, please have them
contact our central office
at
620-356-5577
or go to http://www.highp l a i n s e d
.com/job_opportunities.ht
m and fill out an application.

denasa@hpleader.com
Sales Manager position
available in
Dodge City, KS

We are a sophisticated,
multi-media, local news
organization and a leader
in delivering local content
to consumers and local
marketing solutions to
businesses. Our company
is looking for a true sales
leader that can help us
continue to evolve, grow
and deliver custom solutions to local businesses.

This person will be responsible for growing advertising revenues through both
the management of other
sales team members and
the development of their
own book of accounts,
using a consultative sales
approach for both print
and digital solutions.

Candidates must have


sales experience, and
preferably management
experience; media experience is helpful but not
required.

Please go to our online website to apply:


www.usfoods.com
or call 405-475-4634

EOE Race/ Color/ Religion/ Sex/ Sexual Orientation/


Gender Identity/ National Origin/ Protected Veteran/
Disability Status

EEOE

www.rescare.com

then select careers,


External Applicants,
enter 67901 and then
choose Liberal Summitt
ResCare.
Summitt ResCare
Kansas is an EOE
employer

AUCTION
10:00 AM

AUDREY LAMBLEY ESTATE

CONCESSIONS AVAILABLE

OLD HOOKER HARDWARE BLDG

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES:


WASH BOWL AND PITCHER
LOTS OF NICE CARNIVAL
GLASS LOTS OF NICE
VINTAGE GLASS BOWLS,
CAKE PLATES & STANDS;
VASES; CREAM &SUGAR
SETS; SALT DIPS BIRD FIGURINES SALT & PEPPER
TEACUPS
7
SHAKERS
SAUCERS OIL LAMPS #10
STONEWARE
WESTERN
CROCK #2 CROCK WATER
JAR LARD PRESS OVAL
GALVANIZED TIN TUB W/ LID
WHEELING WATER CAN
WASH TUB EUROPA ALARM
CLOCK (GERMANY) 5 GAL
CREAM CAN (ERIC W.
COM.
POSTWESSLER)
CARDS,
ENVELOPES
(SHADES WELL) ENTERCHERRY
PITTER
PRISE
UNIVERSAL #2 GRINDER ----SAD IRON USA COOKIE JAR -- VINT BOTTLE CAPPER
PLATES
COLLECTOR
LANTERNS (1 COLEMAN,
I SHAPLEIGH HARDWARE,
ST. LOUIS) RANIER MOUNTAIN FRESH BEER LIGHT
AMBER IRIS HERRINGBONE BOWLS WASHBOARDS
ASHTRAYS
PRECIOUS
MOMENTS FIGURINE 1993
HOMCO LADY CAROLINE
ELGIN CLOCK 1958 HOLT
CHRISTMAS
HOWARD
FIGURINES 3 PC PORCELAIN
NATIVITY SET VINTAGE
KNICK KNACKS VINTAGE
UTENSILS; ROLLING PIN; &
OTHER KITCHEN ITEMS WM
ROGERS
SILVERPLATED
TEAPOT W/ CREAMER AND
BOWL
KENT
SUGAR
ALUM.
STACKABLE
CANISTER SET CHILDS
PORCELAIN CHAMBER POT
VINTAGE CANDLE HOLDERS
BROWNIE HAWKEYE CAMERA RECORDS (33, 45, 78)
COSTUME JEWELRY VINT.
BURROUGHS
ADDING
MACHINE VINT. APSCO
PENCIL SHARPENER ADVERTISING PENS/ OTHER MISC.
ITEMS
KITCHEN & HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS:
STAINLESS

US FOODS
Del i v ery Dri v er

Must have a minimum of 6 months tractor trailer driving


experience or 3 months foodservice, beverage, or similar
delivery experience
Class A CDL license required
Full range of benefits offered including medical and
dental insurance, 401(k), with match, paid holidays and
vacations
$1000 referral bonus

Direct Support
Professional
Summitt Rescare is seeking qualified individuals to
fill the position of direct
support staff. This position
will provide services for
assigned consumers in
Liberal.
High
School
Diploma or GED and a

If interested, apply
online at

CORNER OF SWEM & GLADYAS ST.


