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Next Generation Men

Sexual Health Curriculum

Jordan Helms, Ashley Feuchs, Elizabeth Hook, Natalie Taylor, and Sarah Wiatrek
Rollins School of Public Health | Emory University | Spring 2016

NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Table of Contents
Table of Contents.................................................................................................................................................................... 1
Curriculum Overview........................................................................................................................................................... 2
Needs Assessment ................................................................................................................................................................. 4
Theoretical Framework...................................................................................................................................................... 5
Lesson 1: Introduction & Ground Rules .................................................................................................................. 7
Lesson 1: Handouts and Evaluations ...................................................................................................................... 15
Lesson 2: Communication & Consent ..................................................................................................................... 24
Lesson 2: Handouts and Evaluations ...................................................................................................................... 34
Lesson 3: Teen Pregnancy Prevention .................................................................................................................. 39
Lesson 3: Handouts and Evaluations ...................................................................................................................... 47
Lesson 4: STI Prevention, Testing, and Condom Use .................................................................................... 60
Lesson 4: Handouts and Evaluations ...................................................................................................................... 74
Lesson 5: Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity ......................................................................................... 78
Lesson 5: Handouts and Evaluations ...................................................................................................................... 93
Lesson 6: Risk Reduction and Goal Setting ........................................................................................................ 97
Lesson 6: Handouts and Evaluations ................................................................................................................... 105

NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Curriculum Overview
Intended Audience, Location, and Format
Audience
The target population for this sexual health curriculum is male high school students
working with Next Generation Mens after school program. These students range in grade
level from 9th to 12th grade.

Location
The curriculum will be taught at the Atlanta high schools with whom NGM works, and will
be implemented by the high school teachers who serve as program facilitators.

Format
Each lesson within the curriculum will be taught as a 60-minute session designed for about
20 participants. A total of six sexual health sessions will be facilitated during the school
year.

Program Goals and Objectives


Goal
The goal of this curriculum is to provide Next Generation Men (NGM) students with the
knowledge and tools to make healthy sexual decisions.

Objectives
By the end of the sexual health curriculum, NGM students will be able to:
1. Recognize how sexual health goals fit within the larger framework of overall life
goals.
2. Demonstrate effective communication skills in negotiating safer sexual practices.
3. Identify methods of prevention for STIs and unwanted pregnancies.
4. Develop skills to acknowledge and respect gender identities and sexual orientations
for themselves and others.
5. Develop personal risk reduction strategies.

NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Scope and Sequence of Content


Because each lesson builds upon the previous lessons, it is suggested that lessons be
presented in sequential order. It is also advised that there be no more than one week in
between each lesson. The topics covered in each lesson include:
1) Introduction to the course and setting ground rules.
2) Pregnancy prevention and contraception.
3) STI prevention, testing, and condom use.
4) Communication of personal sexual expectations with partners.
5) Understanding and accepting diverse sexual and gender identities.
6) Creating personalized goal-setting and risk reduction strategies.

How to Use This Curriculum


The information provided in this curriculum is intended to allow facilitators with a
background in education to teach sexual health education group sessions. Each weekly
session contains the following sections:

Lesson overview, goals, and objectives


Lesson timeframe
Materials and instructor preparation
Review
Lesson content and activities
Conclusion
Post lesson

The overview, goals, and objectives provide a summary of what is to be covered and
gained from the lesson, followed by an estimated timeframe. Please be mindful that time
spent on activities may vary depending on attendance or length of discussion on a given
topic. The times listed are an approximation of the maximum amount of time that a
facilitator should focus on an activity without having to cut out any material. Should the
activities take more time than advised, the facilitator can reference the curriculum guide
and skip an activity that takes approximately the same amount of time as the group ran
over. A list of materials is provided as well as instructor preparation steps. It is highly
recommended that the facilitator read this box carefully prior to each lesson to properly
prepare for the lesson.
A weekly recap of the previous lessons material is included in the review to place each
sessions material within the context of the entire program. Although some lesson activities
require the facilitator to read scripts verbatim, the majority of the directions are intended
as guidelines for the facilitator to follow while leading group discussions. Note the goldencolored paper icon throughout the lessons which indicate when handouts need to be
distributed to students; these handouts can be found at the end of each corresponding
lesson. Lessons conclude with a facilitator debrief of the most essential ideas. Lastly, the
post-lesson section instructs facilitators on which evaluation form to complete.

NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Needs Assessment
Background
As of February 1, 2016 over 80% of states had passed legislation mandating that
students receive some form of sexual health or HIV education. Twenty states, including
Georgia, actually require instruction in both subjects (Guttmacher Institute, 2016). While
Georgia law mandates that schools have these sex education programs, the only required
topics are abstinence and the negative outcomes of pre-marital sex (Guttmacher Institute,
2016). A recent study of African American families reveals that the majority of parents
either do not feel comfortable discussing sexual health issues with their teens, or simply do
not have enough knowledge to facilitate such a conversation (Akers et al., 2010).
Furthermore, a 2010 survey of pediatricians revealed that about half discussed
contraception or STD prevention with their teen patients, and only 18% reported
addressing issues of sexual orientation (Henry-Reid LM et al., 2010).
Data indicates that the United States has the highest adolescent pregnancy and birth
rates of any developed country (Singh et al., 2010). African American pregnancy rates are
approximately double those for non-Hispanic whites (Guttmacher Institute, 2014). In a
2015 survey of nearly 10,000 urban high school students, 14.3% of female respondents and
10.8% of male respondents reported having experienced a pregnancy (Lindley et al., 2015).
The literature indicates that teen parents are between 20% and 25% less likely to earn
their high school diplomas, and such low academic achievement has been linked to lifelong
trends of reduced professional accomplishment and negative health outcomes (Mollborn,
2010).
Young adults in the United States, particularly between the ages of 15 and 24, make
up only 14% of the population, yet they account for roughly 50% of all new cases of STIs
(CDC Fact Sheet, 2014).
Furthermore, STIs disproportionately impact minority
populations. African American adolescents experience gonorrhea and chlamydia at rates
that are eight times those among Caucasians (CDC, 2009b). However, research also
suggests that we should not give up hope. While abstinence only education has been
associated with a slight delay in initiation of sexual activity (Lindberg et al., 2012; Kraft et
al., 2012), comprehensive curricula have been shown to increase abstinence and healthy
sexual decision-making among youth. These programs tend to decrease sexual frequency
and number of partners and increase contraceptive and condom use (Kirby, 2008).
Comprehensive health education has also been shown to increase knowledge and reduce
stigma surrounding HIV and other STIs (Mendelsohn et al., 2015). In summation, sexual
health curriculum that provides information on both abstinence and healthy sexual
decision-making are most effective in improving adolescent sexual health (Kirby, 2008).

NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Theoretical Framework
Health Behavior Theory
The proposed curriculum will employ constructs from both the Social Cognitive
Theory (SCT) and the Health Belief Model (HBM) in order to increase students knowledge
and ability to make healthier decisions regarding their sexual health. This curriculum will
focus on self-efficacy, outcome, expectation, and self-regulation, which are personal-level
constructs. Self-efficacy is a belief in oneself to perform a concerted action. The belief that
NGM students have the knowledge, skills, and confidence to consistently and correctly use
a condom and negotiate condom use is an example of how our curriculum will apply selfefficacy. Outcome expectation is the anticipated consequences of a behavior. Through the
curriculum, NGM students will learn about unintended pregnancy and contracting STIs as
consequences of engaging in unprotected sex. Self-regulation is the way in which
individuals control themselves through constant monitoring, feedback, self -reward, selfinstruction, and social support. NGM students will be able to exhibit self-regulation by
setting sexual health goals and drawing upon the support of their peers, teachers, and
mentors to attain these goals. Finally, our curriculum will draw upon observational
learning, an environmental-level construct in which an individual learns a behavior by
watching someone else perform the behavior. This will be applied to condom use and
condom negotiation, as well as role-playing scenarios for improving sexual communication
skills.
Our curriculum draws upon two constructs from the Health Belief Model: perceived
barriers and perceived benefits. Perceived barriers are obstacles which the individual
believes will prevent them from performing a behavior. If the behavior is condom
negotiation, perceived barriers for students may include their lack of confidence to
communicate with their partner, fear of rejection or humiliation when trying to
communicate with their partner, or lack of knowledge about correct condom usage.
Perceived benefits are positive outcomes for performing a certain health behavior. NGM
students will learn the benefits of using condoms when having sex, such as reducing
unintended pregnancy and reducing the risk of contracting STIs.

NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Learning Theory
Though adolescent African Americans residing in urban areas share common
systemic experiences such as discrimination and limited access to resources, they have
unique attitudes, personalities, and learning styles (Peeke et al, 1998). For this reason,
Multiple Intelligences is one of the learning theories that will guide our curriculums
teaching strategies. Application of Multiple Intelligences in the classroom is particularly
beneficial as it extends beyond the traditional verbal, mathematical, and logical definition
of intelligence (Goldman et al, 2003). Teachings that capitalize on multiple intelligences
allow for a variety of instructional activities, such as cooperative learning, role-play, and
multimedia. Role-playing sexual health communication strategies, for example, will be an
integral approach in the NGM curriculum.
Curriculum lesson plans will also draw from the theory of Transformational
Learning, which highlights the importance of relationships in the learning process
(Merriam et al, 2007). Lessons will incorporate Black male community leaders to serve as
role models and share personal experiences with students. Pre-existing and culturally
appropriate videos related to sexual health may be incorporated into the curriculum, as
studies have shown this method to be effective in reducing sexual risk behaviors (Roye et
al, 2003). Such teaching techniques and activities align with Multiple Intelligences and
Transformational Learning and are appropriate for teaching sexual health education and
prevention to NGM students.

Evaluation Plan
In order for Next Generation Men to monitor participants progr ess from week to
week and assess the efficacy of this curriculum, this curriculum includes both informal and
formal evaluations. The evaluation slip and forms will provide information on how
participants competencies, formulated from the sessions goals and objectives, will be
measured throughout the session. For content lessons 2-5, informal evaluations will occur
at the conclusion of each lesson as students debrief. Students will complete exit slips where
they write down key points from the days lesson to demonstrate what was learned. The
facilitators will gauge the level of understating of the students based on their responses by
summarizing their exit slips in the formal evaluation, Instructor Feedback Form:
Individual Lesson, found at the end of lessons 2-5. These will be completed by the
facilitator and contain other questions pertaining to the lesson. For lessons 1 and 6,
Student Learning Assessment: Pre-Curriculum and Student Learning Assessment: PostCurriculum will be the forms used to compare student sexual health knowledge at baseline
and post-curriculum time points.
Lastly, facilitators will evaluate the curriculum in its entirety after all lessons have
been instructed. Facilitators will complete the form, Instructor Feedback Form: Entire
Curriculum, found at the end of lesson. It is our hope that the evaluations will allow NGM to
gather feedback on lesson facilitation, receptiveness, and student growth, and adjust the
curriculum accordingly to best meet the needs of NGM participants and facilitators.

NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Lesson 1: Introduction & Ground Rules


Total Time 1 hour
Lesson Overview
This lesson is intended to set the stage for a productive series of lessons on sexual health.
By establishing ground rules for classroom behavior as a group, studen ts will be more
likely to take ownership of their own behavior. This lesson will also serve as a preliminary
introduction to basic sexual health concepts and discussion of sensitive topics. Finally,
students will be encouraged to think about how short-term sexual health behaviors impact
long-term goals.

Lesson Goal
Students will be able to consider how sexual health relates to achievement of long-term
goals, while creating ground rules to govern discussion surrounding sexual health topics.

Lesson Objectives
By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:
-

Explain the importance of 8 safe space ground rules when discussing sensitive
topics.
Gain basic exposure to speaking and hearing about sexual terms in a group
setting.
Identify 4 specific examples of how sexual health behavior can influence longterm goals.

Timeframe
Activity
Part 1: Introduction
Part 2: Safe Space & Ground Rules
Part 3: Crossword Puzzle Baseline Assessment
Part 4: Concept Combination Speed Round
Part 5: Looking Back & Thinking Ahead

Time
5 min
10 min
20 min
15 min
10 min

NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Materials Checklist
-

Whiteboard/chalkboard
Dry-erase markers/chalk
Flip chart paper or poster board
Tape (masking or duct)
Markers, pencils
Scissors
Bowl, hat, or small bucket

Handouts and Evaluation


-

Safe Space Ground Rules Form


Ground Rules Scenarios Form
Ground Rules Scenarios Key
Crossword Puzzles
Student Learning Assessment: Pre-Curriculum Evaluation

Teacher Preparation: Before Class

Print the following:


o 1 Safe Space Ground Rules form
o 4 Ground Rules Scenarios forms
o 1 Ground Rules Scenarios key
o 4 Crossword Puzzles
o 1 Student Learning Assessment: Pre-Curriculum form

For Part 2:
o Choose either flip chart paper or poster board to create a
permanent list of ground rules. This list will be saved for use as
reference in future lessons. Write "Safe Space Ground Rules"
across the top in large letters with a marker. Then, tape it to the
wall in a location where students will be able to easily see and
write on it.
o Cut the Safe Space Ground Rules form along the dotted lines
and fold those smaller pieces in half. Place them in the
bowl/hat/bucket.

For Part 4:
o Cut the 4 Ground Rules Scenarios forms along the dotted lines,
then group the small slips of paper by ground rule (4 RESPECT
slips together, etc.).

NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Part 1: Introduction (5 minutes)


1) SAY:

2) ASK:

Todays lesson will be the first of a 6-part sexual health curriculum. This
curriculum is going to be a little different than what you may be used to. We
dont normally talk too much about sex, especially not in school, so it might feel
a little intimidating at first.

Can anyone think of some reasons why this curriculum may push us outside our
comfort zone?

3) If students are hesitant to answer, generate discussion with the following prompts,
allowing students to respond after each question.
4) SAY and ASK:
For example, we are going to be talking later on about how to use a condom.
When we do that, well be using a few sexual terms. Do you feel that might be a
little embarrassing to say in class? If so, why?
In addition, were going to talk about communicating with sexual partners.
Because that is something you may normally do in private, why do you think it
might feel awkward at first?
Lastly, different people have different levels of experience and knowledge when
it comes to sexual health. So, do you think someone might be nervous that a
question they have is silly? Why or why not?
5) ASK:
Can you all think of any other reasons why it might be difficult to have
discussions about sexual health topics?
6) Allow students to respond.
7) Once the discussion has come to an end, SAY:
It's ok to feel a little uncomfortable when you're talking about things that you
aren't used to discussing in a group. Because, guess what? Everyone is
probably feeling the same way. Maybe even me! But, sexual health plays a big
role in every person's life, and it's important to have a safe place to learn about
and explore those ideas. So, lets agree on some ground rules for our class time
that will help make everyone feel as comfortable as possible.

