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Veritas NetBackup PureDisk

Getting Started Guide


Windows, Linux, and UNIX

Release 6.5
Publication release 6.5, revision 1

Veritas NetBackup PureDisk Getting Started Guide


Copyright 2008 Symantec Corporation. All rights reserved.
PureDisk 6.5.0
Symantec, the Symantec logo, and PureDisk are trademarks or registered trademarks of
Symantec Corporation or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. Other names may be
trademarks of their respective owners.
The product described in this document is distributed under licenses restricting its use,
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THIS DOCUMENTATION IS PROVIDED AS IS AND ALL EXPRESS OR IMPLIED
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NON-INFRINGEMENT, ARE DISCLAIMED, EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THAT SUCH
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Technical support
For technical assistance, visit
http://www.symantec.com/business/support/index.jsp. Type
NetBackup PureDisk in the Find Your Product field.

Contents

Chapter 1

Product overview
About the PureDisk documentation set ...........................................................11
Accessing updated documentation ...........................................................11
Updating PureDisk help ..............................................................................12
Overview ................................................................................................................13
Major services in a PureDisk storage pool ...............................................13
Example configuration ................................................................................16
Installing and using PureDisk ............................................................................17

Chapter 2

New features and product changes


New features for PureDisk 6.5 ...........................................................................19
Highly available PureDisk ..........................................................................19
CIFS support for NetApp filer ....................................................................20
UNC Path data selection type .....................................................................20
OpenStorage plug-in ....................................................................................20
Larger data selection file limits .................................................................20
New clients ....................................................................................................20
HP-UX client support ..........................................................................20
Mac OS client support .........................................................................21
Multistreamed backups and restores ........................................................21
Performance enhancements ......................................................................21
Veritas Storage Foundation and Veritas Cluster Server integration ...22
Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 support ................................................23
Passwords hidden ........................................................................................23
Content router improvements ...................................................................23
Licensing aligns with NetBackup ..............................................................24
One-click full-system backup .....................................................................24
One-click exclusion of network shares .....................................................24
Windows operating system detail detection ...........................................24
Product changes ...................................................................................................25
Veritas File System (VxFS) is default ........................................................25
Run Policy task effective outside of scheduled job run window ...........25
Additional escalation message ...................................................................25
Product change for future releases ...................................................................26

6 Contents

Chapter 3

Installation prerequisites
Introduction ......................................................................................................... 27
Server requirements ........................................................................................... 28
Storage pool configuration examples ....................................................... 28
Example 1 - An all-in-one configuration .......................................... 28
Example 2 - A two-node configuration ............................................. 29
Example 3 - A three-node configuration .......................................... 29
Example 4 - A five-node, high availability single-cluster configuration
29
Example 5 - A three-node, high-availability configuration .......... 30
PDOS hardware compatibility ................................................................... 31
General PureDisk hardware requirements .............................................. 32
Node-specific hardware requirements ..................................................... 34
Requirements for an all-in-one PureDisk node ............................... 34
Requirements for a content router node .......................................... 35
Requirements for a metabase engine node ...................................... 36
Requirements for highly availability storage pools ....................... 37
Capacity planning ................................................................................................ 37
Capacity planning for a storage pool ........................................................ 37
Planning the number of clients ......................................................... 37
Planning the number of simultaneous backup streams ................ 38
Planning the number of backup jobs per client .............................. 38
Planning the number of user accounts ............................................ 39
Capacity planning for a metabase engine ................................................ 39
Capacity planning for a content router .................................................... 41
Planning for additional content routers .......................................... 41
Disk space requirements for a content router ................................ 41
Capacity planning for service databases .................................................. 42
Client requirements ............................................................................................ 43
Backup and restore client platforms ........................................................ 44
PDDO client platforms ................................................................................ 45
Application agent requirements ....................................................................... 45
Browser requirements ........................................................................................ 45
Storage Foundation requirements .................................................................... 46
Software included ........................................................................................ 46
Supported disks and other hardware ....................................................... 46
PureDisk deduplication option requirements ................................................. 47
High availability requirements ......................................................................... 48
Storage pool hardware requirements ....................................................... 48
Java administration console requirements ............................................. 49
VCS software requirements ....................................................................... 50
PureDisk software requirements .............................................................. 50
Network requirements ................................................................................ 51

Contents

Configuration examples ..............................................................................52


Terminology .................................................................................................53
Planning a cluster ........................................................................................55
Unsupported configurations ......................................................................56
NetBackup requirements ....................................................................................57
Licensing requirements ......................................................................................57
User authentication requirements ....................................................................58
Symantec Product Authentication Service requirements .............................58
Configuring brokers for PureDisk use ......................................................59
Local root broker configuration .........................................................60
Local root broker and remote authentication broker configuration 61
External root broker configuration ...................................................63
Firewall and networking requirements ............................................................65
Communication between client agents and the storage pool ...............66
Communication between the storage pool authority and other services 68
Communication between PureDisk and other applications ..................71
Replication and central reporting ports ...................................................74
Intraclient communication ........................................................................75
Security recommendations for Windows clients ....................................75
Windows 2003 ......................................................................................75
Windows XP with service pack 2 .......................................................76
Enabling snapshotting on Windows clients ....................................................77
Enabling snaphotting on Windows 2003 or on Windows XP clients ...77
Enabling snapshotting on Windows 2000 clients ...................................78
Configuring backups and restores of network shared drives or UNC paths on
Windows platforms .....................................................................................78
Configuring the PureDisk agent to run under the Microsoft Windows Backup
Operator group .....................................................................................78
Configuring backups and restores of a NetApp filer on Windows platforms 81
Upgrade requirements ........................................................................................82

Chapter 4

Known problems and product limitations


Known problems ..................................................................................................83
Documentation might be updated after the release ...............................83
Files migrated using Remote Storage Service are retrieved .................83
Bandwidth limitation ..................................................................................84
Agent updates abort on clients due to inadequate permissions ...........84
Exporting replicated data selections through the common internet file
system (CIFS) results in incorrect access rights .............................84
Messages are cryptic ...................................................................................84
Problems deleting replicated agents while data selections still in use 84
PureDisk reserved user IDs collide with some imported users ............85
Use of PureDisk reserved patterns causes unexpected results ............86

8 Contents

I18N problems .............................................................................................. 86


Double-byte characters do not display properly ............................ 86
Files downloaded through Web UI can exhibit problems with
international characters ............................................................. 86
Unicode characters that are outside of unicode plane zero (0000 - FFFF)
can cause problems with backups and restores ...................... 87
Cannot restore from a localized MacOSX path ............................... 87
PureDisk uses month/day/year format in log files ........................ 87
Erroneous errors in /Storage/log after installation ............................... 87
Need to commit changes in YaST if subsequent changes could conflict 87
Restoring UNC files at the client level ..................................................... 88
Null pointer exceptions in GUI during restore dialogs .......................... 88
Upgrading AIX 5.3 agents from PureDisk 6.2 to 6.5 fails ...................... 88
Upgrading some Linux or Solaris agents fails ........................................ 89
Need to enable file system browsing manually on some Microsoft Windows
XP 32 bit clients ................................................................................... 89
Silent install for Microsoft Windows x64 installs files in Program Files (x86)
directory instead of Program Files .................................................... 89
Cannot install regular backup and restore agent on a Windows media server
after removing a PDDO agent ............................................................ 89
Time-based data removal resets a data selection ................................... 90
Update client routing tables manually after interrupted content router
rerouting job ......................................................................................... 90
System policy for Maintenance job hangs when PDDO is enabled ...... 91
Agent restart required for file browsing change .................................... 92
Need to restart UNIX, Linux, or MacOS agent installation if invalid agent
name characters are supplied ............................................................ 92
Product limitations .............................................................................................. 93
Data selections limited to 16 million files ............................................... 93
CIFS can be installed only on the storage pool authority ...................... 93
VMFS volumes not supported .................................................................... 93
Data lock password blocks exports to NetBackup .................................. 93
File size limitation ....................................................................................... 94
Replicated PureDisk SPAR data cannot be exported to NetBackup .... 94
Metabase engine limitations ...................................................................... 94
I18N limitations ........................................................................................... 94
Non-UTF8 encoding display errors ................................................... 94
Installation of PureDisk client in a localized MacOS, UNIX, or Windows
directory results in unfunctioning client ................................. 94
Localized user passwords and data lock passwords not supported 95

Appendix A

Script-based failover
Example configurations for script-based failover .......................................... 98

Contents

Example 1 - A two-node configuration using script-based failover .....98


Example 2 - A three-node configuration using script-based failover ..98
Example 3 - A five-node configuration using script-based failover ....99
Script-based failover requirements ................................................................100
General requirements for script-base failover ......................................100
Configuration example for script-based failover ..................................101

Index

103

10 Contents

Chapter

Product overview
This chapter includes the following topics:

About the PureDisk documentation set on page 11

Overview on page 13

About the PureDisk documentation set


This manual introduces the PureDisk product and its documentation set.
Symantec updates the PureDisk documentation on an as-needed basis. The
following sections describe how to access and update the documentation for
your site.

Accessing updated documentation


The following procedure explains how to access the PureDisk documentation on
the Symantec Web site.
To download updated PureDisk documentation
1

Go to the following Web site:

http://www.symantec.com/enterprise/support/documentation.jsp?pid=52672
2

In the Version field, use the drop-down list to select the PureDisk 6.5 release
level.

In the Language field, use the drop-down list to select a language.

Click the title of the manual you want.

In the new window that appears, click Download Now.

Use your browsers tools to save the downloaded PDF file.

12 Product overview
About the PureDisk documentation set

Save the downloaded files as follows:


Manual title

File name

PureDisk Administrator's Guide

PureDisk_Admin_Guide.pdf

PureDisk Backup Operator's


Guide

PureDisk_BackupOperator_Guide.pdf

PureDisk Best Practices Guide

PureDisk_BestPractices_Guide.pdf

PureDisk Client Installation Guide PureDisk_ClientInstall_Guide.pdf


PureDisk Getting Started Guide

PureDisk_GettingStarted_Guide.pdf

PureDisk Deduplication Option


Guide

PureDisk_PDDO_Guide.pdf

PureDisk Storage Pool Installation PureDisk_StoragePoolInstall_Guide.pdf


Guide
Cluster planning spreadsheet

PureDisk_ClusterPlanning.xls

Updating PureDisk help


You can click on the manual titles in the PureDisk opening screen to display PDF
copies of the PureDisk user manuals. In addition, you can click Help in the
PureDisk Web UI to display the PureDisk documentation.
To download revised copies of the manuals, use the following procedure to
update the PDF files in the documentation directory. After you complete this
procedure, the PDF files that you retrieve when you click Help are the revised
manuals.
To update the documentation in the PureDisk Web UI
1

Perform the procedure in To download updated PureDisk documentation


on page 11.

(Optional) Use Linux commands to copy the existing PDF files to an archive
directory.
Perform this step if you have older versions of the documentation to save in
a directory of your own choosing.

On the storage pool authority, use Linux commands to write the downloaded
PDF files to the following documentation directory:
/opt/pdweb/htdocs/documentation

Make sure to use the file names as stated in To download updated PureDisk
documentation on page 11. These are the file names by which PureDisk
retrieves the manuals when you click the Help button.

Product overview
Overview

Overview
PureDisk provides an enterprise-level data deduplication environment. This
software is ideally suited for companies that need a centralized solution for
bandwidth-optimized backups of data in remote offices and virtual
environments. You can also use PureDisk to reduce the amount of backup data
stored in a data center by NetBackup.
When PureDisk performs a backup, it separates the file content from its
metadata. PureDisk uses global deduplication technology to reduce the amount
of backup data that it stores. It writes file content to secondary disk storage, and
it writes file metadata to a distributed database that is called a metabase. The
metadata consists of information about the file, such as its owner, where it
resides on a client, when it was created, and other information. The metadata
also includes a unique fingerprint that identifies the files content to PureDisk.
The first step in backing up data is to create a data selection. A data selection
specifies a list of files and directories that you want to include in a backup. You
can back up a data selection on a regular basis by including it in a backup policy.
Alternatively, you can make a quick one-time backup of a data selection. When
you restore files, you restore the files or directories that you need. You do not
need to restore an entire data selection.
Identical files can reside on multiple clients in a PureDisk environment.
However, the PureDisk global data deduplication capability ensures that if
identical files exist, only one copy of the files content resides in storage.
PureDisk analyzes the content of each file and stores only one backup image for
each unique file in the environment. When files change, PureDisk detects these
changes by comparing the file fingerprints. When you install the PureDisk
deduplication option (PDDO) plug-in on a NetBackup media server, you can
deduplicate NetBackup data.

Major services in a PureDisk storage pool


A PureDisk storage pool is a main data repository. When PureDisk backs up data,
it writes backup copies of content and metadata to the disk storage that is
attached to a storage pool. If you configure more than one storage pool, you can
replicate the backup data from one storage pool to the other storage pool.
A storage pool consists of one or more PureDisk nodes. A node is a server with
the PureDisk operating system (PDOS) installed upon it. The installation
package includes PDOS. After you install PDOS, you can install one or more
PureDisk storage pool services on that node.

13

14 Product overview
Overview

Table 1-1 on page 14 shows the roles for each PureDisk services.
Table 1-1

PureDisk software service roles

Service

Role

Storage pool
authority

A storage pool authority manages a storage pool. For example, the


storage pool authority manages policies and storage.
In Figure 1-1 on page 16, Node_1 is the storage pool authority.
You can configure one storage pool authority per storage pool.

Metabase server

A metabase server manages queries on one or more metabase


engines.
You can configure one metabase server per storage pool.
The metabase server in the storage pool manages the process by
which PureDisk stores the metadata into one or more metabase
engines. Metabase engines are the databases that retain each files
metadata permanently. After you remove a files content from
PureDisk storage, its metadata remains in the metabase engine.
The metadata is kept for auditing purposes until you run a
garbage collection policy.

Metabase engine

When PureDisk backs up a file, it separates the files metadata


from the files content. PureDisk writes the metadata to a
metabase engine, and it writes the files content to a content
router.
You can configure more than one metabase engine per storage
pool. The following factors can influence your decision:

The number of clients.

The number of files per client.

The rate of change for your files.

Two or more metabase engines improve performance.

When you install a metabase engine, PureDisk automatically


installs a controller. The controller manages the communication
between the clients and the metabase engines. The metabase
engine and the controller reside on a host together.

Product overview
Overview

Table 1-1

PureDisk software service roles (Continued)

Service

Role

Content router

When PureDisk backs up a file, it separates the files metadata


from the files content. PureDisk writes the metadata to a
metabase engine, and it writes the files content to a content
router.
A content router stores and retrieves file content. PureDisk breaks
larger files into segments and distributes the segments across the
available content routers.
You can configure more than one content router in a storage pool.
PureDisk writes file content to a content router, so the content
routers need to be attached to a large disk group. The bulk of the
disk storage in a storage pool hosts file content.

CIFS interface

The PureDisk file sharing system is based on the common


internet file system (CIFS). This CIFS-based file system is a
gateway to the PureDisk server. It allows the data selections that
are stored on a storage pool to be visible as a network drive or
share. A CIFS client can mount this network drive or share.
The CIFS interface is an optional service. You can configure one
CIFS interface. If you configure a CIFS interface, you must
configure it on the same node as the storage pool authority.

NetBackup export
engine

The NetBackup export engine is a service. If you configure this


service on a node, you can export content router data from a
PureDisk storage pool to NetBackup.
The export engine is an optional service. If you configure a
PureDisk storage pool with multiple nodes, you can configure one
export engine per node. Other PureDisk services can reside on a
node with a NetBackup export engine. Alternatively, you can
configure the export engine on a node by itself.
If you configure multiple export engines on multiple nodes in
your storage pool, you can use them to export data to NetBackup
in parallel.

A PureDisk storage pool includes several clients that need to be backed up.
When you configure your PureDisk environment, you install PureDisk agent
software on the client, and you assign each client to a storage pool. The
controller service on the metabase engine maintains a connection to the agent
on each client. The controller sends backup, restore, and other job instructions
to the agent through this connection.

15

16 Product overview
Overview

Example configuration
Figure 1-1 shows an example configuration with five nodes.
Figure 1-1

Example storage pool

Node_5
Metabase engine

Node_4
NetBackup export engine

Node_3
Content router
Disk
storage

Node_1
Storage pool authority
Metabase server

Node_2

CIFS interface

Content router

Client

Client
Client
Client

Client

In Figure 1-1, the services are distributed as follows:

Node_1 hosts the storage pool authority, the metabase server, and the CIFS
interface.

Node_2 and Node_3 each host a content router.

Node_4 hosts a NetBackup export engine.

Node_5 hosts the metabase engine.

Product overview
Installing and using PureDisk

This example configuration does not include any spare nodes. If you want to
enable high availability or script-based failover, you need to configure one or
more spare nodes in your storage pool.
The CIFS interface and the NetBackup export engine are optional services.