HOOKER, OKLAHOMA

Sepulveda Plumbing
Heating & Air is looking
for a HVAC Technician.
Valid drivers
license required.
Experience required.
Compensation based on
experience up to $25/Hr.
Call 620-624-2323
for more information.

$18 an hour
$2,500 Sign-On Bonus

To apply, submit cover


letter and resume with
salary expectations to
Lee Bachlet
Senior Group Publisher
GateHouse Media
lbachlet@gatehousemedia.com

SATURDAY
JUNE 11, 2016

The Yarco Companies is


an Equal Opportunity
Employer.

Liberal, Kansas

valid Drivers License are


required.

Compensation includes
competitive base salary
plus commissions and full
benefits.

1917 Windsor Ln.

Huge kitchen with a Jenn-aire


range, breakfast bar and dining
area. Large living room with a
cozy fireplace. 3 Brs, 2 full
baths, covered patio, fireplace.
Near Oliver Brown Park.
MLS #5631

$164,900

THIS HOME IS A MUST SEE!

2331 S. Holly Dr.

5 Brs, 3 bathrooms, fabulous


kitchen, trendy master br suite
with updated bathroom and great
closet. Cozy den with fireplace
and snack center.
MLS #5900 - $269,000

BOARD
MASTERCRAFT
SOFA (TAN & BROWN)
BURBANK
SOFA
(TAN,
RUST,BROWNS) BURBANK
LOVESEAT 4-TAN VINYL
SWIVEL BARSTOOLS BROWN
W/
OTTOMAN
CHAIR
RECLINERS (1 BROWN, 1
GOLD)
GOLD,
GREEN,
ORANGE FLORAL SOFA 2
METAL BARSTOOLS MAPLE
COLORED NIGHTSTAND 2
PIECE WICKER LAWN SET
WHITE BENTWOOD ROCKER
6-DRAWER DRESSER W/ MIRROR 4-DRAWER DRESSER
CHEST OF DRAWERS 2DRAWER NIGHTSTAND HALL
TREE----COFFEE TABLE DINING TABLE W/ 3 LEAVES 2TIERED ROUND END TABLE
ADMIRAL
TV,
RADIO,
RECORD PLAYER CONSOLE
11 UPHOLSTERED OFFICE
CHAIRS

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS;
HP PAVILION 7940 COMPUTER WITH MONTOR, SPEAKERS, KEYBOARD MINOLTA
EP270 COPIER 2-DRAWER
METAL FILING CABINETS (5)
2-DRAWER METAL CARD
FILE CABINETS MISC. OFFICE
TYPEWRITERS,
SUPPLIES
ADDING MACHINES BIRELEYS MILK BOTTLES (3)
KOOLMATE
36
IGLOO
THERMO ELEC. COOLER/
WARMER (NEW) B&D APT
SIZE REFRIGERATOR WRAPPING PAPER CUTTERS (2) 2GRILLS
CHARBROIL
WURTLITZER FUNMAKER
REDI SMOKE BBQ COOKER
LOTS OF NICE LAWN &
GARDEN CROSLEY FAN
FORCED HEATER 15 BTLS
INCREDIBLE
CLEANER
MOVIE
PROJECTORS
&
SCREENS FUJI 185 ZOOM
CAMERA BEAUTY SHOP
DRYER CHAIR PORTABLE
HAIR DRYERS (2) SUITCASES---SEASONAL ITEMS COLEMAN CATALYTIC HEATERS
JOHNSON CB RADIO W/ MIC
MANY MORE ITEMS TOO
NUMEROUS TO MENTION

JERRY ALLENS CREW WILL BE HELPING DEL LAMBLEY


AUCTION ITEMS FROM HIS MOMS ESTATE. VIEW ONLINE
@kscbnews.net. IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS PLEASE GIVE DEL
A CALL @ 580-652-2331. ADDITIONAL PICS CAN BE VIEWED
ONLINE AT www.suctionzip.com id 44328

MOM WILL LOVE THIS!