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Part 2: Safe Space & Ground Rules (10 minutes)


1) Ask one volunteer to come up, draw a piece of paper out of the bowl/hat/bucket,
and read it aloud.
2) Once the student has read the chosen rule, ASK:
So what do we think? Does that seem like a fair rule?
3) Once everyone agrees, SAY:
Ok great, Ill write it on the list over here on the wall.
4) Write the rule and description on the Safe Space Ground Rules flip chart paper or
poster board you taped to the wall earlier, using the Safe Space Ground Rules form.
5) Repeat this process until all pieces of paper have been removed from the
hat/bowl/bucket.
6) Ask students if they can think of any other rules that might be good to include. If
they do, lead a discussion about whether to add these rules to the list. Add any new
rules if appropriate.
7) SAY:

Nice job guys! So, now that we are all on the same page, let's get started with
the interesting stuff!

Note to Teacher Be sure to save the Safe Space Ground Rules flip chart paper or poster
board for reference in future lessons.

Part 3: Crossword Puzzle Baseline Assessment (20 minutes)


1) SAY:

Ok we are going to get into groups for our next activity. Lets make the groups
random, though, so you arent necessarily working with the people you
normally do. We are going to start with__________________ (pick a student at
random) and count off by 4. So, 1, 2, 3, 4

2) Tell all the 1s to go sit together, 2s to sit together, etc. Some groups may have
5 members.
3) Once all the students are seated, give each group one of the 4 Crossword Puzzle
handouts. Each group should have only one puzzle (either Pregnancy Prevention;
STI Prevention, Testing & Condom Use; Communication & Consent; Sexual
Orientation & Gender Identity).

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4) SAY:

These puzzles are meant to be fun and to introduce you all to some of the sexual
health concepts we will be learning about throughout this curriculum. So, don't
worry if you can't come up with all the answers. Just work as a team and do the
best you can.

5) Give the students around 5-7 minutes to work through the Crossword handouts.
6) Collect the handouts and return to the front of the class.
7) SAY:

Alright guys, let's see what you came up with!

8) Go through the Crossword handouts group by group and read the sentences that the
students were able to complete. Use the answer key below to ensure that the students'
answers were correct, and to verify the answers to any questions lef t blank.

Note to Teacher Keep in mind that this exercise is intended to be fun and somewhat
interactive. Try to engage the group members as you read their handouts by asking how
they came up with those answers. Or, if they missed a question, ask if anyone else in the
class knows the answer. This will deepen the students' understanding, as well as get them
accustomed to discussing sexual health topics as a group. Also be sure to keep the
completed Crossword Puzzle handouts, as you will be using them as reference when filling
out the Student Knowledge Assessment form.
Pregnancy Prevention
1. CONTRACEPTIVES
2. CONDOMS
3. SPERM
4. ABSTINENCE
5. MORE
6. DIPLOMAS
7. LESS
8. FREE
9. BIRTHCONTROLPILLS
Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity
1. HETEROSEXUAL
2. TRANSGENDER
3. LOVE
4. LESBIAN
5. IDENTITY
6. ORIENTATION
7. BISEXUAL
8. GAY

STI Prevention, Testing & Condom Use


1. WALLET
2. VIRUS
3. CONDOMS
4. SYMPTOMS
5. BLOOD
6. SEXUALLY
7. LATEX
8. EXPIRATION
Communications & Consent
1. MOMENT
2. RELATIONSHIP
3. NOT
4. CONSENT
5. CLEAR
6. SPACE
7. QUESTIONS

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9) SAY:

Good! So, you guys learned a little bit of basic information about the 4 topics
we're going to be covering through the rest of the curriculum. And from
observing, you all did a nice job following the ground rules we created earlier.
The next activity is going to help us think about how following these rules can
have an impact in real life.

Part 4: Concept Combination Speed Round (15 minutes)


1) Check to ensure students remained in groups of 4 or 5.
2) Choose any of the scenarios from the Ground Rules Scenarios key, then pick up
the four pre-cut slips of paper (from the Ground Rules Scenarios form you cut
earlier) that correspond to the scenario you chose.
3) SAY:

So Im going to put a slip of paper face down on each group's desk. Don't flip it
over until I say to! Each slip of paper has a short description of a scenario that
might happen during one of the classes in this curriculum. All the groups will
have papers that say the same thing. In each scenario, one of the safe space
ground rules we agreed to earlier is being broken. When I say "Go!" you can flip
over your papers and read them. As soon as you think you know which rule is
being broken, raise your hand. When I call on you, if you have the correct
answer, your team will get a point. If you guess the wrong rule, the next team to
raise their hand gets a shot. We'll do a few, and the team with the most points
at the end wins!

4) Remind students that the Safe Space Ground Rules list is still on the wall for
reference, so they arent expected to do this from memory.
5) Place the first 4 slips of paper face down, one on each group's desk.
6) Once you have finished, SAY:
Ok, everyone has their paper! Ready.go!
Note to Teacher If students have a hard time figuring out which ground rule is being
violated, try giving them some hints.
7) Call on the first group member to raise his hand, and if he answers correctly SAY:
Nice job! Your team gets a point. Can someone tell me why you chose that rule?
8) If the first team doesn't answer correctly, SAY:
Good guess, but are you sure that's the BEST answer? Any other groups have an
idea?

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9) After the students explain their choice, add anything you think is relevant.
10) Repeat the game as many times as possible.

Note to Teacher Keep track of time. Be sure to leave around 10 minutes for Part 5 of
the lesson.
11) After the final round, SAY:
Well, it looks like__________________ team is the winner! That was some quick
thinking! Great job!

Part 5: Looking Back & Thinking Ahead (10 minutes)


1) Collect the slips of paper from the previous game.
2) SAY:

3) ASK:

So, we're almost at the end of the first lesson. Today was a little different than
the rest of the lessons in this curriculum are going to be. Normally, you'll come
in and talk about one of specific topics the crossword puzzles introduced you to.
But today wasn't about learning a bunch of new information. Today was about
getting used to talking about mature topics like sex, and thinking about why it
is so important to do so in a sensitive way. Like I said earlier, sexual health is an
important part of a person's life. And, the sexual health choices you make in
high school can have an impact on the rest of your life. That's why this
curriculum is so important! So, before we leave I want to do one last activity.
We talk a lot outside this class about long term aspirations.

Can somebody tell me what career they want to work toward?

4) As students call things out, write them on the whiteboard/blackboard.


5) Once you have 4, SAY:
Those are all great goals. So let's talk about _______________ (the first career on
the list). One of the topics we spoke about earlier was pregnancy prevention.
Why might it be difficult to become a _______________________ if you become a teen
parent?
6) After one of the students volunteers a reason, SAY:
That's absolutely right. What about_________________ (the second career on the
list)? We also talked about STI prevention. Why might it be difficult to become
a __________ if you get an STI in high school?

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

7) After getting an answer, SAY:


And ________________ (the third career on the list)? Why do you think it might be
important to know the appropriate terms to refer to people with different
sexual orientations if you want to be a ______________________?
8) After getting an answer, SAY:
The last career on the list is____________________, and the last topic we spoke
about today was communication and consent. If you don't get clear consent
from a sexual partner, how might that prevent you from becoming
a__________________?