Installing and using PureDisk


The PureDisk documentation explains the procedures you need to complete to
install and configure PureDisk on your storage pool and on its clients. The
documentation also explains how to back up and restore your clients and how to
administer your storage pool. The following procedure explains the procedures
you need to perform and where to look for information.
To install and configure PureDisk
1

Familiarize yourself with the PureDisk product and plan your storage pool
Use the information in this manual, the PureDisk Getting Started Guide.
This guide contains general information about this PureDisk release. It also
describes the software requirements and hardware requirements that your
site needs to meet to install and configure PureDisk successfully.

Install the storage pool software.


Use the information in the PureDisk Storage Pool Installation Guide. This
guide describes how to configure the servers and disks in a PureDisk
storage pool.

Install the PureDisk software on the clients.


Use the information in the PureDisk Client Installation Guide. This guide
describes how to install the client software and other types of PureDisk
agent software. This guide also explains how to configure the initial set of
users.

Specify data selections and configure backups.


Use the information in the PureDisk Backup Operators Guide. This guide
describes how to create data selections and schedule PureDisk to back up
your data selections. A data selection is a defined list of files and other data
objects that you want to back up. After you specify data selections, you can
back them up manually or you can schedule PureDisk to back them up
according to a schedule.

Monitor, protect, and modify your storage pool as needs change.


Use the information in the PureDisk Administrators Guide. The topics in
this guide include reporting, disaster recovery backups, system monitoring,
and system expansion.

17

18 Product overview
Installing and using PureDisk

Chapter

New features and product


changes
This chapter includes the following topics:

New features for PureDisk 6.5 on page 19

Product changes on page 25

Product change for future releases on page 26

New features for PureDisk 6.5


The following sections describe the features that are new to PureDisk in the 6.5
release.

Highly available PureDisk


PureDisk 6.5 supports high availability. Highly available PureDisk moves
processing functions from malfunctioning nodes to spare nodes as needed. All
the services on a clustered malfunctioning node automatically failover to the
spare node. This feature uses the Veritas Storage Foundation software and the
Veritas Cluster Server software.
More information is available about this additional software.
See Veritas Storage Foundation and Veritas Cluster Server integration on
page 22.
Symantec supports this feature for those storage pools that install PureDisk for
the first time with the 6.5 release. This feature is incompatible with the
script-based failover capability introduced in the PureDisk 6.2 release. This
feature is not supported in those storage pools that use iSCSI disks.

20 New features and product changes


New features for PureDisk 6.5

CIFS support for NetApp filer


If you enable the PureDisk Common Interface File system (CIFS) support for the
NetApp filer, PureDisk 6.5 can back up the data that resides on a NetApp filer
over a CIFS mount. PureDisk can create a snapshot on the filer, back up, and
restore full access control list (ACL) and directory permissions.

UNC Path data selection type


The new universal naming convention (UNC) Path data selection type enables
you to back up the following types of data:

Data that resides on a NetApp filer. PureDisk can back up and restore full
ACLs.

Data that resides on a network-mounted drive. This backs up data that


resides on a CIFS-mounted network drive on a Windows client.
On Linux and UNIX systems, you can enable or disable the backup of files
from mounted volumes in the file system.

OpenStorage plug-in
The PureDisk deduplication option (PDDO) plug-in is a PureDisk agent that you
can install on a NetBackup media server. The plug-in lets you configure a
PureDisk storage pool as a NetBackup disk storage unit.
You can install the PDDO plug-in on NetBackup Windows, Linux, and Solaris
SPARC media servers. The PDDO plug-in supports optimized duplication of data
from NetBackup.

Larger data selection file limits


With PureDisk 6.5, you can now include up to eight million files in a data
selection. Previsou versions limited data selection to no more than one million
files.

New clients
PureDisk 6.5 now supports additional HP-UX clients and MacOS clients.

HP-UX client support


PureDisk adds to its list of supported Hewlett-Packards platforms in this release
with its support for HP-UX 11.31 on IA 64 (Itanium) platforms. From the
PureDisk opening screen, the client download is
pdagent-HPUX_11.23_ia64-6.5.0.XXXX.run.

New features and product changes


New features for PureDisk 6.5

Mac OS client support


PureDisk 6.5 is able to back up data from a Mac OS client. From the PureDisk
opening screen, the client downloads are as follows:

pdagent-MacOSX_10.3_powerpc-6.5.0.XXXX.run, which is designed for Mac


OS X 10.3.x and 10.4.x systems that use PowerPC technology.

pdagent-MacOSX_10.4_x86-6.5.0.XXXX.run, which is designed for Mac OS


10.4.x systems that use Intel technology.

Multistreamed backups and restores


The PureDisk 6.5 release lets you specify information to PureDisk that can
reduce the amount of internal communication that occurs between content
routers and clients. This reduced communication can yield faster backups and
restores. The additional information you can specify is as follows:

On a backup policy, you can configure the following:

The number of threads.

The types of files that PureDisk should segment. For example, if you
back up graphics files, you can specify the file extensions for the
graphic file types to disable segmentation for those files.

The size of the files that PureDisk should segment.

On restore, you can configure the number of threads.

If you do not specify any of the new parameters, PureDisk behavior and
performance matches PureDisk releases prior to 6.5.
You can configure some aspects of this capability in the Web UI and others in
the client configuration files.

Performance enhancements
The PureDisk 6.5 release includes the following performance enhancement
features:

Workflow engine optimization. The new centralized workflow engine


increases processing speed, lowers the load on the storage pool authority,
and increases scalability.

Metabase improvements. The metabase engine now can accommodate the


metadata for 100 million files.

New fingerprint algorithm. The new algorithm improves the fingerprint


computation on the client. Most of the increased performance occurs in the
file scanning phase of a backup.

21

22 New features and product changes


New features for PureDisk 6.5

64-bit port. This feature extended the content routers memory addressing
capability. The content router can now keep a larger fingerprint index table
in its memory. Backup and restore operations are faster, and this change
supports the content router capacity increase from 4 TB to 8 TB.

Veritas Storage Foundation and Veritas Cluster Server integration


The PureDisk Operating System (PDOS) now includes the Veritas Storage
Foundation software and the Veritas Cluster Server (VCS) software. To enable
highly available PureDisk, you must configure the VCS software. You can use the
Veritas Storage Foundation software for disk management and other tasks in
both clustered and unclustered storage pools, however.
At installation time, PDOS installs the following versions of this additional
software:

The Veritas Storage Foundation software. The principal products are as


follows:

Veritas Enterprise Administrator (VEA), release 4.1 MP4.

Veritas Volume Manager (VxVM), release 4.1 MP4 RP1.

Veritas File System (VxFS), release 4.1 MP4 RP1. Symantec


recommends the VxFS file system for all PureDisk storage pools.
However, your ability to use VxFS depends on the disks you use. For
more information about VxFS and supported disks, see the PureDisk
compatibility list at the following Web site:
http://www.symantec.com/business/support/compatibility.jsp?langua
ge=english&view=comp&pid=52672

The Veritas cluster server (VCS), releases 4.1 MP3 and 4.1 MP4.

The PDOS installation process installs the operating system software, as well as
VxVM and VxFS. No additonal installation steps are needed for VxVM or VxFS.
In addition, the PDOS installation process also installs the license keys for these
products.
The PureDisk release includes the documentation for the Veritas Storage
Foundation products that are integrated into PureDisk. For more information on
these products, select the 4.1 MP4 documentation at the following link:

For the main Symantec Corporation documentation Web site, visit the
following Web site:

http://www.symantec.com/business/support/all_products.jsp

For Veritas Volume Manager documentation, see

http://www.symantec.com/business/support/documentation.jsp?pid=15273

For Veritas File System documentation, see

New features and product changes


New features for PureDisk 6.5

http://www.symantec.com/business/support/documentation.jsp?pid=15101

For Veritas Cluster Server documentation, see

http://www.symantec.com/business/support/documentation.jsp?pid=15066
Tip: Some of the preceding documentation links contain several files. For best
results, use the Show Document Types, Show Results For, and Show Language
pull-down menus to narrow your search.

Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 support


PureDisk 6.5 adds support for Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 full message
store backup. PureDisk does not support individual mail or individual folder
backups or restores in this release.

Passwords hidden
Passwords now appear as masked text in configuration files or other locations.

Content router improvements


Several improvements have been made to the PureDisk content router (CR) to
increase the maximum capacity of a content router, as well as the backup and
restore performance. These improvements have also led to changes in the
behavior of the content router and to the way it is managed.
The PureDisk content router now stores data in an optimized layout. This
approach reduces fragmentation, increases the backup and restore
performance, and allows a content router to manage more data than before (8
TB instead of 4 TB).
In previous releases, the content router continuously processed its queue of
incoming data operations. On heavily loaded systems, this could lead to
excessive usage of system resources.
The new content router processes its queue based on the schedule you define in
the content router queue processing system policy. This new processing leads to
a more efficient use of system resources and results in a higher average
throughput and allows the content router to manage more data.
Content router queue processing is controlled by a new system policy linked to
the content router queue processing workflow. You can define the schedule for
this policy and control when the queue processing is performed.

23

24 New features and product changes


New features for PureDisk 6.5

Note: You can edit the scheduling of the new CR Queue Processing workflow to
change its default schedule. For more information, see the maintenance policies
chapter of the PureDisk Backup Operators Guide.

Licensing aligns with NetBackup


PureDisks license has changed to be more consistent with NetBackup 6.5s
license model. For information about licensing, see your Symantec sales
representative.

One-click full-system backup


The Full System backup policy is a new workflow that lets you include the
following in one backup:

Files

Directories

System state (Windows platforms only)

System service data in one backup (Windows platforms only)

This new policy accomplishes the following:

It eliminates the need to create separate data selections for Files and Folders
data and for System State and Services data.

It eliminates the need to create separate backup policies for Files and
Folders data and for System State and Services data.

It lets you create a backup policy on an agent basis, not on a data selection
basis.

One-click exclusion of network shares


The Files and Folders and Full System data selections include an Include
Network Shares check box. You can specify for PureDisk to include or exclude
data on network shared drives when you check or clear this box on a backup
policy.

Windows operating system detail detection


On Windows operating system clients, PureDisk now detects the Windows
release version and service pack level. PureDisk lets you create data selection
templates that are specific to particular Windows levels.

New features and product changes


Product changes

Product changes
This section describes major changes in PureDisk release 6.5 that might affect
your site practices.

Veritas File System (VxFS) is default


PureDisk 6.5 supports the VxFS file system by default. Symantec recommends
that you configure a VxFS file system on each node. The VxFS file system
ensures interoperability with new features, such as the high availablility
feature.
In previous releases, Symantec recommended that you configure an XFS file
system on each PureDisk node. PureDisk 6.5 supports the XFS file system, but
the XFS file system is no longer the default. Symantec recommends that you use
an XFS file system only on the nodes that are attached to iSCSI disks. PureDisk
6.5 supports the nondefault XFS file system for the following circumstances:

Upgrades. Symantec Corporation does not support a migration from XFS to


VxFS at this time. If you upgrade to PureDisk 6.5, you must continue to use
the XFS file system for the nodes in your PureDisk 6.5 storage pool.

Specific hardware. The VxFS file system does not support all disk types. For
example, it does not support iSCSI disks. If you have iSCSI disks, use the XFS
file system for all the nodes in your storage pool.

Run Policy task effective outside of scheduled job run window


PureDisk allows you to specify a schedule that defines job start and end times. In
previous releases, if you clicked Run Policy in the left pane at a time that was
outside the jobs start/end time, the job failed.
In this release, you can click Run Policy, and PureDisk starts the job even if it is
outside of the job start/end time. However, if the job does not complete before
the scheduled end time, PureDisk stops the job.

Additional escalation message


In previous releases, you could specify the time allowed to elapse before
PureDisk generated a warning-level or error-level escalation message.
PureDisk 6.5 generates an additional type of escalation message. If a job ends in
an error of any kind, PureDisk generates an email message or an event.

25

26 New features and product changes


Product change for future releases

Product change for future releases


The PureDisk 6.5 release is the last PureDisk release that Symantec plans to
distribute on CDs. Media kits for future major releases will contain DVD media.
All releases will continue to be available from Symantecs download Web site.
Symantec recommends that you install a DVD drive on each node to
accommodate future upgrades.

Chapter

Installation prerequisites
This chapter includes the following topics:

Server requirements on page 28

Capacity planning on page 37

Client requirements on page 43

Application agent requirements on page 45

Browser requirements on page 45

PureDisk deduplication option requirements on page 47

High availability requirements on page 48

NetBackup requirements on page 57

Licensing requirements on page 57

User authentication requirements on page 58

Symantec Product Authentication Service requirements on page 58

Firewall and networking requirements on page 65

Enabling snapshotting on Windows clients on page 77

Configuring backups and restores of network shared drives or UNC paths


on Windows platforms on page 78

Configuring backups and restores of a NetApp filer on Windows


platforms on page 81

Introduction
This chapter describes the hardware and software that you are required to
obtain and prepare before you begin to install the PureDisk software. PureDisk
interoperates with additional Symantec software products and third-party

28 Installation prerequisites
Server requirements

software products. This chapter contains compatibility information, but for


more details on compatibility, visit the following Web site:
http://www.symantec.com/business/support/compatibility.jsp?language=e
nglish&view=comp&pid=52672

Server requirements
The PureDisk software lets you create a modularly scalable backup
environment. You can install all the PureDisk services on one server.
Alternatively, you can install PureDisk software on multiple servers to create
multiple nodes. These multiple nodes increase the storage pools capacity and
performance because they balance the backup processing load.
For each node, you can configure several services, but you cannot configure
multiple instances of the same service on one node. For example, you can
configure a storage pool authority service and a metabase server service on one
node. But you cannot configure two metabase servers on the same node.
The following sections present configuration examples, describe PDOS
requirements, and describe the PureDisk service requirements. During an
installation, you install PDOS on each server. Then you configure each server to
assume one or more roles in a PureDisk environment.
For additional example configurations and an explanation of the PureDisk
services that are available, see the following section:
Example configuration on page 16

Storage pool configuration examples


The storage pools in these examples show a progression from the smallest
PureDisk storage pool to a larger, modular storage pool. They show that as the
need for backup capability grows, you can add content routers and metabase
engines.
If you add a spare node to any of these storage pools, you can enable high
availablity.

Example 1 - An all-in-one configuration


This example storage pool includes only one PureDisk node. This storage pool is
appropriate for a small remote office or centralized environment. You can
install all the PureDisk services on one node. In the future, you can add more
nodes as needed to improve performance and expand capacity as described in
examples 2, 3, and 4.
The all-in-one node has the following services:

Installation prerequisites
Server requirements

Storage pool authority with the common internet file system (CIFS)
interface

Metabase server

Metabase engine

Content router

Example 2 - A two-node configuration


This example storage pool includes two PureDisk nodes. To improve storage
pool performance, the storage pool authority and metabase services are
installed on the first node. The separate content router node can store
approximately 8 TB of optimized file content.
Node 1 has the following services:

Storage pool authority with the CIFS interface

Metabase server

Metabase engine

Node 2 has the following service:

Content router

Example 3 - A three-node configuration


This example storage pool includes three PureDisk nodes. When you configure
two content routers on different nodes, you provide up to 16 TB of space to store
optimized file content.
Node 1 has the following services:

Storage pool authority with the CIFS interface

Metabase server

Metabase engine

Node 2 has the following service:

Content router

Node 3 has the following service:

Content router

Example 4 - A five-node, high availability single-cluster


configuration
This example storage pool includes five PureDisk nodes that are configured in a
cluster.

29

30 Installation prerequisites
Server requirements

Node 1 has the following services:

Storage pool authority with the CIFS interface

Metabase server

Metabase engine

Node 2 has the following service:

Content router

Node 3 has the following service:

Content router

Node 4 has the following service:

Metabase engine

Node 5 has the following service:

Spare node

Like the storage pool in example 3, the two content routers in this storage pool
can accommodate up to 16 TB of file content. If you add another content router,
you can increase the optimized file storage capacity.
Node 4 is a dedicated metabase engine node. Each dedicated metabase engine
can store the metadata of approximately 140 million file and version records
that you want to retain. Node 1 hosts three services, and one of these services is
a metabase engine. A metabase engine on a multiservice node can retain fewer
file and version records than a metabase engine that resides on a node by itself.
The metabase engine on node 1 can retain approximately 100 million file and
version records. If you add another metabase engine, you can increase the
number of files that the metabase can contain. For example, if you add another
dedicated metabase engine to this storage pool, the expanded system can now
store approximately 380 million file and version records.
You can continue to add nodes to this cluster. All nodes you add need to be
configured for high availability. For example, you can add a NetBackup export
engine.
Note: Symantec recommends that you contact Symantec Consulting Services for
the installation of a clustered, highly available PureDisk storage pool.