SUNBEAM
MIXMASTER
ELECTRONIC
SUNBEAM
FOOD PREP CENTER (MIXER)
W/ JUICER TAPPAN OVENWARE CASSEROLE W/ LID
RIVAL CROCKPOT/ SLOW
COOKERS (2) ROMERTOPF
CLAY COOKER LARGE ASST
CORNING WARE GLASS
SAUCEPANS (2 W/ 1 LID) SEVERAL COFFEE POTS PRESTO
ICE CREAM NOW SUNBEAM
HD
FOOD
PROCESSOR
PRESTO PRESSURE COOKER
QT.
WAGNERWARE
6
ROASTER 4 QT. MAGNOROASTER
GLASS
LITE
PITCHERS ONEIDA ST STEEL
FLATWARE (12 PLACE) ASST
PANS-COOKIE
COOKING
SHEETS HOME INTERIOR
DECORATIVE
ITEMS
PRINCESS HOUSE COASTER
SETS PRINCESS HOUSE
FORK AND SPOON HOLDER
SETS FLOUR SACKING DISH
TOWELS (NEW) VINTAGE
PAINTED DISH TOWELS
CROCHETED
DOILIES
AFGHANS ASSTD PLACEMENT SETS DECORATIVE
PILLOWS BEDDING TABLEMISC
SEWING
CLOTHS
NOTIONS VINTAGE PATTERNS FLOOR AND TABLE
DECORATIVE
LAMPS
PHONES 2 LG WHITE PLANT
PEDESTALS ASST PITURES
AND WALL DCOR ARTIFICIAL FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS TELEVISIONS SHARP
CAROUSEL MICROWAVES (2)
1 BOX MISC. TUPPERWARE 1
BOX MISC. RUBBERMAID
ITEMS VINTAGE METAL
HIGH CHAIR (YELLOW)
MIRRORS 2 WHITE METL
CORNER SHELVES BOOKCASES (4 SHELF, 6 SHELF) 2
HIGH BACK WOOD CHAIRS
SM VINT TABLES & MGAZINE
RACKS 8 WICKER-BACKED
CHAIRS W/ ROLLERS SEVERAL ROLLER CARTS AND
DROP LEAF ROLLER
VINTAGE
DESKS/TABLES
ASHTRAY W/ STAND
VINTAGE
FURNITURE:
FORMICA/CHROME TABLE
KINGSIZE BEDTWIN HEAD-

MACARTHUR DISTRICT

1604 N. Roosevelt Ave.

ANNOUNCEMENTS DAY OF SALE TAKE PRECEDENCE OVER


PRINTED MATERIAL.NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCIDENTS OR
LOSS OF ITEMS.

COUNTRY LIVING!

320 Cartwright, Turpin, OK.

You will love this upgraded


kitchen and master bath. 3 Br, 1
3/4 bath well kept home in
MacArthur District. CA/CH,
pretty fenced yard, large corner
lot, storage bldg. 2 car garage
MLS #5921

5 Brs, 2 3/4 bath home with just


under 4000 sq ft. situated on 3
acres of gently rolling hills in the
Ponderosa. Partial bsmt, CA/CH.
1 (30x60) shop with bathroom
and another (36x30) Morton Bldg
plus stand alone game room with
a 1/2 bath, gazebo, secluded tree
lined property. MLS#5766

ALL ON ONE LEVEL

BIG FAMILY?

407 N.Tulane Ave.

2 or 3 BR, 1 3/4 bath brick


ranch, shady covered patio, corner lot near Harrison Circle.
MLS #5915

$129,000

1111 S. Pershing Ave.

5 Br, 1 3/4 baths, basement,


attached garage,

MLS #5895
$139,900

GREAT STARTER HOME!