9) Once discussion comes to a close, SAY:


Well, I think we had a great start today. Going forward, try and keep the things
we talked about today in the back of your mind. You all have to ability to do
whatever you want with your life, whether it's one of the careers we just
discussed, or something totally different. The rest of this curriculum will give
you all the information you need to make sexual health choices that help you
reach your goals. Alright, nice job guys. Next time we are going to talk about
communication and consent!

Post Lesson
1) Complete the Student Learning Assessment: Pre-Curriculum evaluation.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Lesson 1: Handouts and Evaluation


Safe Space Ground Rules Form
Crossword Puzzles
Ground Rules Scenarios Form
Ground Rules Scenarios Key

Student Learning Assessment: Pre-Curriculum

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Safe Space Ground Rules


RESPECT Pay attention and do not interrupt when someone else is speaking.
CONFIDENTIALITY Any personal information that is shared during a lesson should not
be shared with others outside the group without permission.
OPENNESS Be as open and honest as you can when sharing, but do not mention specific
friends or family if you choose to tell a story.
RIGHT TO PASS If you truly feel uncomfortable, it is always okay to say you would rather
not answer a certain questions.
NONJUDGEMENTAL ATTITUDE It is always okay to disagree with another persons
opinion, but it is never okay to put that person down.
SENSITIVITY TO DIFFERENCES Everyone comes from a slightly different background
and has different beliefs (religious, cultural, etc.), so try not to make careless remarks that
might hurt someone elses feelings.
ACCEPTANCE Its ok to feel uncomfortable, especially when talking about sensitive issues
like sexuality. Try and be understanding of other peoples emotions.
HAVE FUN! The purpose of safe space rules is not to make you feel nervous or restricted.
Being in a safe space allows you to relax, feel supported, and have fun.

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Ground Rules Scenarios

A student has volunteered to explain the difference between biological sex and gender to the
class. While he is speaking, another students yells out that he has to go to the
bathroom and another student is texting on his phone.
During a lesson on pregnancy prevention, a student shares that he has
had trouble figuring out how to correctly put on a condom in the past. The next
day at lunch a girl makes fun of him for being too stupid to use a condom.
During the sexual orientation and gender identity lesson, a student opens up about
feeling confused over what was the most respectful term to describe his cousin
Joe who is attracted to other guys.
A student feels very uncomfortable discussing STI testing because, even though
the other students dont know it, he is HIV positive. He feels like he has to talk about it, but
after that he doesnt want to attend the next lesson in the sexual health curriculum.
During a pregnancy prevention lesson, a student says that he
thinks it is impossible for a girl to get pregnant the first time she has sex.
Another student laughs and says that that is a stupid thing to think.
A student says that its silly for religious people to think that
using birth control is wrong.
A student cries when he shares that he feels guilty for not making sure to get
verbal consent before having sex. Another student rolls his eyes and says to st op
being so dramatic.

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Ground Rules Scenarios Key


RESPECT - A student has volunteered to explain the difference between biological sex and
gender to the class. While he is speaking, another students yells out that he has to go to
the bathroom and another student is texting on his phone.
CONFIDENTIALITY During a lesson on pregnancy prevention, a student shares that he has
had trouble figuring out how to correctly put on a condom in the past. The next day at
lunch a girl makes fun of him for being too stupid to use a condom.
OPENNESS During the sexual orientation and gender identity lesson, a student opens up
about feeling confused over what was the most respectful term to describe his cousin Joe
who is attracted to other guys.
RIGHT TO PASS A student feels very uncomfortable discussing STI testing because, even
though the other students dont know it, he is HIV positive. He feels like he has to talk
about it, but after that he doesnt want to attend the next lesson in the sexual health
curriculum.
NONJUDGEMENTAL ATTITUDE During a pregnancy prevention lesson, a student says that
he thinks it is impossible for a girl to get pregnant the first time she has sex. Another
student laughs and says that that is a stupid thing to think.
SENSITIVITY TO DIFFERENCES A student says that its silly for religious people to think
that using birth control is wrong.
ACCEPTANCE A student cries when he shares that he feels guilty for not making sure to get
verbal consent before having sex. Another student rolls his eyes and says to stop being so
dramatic.

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Student Learning Assessment: Pre-Curriculum


1. Describe the students' overall level of confidence in completing Lesson 1: Part 3
(Crossword Puzzle Baseline Assessment).
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2. Below, please note whether the student groups able to co mplete their crossword
puzzles. Also, note which specific parts of each puzzle the students were unable to fill in.
Communication & Consent
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Pregnancy Prevention _________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
STI Prevention, Testing & Condom Use
_______________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Gender Identity & Sexual Orientation __________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3. Describe the students' overall level of comfort in engaging in a discussion related to the
answers to the crossword puzzle questions.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
4. Please comment on whether you believe that the students saw value in the safe space
ground rules and plan to follow them.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

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Lesson 2: Communication & Consent


Total Time 1 hour
Lesson Overview:
During this lesson students will learn the basics of both good and bad communication
characteristics in order to discuss how it applies to sexual or romantic relationships.
Students will then watch a video about consent and discuss how to make sure sexual or
romantic partners are giving consent. Lastly, students will reflect on their desires and
expectations related to intimacy and practice communicating these expectations with a
partner.

Lesson Goal
Students will be able to make healthy sexual decisions by understanding the importance of
acquiring consent and learning to communicate with sexual partners.

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of this lesson students will be able to:
-

List 2 characteristics of being a good communicator.


Explain 1 reason why it is important to obtain sexual consent.
Apply at least 2 communication strategies to negotiating consent.

Timeframe
Activity
Part 1: Review
Part 2: Communication Basics
Part 3: Consent Video
Part 4: Communicating What You Want
Part 5: Conclusion

Time
5 mins
20 mins
10 mins
22 mins
3 mins

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Materials Checklist:
-

Projector
Computer with Internet access
Whiteboard/chalkboard
Dry-erase markers/chalk
Flip chart paper (at least 5 sheets)
Tape (masking or duct)
Blank white paper (entire class)
Notecards (1 per student)
Post-it sticky notes (2 per student)
Pens, Pencils
Markers

Handouts and Evaluation


Communicator One
Communicator Two
My Boundaries
Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson

Teacher Preparation: Before Class

Print the following:


o My Boundaries (enough for entire class)
o Communicator One and Communicator Two (enough so only half of the
class has a copy of each)
o 1 Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson

For Part 1:
o Using half of the board, write the following questions:
Q1: What are the ground rules during the sexual health classes?
Q2: What is one of your life goals?
o Obtain the Safe Space Ground Rules flip chart paper or poster board created
in Lesson 1.

For Part 3: Open consent video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=laMtr-rUEmY

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Part 1: Review (5 mins)


1) As students come in, handout two sticky notes and one pen or pencil per student.
2) SAY:
Hello! Welcome to class. Today we are going to continue discussing sexual health with
an emphasis on communication and consent. First, we will review the ground rules you
all created during the first sexual health class and your goals. On one sticky note, write
down one ground rule you remember from our first sexual health class, and on the
other sticky note write down one of your goals. Goals can be anything: short-term,
long-term, academic, or personal. Stick these under the corresponding question on the
board.
3) After students have finished taping their notecards read them aloud. If students forget
to mention some rules, refer back to the Safe Space Ground Rules flip chart paper or
poster board created in Lesson 1. Then, tape in the front of the classroom where students
can easily see them for the duration of the lesson.
4) SAY:
Good job guys! We will refer back to your goals later in the lesson.
5) ASK:
Does anyone have any questions before we begin our first activity?
6) Allow for and answer student questions, if any.
7) SAY:
Great! Now that we have reviewed the ground rules and your personal goals, today we
are going to get comfortable communicating with our romantic/sexual partners and
understanding consent.