Example 5 - A three-node, high-availability configuration


This example storage pool includes three PureDisk nodes that are configured in
a cluster.
Node 1 has the following services:

Installation prerequisites
Server requirements

Storage pool authority with the CIFS interface

Metabase server

Metabase engine

Content router

Node 2 has the following services:

Content router

Metabase engine

Node 3 has the following service:

Spare node

You can continue to add nodes to this cluster. All nodes you add need to be
configured for high availability.
Note: Symantec recommends that you contact Symantec Consulting Services for
the installation of a clustered, highly available PureDisk storage pool.

PDOS hardware compatibility


The server hardware must be capable of running SUSE Linux Enterprise
Server 10 (SLES10), Service Pack 1, for AMD64 and Intel EM64T. PDOS is based
on SLES10, SP1. To create PDOS, Symantec removed some packages from the
standard SLES10, SP1, installation and added some different packages.
Symantec did not change the kernel or any other package or binary installed.
Each server can be connected to internal storage, external disk storage, or both.
For production installations, there must be at least two disks: a boot disk and a
storage disk. The storage disk can consist of any of the following:

Direct-attached storage (DAS) over SATA, serial-attached SCSI (SAS), or


SCSI.

A storage area network (SAN) or disk array over fibre channel.

A SAN over disk array over iSCSI. This disk storage scheme is supported for
XFS file systems only. The VxFS file system does not support iSCSI disks. Do
not use iSCSI disks if you want to configure a highly available PureDisk
storage pool.

PureDisk supports network-attached storage (NAS) over NFS only with NetApp
Filers. No other NAS devices are supported.
The amount of storage to attach to each PureDisk node depends on the roles you
want to assign to the PureDisk node. This chapter contains the storage
requirements for each PureDisk service in a later section.

31

32 Installation prerequisites
Server requirements

This chapter explains when you can use the various types of disks in more detail
when it describes the PureDisk services and their requirements. By default,
PureDisk installs the Storage Foundation file system, VxFS, and installs the
Storage Foundation volume manager, VxVM. Use a storage system that is
compatible with the Veritas Storage Foundation 4.1 MP4. Use a host bus adaptor
(HBA) that is compatible with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10.1 for AMD64
and Intel EM64T.
For any hardware that SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for AMD64 and Intel
EM64T does not support by default, obtain the drivers from the vendor.
For more compatibility information, see the following Web sites:

For information about hardware compatibility with SUSE Linux Enterprise


Server 10.1 and PDOS, visit the following Web site:
http://www.novell.com/partnerguide/section/481.html

For information about the list of arrays that VxVM supports in the Storage
Foundation 4.1 MP4 release, see the hardware compatibility list in the
following document:
http://seer.entsupport.symantec.com/docs/289200.htm

Caution: The PureDisk node software you install on a server overwrites any
pre-existing information on that server. The server becomes a dedicated
PureDisk node.

General PureDisk hardware requirements


Table 3-1 provides general information about the hardware requirements that
pertain to all PureDisk nodes.
Table 3-1

General requirements for hardware components

Hardware
component

Requirement

Processor

Each PureDisk node requires a processor that is compatible with


Intel EM64T or AMD64 specifications. For best performance,
Symantec recommends Intel Xeon (64 bit) or AMD Opteron
processors.
PDOS is not compatible with Itanium processors.

Installation prerequisites
Server requirements

Table 3-1

General requirements for hardware components (continued)

Hardware
component

Requirement

Network cards

Symantec recommends that you use enterprise-class GB Ethernet


network interface cards (NICs), such as an Intel PRO or equivalent.
PureDisk requires that each server you configure contain at least
one NIC.
Note: If the system has more than one NIC, PDOS chooses the first
NIC that it encounters which is connected to the network. PDOS
does not consider NICs that are not connected to the network.
If you want to enable highly available PureDisk, each server that
you want to include in a cluster requires three NICs. The
additional NICs are needed for the clusters private network. Do
not configure an IP address on the additional two NICs. These
additional NICs are used exclusively by the Veritas Cluster Server
software.
PureDisk supports only static addresses. PureDisk does not
support DHCP.

Removable media

Symantec distributes the PureDisk 6.5 software on CD-ROM


media. Each node must have a CD-ROM drive to facilitate software
installation.
The PureDisk 6.5 release is the last PureDisk release that
Symantec plans to distribute on CDs. Media kits for future major
releases will contain DVD media. All releases will continue to be
available from Symantecs download Web site. Symantec
recommends that you install a DVD drive on each node to
accommodate future upgrades.

Uninterruptible
power supply (UPS)

Use a UPS to protect the hardware in your PureDisk environment.


If you turn off a PureDisk storage node in any uncontrolled way, it
can result in backup data corruption or data loss.
If your UPS requires a USB, Ethernet, or serial port to connect to
the PureDisk node, ensure that they are available on the node also.
If you use an Ethernet port, Symantec recommends that you
provide an additional port in the device.

Symantec recommends that you use RAID technology for the disks that you
include in a PureDisk storage pool. The PureDisk Storage Pool Installation Guide
discusses the use of hardware and software RAID technology when it describes
how to configure the storage partitions.

33

34 Installation prerequisites
Server requirements

Note: PureDisk has databases for the content router, metabase engine, and
storage pool authority services. Symantec recommends that you do not use a
RAID 6 configuration for the partitions on which those PureDisk databases
reside. RAID 6 configurations cause the performance of the PureDisk databases
to degrade significantly, which adversely affects the performance of PureDisk
processes.

Node-specific hardware requirements


The following sections describe hardware requirements as they pertain to
individual nodes.

Requirements for an all-in-one PureDisk node


Table 3-1 on page 32 states the requirements that an all-in-one PureDisk node
must meet. The requirements assume that the node includes a metabase engine
and a content router service. In addition, it must meet the following
requirements:

Two dual-core processors. Higher-speed processors enhance system


performance. Greater numbers of processors/cores do not enhance system
performance.

10 GB of error-correcting code (ECC) random-access memory (RAM) for an


8-TB all-in-one PureDisk node.
or
4 GB of ECC RAM for a 4-TB all-in-one PureDisk node.

Internal disks or external disks. The PDOS installer creates several


partitions on these disks:

The /, swap, and /boot partitions, which require 15 GB of disk space.

The /Storage partition, which requires between 250 GB and 8 TB of


usable space after the RAID configuration.
If you use only internal disks, PureDisk requires that they be at least 7,200
RPM IDE or SATA disks. SCSI, fibre channel, or serial-attached SCSI disks
enhance PureDisk performance.
If you use an external disk cabinet or SAN, you have both internal disks and
external disks. The requirements for these disks are as follows:

PureDisk requires internal disks to be at least 7,200 RPM SCSI disks.


PureDisk requires at least 250 GB to store the databases and the
temporary backup data on the internal disks. More internal disk space
enables PureDisk to back up a higher volume of daily incremental data
at higher backup rates.

Installation prerequisites
Server requirements

PureDisk requires external disks to be at least 7,200 RPM IDE or SATA


disks. PureDisk stores and retains up to 8 TB of unique data segments
on an all-in-one nodes external disks. For best performance, the
PureDisk databases in /Storage/databases need to be on fast disks
with RAID 1 protection. The backup data in /Storage/data can be on
high-capacity disks with RAID 5 protection.

Be aware of the following limitations when you configure an all-in-one system:

The metabase engine on an all-in-one node can store 100 million file records
and file version records. If you want to back up more than 100 million files,
plan to add an additional node for a second metabase engine.

If you need more than 8 TB of disk space for your file content on storage,
plan to add a node for another content router.

Requirements for a content router node


Plan to include one content router service for every 8 TB of addressable storage.
One content router has a maximum capacity of 8 TB in which to store
deduplicated data segments. A deduplicated data segment is a unique piece of
file information. As PureDisk backs up file data, it uses its deduplication
technology to store each piece of unique file content only one time.
You can attach either internal disks or external disks to a content router. The
following are the requirements for a node with only a content router:

One dual-core processor. Higher-speed processors enhance system


performance. Greater numbers of processors/cores do not enhance system
performance.

4 GB of ECC RAM for a 4-TB content router node.


or
8 GB of ECC RAM for an 8-TB content router node.

Internal disks or external disks. The PDOS installer creates several


partitions on these disks:

The /, swap, and /boot partitions, which require 15 GB of disk space.

The /Storage partition, which requires between 100 GB and 8 TB of


usable space after the RAID configuration.

The following are the requirements for the /Storage partition:

If you use only internal disks, PureDisk requires them to be at least 7,200
RPM IDE or SATA disks. SCSI, fibre channel, or serial-attached SCSI disks
enhance PureDisk performance.

If you use an external disk cabinet or SAN, configure both internal disks and
external disks, as follows:

35

36 Installation prerequisites
Server requirements

For the internal disks, PureDisk requires them to be at least 7,200 RPM
SCSI or serial-attached SCSI disks with RAID 1. PureDisk requires 250
GB or more to store the content router database and the temporary
backup data on the internal disks. More internal disk space permits you
to back up a higher volume of daily incremental data at higher speeds.

For the external disks, PureDisk requires them to be at least 7,200 RPM
IDE or SATA disks with RAID 5. PureDisk can store up to 8 TB of unique
data segments on these disks.

If you want to be able to configure highly availability, configure the


/Storage partition on external disks.

Requirements for a metabase engine node


You can configure a metabase engine service on a dedicated, standalone node or
you can configure a metabase engine on a multiservice node with other
PureDisk services. A metabase engine on a dedicated node can store records for
more files and file versions than a metabase engine that you configure on a
multiservice node, as follows:

A metabase engine on a dedicated node can store the metadata of


approximately 140 million file and version records.

A metabase engine on a multiservice node can store the metadata for


approximately 100 file and file versions.

Depending on whether you configure your metabase engine(s) as dedicated


nodes or as a multiservice nodes, plan to include one metabase engine for every
140 million file and version records or every 100 million file and version
records.
You can attach a metabase engine node to either internal disks or external disks.
The following are the requirements for a node with a dedicated metabase
engine:

One dual-core processor. Higher-speed processors enhance system


performance. Greater numbers of processors/cores do not enhance system
performance.

4 GB of ECC RAM.

Internal disks or external disks. PureDisk requires metabase engine disks to


be 7,200 RPM SCSI, fibre channel, or serial-attached SCSI disks with RAID 1.
The PDOS installer creates the following partitions on these disks:

The /, swap, and /boot partitions, which require 15 GB of internal disk


space.

The /Storage partition, which requires between 250 GB and 300 GB of


usable space after the RAID configuration.

Installation prerequisites
Capacity planning

If you want to be able to configure high availability, configure the /Storage


partition on external disks.

Requirements for highly availability storage pools


A highly available storage pool consists of at least one node that contains the
PureDisk services and at least one spare node. Typically, you configure the
PureDisk services on several nodes, and then you configure one or two spare
nodes. The following are the high availability requirements:

All nodes in a cluster must have equivalent hardware capabilities. This


requirement pertains to areas such as CPU performance, memory, and so on.
This requirement applies equally to both active nodes and spare nodes for
the following reasons:

Any node must be able to act as a spare.

If a formerly active node fails, it can be repaired and brought up again


as a spare in the cluster.

Each node you configure must be connected to external storage. The


/Storage partiton must be attached to external disks. You cannot
configure high availability if any of your nodes use only internal disks.

All the nodes must be able to access the /Storage partition on the external
disks.

Capacity planning
The following sections contain information about node-specific capacity and
database needs.

Capacity planning for a storage pool


The following are Symantecs recommendations for the whole storage pool.

Planning the number of clients


A PureDisk storage pool supports a maximum of 1000 clients. Consider
installing one or more additional storage pools if you need to protect more than
1000 clients at a location. PureDisk performs data deduplication within a
storage pool, not across storage pools. Plan to back up similar clients, which are
more likely to have duplicate data, to the same storage pool for optimal data
reduction.

37

38 Installation prerequisites
Capacity planning

Planning the number of simultaneous backup streams


A PureDisk storage pool supports simultaneous backups of up to 300 streams.
Consider grouping client backups according to a schedule that backs up a
maximum of 300 streams simultaneously. You can increase the number of
parallel streams to 1000 if you change the content router configuration and if
you add 1 GB RAM to the content router nodes.
If you need to run more than 1000 backup streams simultaneously, consider
installing one or more additional storage pools. If you use the PureDisk
deduplication option (PDDO), each NetBackup stream that is deduplicated in
parallel consumes three PureDisk streams.

Planning the number of backup jobs per client


PureDisk can back up millions of files per client. However, Symantec
recommends that you retain no more than 8 million file and version records in
one data selection. When data selections include more than 8 million records in
the metabase, they degrade backup job performance. PureDisk limits the
number of records in one data selection to 16 million.
You might need to retain more than 8 million files and versions per client. If so,
create multiple data selections with a maximum of 8 million records per data
selection. To protect all the client data, you can schedule the backup jobs for
each of these data selections consecutively.
Multiple data selections on one client have no negative effect on data
deduplication. When you use the same segment size for data selections,
PureDisk globally deduplicates the data across data selections on all clients in
the storage pool.
Consider the following example. A client has 500,000 files to back up. The daily
file change rate for this client is 5%. The file change rate is equal to the sum of
the number of new files + the number of modified files + the number of deleted
files.
You want to retain all of the backed-up files and their versions for 60 days.
Table 3-2 represents this client.
Table 3-2

Client backup estimation example

Data type

Change

Data selection records

Initial full backup

100%

500,000

Incremental backup

5%

25,000

Installation prerequisites
Capacity planning

If you retain all of the files and their versions for 60 days before you remove the
older versions, the records eventually grow to 2,000,000. The calculation is as
follows:
500,000 + (60 25,000) = 2,000,000 records

Planning the number of user accounts


You can create user accounts with user or administrator permissions to operate
on the same storage pool. Do not create over 500 user accounts per storage pool.
If you create over 500 user accounts, the Web UIs responsiveness can degrade.

Capacity planning for a metabase engine


You can configure a metabase engine service on either a dedicated, standalone
node or a multiservice node with other PureDisk services. A metabase engine on
a dedicated node can store records for more files and file versions than a
metabase engine that you configure on a multiservice node, as follows:

A metabase engine on a dedicated node can store the metadata of


approximately 140 million file and version records.

A metabase engine on a multiservice node can store the metadata for


approximately 100 file and file versions.

File metadata accumulates for every file and version that you retain in a
PureDisk storage pool. Depending on whether you configure your metabase
engine(s) as dedicated nodes or as a multiservice nodes, plan to include one
metabase engine for every 140 million file and version records or every 100
million file and version records. If you want to retain more than these
recommended limits, you need to configure more than one metabase engine.
If you replicate data from one storage pool to another, PureDisk replicates the
metabase engines data, too. The target storage pool is the storage pool to which
PureDisk writes replicated data. Make sure that the target storage pool has
enough capacity in its metabase engine to store the following:

The copied data from the source storage pool

The regular, local backup data from its own clients

To estimate the amount of storage to attach to a metabase engine, consider the


following:

The number of files you want to back up. This number represents all of the
files that currently reside on the clients primary storage.

The rate at which the files are modified and added to the clients. PureDisk
creates new records in the metabase engines database when files are
modified or added.

39

40 Installation prerequisites
Capacity planning

Note that if a user deletes a file from source, PureDisk does not
automatically delete the metabase entry for that file. You can configure
policies for removing expired backup copies and their metabase
information.

(Optional) The amount of data you want PureDisk to replicate to this


metabase engine from a remote storage pool. Consider this option only if
you plan to enable replication.

The retention period, which is amount of time you want to keep the
metadata on the metabase engine.

If you configure multiple metabase engines, PureDisk assigns a client to a


particular metabase engine. This assignment occurs when you register the
clients agent with the storage pool authority. PureDisk stores all the data for a
client on the clients assigned metabase engine.
With replication enabled, PureDisk sends the metadata from a metabase engine
in the source storage pool to a metabase engine in the target storage pool. For
example, assume that storage pool A has one metabase engine and storage pool
B has 4 metabase engines. You enable replication from storage pool A to storage
pool B. How much data PureDisk writes to the four metabase engines in storage
pool B depends on the available capacity on those metabase engines. When you
create the replication policy, the metabase engine with the most available space
in storage pool B receives all of the the replicated data.
If you have up to 100 million records (multiservice node) or 140 million records
(dedicated node) per metabase engine, backup job performance can be affected.
For this reason, you must keep the number of records per data selection to under
8 million. For information about how to limit the number of files in a data
selection, see the following section:

Planning the number of backup jobs per client on page 38

A metabase engine includes a database. For information about database capacity


needs, see the following section:

Capacity planning for service databases on page 42

Note: If you use PDDO, the metadata for each individual file is stored in the
NetBackup catalog, not in the PureDisk metabase. For each NetBackup image
that is stored in the PureDisk storage pool, PureDisk creates only three entries
in the PureDisk metabase.