LUXURIOUS EXECUTIVE HOME

233 S. Tulane Ave.

You will love the decorating! 3


Brs and 2 baths on the main
floor, 2 more brs, and 1 bath in
the basement. Main floor laundry, 2 living areas, pretty wood,
tile, stained concrete and carpeted flooring, nice storage bldg.,
CA/CH, 2 car garage
MLS #5284

NEW LISTING!

3 Bedrooms, 1 bath, great backyard shop or storage bldg in this


fenced yard.
MLS #5977

Under $100,000
PRICED TO SELL!

1504 N. Webster Ave.

3 Br. 1 1/2 bath brick ranch


with attractive vinyl fencing.
Attached 1 car garage
MLS #5981

$115,000

300 Canna Ln.

$335,000

GREAT STARTER HOME!

803 N Tulane Ave.

on the corner of Tulane and 8th


street . 3 bedrooms, pretty
updated bathroom, attached
garage CA/CH. 94,900
MLS #5966

$94,900

1 Rural Property - In KS with Acerage Call for More Information!

Janie Rine

BROKER/OWNER
620-621-5025

S U N DAY, J U N E 5 , 2 0 1 6

Classifieds
Thanks for
making
us your paper!

L&T

denasa@hpleader.com

Sudoku

6B

FOR RELEASE SATURDAY, JUNE 4, 2016

Hints from
Heloise

The ways of watering plants

Sudoku Answers

Dear Heloise: My mother taught me


to WATER MY HOUSEPLANTS
from the bottom. She said that this will
strengthen the roots by training them to
seek out the water.
Do you have any hints about watering houseplants? Thank you! Elizabeth in Columbus, Ohio
Hi, Elizabeth. Houseplants can add
so much to your home or office. Some
plants are easier to take care of than
others, but watering is key for all of
them. If the pot is in a saucer, pour the
water in there, and it will soak up into
the soil.
However, depending on your water
supply, you may see a white powder on
the soil. Salt and lime minerals are not
good for the plants. Save rainwater to
water houseplants its free, and better for the plants.
If you are a newbie and want to start
out adding some green to your home,
IVY is the way to go! You can grow it
in water or soil. I have several plants
from which I have given cuttings to
friends, spreading the green. They keep
growing. Green Thumb Heloise
P.S.: One ivy plant is almost 40 years
old! It was my mothers.
PET PAL

Dear Readers: Clip B. in Benton,


Maine, sent a picture of his family of
schnauzers, Elvis, Abby, Cricket and
Cooper, eagerly peering out the storm
door, scouting for lizards to chase in
the courtyard.
Clip reads my column in the (Waterville, Maine) Morning Sentinel. If
youd like to see these curious canines,
visit www.Heloise.com. Heloise
P

QUICK COOK

Dear Heloise: When I boil eggs or


make spaghetti or macaroni and
cheese, I bring the water to a boil and
put the spaghetti and macaroni in and
stir a couple of times, put a tight lid on
the pot and cut off the heat.
The water cools gradually, and the
pasta or eggs are cooked without
OVERcooking. This will save on electricity, also.
Thank you for all the good hints! The
hint about storing quilts between the
mattress and box springs was a help to
me, and freed up needed space!
Frances D., Kingsport, Tenn.
LIPSTICK LOVER

Dear Heloise: I love dining out


socially, but what is the correct way to
refresh my makeup after eating? Do I
have to excuse myself and run to the
ladies room? Lettie M. in San
Antonio
Hi, Lettie. There are no laws, but
as the saying goes, When in doubt,
dont, and keep that in mind. There
are many variables: Who are you with?
Where are you? Can you quickly just
do a swipe of your lips without making a big show? Readers? Heloise
GROOMING NAILS

Dear Heloise: My sister taught me


how to do my own manicures and
pedicures. It has saved me a lot of
money! Here are two hints I use: Dont
paint thumbnails until last; you can
scrape off polish from other fingers.
Use an emery board and gently remove
polish from cuticles. Joyce C.,
Scottsdale, Ariz.
2016 by King Features Syndicate Inc.