Part 2: Communication Basics (20 mins)


1) SAY:
Please get into pairs. Im going to distribute three things to you right now. First,
everyone will get a blank sheet of paper and a marker to share with your partner. Im
going to give a handout to one person in each pair. That person is going to be the
communicator. The other person is the listener. Communicators do not show your
partner what is on the sheet I hand to you.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Note to Teacher Activity Rules

Listeners cannot see what is on the communicators sheet.

Communicators cannot use their hands to point or use gestures or draw anything.

You may not look at the work other pairs are doing.

Listeners can ask clarifying question such as where on the page did you say to

draw, but otherwise should not speak.

2) Hand out two blank sheets of paper and 1 marker to each set of partners , and hand one
partner the Communicator One handout.
3) SAY:
When I say go, communicators are going to describe what is on the sheet of paper in
front of them. Listeners, you are going to draw on the blank paper what you hear the
communicators describe. Listeners you can ask clarifying question such as where on
the page did you say to draw, but otherwise should not speak. The goal is at the end to
have both papers look the same. You will have two minutes to work.
4) ASK:
Any questions?
5) Allow for and answer student questions, if any.
6) SAY:
Okay, start!
7) Start a timer for two minutes.

Note to Teacher While students are working, watch and listen to see how partners are
doing. You can use what you notice during the reflection section.

8) After 2 minutes, ask students to stop and to flip both o f their sheets over face down.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum


9) SAY:
Now youre going to switch roles. The communicator is now the listener, and the
listener is now the communicator. Im going to pass out the second handout. Do not flip
it over until I tell you.
10) Pass out Communicator Two handout face down.
11) SAY:
When I say go, communicators start describing the image and listeners start
drawing what you hear being described. Okay, go!
12) Start the 2 minute timer. While students are working, create two columns o n the board
and write, Worked Well and Didnt Work Well. The board should look like this:
Worked Well

Didnt Work Well

13) After the timer sounds, ask groups to stop working.


14) Tell them to turn over all 4 sheets of paper and compare both drawings to the original.
Give them a few seconds to review their work.
15) ASK:
How did you all do?
16) Allow for students to respond.
17) SAY:
What worked well for you and your partner?
18) Record responses in the Worked Well column.
Responses may include:
When my partner was clear.
When my partner was specific.
When we didnt get frustrated.
Asking questions.
19) SAY:
What made it challenging to draw the picture being described?

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum


20) Record responses in the Didnt Work Well column.
Responses may include:
The communicator got frustrated when I didnt understand.
The communicator rushed me.
The communicator gave incomplete information.
Not asking clarifying questions.
21) SAY:
Is there anything else you want to add to these lists?
Note to Teacher If students miss any main traits of good and bad communication
make sure to point them out and add them to the list.

Characteristics of good communication: listen to others, clarify by restating

what person said or asking questions, remain calm, empathetic/understanding of


others, use clear and specific language, notice body language, make eye contact

Characteristics of bad communication: dismissive of others, does not try to


understand others perspective, making assumptions, not listening, speaking
quickly, vaguely, and quietly, getting angry or frustrated, blaming other person

22) SAY:
Do you think you communicated well with your partners based on the traits we listed?
23) Allow for students to respond.
24) SAY:
It is important to know how to communicate well to make sure that both partners in
the relationship are happy and feel comfortable. We are now going to watch a quick
clip about consent to make sure we understand what it means for both partners to be
on the same page.

Part 3: Consent Video (10 mins)


1) SAY:
The video we are about to watch will demonstrate the communication traits we just
listed on the board. We will have a brief discussion after we watch it.
2) Play consent video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=laMtr-rUEmY

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum


3) SAY:
Okay, now get into groups of five.
4) Handout one flip chart paper per group.
5) SAY:
Make a list about how you can make 100% sure your partner is giving consent.
6) After a few minutes ask someone from each group to present their flip chart paper.
Responses may include:
Ask partner if they are okay.
Ask clarifying questions.
Use clear language and specific language.
Wait for partner to verbally give permission.
7) SAY:
What does silence mean?
Response:
Silence does not mean yes.
8) SAY:
Thank you all for sharing. Why do you think consent is important? (Wait for
responses.)
Responses may include:
To make sure both partners are in agreement.
In order for both partners to know that they can stop at any time.
To make sure no one is uncomfortable.
To keep relationships honest and healthy.
9) SAY:
Now we are going to apply the characteristics we listed about communication and our
understanding of consent to better understand and express our own desires and
expectations.

Part 4: Communicating What You Want (22 mins)


1) SAY:
Its important to know what you want, your limits and how to communicate these to
your partner.
2) Pass out My Boundaries handout.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum


3) SAY:
I will give you a few minutes to fill out this worksheet. Do NOT put your name at the
top of the page. We want your answers to remain confidential. Take this time to think
about your relationships and what your expectations are.
4) After a few minutes, have students hand forward their completed worksheets.
5) Then, ask for two volunteers to come to the front of the room for a quick role play.
Assign one to be Person 1 and one student to be Person 2.
6) SAY:
Imagine you are both sitting together watching TV. Person 1 (say students name)
doesnt like cuddling when watching TV, but Person 2 (say students name) starts
snuggling. I want you all to act out good characteristics of communication to resolve
this difference.
7) ASK:
Person 1 (say students name), how might you tell person 2 (say students name) they
dont like snuggling?
Responses may include:
Tell person 2 they appreciate the affection but would like some space for
now.
Tell person 2 that they arent use to cuddling while watching TV and
would like to have some space.
8) If the volunteers arent sure how to handle the situation, ask the rest of the class to give
suggestions.
9) After the class has provided a good suggestion about how to handle the situation, say
thank you to the volunteers and ask them to sit back down.
10) SAY:
Thank you both for your help. I know that might have been a little awkward and
difficult. Now that we have taken some time to think about our own expectations and
desires we are going to practice communicating them with a partner just like the two
volunteers did. Not only is it important to know how to tell others what you desire, but
it is important to respect your partners opinions as well. Please find a partner to work
with.
11) As students find a partner, shuffle the handouts and redistribute them.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum


12) SAY:
Now you are going to pretend the opinions on the paper I gave you are your own
opinions. Even if you don't agree with the responses, take on the role of the person who
completed the handout. Go through each question and compare answers with your
partner. Some may be similar and some responses may be different. When the opinions
reflect different desires, discuss with your partner about what you should do to resolve
the different opinions. Remember the traits of good communication we came up with
at the beginning of class.
13) After a few minutes, ask everyone to stop discussing.
14) SAY:
Now that we are finishing up, why do you all think it is difficult for sexual/romantic
partners to communicate? (Wait for responses.)
Responses may include:
Its awkward.
It can be hard to communicate clearly.
It can be hard to not give into the moment and slow down.
13) SAY:
Why is it important to try to communicate with sexual/romantic partners? (Wait for
responses.)
Responses may include:
To ensure everyone is on the same page
To receive consent
To know your partners limits and expectations
To make sure your partner knows your limits and expectations
14) SAY:
Think about the goal you wrote down at the beginning of class. How might
communication impact these goals? (Allow time for students to respond.)
ASK: Do you think it is important to have good relationships with your
teachers or in the future your boss?
ASK: Do you think it is important to work well with classmates or in the
future with coworkers?
15) SAY:
Whether with your friends, family, teachers, or a special person, all types of
relationships require good communication. We all communicate in different ways
which can make communication difficult. Communicating about sex carries a bit more
responsibility with it because sex is a big decision to make, even if one or both people
have already had sex before. For this reason, it is important to know and communicate
what you are and are not interested in doing. It is also important to respect how the
other person is feeling, especially if it differs from how you are feeling. Even though it
may be difficult, it is important to be honest and clear with your partner to maintain a
healthy relationship.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Part 5: Conclusion (3 mins)


1) Handout one notecard to each student, and instruct the students to write down the
most important, interesting, or useful thing they took away from the days lesson.
2) Give students one minute to write down their responses.
3) SAY:
Please hand me your note card before you leave. Thank you for your hard work
today.