Installation prerequisites
Capacity planning

Capacity planning for a content router


The content routers store the file content that PureDisk backs up from client
primary storage. The following sections describe capacity planning as it relates
to content routers:

Planning for additional content routers on page 41

Disk space requirements for a content router on page 41

Planning for additional content routers


When PureDisk backs up a file, it breaks large files into segments, and it writes
the segments to one or more content routers. The default segment size differs
depending on the type of data you want to back up. The default segment size is
128 KB for files and directories, Microsoft Exchange data, and Microsoft SQL
data. The default segment size is 256 KB for system state and services data. By
default, PureDisk does not segment any files that are smaller than the default
segment size.
For example, if you back up files and directories only, a content router can
support 80,000,000 file segments with 8 TB of addressable storage. Your backup
requirements might exceed 8 TB of content router disk space. If you need more
space, you can create additional PureDisk nodes in your storage pool and install
additional content routers on those nodes.

Disk space requirements for a content router


You can estimate the amount of storage to attach to a content router by
considering the following:

How much file data you want to back up. This amount is the number of bytes
of data that currently resides on the clients primary storage.

(Optional) The amount of data you want PureDisk to replicate to this storage
pool from a remote storage pool. Consider this option only if this content
router is part of the target storage pool to which the data is replicated.

With replication enabled, PureDisk sends the data from a content router in
one storage pool to all of the content routers in another storage pool.
PureDisk distributes the data to all content routers in the target storage pool
evenly. Your target storage pool may have two or more content routers.
Remember that the data each content router receives from the source
storage pool is divided among all content routers in the target storage pool.
For example, assume that storage pool A has one content router and storage
pool B has four content routers. You enable replication from storage pool A
to storage pool B. Because storage pool B has four content routers, each
router receives one quarter of the data from storage pool A.

41

42 Installation prerequisites
Capacity planning

The amount of data reduction. PureDisk reduces data during a backup by


applying global data deduplication, file segmentation, and file compression
technologies. For example, you can expect to see the following global data
deduplication for Microsoft Office files:

75% for the initial backup

99% for daily incremental backups


As PureDisk backs up files from primary storage and writes files to content
router storage, PureDisk typically reduces storage consumption to 25% of
the original file size on primary storage at the first full backup. Consecutive
PureDisk backups typically add only 1% of the average original file size to
storage.

The retention period, which is amount of time you want to keep backups on
the content router.

For example, assume that your site has 1,000 GB of source data to protect. You
want to retain backup copies for 60 backup days. Use the following numbers to
make the calculation:

Source data of 1,000 GB 25% = 250 GB needed for the initial backup

Source data of 1,000 GB 1% = 10 GB needed for incremental backups

250 GB + (10 GB 60 days) = 850 GB total storage needed

You might replicate this data to another storage pool with the same 60-day
retention policy. Without filters applied, you must allocate another 850 GB of
storage for this data in the other storage pool. PureDisk spreads the data equally
over the number of content routers in the target storage pool. PureDisk applies
its global data deduplication technology on replicated data. Therefore, the
actual amount of storage that the other storage pool requires is likely to be less
than 850 GB. You can monitor the storage pool log files and change your storage
allocation as needed.
A content router includes a database. For information about database capacity
needs, see the following section:

Capacity planning for service databases on page 42

Capacity planning for service databases


The PureDisk metabase engine, content router, and storage pool authority each
have an internal database. Symantec recommends that you limit the size of a
node database to less than 250 GB. Databases on dedicated metabase engine and
content router nodes do not typically reach this limit. However, if you configure
an all-in-one storage pool, the metabase engine, content router, and storage pool
share a common database. If you configure an all-in-one node, you need to

Installation prerequisites
Client requirements

monitor the size of the database and add additional nodes if the databases reach
their capacity.
PureDisk creates one record in the metabase engines internal database for each
file during the initial backup. It adds a record when each file changes. The
average length of a metadata record is 500 bytes. The actual metadata record
length depends on the number of characters in the file name and the path.
For example, assume that across all the clients at your site, you have 20,000,000
files to back up. Of these files, 5% change on a daily basis. You want to retain all
versions of these files for 60 days. Table 3-3 summarizes the information about
the files at this site.
Table 3-3

Characteristics of file data to back up

Data type

Change

Source data

Internal database
records
20,000,000

Index in matabase

100%

20,000,000

Daily incremental indexes in metabase

5%

1,000,000

If you retain all files and their versions for 60 days before you remove the older
versions, the metabase engine records eventually grow to 80,000,000. The
metabase engine eventually consumes 40 GB of disk space. The calculations are
as follows:
20,000,000 + (60 1,000,000) = 80,000,000 records
80,000,000 records 500 bytes per record = 40 GB of storage
Note: If you use PDDO, the metadata for each individual file is stored in the
NetBackup catalog, not in the PureDisk metabase. For each NetBackup image
that is stored in the PureDisk storage pool, PureDisk creates only three entries
in the PureDisk metabase.

Client requirements
You can restore the PureDisk agent on a client as either a backup and restore
agent or as a PDDO agent. For specific client operating system levels that
PureDisk supports, see the hardware compatibility matrix at the following Web
site:
http://www.symantec.com/business/support/compatibility.jsp?language=e
nglish&view=comp&pid=52672

43

44 Installation prerequisites
Client requirements

The following requirements apply to all clients:

Each client must have a network connection to the storage pool authority
node and to all other PureDisk nodes.

A client needs at least 100 MB of available free space to install and run the
PureDisk agent.

Backup and restore client platforms


You can install a PureDisk backup and restore agent on the following client
platforms:

AIX

HP-UX

Linux

Mac OS

Solaris SPARC

Windows 2000 Server

Windows 2000 Professional

Windows 2003 Server

Windows XP

The following requirements apply to backup and restore clients:

For Windows clients, Symantec recommends strongly that you follow


Microsoft's recommendations and upgrade to the latest patches. The
minimum requirements are as follows:

For Windows 2003 platforms, make sure that SP1, SP2 or both have
been installed on each client machine.

For Windows XP 64-bit platforms, make sure that SP2 is installed on


each client machine.

During backups, a client stores lists of files that have been backed up
previously. PureDisk writes this file list to the clients temporary directory.
An entry in this list consumes an average of 200 bytes, depending on the
average path length and the file name length on the client. Up to three
separate lists can exist on a client. For example, a client that backs up 1
million files stores three lists of 1 million files each. This operation requires
600 MB of disk space on the client.

PureDisk uses a snapshotting technology to back up open files. For more


information on requirements, see the following section:

Enabling snapshotting on Windows clients on page 77

Installation prerequisites
Application agent requirements

PDDO client platforms


You can install a PureDisk PDDO agent on the following NetBackup media server
client platforms:

Windows media servers

Solaris SPARC

Linux

Application agent requirements


The PureDisk Windows client supports backups and restores for the following
Windows application agents on Windows 2003 Server platforms:

Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 databases

Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 databases

Microsoft SQL Server 2000 databases

Microsoft SQL Server 2005 databases

System state and services files on Windows 2003 server and Windows XP
64-bit agents

The PureDisk Windows agent software includes these application agents.


PureDisk uses the snapshotting technology to back up open files. For more
information on requirements, see the following.
Enabling snapshotting on Windows clients on page 77.

Browser requirements
The PureDisk graphical user interface is Web based. You can use the Web UI on
any screen resolution of 1280 1024 pixels or higher. For an optimal user
experience, Symantec advises that you maximize the browser window or use a
higher screen resolution.
The Web UI is compatible with the following browsers:

Microsoft Internet Explorer version 5 or 6. PureDisk does not support


Internet Explorer version 7 at this time.

Mozilla, which includes Firefox version 2.

In addition, PureDisk requires the Java platform version 1.5 or later

45

46 Installation prerequisites
Storage Foundation requirements

Storage Foundation requirements


PureDisk includes the Veritas Storage Foundation 4.1 MP4 software for Linux.
The PDOS installation process explains how to use these products with
PureDisk.

Software included
The Storage Foundation software that PDOS includes is as follows:

Veritas Volume Manager (VxVM). The PDOS installation procedure installs


VxVM automatically. Do not try to configure VxVM separately from PDOS.

Veritas File System (VxFS). You can configure the VxFS file system if your
disk types permit. PureDisk supports some disk types that are not
compatible with VxFS. Symantec recommends that you use the VxFS file
system with PureDisk if VxFS supports your disk types.

Veritas Enterprise Administrator (VEA). The PureDisk installation process


explains how to install the VEA software.

For information about hardware compatibility, see the Storage Foundation and
PureDisk hardware compatibility lists.
For information about how to use the Storage Foundation software, see the
Storage Foundation documentation.

Supported disks and other hardware


VxVM supports dynamic multipathing (DMP). The DMP feature balances I/O
across all available paths between the server and the storage devices to improve
performance and availability. Some hardware vendors provide their own tools
for multipathing, but Symantec recommends that you use VxVMs multipathing
capability.
For information about this feature, visit the following Web site:
http://www.symantec.com/business/products/otherresources.jsp?pcid=22
45&pvid=203_1
For information about the list of supported arrays in VxVM in the Storage
Foundation 4.1 release, see the hardware compatibility list in the following
document:
http://ftp.support.veritas.com/pub/support/products/VolumeManager_UN
IX/277905.pdf
VxVM includes some array support libraries (ASLs) and drivers by default. For
nondefault arrays, you must download the ASL/APM separately and install it
afterwards. Consult the hardware compatibility list at the preceding Web site.

Installation prerequisites
PureDisk deduplication option requirements

Make sure that your array is supported and check whether you need to
download the ASL/APM.
For example, if you have an EMC Clariion Cx00 array and you want to use it with
PureDisk, install the ASL after you install PureDisk. For more information, visit
the following Web sites:

For the ASL:


http://support.veritas.com/docs/286207

For the APM:


http://support.veritas.com/docs/283057

VxVM makes all internal changes.

PureDisk deduplication option requirements


The PureDisk deduplication option (PDDO) enables you to configure a PureDisk
storage pool as a NetBackup OpenStorage unit. The NetBackup OpenStorage API
enables NetBackup to communicate with PureDisk. When you install the PDDO
plug-in on a NetBackup media server, you enable NetBackup to write backups to
a PureDisk storage pool. All data in a PureDisk storage pool is deduplicated,
which reduces the amout of space that is needed for the NetBackup backup
copies.
Before you begin to install the PureDisk agent as a PDDO plug-in, make sure that
the target server meets the following requirements:

Verify that the NetBackup media server upon which you want to install the
PDDO client is a good candidate for this purpose.
The hardware must be suited for both I/O and for computation. PDDO
increases the computational load on a media server because it calculates
data deduplication. Verify your media servers hardware capabilities to
ensure an optimal PDDO configuration.

Verify that you have the following required licenses:

The PureDisk license that you used to install your PureDisk storage
pool. You need to install this PureDisk license on your NetBackup
media server.

The NetBackup Open Storage Disk Option license. If you do not already
have this license installed in your NetBackup environment, obtain and
install this license on the NetBackup master server and the NetBackup
media server before you attempt to install and configure the PDDO
plug-in. For information about the NetBackup Open Storage Disk
Option License, see the Veritas NetBackup Shared Storage Guide.

Verify that the media server is configured with NetBackup 6.5 or later.

47

48 Installation prerequisites
High availability requirements

Verify that the media server meets the PureDisk PDDO client requirements.
You can install the PDDO software on NetBackup Windows, Linux, and
Solaris SPARC media servers. For more information about this requirement,
see the following resources:

The PureDisk hardware compatibility list at the following Web site:


http://www.symantec.com/business/support/compatibility.jsp?langua
ge=english&view=comp&pid=52672

Client requirements on page 43

High availability requirements


You can configure PureDisk services for high availability. PureDisk 6.5
documentation uses the term highly available or clustered to refer to the storage
pools that use the Veritas Cluster Server (VCS) software for high availability. In
a highly available PureDisk storage pool, all services reside on nodes in one or
more clusters. In the event of a malfunction, the VCS clustering software moves
the service group from one node to another automatically and ensures high
availability.
Symantec supports the ability to configure highly available services at the time
you perform the PureDisk initial installation and configuration. After you install
and configure Puredisk 6.5, you cannot reconfigure that storage pool for high
availability.
In a highly available PureDisk environment, you can configure one or more
PureDisk services on a node. The services on a node comprise a service group.
Each node contains a NIC that has a service IP address or service FQDN assigned
to it. The service IP address or service FQDN of each node is wired to the
PureDisk service group.
PureDisk associates a storage pools services with the service IP address or
service FQDN of the node upon with they are configured. When the service IP
address or service FQDN moves, VCS moves all the PureDisk services for that
service IP address or service FQDN.
Note: Symantec recommends that you contact Symantec Consulting Services for
the installation of a clustered, highly available PureDisk storage pool.

Storage pool hardware requirements


Make sure to design your PureDisk environment to meet the requirements in
this section. The general requirements are as follows:

One or more servers to act as primary, active nodes.

Installation prerequisites
High availability requirements

One or more spare nodes.

External storage on a SAN. The following additional information also


applies to the SAN:

The PureDisk software installation package includes the Veritas


Volume Manager (VxVM), the Veritas File System (VxFS), and the
Veritas Cluster Server (VCS) software.
The installation procedure directs you to use VxVM and to configure a
VxFS file system on the storage partitions. You can configure either
/Storage in one partition, or you can configure /Storage/data and
/Storage/databases.

The SAN must include the disk devices that VxFS supports. For
example, the SAN cannot consist of iSCSI disks. Although PureDisk
supports iSCSI disks in a SAN, PureDisk does not support iSCSI disks
for high availability. For more information about disk device
compatibility, see the compatibility list at the following Web site:
http://www.symantec.com/business/support/compatibility.jsp?langua
ge=english&view=comp&pid=52672

Java administration console requirements


You can administer the PureDisk cluster through the Veritas cluster server Java
console. This console is a graphical user interface. During the configuration
process, you install the PureDisk storage pool software and then you configure
the cluster software. After you configure the cluster software, you can install
the Java Console on a Linux or Windows NT/2000 Professional system. The
system from which you run the Java console can be a system in the cluster or a
remote workstation. If you install the Java console on a remote computer, you
can administer each node in the cluster remotely.
The following are the minimum hardware requirements for the Java console:

A 300 MHz Pentium II processor. Symantec recommends a 400 MHz


Pentium III processor.

256 MB RAM

800x600 display resolution

A monitor with 8-bit color depth

A graphics card capable of 2D images

The version of the Java 2 Runtime Environment (JRE) requires 32 MB of RAM.


The JRE is supported on the Intel Pentium platforms that run the Linux kernel v
2.2.12 and glibc v2.1.2-11 (or later). Symantec recommends that you use the
following:

49

50 Installation prerequisites
High availability requirements

48 MB of RAM

16-bit color mode

KDE and KWM window managers that are used with displays set to local
hosts

VCS software requirements


The VCS software enables high availability in a PureDisk environment. The
following documents explain the hardware prerequisites that must be met in
order to install VCS in a PureDisk environment:

VERITAS Cluster Server 4.1 Installation Guide for Linux

VERITAS Cluster Server 4.1 Release Notes for Linux

Make sure you familiarize yourself with the VCS documentation and the
PureDisk Storage Pool Installation Guide before you begin to install the product.

PureDisk software requirements


The PureDisk software distribution includes all the software that you need to
configure a highly available PureDisk storage pool. No additional software
requirements exist. This section explains how a typical Veritas Cluster Server
(VCS) solution is incorporated into the PureDisk software distribution package.
VCS is a high-availability solution for cluster configurations. In the context of
PureDisk, VCS monitors the PureDisk services that reside on an individual
server system, or node. Each cluster includes a spare node, which you initially
configure without any hosted services. When VCS detects a hardware failure or
a software failure, it restarts the services on the spare node.
The Symantec Veritas SF (Storage Foundation) software typically includes the
VCS software. The PureDisk package includes the SF software binaries and the
VCS binaries. In addition, the PureDisk license includes the licenses for these
additional products.
The procedures that you follow to install and configure highly available
PureDisk are similar to those for VCS. To summarize the procedures, the first
step is to install VCS 4.1MP3, and the second step is to apply VCS 4.1MP4. The
PureDisk 6.5 version of the PureDisk Operating System (PDOS) requires VCS
4.1MP4. Do not reboot in between the 4.1MP3 and 4.1MP4 installation. At this
time, VCS 5.0 does not support PDOS.
The VCS Web UI conflicts with the PureDisk Web UI. Do not install the VCS Web
UI. If you install the VCS Web interface, the subsequent PureDisk installation
replaces it with the PureDisk Web UI. The PureDisk software distribution
includes the VCS Java console. Use the VCS Java console to administer VCS.

Installation prerequisites
High availability requirements

For more information about hardware compatibility, see the Storage Foundation
hardware compatibility list on the Symantec Web site.

Network requirements
Each server node that you want to include in a cluster requires three NICs:

One NIC is required for the public network.

Two additional NICs are required for the private heartbeat network. These
NICs need to be connected to the private network NICs on the other nodes.