Crossword

Horoscope

BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

Note: Bigars Stars is based on the


degree of your sun at birth. The sign
name is simply a label astrologers put on
a set of degrees for convenience. For best
results, readers should refer to the dates
following each sign.
A baby born today has a Sun in Gemini
and a Moon in Cancer.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, June


6, 2016:
This year you might not be as assertive
with your career and in situations in
which you normally step up to the plate.
Others will wonder about your low-key
approach to what they consider important matters. Your creativity excels after
September. Your mind is full of ideas. If
you are single, enjoy the summer,
because after that period, you are likely
to meet someone very special. If you are
attached, the two of you will enter a new
phase where the romance heats up. You
will act like new lovers. CANCER offers
a different perspective.
The Stars Show the Kind of Day Youll
Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive;
3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19)


### Emotions run high. Act like you
are in control, and know that you can
control only yourself. Your sixth sense
will help you make a major decision. You
could be far more mellow and effective
than usual. Others might ask for some
feedback or help. Tonight: Close to
home.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
##### Communication excels, and
you seem to be a source of good vibes to
many people. Allow your creativity to go
to a new level; trust your intuition. Share
your ideas with others more frequently,
and you will gain important feedback.
Tonight: Go to a favorite haunt.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

For entertainment purpose only. The Daily Leader does not


endorse predictions.

#### Be aware of the costs of proceeding as you have been without a


budget or any self-discipline. You easily
could spend far more money than you are
aware of. You will want to indulge a
child or loved one. A boss gives you
strong feedback. Tonight: Make it your
treat.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
##### You are ahead of yourself, no
matter what you take on. You have an
overactive mind. Others cant seem to
understand your thoughts and feelings.
Try to be more explicit about your ideas.
Tap into your imagination to find a better
approach. Tonight: Be spontaneous.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
### Read between the lines. This
approach will give you a better idea of an
issue that might arise in the near future.
Find out what is happening behind the
scenes. A loved one clearly is supportive.
Listen to what he or she says, and
respond accordingly. Tonight: Time to
think.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
#### A friend might get you focused
on an important matter. Your efforts
could be the beginning of a profound
change, at least to one other person. A
close associate or loved one will share
many viable suggestions to help you land
where you want to be. Tonight: All
smiles.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
### Pressure builds. As a result, you
might have difficulty sharing a good
idea. A boss could be at a point where he
or she needs your complete attention. An
associate will help you gain a new perspective. Listen to this person, no matter
what happens. Tonight: Your instincts are
right-on!
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
#### Reach out for more information,
but know that you might not get the
response you desire. Youll get a lot of
support from a friend, who can give you
important feedback. How you see a per-

sonal matter is more a reflection of what


you choose to see. Tonight: Use your
imagination.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
### You might feel unusually generous and caring. A loved one will be
delighted by your change of tune. Youll
mend broken bridges with ease, as you
understand your role more clearly. Use
care with an authority figure who might
try to take advantage of you. Tonight: All
smiles.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
##### Move forward with an understanding of your limits as well as others.
You appreciate a loved ones good mood,
but might wonder how long it will last.
Make plans for a getaway for just the two
of you; you will be amazed by what happens. Tonight: Share some news.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
#### Allow yourself to go with the
flow and express your feelings. Be careful with your generous spirit right now,
as you easily could go overboard financially. A loved one or dear friend will
encourage you to indulge in an expenditure. Tonight: Be spontaneous.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
##### You have the ability to inspire
others, especially a child. If you are artistic, you might delight yourself with what
you create. You are likely to walk past a
mental barrier, and could wonder why it
was there in the first place. Tonight: Let
the good feelings flow.
BORN TODAY
Tennis player Bjorn Borg (1956), author
Thomas Mann (1875), actor Robert
Englund (1947)
***

Jacqueline Bigar is on the Internet at


www.jacquelinebigar.com.
2016 by King Features Syndicate Inc.