Post Lesson
1) Complete the Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson evaluation.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Lesson 2: Handouts and Evaluation


Communicator One
Communicator Two
My Boundaries

Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Communicator One

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Communicator Two

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

My Boundaries
Instructions: Please indicate whether you agree or disagree with the following statements
by circling the appropriate response below. Please DO NOT put your name on this
worksheet.
1. If Im in a relationship with someone, I want to hold hands and walk with our arms
around each other to show people were together.
Describes Me Completely

Describes Me Somewhat

Doesnt Describe Me At All

2. When Im watching TV with my partner, I want my own space, I dont want us to


snuggle or lean on each other.
Describes Me Completely

Describes Me Somewhat

Doesnt Describe Me At All

3. I dont like it when someone hugs me from behind.


Describes Me Completely

Describes Me Somewhat

Doesnt Describe Me At All

4. I think having sex is what makes a relationship a relationship.


Describes Me Completely

Describes Me Somewhat

Doesnt Describe Me At All

5. I think if one person really wants to try something new sexually, the other person
should at least be willing to try it once.
Describes Me Completely

Describes Me Somewhat

Doesnt Describe Me At All

6. I enjoy play wrestling with a partner.


Describes Me Completely

Describes Me Somewhat

Doesnt Describe Me At All

7. I think that if Im in a relationship with someone he/she kind of belong to me so I


should be able to touch him/her, and he/she should be able to touch me, whenever
and wherever we want.
Describes Me Completely

Describes Me Somewhat

Doesnt Describe Me At All

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum


Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson
Instructions: This form should be completed by the instructor at the completion of each
lesson.
Instructor Name: __________________________
Lesson Number: ______

Cohort: _________________

Date of Lesson: ________


Number of Participants: ________

Please answer the following questions:


1. Were you able to complete all of the lesson activities in the allotted timeframe? If
not, which activities were you unable to cover?

2. Did any questions come up that you felt unable to answer based on the information
provided in the lesson materials? If so, please describe.

3. Did anything unexpected happen during the lesson? If so, please describe.

4. Were there any activities in this lesson that you felt the students were not receptive
to or just didnt work for whatever reason?

5. Based on the exit slips that students provided, please summarize the main points
that students took away from the lesson.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Lesson 3: Teen Pregnancy Prevention


Total Time 1 hour
Lesson Overview
Male youth have an important role to play in preventing pregnancy. The purpose of this
lesson is to equip NGM students with the knowledge and tools for better decision -making
regarding safe sex practices through interactive games, presentations, videos, and engaging
discussion.

Lesson Goals
To provide students with accurate information regarding pregnancy prevention and
contraception and enhance their understanding of the implications of teen parenthood.

Lesson Objectives
By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:
-

Learn 10 facts regarding sex and pregnancy prevention.


Identify at least 3 consequences of becoming a teen parent.
Present at least one advantage and disadvantage of one form of contraception .

Timeframe
Activity
Part 1: Review
Part 2: Sex Mythbuster Game
Part 3: Contraceptive Commercial
Part 4: Video and Discussion
Part 5: Conclusion

Time
5 min
10 min
20 min
22 min
3 min

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Materials Checklist
-

Projector
Computer with Internet, PowerPoint, and YouTube access
Whiteboard/chalkboard
Dry-erase markers/chalk
Flip chart paper
Poster Board
Tape (masking or duct)
Notecards (1 per student)
Candy Prizes
Pens, pencils
Markers, Drawing materials
Scissors
Realities of Teen Parenthood video link
Contraceptive Commercial PowerPoint file

Handouts and Evaluations


Sex Mythbuster Answer Key
Birth Control Method Info Sheet
Realities of Teen Parenthood Facts and Statistics: Facilitator Guide
Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson

Teacher Preparation: Before Class Starts


Print the following:
o 1 Sex Mythbuster answer key
o 1 Birth Control Method info sheet
o 1 Realities of Teen Parenthood Facts and Statistics facilitator guide
o 1 Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson

Tape the Safe Space Ground Rules flip chart paper or poster board created in
Lesson 1 in front of the classroom where students can easily see them.

For Part 1:
o On flip chart paper, write the following questions. Leave space to write
correct answers. Tape it in front of room where it can be easily seen.
Q1: What are good characteristics of communication?
Q2: What is the best way to know if someone has given consent?

For Part 3:
o Cut each individual table from the Birth Control Method info sheet so
there is a total of 8 slips.
o Open the Contraceptive Commercial PowerPoint file.

For Part 4: Open teen parenthood video. https://youtu.be/vGBT6rzUN5s

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Part 1: Review (5 minutes)


1) Remind students that the Safe Space Ground Rules are post in the front of class for
their reference throughout the lesson.
2) SAY:
Hello! Welcome to class. Today we are going to continue discussing sexual health
with an emphasis on pregnancy prevention. First, we will review some key points
from last lesson.
3) Ask each review question written on the flip chart paper, and SAY:
Shout out your answers!
4) Allow students to respond.
5) Award prize candy to students who volunteer correct answers, and write them on
the flip chart underneath the corresponding question on the flip chart.
6) Spend about 1-2 minutes on each question. If students have trouble recalling, finally
reference the answers in italics and write each answer underneath the corresponding
question on the flip chart.

Note to Teacher
What are good characteristics of communication?
Listening to others, clarify by restating what the person said or asking questions,
remain calm, being empathetic/understanding of others, using clear and specific
language, noticing body language, making eye contact
What is the best way to know if someone has given consent?
Verbal yes. Silence does not mean yes
7) SAY:

Good review, guys! Lets get started.

Part 2: Sex Mythbuster Game (10 minutes)


1) Pull out the Sex Mythbuster answer key to conduct this game.
2) SAY:

So how many of you would say you know a lot about sex? Can I get a show of
hands?

3) Allow students to comment.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum


4) SAY:

Well lets test your knowledge! Were going to start with a fun, interactive
game to get you guys warmed up.

5) Instruct all students to stand up and move toward the center of the room. Move
desks around if necessary for additional space.
6) Write the word Myth on the left side of the board and the wo rd Fact on the right
side of the board.
7) SAY:

I am going to read a few statements, and I want you to tell me whether you
think it is a myth or fact. If you believe it to be a myth, move to the left side of
the room; if you believe it to be a fact, move to the right side of the room.

8) Read the first statement and allow time for students to move to either side of the
room.
9) Once students have ceased to move, ask one to two students from each group why
they decided as they did.
10) Then, once they have explained their choices, read the correct answer listed
underneath the statement.
11) Instruct all students to move back toward the center of the room.
12) Repeat until all 10 statements have been asked and discussed, or ask as many as
you can fit into the 8-min time allotment.
13) SAY:

So now that weve dispelled some myths, how do you think you can use this new
information you learned to communicate with your friends or partners?