The following list contains more information about these NICs and their roles:

The public NIC manages backups, restores, and typical PureDisk


communications. This card also lets you access the node for installation,
configuration, and typical system maintenance activities.
On this NIC, configure the following:

A host IP address and a host FQDN. In a cluster, you use these


identifiers to contact the node for system maintenance activities from
outside of PureDisk. This address is the administrative address.

A service IP address and a service FQDN. PureDisk associates all


PureDisk services with this service IP address and service FQDN. In a
cluster, when a failover occurs, VCS moves these identifiers, and their
associated services, from an active node to a spare node.

The first private NIC detects and monitors the cluster heartbeat. This NIC
also manages internode communication in the cluster. It connects the node
to the clusters private network. The private network is internal to the
cluster.
Do not configure an IP address or an FQDN on this NIC. If an IP address or
FQDN are already configured on this NIC, unconfigure them. The VCS
software requires exclusive use of these cards, and VCS does not use TCP/IP.

The second private NIC detects and monitors a redundant heatbeat. This
NIC connects the node to the clusters second (redundant) private network.
Connect this card to a switch that is different from the switch for the first
private NIC. The private network is internal to the cluster.
As is true for the other private NIC, do not configure an IP address or an
FQDN on this NIC. If an IP address or FQDN are already configured on this
NIC, unconfigure them. The VCS software requires exclusive use of these
cards, and VCS does not use TCP/IP.

The following additional information describes how to configure network cards:

During typical operations, the nodes in a cluster ping each other. When VCS
detects that a node is down, the cause can be a node malfunction or a

51

52 Installation prerequisites
High availability requirements

network malfunction. If the network malfunctions, then card two and card
three can appear to be malfunctioning.
When the two private network links are down and VCS does not receive
heartbeat from a node, it marks the node as DOWN. It excludes the node
from the cluster. The cluster takes corrective action, which can initiate a
failover.

From node to node, make sure to connect all the NICs that form the two
private networks.

Configuration examples
A PureDisk high availability configuration is similar to other high availability
configurations that use Veritas Cluster server.
Figure 3-1 shows the network connections between the services in a VCS
configuration. In this figure, the storage pools four nodes are configured into
one cluster. The cluster consists of three nodes that are configured with
services, and one spare node. In the event of a malfunction, the VCS fails over
the services from the malfunctioning node to the spare node.

Figure 3-1

A four-node cluster

Installation prerequisites
High availability requirements

Figure 3-2 shows the network connections between the services in a different
VCS configuration.
Figure 3-2

A cluster with two private networks and one public network

Terminology
The documentation for highly available PureDisk includes the following new
terms:
Term

Definition

Active node

A node with PureDisk services configured and running on it.


Compare to spare node.

Cluster

Two or more nodes with failover capability. At least one node must
be configured as a spare node.

Host address

The host IP address, the host name, and the host FQDN are the
identifiers for a particular server node. These addresses are
associated with the node hardware.
These addresses reside on the public NIC in each node, and these
are the address that an administrator can use for system
administration purposes. For example, these are the addresses you
use to log into a node to perform system maintenance, to install
PDOS, to install VCS, and to verify the state of the machine.
In an unclustered storage pool, the service address is most likely
the same as the host address, but this is not a requirement.
Compare to service address.

53

54 Installation prerequisites
High availability requirements

Term

Definition

Passive node

See spare node.

Private NIC

A NIC that is reserved for internal, proprietary use. A VCS cluster


requires two private NICs to monitor the state of the cluster. These
NICs are not available for other use.
Compare to public NIC.

Service address

The service IP address, the service host name, and the service
FQDN are the identifiers for the service group that resides on a
particular node.
When you configure VCS, you define the service addresses on the
public NIC that resides in a node. VCS manages the service IP
address as a service group. When a failover occurs, the VCS
software moves the nodes service group, including the PureDisk
services and the nodes service address, to a spare node.
In an unclustered storage pool, the service address is most likely
the same as the host address, but this is not a requirement.
Compare to host address.

Public NIC

An NIC that is available for applications to use.


Compare to private NIC.

Service group

A VCS service group is a collection of resources that reside on one


node and work together to provide application services. A service
group typically includes multiple resources, both hardware and
software, working together. If one resource in a service group fails,
VCS moves all the resources in the service group to one of the spare
nodes.
The PureDisk VCS service groups that you need to configure are as
follows:

Shared disk

The NIC

The service address

The disk group

The disk volume

The shared disk mount point

The PureDisk services installed on the node

An external disk that is accessible to all PureDisk nodes but is


accessed by only one node at a time.

Installation prerequisites
High availability requirements

Term

Definition

Spare node

In a highly available storage pool managed by VCS, a spare node is a


node with PDOS and VCS software installed upon it but without
any active services configured or running. A spare node can assume
the role of an active node after a VCS failover. In VCS terms, this is
called a stand-by node. Compare to active node.
In an environment with script-based failover implemented, a spare
node is an unconfigured node that meets the hardware
requirements to host PureDisk when necessary. A spare node does
not need to be powered on. The only requirement is that an
operator be able to turn it on and add it to the network for use when
needed. For example, the PureDisk manual failover procedure uses
a spare node as target. Compare to stand-by node.
For more information about script-based failover, see the following
section:
Script-based failover on page 97

Stand-by node

VCS uses the term stand-by node to refer to the configured, but
inactive, node in a storage pool. PureDisk uses the term spare node
to refer to this node. Compare to spare node.

Virtual address

The virtual IP address, virtual host name, and virtual FQDN. These
addresses are not connected to a specific computer or NIC.
Incoming packets go to the virtual address, but all packets travel
through real network interfaces. In a clustered storage pool, the
service address is a virtual address.
PureDisk requires you to add the virtual address to a node when
you configure VCS. After installation, VCS controls the virtual
address.

Planning a cluster
The following procedure can help you plan your highly available PureDisk
configuration. Perform this procedure before you begin to install any PureDisk
software.
To plan the cluster
1

Complete the spreadsheet that is included in the following file in the


puredisk/documentation directory of the PureDisk Application disk:
PureDisk_ClusterPlanning.xls

This spreadsheet requires that you obtain several types of information:

Network information about your default gateway, your NTP server, and
so on.

55

56 Installation prerequisites
High availability requirements

Service group names for the VCS service groups you are about to create
for disk groups, disk volumes, and so on. These are names you create
for the cluster service groups.

Cluster information, including a unique ID for this cluster, a unique


name for this cluster, and so on.

Network information for each node that includes public addressing


information, service addressing information, and so on.
Your network administrator can help you complete this planning
spreadsheet.

Read the installation information in the PureDisk Storage Pool Installation


Guide.
The installation has several phases. The installation process can go more
smoothly if you read the instructions first. If you have ever installed a
highly available NetBackup environment, be aware that there are some
differences between the way NetBackup and PureDisk use the VCS
capabilities. Both use the VCS software, but NetBackup and PureDisk
implement clustering in product-specific ways.

Unsupported configurations
Symantec does not support the following capabilities:

The ability to migrate a storage pool that uses PureDisk 6.2 software to one
that is highly available.

The ability to convert a non-highly available PureDisk 6.5 storage pool into a
highly available storage pool. At installation time, you can configure a
storage pool to be highly available or not.
Within your backup infrastructure, you can mix and match both highly
available and non-highly available storage pools. For example, you can
configure a central offices storage pool to be highly available and you can
configure remote office without the highly available feature.

Script-based failover with high availability in the same storage pool.


Script-based failover is not compatible with high availability in the same
storage pool. The VCS implements automatic high availability, which causes
a failover to happen automatically. This implementation is different from
the script-based failover that PureDisk introduced in its 6.2 release. In a
script-based failover, you use scripts to move a service from a failed node to
a spare node. For more information about the script-based failover feature,
see the following section:
Script-based failover on page 97

Installation prerequisites
NetBackup requirements

NetBackup requirements
PureDisk has some features that interoperate with NetBackup. These features
require that you install a NetBackup DataStore license on the NetBackup server.
The PureDisk license key includes a NetBackup DataStore license.
The PureDisk features that interoperate with NetBackup are as follows:

The NetBackup export engine. This feature lets you copy a backed-up data
selection from a PureDisk content router to NetBackup. NetBackup catalogs
the data and copies it to tape or disk. After you export the PureDisk files to
NetBackup, log into a NetBackup administration console. You can treat these
files as if they were native NetBackup files. From the administration console,
you can generate NetBackup reports, browse the files, and manage the files.
The NetBackup export engine requires you to install the NetBackup 6.0 MP5
or later software in your NetBackup environment. In addition, install the
NetBackup client on at least one node in your PureDisk storage pool.
For information about this feature, see the PureDisk Administrators Guide.

NetBackup disaster recovery. This feature lets you write PureDisk disaster
recovery backups to NetBackup. Symantec recommends that you use
NetBackup to perform disaster recovery backups. Without NetBackup, you
should implement a disaster recovery plan that copies files to a CIFS shared
file system or to a local file system.
The NetBackup disaster recovery feature requires you to install the
NetBackup 6.0 MP5 or later software in your NetBackup environment. It
requires you to install the NetBackup 6.5 client software or NetBackup 6.0
MP5 client software on every node in your PureDisk storage pool.
For information about this feature, see the PureDisk Administrators Guide.

PDDO. For prerequisites and an introduction to this feature, see the


following section:
PureDisk deduplication option requirements on page 47
For comprehensive information about how to install and use the PDDO
plug-in, see the PureDisk Deduplication Option Guide.

Licensing requirements
PureDisk requires a license key to install a server, to activate clients, and to
activate application agents. The PureDisk pricing and licensing guide explains
the PureDisk licensing options.

57

58 Installation prerequisites
User authentication requirements

User authentication requirements


By default, PureDisk authenticates users through its own internal OpenLDAP
directory service. You can configure PureDisk to authenticate users through an
external OpenLDAP or Active Directory service.
You can configure PureDisk to authenticate users through an external directory
service. You must verify that the software version level of your directory service
is compatible with this PureDisk release.
More information is available about supported levels of the OpenLDAP or Active
Directory service. See the Symantec technical support Web sites compatibility
matrix at the following Web site:
http://www.symantec.com/business/support/compatibility.jsp?language=e
nglish&view=comp&pid=52672

Symantec Product Authentication Service


requirements
PureDisk requires that you configure the Symantec Product Authentication
Service. The Symantec Product Authentication Service authenticates users and
provides a single sign on for Web UI use. The single sign on capability allows
users to log into one application and have access to multiple Web UIs. For
example, users can log in one time to either PureDisk or Veritas Backup
Reporter (VBR).
When you install a PureDisk storage pool, the installation software prompts you
to specify a root broker and one or more authentication brokers. The
authentication service uses these brokers.
To use a root broker that is already installed on a host on your companys
network, ensure that the host satisfies the following requirements:

The host has a network connection to the storage pool you want to
configure.

The host is running the Symantec Product Authentication Service software,


revision 4.3.28.0 or greater.

This service uses one network-wide root broker and several authentication
brokers. Each authentication broker communicates with a root broker to provide
trust in the user identities that other authentication brokers have verified.
Authentication brokers support the default PureDisk internal OpenLDAP
directory service and the optional external OpenLDAP and Active Directory
services. More information is available on synchronization.
See User authentication requirements on page 58.

Installation prerequisites
Symantec Product Authentication Service requirements

For background and more detailed information about using this authentication
service, refer to the Symantec Product Authentication and Authorization guide.

Configuring brokers for PureDisk use


Symantec strongly recommends that you install only one root broker on your
enterprise network. PureDisk can use another products root broker services.
Before you begin to install any PureDisk software, determine if you can use a
root broker that already exists on your network.
Caution: Do not install multiple root brokers in your network. Symantec
recommends that there be only one root broker in an enterprise network. If you
configure more than one root broker in your environment, single sign on is not
possible. Also, multiple root brokers require additional expert configuration to
provide user authentication.
For example, assume that you installed a root broker for use by VBR, NetBackup,
or some other Symantec product on your network. Now, you want to install
PureDisk on the same network. You can configure your PureDisk storage pools
to use that existing root broker.
PureDisk installs an authentication broker (AB) on every PureDisk storage pool
authority. The authentication broker communicates with the networks root
broker to provide trust in the user identities that other authentication brokers
verified.
This section describes how the brokers interoperate in a Symantec software
network. Use this information in this section to plan your security configuration
now.
Figure 3-3 on page 60 is a flow chart that can help you plan and configure
brokers. Your path through the chart varies based on the number of storage
pools you install and where your root broker is installed in your environment.

59

60 Installation prerequisites
Symantec Product Authentication Service requirements

Figure 3-3

Planning a PureDisk broker deployment


Start

Is a root broker
installed on the
network?

No
See Local root broker configuration on page 60

Yes

Is the root broker


installed on a
PureDisk storage
pool?

Yes

See Local root broker and remote authentication


broker configuration on page 61

No
See External root broker configuration on page 63

The following sections explain the relationships between the brokers and how to
specify these relationships when you install a PureDisk storage pool. These
sections refer to the PureDisk installation topology wizard. You might find it
useful to refer to the information about the broker configuration in the PureDisk
Storage Pool Installation Guide.

Local root broker configuration


The local root broker configuration installs a root broker on a PureDisk storage
pool.
Plan to use the local root broker option when both of the following points are
true:

You have not yet installed and configured a root broker anywhere in your
PureDisk environment

No root broker that you want to use exists on your network.

In a local root broker configuration, a PureDisk storage pool has both a root
broker and an authentication broker installed. Other Symantec products and

Installation prerequisites
Symantec Product Authentication Service requirements

other storage pools that you install subsequently on the network can use this
root broker.
The local option is number 1 in the PureDisk installation topology wizard.
Choose only one PureDisk storage pool to host a root broker. If you plan to
configure a PureDisk central storage pool for reporting, this storage pool is a
good choice to host a shared root broker.
To create a local root broker, specify the following when the topology wizard
prompts you for the Unique host name for this SPA:

For an unclustered storage pool, specify the fully qualified domain name
(FQDN) or host name of the storage pool authority node. This name is an
entry in the installation wizard worksheets in the PureDisk Storage Pool
Installation Guide.

For a clustered storage pool, specify the host FQDN or host name of the
storage pool authority node. In a cluster, the broker is associated with a
physical server, not a PureDisk service, so do not specify a service name.
This name appears on the cluster installation spreadsheet.

PureDisk storage pool

Root broker +
authentication broker
Storage pool installation using
the Local option

Local root broker and remote authentication broker


configuration
The local root broker and remote authentication broker configuration installs a
local root broker on a storage pool. It also installs several authentication brokers
on the other storage pools.
Plan to use the local root broker and remote root authenication broker option
when both of the following points are true:

You plan to install more than one storage pool

You have no other Symantec product on the network that has a root broker

61

62 Installation prerequisites
Symantec Product Authentication Service requirements

Note: Install only one local root broker in a PureDisk storage pool. Configure all
other storage pools in your environment to use this single root broker.
Figure 3-4 shows three storage pools and locations for root brokers and
authentication brokers.
Figure 3-4

Local root broker + remote authentication brokers

Storage pool installation using


the Local option
PureDisk storage pool A

Root broker +
authentication broker

PureDisk storage pool B

Storage pool installation using


the Remote option

authentication broker

PureDisk storage pool C

Storage pool installation using


the Remote option

authentication broker

Figure 3-4 shows the following configuration:

Storage pool A has a root broker and an authentication broker installed. The
broker was installed as a local broker. This storage pool is the first one
installed on the Symantec network. The storage pool is also the first
software that you installed on the Symantec network with an authentication
broker.

Storage pools B and C reside on the same network and have only
authentication brokers installed. You configured these storage pools after
you configured storage pool A. The authentication brokers on storage pools

Installation prerequisites
Symantec Product Authentication Service requirements

B and C communicate with and run under control of the shared root broker
on storage pool A.
If you need to create a broker system like the one in Figure 3-4, use the topology
wizard is as follows:

For the first storage pool you configure, use the topology wizard to select
Local, which is option 1 in the Root broker screen. This method installs a
root broker and an authentication broker on that PureDisk storage pool.
Configure this storage pool first.
See Local root broker configuration on page 60.

For the other storage pools, use the topology wizard to select Remote, which
is option 2 in the Root broker screen. This option installs only an
authentication broker on these storage pools. Configure these storage pools
after you configure the storage pool with the local root broker.
For these and all subsequent storage pools you add, choose the Remote
option, which is option 2, in the topology wizard. This configuration option
uses the existing root broker that was installed on the first storage pool. It
installs only an authentication broker on any new additional storage pools.
For topology wizard Remote option, in the IP/Host name field, specify the
FQDN, host name, or IP address of the first storage pool.
For the installation wizard worksheets, specify the root login password for
that first storage pool for the Root Broker password field.
Specify the following when the topology wizard prompts you for the Unique
host name for this SPA:

For an unclustered storage pool, specify the fully qualified domain


name (FQDN) or host name of the storage pool authority node. This
name is an entry in the installation wizard worksheets in the PureDisk
Storage Pool Installation Guide.