S U N DAY, J U N E 5 , 2 0 1 6

7B

L&T

Kansasland Tire is seeking


individual to fill the position
of
Service
Truck
Operator
/Comm-Ag/
OTR Tire Technician.
Must have experience and
valid drivers license. Must
have a clean driving
record, be authorized to
work in the US, and have
the ability to read and
comprehend instruction.
Health insurance, commission and 401k available.

Classifieds

denasa@hpleader.com

Please apply in person


at:

837 S. Kansas Ave.


Liberal, KS

Convoy Systems is hiring


Class A drivers to run from
Kansas City to the west
coast. Home Weekly!
Great Benefits! www.convoysystems.com Call Tina
ext. 301 or Lori ext. 303 1800-926-6869

Real Estate

Apartments for Rent

AUCTION CALENDAR

SHORES AUCTION

ROBERT &
PAULINE LOVE
ESTATE
JUNE 4&5 - 9AM

Location:From Tyrone,
OK: 1/2 Miles West on
Hwy 54
Truck & Car Bodies, Motor
Cycle Scrap Iron,
Collectible Clocks, Little
Red Wagons, Antique Farm
Equipment.
(3) 1950s Studebaker 2 Ton
Trucks, 1951 Ford 2 Ton,
1951 Chev 2 Ton w/Bed &
Lift
1958 GMC 2 Ton w/Tall
Sideboards, App 200
Bicycles, (4) Tanks 400 gal
to 600 gal, (2) Galvanized
Windmill Towers

Terry Shores Auctioneer


License #10092
(580)349-2455 Cell
(806) 339-3490

For rent: Duplex. 1800


square feet. 3 bedroom, 2
bathroom, Washer/dryer,
kitchen appliances and
fireplace. In Ponderosa
area, 6 miles south of
Liberal on hwy 83. $850
month $850 deposit also a
$35 application fee.
Call: 405-742-7125

Apartments for Rent:


Studio
$495.00 all bills paid
1 Bedroom
$595.00 all bills paid

HEGLIN AUCTION

RENT SPECIAL
NOW AVAILABLE

2BD/2BTH - $499.00
3BD/2BTH - $549.00
For a limited time!

Stop by and tour your new


Apartment home today at
Cottonwood Apartments!!
811 Millwood Circle
Open Monday - Friday 8-5
(620) 626-5577

** Some Income & Student


Restictions Apply.

Large 1 Bedroom
$695.00 Tenant pays the
Electric and the Gas

ESTATE AUCTION
JUNE 4 - 10AM

Location:1/2 Mile North


of intersection 129 & 17,
or 4 miles South of
Beaver, 6 Miles West, 1
Mile North, 4 miles West
and 1/2 mile North, or
from Turpin go 8 miles
South on Hwy 83 to Rd.
18 then 4 miles East, 1
mile North, 3 miles East
and 1/2 mile North.
The following is a short
list of items we will be
selling: 1979 Ford 1600
Tractor w/ Loader; 1982
Case 480D back hoe; complete list and pictures at
heglinauctions.com

Heglin Auction
Robert Heglin
Sales Associate/Auctioneer
580-934-2005

Duplex, 2 Bdrm; Water


Paid; $675 Sec. Dep.
$675 Rent. No Pets.
Call 620-629-7805
Leave Message
SENIORS 55 AND BETTER
Beautiful 1 & 2 bedroom
apartments. All kitchen
appliances &
washer/dryer furnished,
maintenance free living,
scheduled activities.
Some income restrictions
may apply.

Call 620-626-5756 or visit


our website at www.liveatcottages.com

2 weeks free rent

Call 620-629-5604
One bedroom Furnished
Apartment. Tenant pays
Electric.
$700/Rent
$600/Deposit. References
Required.
620-624-3272
620-624-6625
Open MRI is looking to fill the following positions:

1: MRI Technician

Operate MRI equipment to scan designated anatomical


region in a safe and effective manner for operator and
patient following MRI safety protocols. Assist with
maintenance and care of facility, equipment, and supplies.
Required: ARRT- (R) &/or ARRT- (MR) certification.
ARRT (MR) preferred.
Full time job but part time candidates are encouraged to
apply

2: Administrative clerk

Looking for a full time office receptionist.


