Install an outside phone

Tips for pool safety at home
Individual alarms can be

purchased for doors and windows with pool access.
Home alarms can alert when

or keep a cordless phone poolside. Leaving children alone to answer the phone puts them at risk.

doors or windows are opened.
The pool should be visible All entryway locks

from all windows. Do not obscure view with plants.

should be 54 inches high. Doors should self-close and self-latch.
A ring buoy with a nylon rope can be

thrown to someone in distress.
Keep barriers and fences

clear of objects, structures and toys that children could use to climb on to gain access to the pool.

A shepherd’s hook

Supervision, swimming lessons and securing your pool are keys to averting pool-related drownings
Graphic by Cindy Jones-Hulfachor/Sun Sentinel

on a 16-foot-pole is very important in households where an adult can’t swim.

A child could Wheeled toys, such as

use a chair to climb over a fence.
Self-closing gate

a tricycle or baby walker, in the pool area can lead to children falling in.

Toys near or in the pool attract

A four-foot high fence is

recommended.

Child safety fencing

children to the pool’s edge, increasing the risk of falling in.

is one way to protect a new pool. Fence construction is available in a variety of materials including fiberglass and aluminum. There also are several qualities of mesh netting.

Inflatable toys and arm bands

should not be relied upon as safety devices.

Anti-vortex drain cover

Replace old covers. New covers have holes that circle the cover to help prevent tangled hair and suction-related injuries.

Check drain covers to make

Pool alarms

sure they aren’t broken and screws aren’t missing.

that monitor wave activity. An indoor, wireless remote device can sound when there is activity. Other types of alarms measure subsurface pressure waves or monitor underwater activity with lasers.
Safety netting

Hooks attach to the anchors at the pool’s edge.

has hooks that attach and tighten.

Solar covers

Safety rules for home pools
■ Make sure family and visitors understand pool rules. ■ No running or screaming. Loud voices are for emergency situations only. ■ Always supervise children swimming. ■ If diving is permitted, tell swimmers which area of the pool is safe for diving. ■ Let swimmers know rules for pool toys, which may be different by age.

are not safety covers; they should be removed from the pool before use. People can become entangled in the covers, and they hamper rescue.
S O U R C E S : T H E A S S O C I AT I O N O F P O O L & S PA P R O F E S S I O N A L S ; A M E R I C A N R E D C R O S S ; C A R L O S TA N O N , P I N C H A P E N N Y; S T E V E S C H AT Z B E R G , B A B Y G UA R D ; L E S L I E ’ S P O O L S U P P L I E S ; A L L A M E R I C A N P O O L S A F E T Y F E N C E ; K I D S A F E P O O L N E T S ; PA L M B E AC H A N D B R OWA R D C O U N T I E S MEDICAL EXAMINER’S OFFICES; SUN-SENTINEL RESEARCH

Statistics on families and water-related activities
■ A 2009 American Red Cross telephone survey found that 87 percent of all households in the United States will participate in at least one water-related recreational activity during the summer. ■ A 2007 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study found that of all children ages 1 to 4 years old who died from an unintentional injury, almost 30 percent died from drowning. ■ More than one in five fatal drowning victims are children 14 and younger. For every child who dies from drowning, another four received emergency department care for nonfatal submersion injuries.

Teaching children how to swim is important if you plan to participate in recreational activities around water.
MCT

SOURCES: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, AMERICAN RED CROSS

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