For a clustered storage pool, specify the host FQDN or host name of the
storage pool authority node. In a cluster, the broker is associated with a
physical server, not a PureDisk service, so do not specify a service
name. This name appears on the cluster installation spreadsheet.

External root broker configuration


To install storage pools on a network that already uses the Symantec product
authentication service, plan to install an external broker on all storage pools.
An external broker configuration uses a root broker that was previously
installed and is available somewhere outside of all your PureDisk storage pools.
This external host is not a PureDisk node. For example, this root broker can be
one that VBR also uses.

63

64 Installation prerequisites
Symantec Product Authentication Service requirements

When you configure a storage pool to use an external root broker, PureDisk
installs only an authentication broker on each storage pool. The authentication
broker on each storage pool communicates with the root broker on the external
host.
If you decide to use an existing external root broker, consider the following
points:

Configure all of your PureDisk storage pools to use the same external root
broker.

Ensure that the external host has a network connection to the storage pool
you are configure.

Any version of the authentication broker can communicate with any version
of the root broker. Therefore, you can upgrade the software version of the
external root broker safely.

When you invoke the PureDisk topology wizard during installation, select
External, which is option 3 in Root broker screen.

Figure 3-5 shows two storage pools, X and Y, that use an external root broker.
This root broker is installed on host C, which is not part of a PureDisk storage
pool.

Installation prerequisites
Firewall and networking requirements

Figure 3-5

Storage pools that use an external root broker

Root broker installation on a


non-PureDisk host
Non-PureDisk host C

Root broker

PureDisk storage pool X

Authentication broker

Storage pool installation using


the External option

Storage pool installation using


the External option

PureDisk storage pool Y

Authentication broker

To configure an authentication mechanism similar to the one in Figure 3-5, you


need information about the external host before you begin to install PureDisk.
The PureDisk Storage Pool Installation Guide explains how to collect the
required information about the root broker and its external host.

Firewall and networking requirements


You configure the firewalls that protect PureDisk clients to permit network
connections to all of the PureDisk nodes in a storage pool. Symantec strongly
recommends that you deny connectivity between the clients and IP addresses
outside of the PureDisk node addresses. If you add PureDisk nodes to expand a
storage pool, enable connectivity between the PureDisk clients and the new
PureDisk nodes.
PureDisk relies on the accessibility of several ports between the clients and the
PureDisk nodes. Be aware of the following information regarding firewalls and
ports:

65

66 Installation prerequisites
Firewall and networking requirements

Firewalls can exist in the communication path between the clients and the
PureDisk nodes. Use the port information in this section to configure the
environment to allow these connections.

If the Symantec Client Firewall is installed on a client, the PureDisk agent


cannot run backup jobs with default settings. For information on the
firewall settings, see the PureDisk Client Installation Guide.

If personal firewall software is active on a client that has the PureDisk agent
installed, configure it to allow the network connections. Also configure the
firewall to allow the connections in the following sections.

If the connectivity requirements are not met and your firewall performs a
passive drop, PureDisk does not generate a message that describes this
situation. Your connection times out without notification.

Communication between client agents and the storage pool


Figure 3-6 shows the ports that the PureDisk nodes use for communication
between client agents and the storage pool. Table 3-4 provides a list of
communication ports.

Installation prerequisites
Firewall and networking requirements

Figure 3-6

PureDisk communication between client agents and a storage pool

Job management

443

Storage pool authority

Metadata checks

443

53

DNS server

Metabase server

Client agent
Control management

10101

Controller
(on metabase engine)

10082

Data

Content router

Data

137, 138,
139, 445
CIFS
(on storage pool authority)

Samba client

Table 3-4 on page 67 shows communication ports.


Table 3-4

Ports between client agents and their storage pool

Source

Destination

Port

Protocol Purpose/notes

Client agents

Controller

10101

TCP

Registers, authenticates, and controls. A


metabase engine always hosts a controller
service.

67

68 Installation prerequisites
Firewall and networking requirements

Table 3-4

Ports between client agents and their storage pool (continued)

Source

Destination

Port

Protocol Purpose/notes

Client agents

Content router

10082

TCP

Sends data.

Client agents

Storage pool
authority

443 (HTTPS)

TCP

Checks and updates actions on the client


side.

Metabase server
Client agents

DNS server

53

UDP and
TCP

Used when you install PureDisk with


FQDNs or hostnames. Not used if you
install PureDisk with IP addresses.

Samba client

CIFS gateway

137, 138, 139,


and 445

TCP

Exposes data over the CIFS protocol.

Communication between the storage pool authority and other


services
Each service on a PureDisk node requires certain incoming ports to be open. The
nodes themselves do not monitor the specific ports that the other nodes use to
send information. Therefore, the ports need to be open to all communication.
Figure 3-7, shows the ports that need to be open on each PureDisk node.
Table 3-5 contains more information about the ports in the figure.

Installation prerequisites
Firewall and networking requirements

Figure 3-7

Storage pool authority communication

Administrators host system

Root broker host

2821
22, 443
Storage pool authority,
Web UI, and CIFS
21, 443
21, 443

21, 443

22, 10082

22, 10101
22
Metabase engine
and controller
node

10082
10101,
10085
10082

Content router

10101
10101

Metabase server

Clients

Note: For communication purposes, PureDisk interoperates with a NetBackup


export engine service as if it were on its own self-hosted node. A gateway for this
service needs to be on each node.

69

70 Installation prerequisites
Firewall and networking requirements

Table 3-5 shows communication ports.


Table 3-5

Ports between the storage pool authority node and other services

Source

Destination

Port

Protocol Purpose/notes

All PureDisk node


services

Storage pool
authority

21

TCP

Facilitates any PDOS upgrades.

Storage pool
authority

All PureDisk
node services

22 (SSH)

TCP

Facilitates PureDisk installation,


upgrades, and maintenance.

Administrators host Storage pool


system
authority

22 (SSH)

TCP

Performs inquiries.

All PureDisk node


services

Storage pool
authority

443 (HTTPS)

TCP

Monitors the communication among all


other services.

Administrators host Storage pool


system
authority

443 (HTTPS)

TCP

Connects to storage pool authority and


then to PureDisk Web UI.

Storage pool
authority

Root broker host

2821

TCP

Authentication between each node.


Authentication from the storage pool
authority to the broker.

All PureDisk nodes

Content router

10082

TCP

Exchanges data.

Metabase server

Metabase engine

10085

TCP

Processes any queries on data selections.


This port should be open only on
metabase engine nodes.

All PureDisk nodes


and all clients

Controller

10101

TCP

Controls the client agent software on the


clients. Client agents and server agents
connect to the storage pool through the
controller.
The metabase engine node hosts the
controller service.

Following are some additional ports that are not shown in the figure:
All PureDisk node
services

Samba shared file 137, 138, 139,


system
and 445

TCP

All PureDisk node


services

Storage pool
authority node

UDP

10087

Facilitates any database dumps.


Used only when disaster recovery
through a Samba/CIFS share is
implemented.
Facilitates debugging with the debug
logging daemon (DLD).
Used only when disaster recovery
through a Samba/CIFS share is
implemented.

Installation prerequisites
Firewall and networking requirements

Table 3-5

Ports between the storage pool authority node and other services (continued)

Source

Destination

Port

All PureDisk node


services

NetBackup

NetBackup
ports

Protocol Purpose/notes
Facilitates any disaster recovery through
NetBackup. This communication is
bidirectional.
Used only when disaster recovery
through NetBackup is implemented. See
NetBackup documentation for protocols.

NetBackup Export
Engine gateways

NetBackup

NetBackup
ports

Facilitates any exports to NetBackup. This


communication is bidirectional.
Used only when the NetBackup export
engine is implemented. See NetBackup
documentation for protocols.

Communication between PureDisk and other applications


Figure 3-8 shows the ports that are involved in communication between
PureDisk and other applications. Table 3-6 describes the ports in more detail.

71

72 Installation prerequisites
Firewall and networking requirements

Figure 3-8

NetBackup

Communication between PureDisk and other applications

123

13724

NTP server

All PureDisk node services


53 (UDP)

53 (UDP)

DNS server

SNMP server

SMTP server

10443
Veritas Backup
Reporter (VBR)

161

25

Administrators host
system

10087

DL daemon

Storage pool authority and


server agents

2148
Veritas Enterprise
Administrator (VEA)

14141
Veritas Cluster
Server (VCS)

Installation prerequisites
Firewall and networking requirements

Table 3-6 provides more details about the ports that are used in communications
between PureDisk and other applications.
Table 3-6

Ports between PureDisk and other applications

Source

Destination

Port

Protocol Purpose/notes

Storage pool
authority

SMTP server.

25

TCP

Email notification for events.

All PureDisk node


services and
administrators host
system

Corporate DNS
server.

53 (DNS)

TCP

Allows any management interventions.


This communication is bidirectional.

All PureDisk node


services

NTP client.

123

TCP

Synchronizes the local time to an external


NTP server. This synchronication ensures
that all server nodes are on the same
clock.

Storage pool
authority

SNMP server.

161

UDP

Traps SNMP packets.

Any machine. For


example, the
administrators
desktop.

PureDisk nodes
with the Veritas
Enterprise
Administrator
(VEA) installed
upon them.

2148

FTP

VEA server.

Veritas Backup
Reporter (VBR)

Storage pool
authority.

10443

TCP

Facilitates the communication between


VBR and the storage pool authority.

Any machine. For


example, the
administrators
desktop.

PureDisk nodes
with the Veritas
Cluster Server
(VCS) installed
upon them.

14141

FTP

VCS Java client.

UDP

Used when you install PureDisk with


FQDNs or host names. Not used if you
install PureDisk with IP addresses.

UDP

73

74 Installation prerequisites
Firewall and networking requirements

Replication and central reporting ports


Table 3-7 on page 74 shows the ports that are involved in the communication
between one storage pool and other storage pools.
Table 3-7

Ports between PureDisk storage pools

Source

Destination

Port

Protocol Purpose/notes

Metabase engine on
the source storage
pool

Storage pool
authority on the
destination
storage pool

443

TCP

Facilitates PureDisk replication.

Metabase engine on
the source storage
pool

Content router
on the
destination
storage pool

10082

TCP

Communicates with the destination


storage pool during replication.
The metabase engine of the source
storage pool contacts the storage pool
authority of the destination storage pool.
It retrieves data selection mapping,
creates replication jobs, and performs
additional functions.
The metabase engine of the source
storage pool contacts the content router
of the destination storage pool to transfer
data.

Central storage pool


authority node

Centrally
managed storage
pool authority
nodes

443 (HTTPS)

TCP

Facilitates central reports. Used by the


central reporting feature. The central
storage pool uses Web service calls to
retrieve license and capacity information.
The obtains the information from the
storage pools that are included in the
central reporting storage pool authoritys
reports.

Installation prerequisites
Firewall and networking requirements

Intraclient communication
PureDisk uses port 7325 for interprocess communication such as file
snapshotting through VSP and VSS. Table 3-8 provides details about this port.
Table 3-8

Ports on Windows clients

Source

Destination

Port

Protocol

Purpose/Notes

Any Windows client

The same
Windows client

7325

TCP

Manages snapshotting. The following operations


use this port:

UDP

Files and Folders backups when


snapshotting is enabled.

All MS Exchange and MS SQL backups and


restores.

System State and Services operations are not


affected.

If port 7325 is used for another purpose, edit the /etc/services file and add
lines at the end to specify a different port number. For example:
puredisk-ss
puredisk-ss

7326/tcp
7326/udp

Ensure that you include a newline character at the end of the last line that you
add so that Windows recognizes it.

Security recommendations for Windows clients


The following information applies if you use the PureDisk agent on a Windows
2003 or a Windows XP platform. It explains how to configure your system to
meet the PureDisk network requirements.
When Symantec Client Firewall and the Windows PureDisk agent are both
installed, the firewall might report that the agent tries to listen to the internet.
This message occurs because when the agent connects, it listens on a random
port for 1 millisecond. Either ignore the firewall warning or configure the
firewall to always trust pdengine.exe. For more information about how to
configure a firewall, see the PureDisk Client Installation Guide.

Windows 2003
The default security settings in Windows 2003 prevent proper access to the
storage pool authority Web UI. The settings also disallow the download of the
PureDisk agent software. You can change the security settings in Internet
Explorer.
Use one or both of the following procedures to configure Internet Explorer.

75

76 Installation prerequisites
Firewall and networking requirements

To change the security settings in Internet Explorer


1

Open Internet Explorer.

Click Extra > Internet Options > Advanced > Security.

Clear the Do not Save Encrypted Files to disk check box.

To enable Web UI access in Internet Explorer 6 on Windows 2003


1

Open Internet Explorer.

Add the IP address or host name of the storage pool authority and the
PureDisk nodes to the following setting:
Extra > Internet Options > Security > Trusted sites

Windows XP with service pack 2


The tightened security settings in Windows XP with service pack 2 require you
to revisit some system settings for the PureDisk storage pool authority Web UI.
After you install service pack 2, the operating system activates the Windows
firewall if it does not detect a third-party firewall on the system. In that case, the
integrated Windows firewall blocks connections to the storage pool authority.
Configure the firewall in such a way that the storage pool authority Web UI can
get through. As an alternative, you can deactivate the integrated firewall, but
then you need to configure a third-party firewall to protect the agent host.
Internet security settings are more elaborate after installing service pack 2, and
they affect the way PureDisk installs and upgrades its agents. A new setting
controls the display of download prompts before an actual download starts. By
default, no prompts are allowed, and this restriction prevents the PureDisk
storage pool authority Web UI from downloading the PureDisk agent file. Use
the following procedure to correct this situation.
To enable the PureDisk storage pool authority Web UI to download files to an
agent host
1

Open the Internet Options dialog by selecting Tools > Internet Options from
the Internet Explorer toolbar.

Click the Security tab.

Click Internet and click Custom Level to open the Security Settings dialog
box.

Scroll down to the Downloads section and set Automatic prompting for file
downloads to Enable. Note that if you enable only the File Download setting,
that does not fix the problem.

Installation prerequisites
Enabling snapshotting on Windows clients

Enabling snapshotting on Windows clients


PureDisk can back up any files that are open at the time a backup is in process.
The information in the following sections describes how to enable this capability
for your specific Windows client.

Enabling snaphotting on Windows 2003 or on Windows XP clients


PureDisk uses Microsofts VSS technology to back up open files on Windows
2003 or on Windows XP clients. Microsoft supports VSS on Windows 2003 or on
Windows XP platforms. On Windows XP platforms, the snapshot configuration
attributes are not supported. You can configure VSS through the Microsoft VSS
configuration dialog boxes.
For VSS to work properly, make sure Windows clients have the following:

One local NTFS volume on the target system being snapped. The
snapshotting feature is supported only on NTFS volumes. The snapshotting
software does not support other file system types.

300 MB or more of free disk space on the volume to be snapped. This


requirement is very strict. Snapshots fail with less free space.

Correct firewall configuration. If firewall software is enabled on a client and


you enable VSS when you perform backups, the backup might fail at the
Make snapshots step. The message PureDisk writes is vss_cmd_tool
unexpectedly terminated with exit status 6007. This condition
arises when the firewall blocks the PureDisk VSS application
vss_cmd_tool.exe. Make sure that client firewalls do not block
vss_cmd_tool.exe.

To ensure that you have all the latest VSS updates or to verify your VSS
binaries, visit the following Web site:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/833167

To download updates, visit the following Web site:


http://www.windowsupdate.com

The preceding requirements are Microsoft Shadow Copy requirements. VSS


enforces these requirements. No workarounds exist for these requirements. If
clients do not meet these requirements, VSS returns the following message:
VSS_E_INSUFFICIENT_STORAGE.
By default, the Windows agent install process installs a copy of the Symantec
Veritas Frozen Image (VxFI) software. Because VxFI is a required service for
VSS, do not disable the VxFI package installation when you install the PureDisk
agent on Windows agents.

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78 Installation prerequisites
Configuring backups and restores of network shared drives or UNC paths on Windows platforms

Enabling snapshotting on Windows 2000 clients


PureDisk uses Symantecs Volume Snapshot Provider (VSP) technology to back
up open files on Windows 2000 clients. The snapshotting software requires that
there be one local NTFS volume on the target system being snapped. The
snapshotting feature is supported only on NTFS volumes. The snapshotting
software does not support other file system types.
For general information about VSP, see the NetBackup Administrators Guide,
Volume 1.
For information about how to use VSP to back up files with PureDisk, see the
PureDisk Administrators Guide.

Configuring backups and restores of network


shared drives or UNC paths on Windows platforms
If you plan to use PureDisk to backup a network shared drive or UNC paths on
Windows platforms, you must first perform the following procedure:
Configuring the PureDisk agent to run under the Microsoft Windows Backup
Operator group on page 78.