Job duties: Take phone calls, schedule patient
appointments, daily office maintenance tasks such as mail,
laundry.
Bi lingual preferred.

To Apply Please Send Resume to:


famber4@yahoo.com
or call 620-655-2225

1-2-3 Bdrm Low-Income


apts. available. No pets.
Pick up application at
Westkan Apts. 104 Harold
Blvd. Liberal, KS

Mobile Homes for


Rent
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Mobile
Home, Fenced Yard,
Covered
Storage,
Furnished. For Sale for
$18,000. Rent $550.
Financing Available. In
Forgan.
580-528-1188

Houses for Rent


Clean, 3 Bed, 1 Bath,
Hardwood Floors, CH/A,
Fenced Yard, Carport,
Sprinkler System, Mowing
Included.
$875/Mth
$875/Deposit. References
Required.
NO PETS!!
CALL 620-655-5408
For Rent:
Rural Liberal Farm
Home
2B, 2B, large family room,
fire place, garage, and
much more. No smoking
no pets. $800.00/month +
deposit. Call for details.
620-624-3140 or 620482-6306
CLEAN - NICE.
1-2-3 Bedroom,
$500/$1000
Tenant pays all utilities
620-624-2226 or
580-778-3840

Farm & Ranch


Farm Misc.

Accountant/Bookkeeper

Exciting full time position in the Hugoton, Kansas area


available for an experienced Accountant/Bookkeeper.
The ideal candidate will have strong accounting and
computer skills. Responsibilities will include the
management and preparation of financials, payroll, and
payables. A college degree and experience in the
agricultural industry a definite plus, but not required.
This outstanding position with a growing organization,
offers a competitive salary and benefits package,
commensurate with experience.

Our Hunters will Pay Top


$$$ To hunt your land. Call
for a Free Base Camp
Leasing info packet &
Quote. 1-866-309-1507
www.BaseCampLeasing.com

To apply for this exceptional


opportunity, please send your resume to:
Lewis, Hooper & Dick, LLC
Attn: Personnel
PO Box 699
Garden City, KS 67846
EOE

This Spring
Let Us Be Your KEY
to a successful Home
Search!

2170 Rose Lane,

18 E. 2nd St.

1001 N. Roosevelt,

222 N. Kansas,

3 bedroom, 2 bath,
$130,000. Call Lidia

Downtown retail building


4983 sq. ft.
$165,000. Call Lidia

3 bedroom,
$99,500. Call Lidia

Prime downtown retail bulding,


$90,000. Call Lidia

1100 S. Sherman,

420 Canna Lane,

Rt.1, Box 58, Forgan, OK,

355 E. Pancake

1333 Fairview,

3 bedroom, 2 bath,
REDUCED! $140,500. Call Gary

5 bedroom, 3 bath,
$252,500. Call Lidia

5 bedroom, 3 bath, on 5 acres


REDUCED! $265,000. Call Lidia

Over 5000 sq.ft. building,


REDUCED! $200,000. Call Steph

4 bedroom, 2 bath,
$132,000. Call Gary

5 bedroom, 4 bath,
REDUCED! $385,000. Call Lidia

1222 N. Western,

651 Lilac Dr.,

311 Sunflower,

202 S. Virginia,

1410 N. Prospect,

790 S. Western,

4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath,


REDUCED! $265,000. Call Steph

4 bedroom, 3 bath,
REDUCED! $214,000. Call Steph

commercial building
on corner lot,
$138,500. Call Gary

4 bedroom, 3 bath,
$257,500. Call Lidia

4800 sq.ft, shop, parts room &


office building,
REDUCED! $199,000. Call Lidia

209 W. Pine,

3 bedroom, 2 bath,
REDUCED! $140,000. Call Gary

820 Apollo,

325-341 S. Kansas,

508 N. Beaver, Tyrone, OK,

5 bedroom, 3 bath,
$208,000. Call Gary

commercial property,
REDUCED! $899,000. Call Lidia

2 bedroom, 1 bath,
$76,000. Call Gary.