Configuring the PureDisk agent to run under the Microsoft Windows


Backup Operator group
By default on Windows platforms, the PureDisk client agent runs under
LocalSystem. The following procedures configure users to run under Backup
Operator and change the PureDisk agent to run under Backup Operator.
When you run backups under Backup Operator, PureDisk sets the
permissions it needs for the agent to run and to read all of the ACL settings. For
security purposes, the change also limits the user permissions that are allowed.
Perform all of the following procedures to configure PureDisk users to run
under Backup Operator:

To add users to the backup operator group on page 79

To add the Manage auditing and security log rights for users who are
added to the Backup Operator group on page 79

To grant write permissions to users who are added to the Backup Operator
group on page 80

To change the PureDisk service to run under the Backup Operator group
for each user on page 81

Installation prerequisites
Configuring backups and restores of network shared drives or UNC paths on Windows platforms

Note: These procedures apply to the Windows XP operating system, but are
similar on other Windows platforms. For the specific procedures that apply to
Windows 2003 platforms or Windows 2000 platforms, see your Microsoft
documentation.
To add users to the backup operator group
1

Set up user accounts.

Right-click My Computer and choose Manage.

Click Local Users and Groups.

Double-click Groups to open the folder.

Right-click Backup Operators.

Choose Add to Group .

Click Add .

Specify a user name under which the pdagent service can run.
To browse for a user name, use the following procedure:

Click Locations.

Select the domain for the user name you want to add.

Click Advanced... .

Click Find Now.

Select a user name from the list.


Remember this name. You need it again in the following procedures:

To add the Manage auditing and security log rights for users who
are added to the Backup Operator group on page 79

To grant write permissions to users who are added to the Backup


Operator group on page 80

To change the PureDisk service to run under the Backup Operator


group for each user on page 81

Click OK.

Click OK.

10 Click OK.
To add the Manage auditing and security log rights for users who are added
to the Backup Operator group
1

Click Start.

Click Control Panel.

79

80 Installation prerequisites
Configuring backups and restores of network shared drives or UNC paths on Windows platforms

Double click Administrative Tools.

Double click Local Security Policy.

Click Security Settings > Local Policies > User Rights Assignment.

Double click Manage auditing and security log.

Click Add User or Group.

Specify the user name under which the pdagent service can run.
To browse for a user name, use the following procedure:

Click Locations.

Select the domain for the user name you want to add.

Click OK.

Click Advanced... .

Click Find Now.

Select a user name from the list.


Select the name you specified in step 8 on page 79.

Click OK.

Click OK.

10 Click OK.
11 Close the Local Security Settings window.
To grant write permissions to users who are added to the Backup Operator
group
1

Ensure that the user account has write access to the agents working
directory.
This location can vary depending on where PureDisk is installed.

Open a Windows Explorer window.


Tip: One way is to right-click Start and choose Explore.

Right-click Program Files in the directory where the PureDisk agent is


installed and select Sharing and Security. The default installation directory
is C:\Program Files.

Click the Security tab.

Click Add.

Specify a user name under which the pdagent service can run.
To browse for a user name, use the following procedure:

Click Locations.

Installation prerequisites
Configuring backups and restores of a NetApp filer on Windows platforms

Select the domain for the user name you want to add.

Click OK.

Click Advanced... .

Click Find Now.

Select a user name from the list.


Select the name you specified in step 8 on page 79.

Click OK.

Click OK.

In the box titled Group or user names, click on the user you added.

In the box titled Permissions for user_name, click in the Write box in the
Allow column.
Verify that a check mark appears in the box.

10 Click OK.
To change the PureDisk service to run under the Backup Operator group for
each user
1

Click Start > Run.

At the Open: prompt, type services.msc.

Right-click Veritas NetBackup PureDisk Client Agent and select Properties


on the pull-down menu.

Click the Log On tab.

Select This Account.

Specify the name of the user you added in step 8 on page 79.
Either type the domain name for the user name or click Browse and follow
the browse prompts.

Type and retype your password.

Click OK when this tab is complete.

Click Restart to restart the PureDisk client service.

Configuring backups and restores of a NetApp filer


on Windows platforms
If you want to backup a NetApp filer using UNC Paths in PureDisk, all of the
following prerequisites must be met:

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82 Installation prerequisites
Upgrade requirements

If the data to be backed up resides in a volume or Qtree on the NetApp filer,


it must be shared using CIFS on the filer and be visible to the windows
client, as a UNC path (Universal Naming Convention in the format
\\server_name\share_name ).

When you configure a volume or Qtree on a NetApp filer, the following


security styles are available:

UNIX

Mixed

NTFS
In order to successfully perform backups and restores of the NetApp Filer
on a Windows client, the security style on the volume or Qtree should be
configuured as Mixed or NTFS.
If the configured security style at backup is UNIX and the restore style is
UNIX or Mixed, then errors can occur when PureDisk restores the files.
If the configured security style at restore is UNIX, errors occur when
PureDisk restores each file.

The PureDisk client service must be logged in as an account that is part of


the Backup Operators group and has access to the NetApp CIFS share to
be backed up. The account should allow the PureDisk client to view the
volume or Qtree on the NetApp filer where the backup or restore is to be
performed.
The PureDisk client service must not be logged in as the local system
account. If you attempt to backup or restore files from a NetApp filer and
the service is logged in as the local system account, the backup or restore
fails.
In Microsoft Windows properly configure the PureDisk client service. See
Configuring the PureDisk agent to run under the Microsoft Windows
Backup Operator group on page 78 for this procedure.

For snapshot based backups of a NetApp filer, the PureDisk client must have
access to each NetApp filer on which a snapshot is to be created. To set up
this authorization, use the following PureDisk client command:

C:\Program Files\bin\pdusercfg --netapp=add --hostname=netapp_filer_host_name


--username=user_id --password=password

Upgrade requirements
The PureDisk Storage Pool Installation Guide includes information about how to
upgrade a PureDisk storage pool to PureDisk 6.5. This information includes
upgrade requirements.

Chapter

Known problems and


product limitations
This chapter includes the following topics:

Known problems on page 83

Product limitations on page 93

Known problems
The following sections summarize the problems that are known to exist in the
PureDisk 6.5 software.

Documentation might be updated after the release


Symantec updates the PureDisk documentation on an as-needed basis. The most
recently updated documentation for this release is available at the following
Web site:
http://www.symantec.com/business/support/documentation.jsp?pid=
52672

Symantec recommends that you examine this Web site before you install
PureDisk and perform backups.

Files migrated using Remote Storage Service are retrieved


Some server editions of Windows have a feature called Remote Storage Service.
This service allows files to be migrated automatically from disk to remote
storage media like tape. On the disk, a placeholder replaces these migrated files.
The PureDisk agent does not recognize these files as being migrated. During a
backup, the agent reads the content in the files. This read forces the Remote
Storage Service to retrieve the files from remote storage and restore them.

84 Known problems and product limitations


Known problems

PureDisk should back up the placeholder instead of the actual file to which the
placeholder refers.

Bandwidth limitation
Testing has shown that backup jobs might fail when the bandwidth limit is set to
a value less than 9 KB per second. This problem occurs on a limited number of
systems and in a limited number of cases.

Agent updates abort on clients due to inadequate permissions


On Windows clients, agent update jobs can fail if the user under which the
PureDisk agent service runs has been changed after the install. The problem
occurs if the PureDisk agent service is configured to run under a user account
with the following attributes:

It is part of the Backup Operators group

It is not a local system account nor an administrator account.

Even if this user is given write access to the C:\Program Files directory,
agent update jobs for this agent fail.

Exporting replicated data selections through the common internet


file system (CIFS) results in incorrect access rights
You can use the CIFS interface to export a data selection that contains data that
was replicated from another storage pool. PureDisk treats such a data selection
as it would treat a data selection without replicated data. However, the resulting
access rights on the exported data are set incorrectly. They do not match the
original access rights.

Messages are cryptic


In several instances, user actions can cause PureDisk to generate some messages
that are difficult to understand. The following sections describe some specific
conditions under which a PureDisk user might see such messages

Problems deleting replicated agents while data selections still in use


When PureDisk runs a replication policy for the first time, it can create
replicated agents at the remote storage pool. The problem occurs at the remote
storage pool for each agent of the source storage pool.
You can delete a replicated agent on the remote storage pool but continue to use
the replication policy. If you do, the next time the policy runs, PureDisk creates a

Known problems and product limitations


Known problems

new replicated agent for every replicated data selection on the source agent.
This behavior is erroneous but does not lead to data loss.
To avoid witnessing this behavior, do not delete a replicated agent that is still in
use. The replicated agent is in use if any policies replicate data to it.

PureDisk reserved user IDs collide with some imported users


PureDisk reserves some user IDs and group IDs for internal use. You cannot
import an ID from an external directory service that is identical to an ID that is
reserved for use by PureDisk. The procedure in this section helps you to identify
external directory IDs that collide with PureDisk IDs. Perform this procedure
before you enable TLS or link PureDisk to the external directory service.
The reserved IDs are as follows:

The IDs for the internal PureDisk users.

The IDs for the PureDisk agents.

To identify users and groups in your directory service that duplicate reserved
PureDisk IDs
1

Log into the storage pool authority as root and check for login IDs that are
reserved for PureDisks internal use.
PureDisk has a limited list of agent ID accounts for its own internal use.
None of the external directory service user IDs that you import can be the
same as one of these internal PureDisk agent IDs. Run the following
command on your PureDisk storage pool authority to obtain the list of
internal user IDs that PureDisk reserves for its own use:

# /usr/bin/ldapsearch -x -D cn=admin,dc=puredisk -w password -b ou=users,dc=puredisk \


"(objectClass=PurediskUser)" | grep uid
For password, specify the password for PureDisks internal OpenLDAP

administrator account. The topology wizard prompts you to define this


password when you configure your storage pool.
For example:
# /usr/bin/ldapsearch -x -D cn=admin,dc=puredisk -w root -b ou=users,dc=puredisk \
"(objectClass=PurediskUser)" | grep uid

This command returns the following list of reserved user IDs:


uid: root
uid: agent_23000000
uid: agent_2
uid: userA
uid: userB
uid: userC
uid: userD

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86 Known problems and product limitations


Known problems

Examine the output from the ldapsearch(1) command you used in step 1
on page 85 for user accounts with invalid characters.
If a user account contains invalid characters, you cannot import that user
account into PureDisks internal OpenLDAP directory service. The list of
invalid characters is as follows: (, ), <, and >.

Use of PureDisk reserved patterns causes unexpected results


Internally, PureDisk uses the patterns in the following format to store data
selections rules and file names:
[0xhh]
In the preceding pattern, hh is a two-digit hexadecimal number. For example,
02, a3, FF.
Consequently, you cannot use these patterns in data selection rules, in file
names, or in any directory names that you specify in search terms. Use of the
patterns generates unexpected results. For example, data selection rules might
not match the desired file name or directory names, and searches might not
return the expected files.

I18N problems
PureDisk 6.5 offers better support for international characters than was present
in earlier releases. PureDisk fully supports the Windows file systems. It fully
supports all Linux and UNIX variants that use either a UTF8 locale or the C
locale.

Double-byte characters do not display properly


PureDisk lets you view backed up files from a browser and download them to
restore. When you perform this operation from Internet Explorer and use the
Save As ... dialog, the browser displays the file name as a garbled characters. To
remedy this problem, rename the file. This problem does not occur in alternate
browsers such as Firefox.

Files downloaded through Web UI can exhibit problems with


international characters
The Find Files dialog box lets you download a file from the search results list.
When you click a download link in Internet Explorer, the Save as ... dialog can
suggest an abnormal file name instead of the expected name. This error
occurred only in a very few specific cases that involved both of the following:

The file name contained international characters.

Known problems and product limitations


Known problems

The file name started with Copy of, which is the case when you create a copy
of a file through Windows Explorer.

The problem only occured with Internet Explorer 6, not with the Firefox
browser.
As a workaround, you can edit the file name in the Save as ... dialog before
saving the file.

Unicode characters that are outside of unicode plane zero


(0000 - FFFF) can cause problems with backups and restores
You cannot back up files and directories that use unicode characters with a
value > 0x10000. For example, unicode planes 1-16 are not supported. Backups
fail when PureDisk encounters such a character.
In the PureDisk 6.5 release, this problem exists. To resolve this problem, contact
Symantec technical technical support to obtain an EEB.

Cannot restore from a localized MacOSX path


You cannot restore a Mac OSX directory with a localized name. That is, directory
restores fail if the directory name contains international characters. The restore
fails if, in the restore dialog, you have explicitly selected the localized directory
for restore.
This defect does not apply to directory names that do not contain international
characters. As a workaround, you can restore from the root directory or from a
nonlocalized higher-level directory.

PureDisk uses month/day/year format in log files


The agent log files always use the month/day/year format. This format is not
internationalized.

Erroneous errors in /Storage/log after installation


During installation, PureDisk might write error message to the files in
/Storage/log. These writes occur because not all components are available at
the same time during the installation process. These errors do not indicate any
real problem and can therefore be ignored.

Need to commit changes in YaST if subsequent changes could


conflict
When you edit a disk group through the YaST interface, YaST queues the
changes you have made and does not implement them until you commit the

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88 Known problems and product limitations


Known problems

changes. For this reason, an error for an invalid change is often only displayed
at implementation time, not while you are making the change.
For example, an error occurs after the following sequence of events:

You create a disk group with one disk and commit this change.

You add a second disk to the group, remove the first disk, then commit these
changes.

You could work around this behavior if you complete these steps instead:

You create a disk group with one disk and commit this change.

You add a second disk to the group and commit this change.

You remove the first disk and commit this change.

Another way to work around the error is to first delete the disk group, then
create a new one with only the second disk.

Restoring UNC files at the client level


When restoring files at the client level and selecting All Files and Folders in the
Restore Files dialog, the restore of files backed up by using UNC Paths data
selections will fail.
To restore files from UNC Paths data selections you can use the Find Files
feature or select the individual data selections in the Restore Files dialog.

Null pointer exceptions in GUI during restore dialogs


You might observe occasional random null pointer issues that leave some
specific stack traces in the logs. A known Sun Microsystems JRE 1.5 problem
causes this.

Upgrading AIX 5.3 agents from PureDisk 6.2 to 6.5 fails


An agent upgrade of PureDisk from level 6.2 (plus any EEBs) or level 6.2.1 (plus
any EEBs) to 6.5 does not complete if the AIX agent is running at patch level
5300-5. This problem does not occur on earlier AIX patch levels.
The workaround for this problem is to perform the upgrade directly from the
client machine. For more information, see the PureDisk Client Installation
Guide.

Known problems and product limitations


Known problems

Upgrading some Linux or Solaris agents fails


If you install a Linux or Solaris agent in a location other than the default
location and provide a path name containing spaces, the agent upgrade job fails
for the following upgrades:

From PureDisk 6.2 + EEBs to 6.5

From PureDisk 6.2.1 + EEBs to 6.5

The workaround for this problem is to perform the upgrade directly from the
client machine. For more information, see the PureDisk Client Installation
Guide.

Need to enable file system browsing manually on some Microsoft


Windows XP 32 bit clients
On a limited number of Microsoft Windows XP 32 bit clients, the PureDisk client
installer does not have the Allow file system browsing check box selected as the
default.

Silent install for Microsoft Windows x64 installs files in


Program Files (x86) directory instead of Program Files
When you perform a silent (unattended) install of a Windows agent on a
Windows 64-bit client, the installer writes the agent to the
Program Files (x86) directory rather than to the default directory of
Program Files.

Cannot install regular backup and restore agent on a Windows media


server after removing a PDDO agent
After you remove a PDDO agent from a Windows media server, you might not be
able to install a regular PureDisk backup and restore agent on that same media
server.
The PDDO agent removal scripts can, under certain circumstances, fail to delete
product files. This incomplete removal can cause the install script to present the
Install PureDisk Deduplication Option checkbox as selected and grayed out. To
remedy the problem, cancel the installation and perform the following
procedure.
To install a backup and restore agent after you remove a PDDO agent
1

Cancel the installation of the regular backup and restore agent.

Reboot the Windows media server.

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90 Known problems and product limitations


Known problems

Examine the content of the NetBackup OST plug-in directory, which is


\install_path\bin\ost-plugins.
For install_path, specify the NetBackup product files directory.

(Conditional) Remove file libstspipd.dll.


Perform this step if file libstspipd.dll resides in the product files
directory.

Restart the PureDisk agent install program.

Time-based data removal resets a data selection


After a time-based data removal policy has run on a data selection, the data
selection state is always reset. At the next backup, the agent detects that the
data selection is reset and retrieves the data selection state from the metabase
instead of using the local snapshot. This can lead to some backup performance
degradation especially if you have a removal policy that runs quite frequently
and/or on a large number of data selections, the performance impact could be
considerable.

Update client routing tables manually after interrupted content


router rerouting job
If a client is disconnected from a storage pool for a long time during a content
router rerouting job, the consequences are as follows:

The routing tables on the clients are not updated.

Restores to the clients can fail.

Consider the following series of events:

Your storage pool contains a storage pool authority, one content router, and
some clients. The storage pool contains some backup data.

You add a new content router to this storage pool and initiate a content
router rerouting job.

The storage pool loses its connection to one or more clients before the
rerouting job completes. If the connection is lost for a long time, the
rerouting job cannot update the client-side routing tables. After these
clients reconnect, backups from these clients are successful. However,
restores to this client fail because the client routing tables are not updated.

To resolve this problem, use one of the following methods to update the client
routing tables manually:

Known problems and product limitations


Known problems

Restart the PureDisk agent on the client. For information about how to stop
and restart the PureDisk agent on a client, see the PureDisk Client
Installation Guide.

In the Web UI, perform the following steps:

Click the Topology tab.

In the middle pane, select the storage pool.

In the left pane, click Push Routing Tables.

System policy for Maintenance job hangs when PDDO is enabled


The default settings for the System policy for Maintenance cause the
maintenance job to hang in the presence of a PDDO agent. To work around this
problem, perform one of the following procedures.
To let the job time out on its own

Ignore the job and let PureDisks internal watchdog terminate the job.

To terminate the job manually


1

Click the Workflows tab.

In the middle pane, click Maintenance.

In the right pane, select the Maintenance job.

Click Terminate gracefully or Terminate immediately.

To edit the System policy for Maintenance


1

Click the Workflows tab.

In the middle pane, click Maintenance.

Select the System policy for Maintenance.

In the left pane, click Edit Policy.

Click the Parameters tab.

Clear the Delete old tmp Files checkbox.

Click Save.

Note: If you choose to edit the System policy for Maintenance, remember to
re-edit this policy periodically and check the Delete old tmp Files checkbox.
When this box is checked, the maintenance policy cleans up the temporary files
that accumulate on all systems.

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92 Known problems and product limitations


Known problems

Agent restart required for file browsing change


You can rerun the UNIX or Linux client installer to change your current file
browsing setting. After the change, you must stop and restart the agent.
To stop the pdagent process on UNIX and Linux clients

Enter the following commands to stop the pdagent process:


# cd /install_path/pdag/share/platform/etc
# sh service.sh stop

For install_path, specify the path in which the agent is installed. The
default is /opt.
For platform, specify one of the following: AIX, Darwin, HP-UX, Linux,
SunOS. Use Darwin for MAC OS.
To start the pdagent process on UNIX and Linux clients

Enter the following commands to start the pdagent process:


# cd /install_path/pdag/share/platform/etc
# sh service.sh start

For install_path, specify the path in which the agent is installed. The
default is /opt.
For platform, specify one of the following: AIX, Darwin, HP-UX, Linux,
SunOS. Use Darwin for MAC OS.

Need to restart UNIX, Linux, or MacOS agent installation if invalid


agent name characters are supplied
The PureDisk agent installer issues the following message and prompt if an
agent name contains invalid characters:
WARNING: The agent name you specified contains characters not valid for exporting to
NetBackup. If you plan to use that functionality we recommend a NetBackup / DNS
compatible name; otherwise, PureDisk will modify the name during export. See
documentation for details.
=> Would you like to change the PureDisk agent name? [y,n] y

The installer issues the preceding warning under the following circumstances:

You performed an attended (interactive) installation of a UNIX, Linux, or


MacOS PureDisk agent.

The agent name you specified on the command line contains characters that
are not allowed in the agent name.

The agent name that the installer detects contains characters that are not
allowed in the agent name.

To remedy this, perform the following procedure.

Known problems and product limitations


Product limitations

To specify a valid agent name


1

Exit the agent installer.

Invoke the installer again.

Specify the agent name with the --hostname=agent_name parameter


on the command line.
For information about supported characters in the agent name, see the
PureDisk Client Installation Guide.

Product limitations
The following are PureDisk limitations.

Data selections limited to 16 million files


When you create a data selection, you cannot include more than 16 million files.
If a data selection contains more than 16 million files, PureDisk generates a
critical warning event and stops the backup. Symantec recommends that you
limit the number of files in a data selection to 8 million.
The 16 million file limit and the 8 million file recommendation refer to the
number of files that are online in the file system you want to back up plus the
number of file versions that you want to retain on storage.
For more information about data selection limits, see the following section:

Planning the number of backup jobs per client on page 38

CIFS can be installed only on the storage pool authority


You can configure CIFS through the storage pool authority Web UI. However,
you must install CIFS on the host where the storage pool authority is installed.
This requirement exists because the Web UI must be able to read the CIFS
configuration files.

VMFS volumes not supported


PureDisk cannot back up VMFS volumes from the VMware ESX Server
management console. You can successfully install the PureDisk agent on the
management console, but backups that include VMFS volumes fail.

Data lock password blocks exports to NetBackup


If a data lock password is enabled on a client, that client cannot export data to
NetBackup. The data lock prevents an administrator or a service provider from

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94 Known problems and product limitations


Product limitations

accessing the data in the storage pool. The administrator on the client system
can remove the data lock password if it is necessary to export that clients data
to NetBackup.

File size limitation


PureDisk supports a theoretical maximum file size of 8 petabytes.

Replicated PureDisk SPAR data cannot be exported to NetBackup


You can export replicated Files and Folders data selections from a source
storage pool to a target storage pool. PureDisk does not export other data
selection types to NetBackup.
SPAR backups use Files and Folders data selections, but PureDisk does not
export SPAR backups to NetBackup.

Metabase engine limitations


The metabase engine has the following limitations:

In a one-node, all-in-one storage pool, the metabase engine can hold a


maximum of 100 million records. One record corresponds to one file
version.

In a multinode storage pool with a metabase engine installed alone on one of


the individual nodes, the metabase engine can hold a maximum of 140
million records. One record corresponds to one file version.

I18N limitations
Non-UTF8 encoding display errors
If a Linux or UNIX clients file system is not configured with UTF8 encoding or
C-locale encoding, PureDisk still provides complete backup and restore support.
However, for these unsupported locales, the PureDisk Web UI displays the
names of files and directories backed up from this client as byte sequences. If
you restore files or directories to the original client, the problem affects only the
Web UI and does not affect how PureDisk restores these files and directories.

Installation of PureDisk client in a localized MacOS, UNIX, or


Windows directory results in unfunctioning client
You can install a PureDisk client into a localized directory, but the client does
not function properly.

Known problems and product limitations


Product limitations

Localized user passwords and data lock passwords not


supported
You cannot specify localized user passwords or data lock passwords. For more
information, see the PureDisk Client Installation Guide.

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96 Known problems and product limitations


Product limitations

Appendix

Script-based failover
The PureDisk 6.2 release introduced a script-based failover capability. It let you
run scripts that failed over a content router or a metabase engine to a spare node
in your storage pool. The current PureDisk release supports script-based
failover, but rather than implement script-based failover, Symantec
recommends that you enable highly available PureDisk if possible. Highly
available PureDisk supports an automatic failover capability for any services on
any node.
Note: In the PureDisk documentation, this capability is called script-based
failover or failover. You use scripts to move a service from a failing node to a
spare node. This capability differs from high availability in that a highly
available service group fails over automatically.
Certain storage pools cannot implement highly available PureDisk. Such storage
pools include the following characteristics:

Storage pools that use iSCSI disks. To implement high availability, PureDisk
requires that you install a VxFS file system on all nodes. The VxFS file
system does not support iSCSI disks. If you use iSCSI disks, you need to
install the XFS file system on those disks.

Storage pools that you upgraded from a PureDisk 6.2.x release. You cannot
enable highly available PureDisk on a PureDisk 6.5 storage pool that you
upgraded from PureDisk 6.2.x. High availability requires the VxFS file
system. You cannot migrate your data from the XFS file system that you
used in PureDisk 6.2.x to the VxFS file system.

This section explains how to implement script-based failover.


Note: If you configure a storage pool for high availability, you cannot also use
the script-based failover capability in that storage pool. These two features are
incompatible.

98 Script-based failover
Example configurations for script-based failover

Example configurations for script-based failover


You can enable script-based failover for the content router nodes and the
metabase engine nodes that you configured as stand-alone services on their own
nodes. If you configure a content router or a metabase engine on a node along
with additional services, you cannot failover the node. The content router and
metabase engine services must be on their own exclusive nodes.
The following sections contain example configurations.

Example 1 - A two-node configuration using script-based failover


This example storage pool includes two PureDisk nodes. To improve storage
pool performance, the storage pool authority and metabase services are
installed on the first node. The separate content router node can store
approximately 4 TB of optimized file content.
Node 1 has the following services:

Storage pool authority with the CIFS interface

Metabase server

Metabase engine

Node 2 has the following service:

Content router

If you add a spare node to this storage pool, you can perform a script-based
failover of the content router node.

Example 2 - A three-node configuration using script-based failover


This example storage pool includes three PureDisk nodes. When you configure
two content routers on different nodes, you provide up to 8 TB of space to store
optimized file content.
Node 1 has the following services:

Storage pool authority with the CIFS interface

Metabase server

Metabase engine

Node 2 has the following service:

Content router

Node 3 has the following service:

Content router

Script-based failover
Example configurations for script-based failover

If you add a spare node to this storage pool, you can perform a script-based
failover of either of the two content router nodes.

Example 3 - A five-node configuration using script-based failover


This example storage pool includes five PureDisk nodes. Like the storage pool in
example 3, the two content routers in this storage pool can accommodate up to 8
TB of file content. This storage pool includes a spare node for failover.
Each metabase engine can store the metadata of approximately 100 million file
and version records that you want to retain. When you configure an additional
metabase engine, the capacity increases. Thus, the expanded system can now
store approximately 200 million files, including the revisions of these files.
You can continue to add content router nodes and metabase nodes. When you
add a content router, you increase the optimized file storage capacity. When you
add a metabase engine, you increase the number of files that the metabase can
maintain.
Node 1 has the following services:

Storage pool authority with the CIFS interface

Metabase server

Metabase engine

Node 2 has the following service:

Content router

Node 3 has the following service:

Content router

Node 4 has the following service:

Metabase engine

Node 5 has the following service:

Spare node. You can perform a script-based failover for either the content
router node or the stand-alone metabase engine node to this spare node.

You can continue to add the following:

Content router nodes to increase the optimized file storage capacity

Metabase engine nodes to increase the number of files that can be


maintained in the metabase

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100 Script-based failover


Script-based failover requirements

Script-based failover requirements


PureDisk supports a script-based failover capability for a node that has only a
metabase engine service or only a content router.
The script-based failover procedure requires that the metabase engine or
content router each be installed on a node all by itself. In addition, a failover
requires you to configure one or more spare, unused nodes. You can failover the
metabase engine node or the content router node to that spare node. When you
perform a failover, you move the processing responsibilities of a failing
metabase engine or a content router to the spare node.

General requirements for script-base failover


If you want to be able to failover a PureDisk service, make sure to design your
PureDisk environment to meet the requirements in this section. The general
requirements are as follows:

Configure your metabase engine services and your content router services
as stand-alone services on their own nodes. If you want to be able to failover
a service, it must be the only service on a node. You cannot failover a node if
it hosts more than one service.

The memory size and processing speed requirements for failover-enabled


content router and metabase engine nodes are the same as other nodes. The
spare nodes must meet also the requirements for a metabase engine node or
for a content router node.
For more information about these hardware requirements, see the
following:
Requirements for a content router node on page 35
Requirements for a metabase engine node on page 36

Attach disks on an external network. Use a storage area network (SAN),


shared storage, or an iSCSI network. For a failover to succeed, the primary
node and the spare node must both be able to access the disk that is used for
/Storage. The key failover principal is that you store all the metadata and
the file data on commonly accessible storage. When you run the failover
scripts, you move the PureDisk data processing responsibility from one
server to another without having to reconfigure disks. If a node uses
internal disks for /Storage, you cannot fail that node over.

Configure the nodes to have identical device paths from the nodes to the
disks used for /Storage. The primary nodes and the spare nodes must
access the /Storage partition in the same way. Do not mount /Storage on
the spare nodes disk.

Script-based failover
Script-based failover requirements

For example, assume that you want to configure a three-node storage pool.
Node_2 is a content router node, and Node_3 is a spare node for the content
router to use in case of a failover. Node_1 hosts the storage pool authority
and all the other services. For example, the device paths to /Storage for
both Node_2 and Node_3 can be /dev/sda3.

When you upgrade PDOS software on any node, make sure that you upgrade
the spare nodes. The failover scripts verify that each node is running the
same PDOS level.

The failover feature requires you to specify an IP address for the node
hardware and a virtual IP address (VIP) for the PureDisk service. Symantec
supports failover for the service if both the IP and the VIP are defined on the
same NIC.
The term virtual has a different meaning for script-based failover than it
has for highly available PureDisk. For more information about terminology,
see the following section:
Terminology on page 53

Configuration example for script-based failover


Figure A-1 on page 102 shows an example PureDisk environment that supports
failover. In the figure, note the following:

Node_5 is a spare node. The spare node meets the hardware requirements
for a metabase engine and for a content router. In this storage pool, you can
failover either type of service to the spare node.

Neither of the services on Node_2 can failover. To be a failover candidate, a


metabase engine service or a content router service must reside on its own
exclusive, stand-alone node. If a node hosts two or more services, you
cannot failover any of the services.

Nodes 3, 4, and 5 are all attached to the SAN. Nodes 1 and 2 are not attached
to the SAN because you cannot failover the services on nodes 1 and 2. Only a
primary node that can be failed over and a spare node need to be attached to
the SAN.

The metabase engine on Node_4 can failover to the spare on Node_5.

The content router on Node_3 can failover to the spare on Node_5.

101

102 Script-based failover


Script-based failover requirements

Figure A-1

Example environment for script-based failover

Node_4

Node_5

Metabase engine

SAN

Spare

Node_3
Content router
Disk
storage

Node_1
Storage pool authority
Metabase server

Node_2
Content router
Metabase engine

Client

Client
Client
Client

Client

You might have a PureDisk storage pool that does not meet these requirements,
but you still want to be able to use the failover feature. In this case, you might be
able to modify your storage pool. For information about how to modify a storage
pool to use failover, see the PureDisk Administrators Guide.

Index

A
all-in-one node configuration
example 28
requirements 34
application agent requirements 45

B
browsers
requirements 45
supported 45

C
capacity planning
clusters 55
content router 41
metabase engine 39
number of clients 37
service databases 42
storage pool 37
CIFS interface 15
clients
backup and restore client platforms 44
capacity planning 37
PDDO client platforms 45
requirements 43
clustering
configuration examples 52
planning 55
PureDisk software requirements 50
requirements 48
terminology 53
VCS software requirements 50
configuration
overview 16
unsupported capabilities 56
configuration examples
all-in-one node 28
cluster configurations 52
four-node 29
three-node 29

two-node 29
connectivity 65
content router
capacity planning 41
role 15
content router node requirements 35

D
data repository
See storage pool
data selection 13
documentation updates 11

E
enabling on Windows clients 77
examples
cluster configurations 52
storage pool configuration 28

F
fingerprint overview 13
four-node configuration example 29

H
hardware compatibility
clients 43
PDOS 31
hardware requirements
all-in-one node 34
clients 43
content router node 35
general 32
metabase engine node 36
power supply (UPS) 33
processors 32
removable media 33
high availability
See clustering

104 Index

I
imitations
See known problems
installation requirements 27

J
Java administration console requirements 49

K
known problems 83

L
license key requirements 57
Linux hardware compatibility 31

M
metabase engine
capacity planning 39
requirements 36
role 14
metabase server role 14
metadata overview 13

N
NetBackup export engine overview 15
network card (NIC) requirements 33
nodes
configuration examples 29
overview 16

O
overview
configuration 16
data selection 13
fingerprint 13
metadata 13
product 11
product components 13
services 13
single instance store 13
storage pool 13

P
PDDO client platforms 45

PDOS
hardware compatibility 31
Storage Foundation and VCS integration 22
personal firewalls on clients 65
ports 65
power supply (UPS) requirements 33
processor requirements 32
product components
overview 13

R
removable media requirements 33
repository
See storage pool
requirements
all-in-one node 34
application agents 45
browsers 45
clients 43
clustering 48, 50
content router node 35
hardware 32
installation 27
Java administration console 49
license key 57
metabase engine 36
Storage Foundation 46
storage pool 48
VCS 50

S
server installation requirements 28
service database capacity planning 42
single instance store overview 13
snapshotting
on Windows 2000 clients 78
on Windows 2003/XP clients 77
Storage Foundation
PDOS integration 22
requirements 46
storage pool
capacity planning 37
major services 13
overview 13
requirements 48
storage pool authority 14
SUSE Linux hardware compatibility 31

Index

T
three-node configuration example 29
two-node configuration example 29

U
uninterruptible power supply (UPS)
requirements 33
unsupported configurations 56
updates to documentation 11

V
VCS
PDOS integration 22
requirements 50
VSP on Windows clients 78
VSS on Windows clients 77

W
Web browsers supported 45
Windows clients
enabling VSP 78
enabling VSS 77

105

106 Index