812 N. Clay,

401 S. Clay,

HUGE REDUCTION!

3 bedroom, 2 bath,
REDUCED $117,900. Call Lidia

Green house business & land,


over 15,000 sq.ft.
Price reduced $120,000. Call Lidia

4 bedroom, 3 bath,
6.23 acres,
REDUCED! $239,000. Call Steph

3 bedroom, $75,000.
Call Gary

3 bedroom, 1 bath,
REDUCED! $129,000. Call Lidia

1005 N. Jordan,

909 W. 2nd St.,

4 bedroom, 2 bath,
$175,000. Call Gary

1321 N. Tulane,

18328 Road I,

Stephanie Hall
Agent
629-0240

1513 Tucker Ct.,

3 bedroom 1 bath,
$114,900. Call Lidia

611 N. Roosevelt,
4 bedroom, 2 bath,
$149,900. Call Gary

4 bedroom, 3 bath,
$279,000. Call Lidia

1110 N. Jordan,

810 N. Lincoln,
3 bedroom,
$80,000. Call Kerri

S U N DAY, J U N E 5 , 2 0 1 6

Classifieds

L&T

denasa@hpleader.com

8B

Looking to have a garage sale?


Get your listing out there by a
dvertising with us!

Call 620-626-0840

or come in for an office visit at


16 S. Kansas, Liberal, KS

500 S. Parkway Blvd


REDUCED! $265,000
3 BR, 3 BA, 2 Car Garage
Basement

REDUCED!
1240 Sycamore St.
REDUCED! $113,000
3 BR, 2 BA, 1 Car Garage

14 E. 4th St.
$164,500 - 8,151 Sq Ft.

Excellent location for retail, office complex, fitness center. Adjacent to


Landmark Center, restaurant, shopping and court house. Recently
replaced roof. Seller reserves the gas
grill, refrigerator, personal property
and theater seats.

1206 S. Oklahoma Ave.


$105,000
4 BR, 1 BA, 1 Car Garage,
Basement

1211 Terrace Ave.


$139,900
3 BR, 2 BA, 1 Car Garage

REDUCED!

NEW LISTING!

2101 Nevada Dr.


$315,000
4 BR, 4 BA, 2 Car Garage
Basement

2846 Road O
$269,900
3 BR, 2 BA, 2 Car Garage
Basement

306 W. Wildcat Plains


$98,500
4 BR, 2 BA, Basement

NEW LISTING!
1916 Windsor Ln.
$220,000
4 BR, 3 BA, 2 Car Garage
Basement

422 Princeton Ave.


REDUCED! $59,500
2 BR, 1 BA, 2 Car Garage

121 Lilac Dr.


REDUCED! $169,500
3 BR, 2 BA, 2 Car Garage

610 Warren Ave.


$105,000
2 or 3 BR, 2 BA, Storm Cellar

723 S. Clay Ave.


4 BR, 1 BA, 2 Car Garage
$125,000

REDUCED!
803-807 N. Missouri Ave.
REDUCED! $75,000 - 5 BR,
2 BA 2 for the price of 1!!!

419 S. Washington Ave.


$63,500 - 1,784 sq ft

Remodeled some new siding, tile


flooring. Excellent for clothing
store, appliance store, church,
many uses for this site. Adjacent
land can be purchased for additional parking.

2221 Sierra Dr.


$182,200
5 BR, 3 BA, 2 Car Garage
Basement

629 S. Seward Ave.


$48,500
2BR, 1 BA

541 Lilac Dr.


$225,000
3 BR, 2 BA, 2 Car Garage

311 Superior Plains


REDUCED! $70,000
4 BR, 2 BA, Basement,
2 Car Garage

Residential Commercial
Rental Management
Office: (620) 432-8016
Se habla Espaol