14) Allow for students to respond. Listen for correcting their peers or not providing
false advice to people they may be sexually involved with.
15) SAY:

There are a lot of myths surrounding sex, contraception, and ways pregnancy
can be prevented, and its not uncommon for some of these ideas to take hold
and, over time, appear to be factual. Its important that you recognize when
untrue statements are brought up during casual conversation or as jokes, so
you can politely and respectfully correct them. Doing so will not only help you
in making healthier sexual choices, but also your fellow peers.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Part 3: Contraceptive Commercial (22 minutes)


1) SAY:

2) ASK:

This next activity will raise your awareness about different types of
contraceptives.

Who knows what contraceptives are?

3) Allow students to respond.


4) SAY:

Thanks for your responses! Well, contraceptive is another word for birth
control. Its simply a method or device used to prevent pregnancy. Even though
male condoms are the only type of contraceptive specifically designed for you,
learning about various types of contraceptives is important so you can share
with partners and friends.

5) Assign students into groups of two, and pass out the Birth Control Method tables
that you cut earlier so that each group has a specific contraceptive to present.
Note to Teacher There may be a few groups of 3 depending on how many students
are in attendance.
6) SAY:

7) SAY:

8) ASK:

Pretend you and your partner work at an advertising agency that promotes the
method of contraception youve been assigned. You have been given a 1 minute
time slot for a television commercial that will be aired nationwide. Your job is
to sell the importance of the particular contraceptive your group has been
assigned to teens. Using the information given in the slip, be sure to describe
the method and emphasize what makes the method effective and easy for
teenagers to use. Include advantages and disadvantages.

Be creative and have fun! Make jokes, rhyme, sing, dance, whatever you like.
Poster board, markers, and other drawing materials are available for you to
use. A picture of your contraceptive will be shown that you can refer to as you
present. You have 10 minutes to work. Once everyone has finished, each group
will present their 1- minute commercial to the class.

Any questions?

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum


9) Allow for and answer questions, if any.

Note to Teacher
As students are preparing their commercial, navigate to the first slide containing
all pictures of the various types of birth control methods. Assist them as needed.
As each group presents, navigate to the slide with the picture of their assigned
contraceptive.
Monitor time to make sure commercials are no longer than 1 minute.
In the event of technical difficulty, PowerPoint slides are located in Appendix A at
the end of the lesson that can be printed out for use.

10) Lead the group in a round of applause after each group has finished the
commercial.

Part 4: Video and Discussion (20 minutes)


1) SAY:

For our last activity, were going to take a close look at the reality of what it
means to be a teen parent. We will watch short video clips of young men and
women sharing their experience of parenthood and offering advice. Afterwards,
I will have you guys share your thoughts on the video and begin to think about
what it might look like if you became a father.

2) Play teen parenthood video: https://youtu.be/vGBT6rzUN5s


3) SAY:

Alright, so after hearing their stories, lets have some discussion.

4) Generate dialogue with students by asking the discussion questions on the


following page as time permits.
Note to Teacher If time is running out, ask at least one question from each

discussion section and the wrap-up question. Allow time for students to respond.
5) DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Financing a Child

ASK:

How much money do you think it would take to provide food, clothes,
childcare, etc.? Just throw some numbers out there.
From the handout, Realities of Teen Parenthood Facts and Statistics,
read the first Finance statistic.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

ASK:
ASK:
ASK:

For those who currently have a job, do you think you would have enough
to pay child support? If not, what would you do to get more income?
For those who do not currently have a job, how would you provide
financially for the child?
How might the government play a role in helping you care for the child?
Listen for financial assistance from the government. Then from the
handout, Realities of Teen Parenthood Facts and Statistics, read the
last Finance statistic.

Caring for a Child

ASK:
ASK:
ASK:

Are you prepared for a lifetime commitment to care for a child?


In what ways would you have to provide the mother with the emotional
and physical support she needs?
What would you all have to do to make sure a child is properly cared
for?
Listen for help from parents, grandparents, family, parenting classes,
finding daycare.

Changes to Daily Schedule

ASK:
ASK:

Are you ready and willing to give up my time with friends to spend time
with a child?
In what ways would your day-to-day schedule change?

Impact on Education and Career Development

ASK:

How do you think your education will be affected? What about


graduation?
From the handout, Realities of Teen Parenthood Facts and Statistics,
read the only Education statistic and the second Finance statistic.

Impact on Childs Future Well-Being

ASK:

How might your childs future be affected if you were to have a baby
now?
From the handout, Realities of Teen Parenthood Facts and Statistics,
read all of the Children of Teen Parents statistics.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Other

ASK:

Can you think of any other outcomes that we have yet to discuss?
From the handout, Realities of Teen Parenthood Facts and Statistics,
read the Crime and Relationship statistics.

Wrap- Up Question

ASK:

Now that weve learned facts about preventing pregnancy, types of


contraceptive methods and their advantages, and the impact that
having a child would have on your life, what do you plan to do
differently that will ultimately help you reach your life goal that youve
discussed in previous lessons?
Listen for plans to make changes in sexual behavior, regularly use
contraception, suggest that partner find reliable contraception, and
have conversations with partners and friends about the realities of
teen pregnancy and importance of making healthy sexual choices.

Note to Teacher After the wrap-question, if some of the above ideas are not
shared, probe about them to get students talking, or offer suggestions of your own to
the students on feasible changes they can make now to achieve their long-term goals.

Part 5: Conclusion (3 minutes)


1) Handout one notecard to each student, and instruct the students to write down the
most important, interesting, or useful thing they took away from the days lesson.
2) Give students one minute to write down their responses. While they are writing,
SAY:
To close, be aware that becoming pregnant isnt as unlikely as you may think.
Youre not invincible, and depending on your sexual behaviors, you must
understand that becoming a teen parent is a risk. Its extremely important for
you all to take the necessary precautions. Use a condom; dont feel
embarrassed. And talk with your partners and friends about safe contraceptive
options that are out there. You wont regret it. Good job today guys!
3) Collect their notecards.

Post Lesson
1) Complete the Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson evaluation.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Lesson 3: Handouts and Evaluations


Sex Mythbuster Answer Key
Birth Control Method Information Sheet
Realities of Teen Parenthood Facts and Statistics: Facilitator
Guide
Contraceptive Commercial PowerPoint

Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum


SEX MYTHBUSTER ANSWER KEY
# 1: Everyone in my age group is having sex.
MYTH! Only 50% of teens under 18 are sexually active.
# 2: A teen couple that always uses protection does not have to worry about pregnancy.
MYTH! Abstaining from sex, or not having sex at all, is the only 100% effective way to not get someone
pregnant. Even certain types of birth control can only prevent pregnancy between 68 and 99 percent.
# 3: A young woman who has sex while on her period can become pregnant.
FACT! Every womans period is different, and some do ovulate during their cycle. Ovulation simply means she
releases an egg. So although the chances are very small, pregnancy is still a possibility. In addition, research
has shown that sperm can survive up to 7 days inside a woman which can potentially fertilize an egg, even
after Melissas period is over.
# 4: Terrance did not fully penetrate or go all the way during sex, but his partner can still become
pregnant.
FACT! Some guys pre-ejaculate or ejaculate near the vagina, so she can become pregnant even if his penis
does not go all the way inside.
# 5: A young woman cannot get pregnant if she has sex standing up.
MYTH! Pregnancy can occur with any sex position. Gravity has no effect on sperms ability to reach the egg.
# 6: Using two condoms during sex is less safe than using one.
FACT! During sex, two condoms will rub together and cause friction. As a result, this can increase the chances
of the condom breaking or slipping off. Therefore, it is best to only use one condom at a time when engaging
in sex.
# 7: If a guy pulls out before he ejaculates, or cums, his partner is still at risk for becoming
pregnant.
FACT! Withdrawal, or pull out method, is not an effective form of birth control. At the tip of the penis, there
is a small amount of fluid, called pre-ejaculate, that can contain semen, so it is possible for some semen to leak
before ejaculation. Because sperm are designed to make their way to the egg, even a tiny drop of semen is
enough to cause pregnancy.
# 8: Olivia took the advice of her partner Eric by taking a long shower immediately after sex. So, she
will not become pregnant.
MYTH! Sperm can still reach the cervix, so flushing out the vagina with water and cleanser, often referred to
as douching is pointless. Doing so can actually shove semen further into her body, thereby increasing the
chance of pregnancy. The only effective way to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex is i f emergency
contraception is taken within 5 days.
# 9: Christina only missed one day of taking her birth control pill, but pregnancy can still occur.
FACT! She can still get pregnant. Birth control pills must be taken according to the prescription, which is the
same time every day.
# 10: If a couple visits a teen clinic, their parents will find out.
MYTH! Ideally, you will want to talk about receiving sexual health services at a clinic with people you trust,
such as family and friends. However, all family planning clinics have strict confidentiality policies. This means
no one can tell anyone else why you were there, or even if you were there. And parental permission is not
needed if a teen wants to receive birth control or testing.

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BIRTH CONTROL METHOD INFO SHEET

Instructions: Pretend you work for an ad agency that promotes your method of contraception. Design a one minute television commercial to market your contraceptive method to teens. Be sure to describe the method, and
emphasize what makes the method effective and easy to use for teenagers. Include advantages and disadvantages.
Method
Description
Effectiveness at
Advantages
Disadvantages
Preventing
Pregnancy
Male Condom
A thin sheath of
84%
Available without
Must be used
rubber that slips
or
prescription
correctly each time
over the penis.
For every 100
Inexpensive
Can break or slip
Condoms provide a women who use this
Easy to carry
off during sex
barrier that prevents
method alone,
around
Some people are
pregnancy and
eighteen will
Helps prevent
allergic to latex, so
sexually transmitted
become pregnant
sexually transmitted
they must find
infections by
within first year.
infections
condoms made with
keeping semen from
other material
entering the vagina.

Instructions: Pretend you work for an ad agency that promotes your method of contraception. Design a one minute television commercial to market your contraceptive method to teens. Be sure to describe the method, and
emphasize what makes the method effective and easy to use for teenagers. Include advantages and disadvantages.
Method
Description
Effectiveness
Advantages
Disadvantages
Female Condom
A pouch with two
79%
No prescription
Usually more
(Vaginal Pouch)
flexible rings, one
or
needed
expensive than male
fitting inside the
For every 100
Easy to buy in
condom
vagina and the other
women who use
drugstores and
Can be difficult to
on the outside. The
condoms alone,
supermarkets
insert
female condom
twenty-one will
Can be used by
Can irritate the
collects pre-cum
become pregnant
people allergic to
vagina or penis
and semen to
within first year.
latex
May slip during
prevent sperm from
Allows the young
sex
entering the vagina.
lady to share
Reduces feeling
responsibility in
during sex
preventing
Cannot be used
pregnancy
with male condom
Helps prevent
sexually transmitted
infections

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Instructions: Pretend you work for an ad agency that promotes your method of contraception. Design a oneminute television commercial to market your contraceptive method to teens. Be sure to describe the method, and
emphasize what makes the method effective and easy to use for teenagers. Include advantages and disadvantages.
Method
Description
Effectiveness
Advantages
Disadvantages
Contraceptive Implant
A thin, flexible
99.9%
Always available
Insertion may be
plastic implant
or
through medical
uncomfortable
(about the size of
For every 100
provider
Expensive cost,
a matchstick) that
women using this
Very safe
up to $800
contains a
method, less than 1
Teens dont have
Possible side
hormone and is
will become
to remember to do
effects: irregular
placed under the pregnant within first anything every day, bleeding, change in
skin of the upper
year.
week, or month
appetite, weight
arm. It releases a
Long-term, lasts
gain, headaches,
hormone that
up to 3 years
nausea, and acne
keeps a young
No one can tell
Does not protect
lady from
that you have it
against sexually
releasing eggs;
transmitted
that way sperm
infections
has no way to
reach it.

Instructions: Pretend you work for an ad agency that promotes your method of contraception. Design a one minute television commercial to market your contraceptive metho d to teens. Be sure to describe the method, and
emphasize what makes the method effective and easy to use for teenagers. Include advantages and disadvantages.
Method
Description
Effectiveness
Advantages
Disadvantages
The Shot
The name of the
94%
Always available
Requires
shot is called Depoor
through medical
prescription
Provera. It contains
For every 100
provider
Possible side
a hormone that
women using this
Convenient
effects: irregular
prevents the ovaries
method, 6 will
Protects against
bleeding, changes in
from releasing an
become pregnant
endometrial cancer weight and appetite,
egg; that way sperm
within first year.
and anemia (low
mood changes,
has no way to reach
iron in blood)
increased risk of
it.
Long-lasting,
blood clots, bone
prevents pregnancy
density loss
for 3 months
Takes up to 2
years for young
woman to become
fertile again
Does not protect
against sexually
transmitted
infections

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Instructions: Pretend you work for an ad agency that promotes your method of contraception. Design a oneminute television commercial to market your contraceptive method to teens. Be sure to describe the method, and
emphasize what makes the method effective and easy to use for teenagers. Include ad vantages and disadvantages.
Method
Description
Effectiveness
Advantages
Disadvantages
Contraceptive Patch
The patch contains
92%
Always available
Requires
hormones that are
or
through medical
prescription
absorbed through
For every 100
provider.
Some teens have
the skin and
women using this
Easy to use
trouble
prevents the
method, 9 will
Small size
remembering to
ovaries from
become pregnant
Stays on well
change the patch
releasing an egg,
within first year.
Easier to
each week
so no sperm can
remember than the
Possible Side
reach it.
daily birth control
Effects: increased
pill
risk of blood clots,
Possible Benefits:
nausea, headaches,
acne may improve,
skin irritation
have lighter periods
Its visible to
and less cramps
other people if not
hidden underneath
clothes, which may
bother other teens.
Does not protect
against sexually
transmitted
infections

Instructions: Pretend you work for an ad agency that promotes your method of contraception. Design a one minute television commercial to market your contraceptive method to teens. Be sure to describe the method, and
emphasize what makes the method effective and easy to use for teenagers. Include advantages and disadvantages.
Method
Description
Effectiveness
Advantages
Disadvantages
Intrauterine Device
A small t-shaped
99%
Always available
Requires
(IUD)
piece of plastic
or
through medical
prescription
that goes inside
For every 100
provider
Short term pain
a womans
women using this
Safe
after procedure
uterus to protect method, less than
Teens dont have to
Possible side
against
1 will become
remember to do
effects depending
pregnancy.
pregnant within
anything every day,
on type of IUD:
Different brands
first year.
week, or month
irregular bleeding,
are ParaGard,
Long-lasting,
mood swings,
Mirena, Liletta,
prevents pregnancy
headaches,
and Skyla.
between 3 and 12 years
cramping
Variety of types to fit Does not protect
the teens needs
against sexually
Completely private
transmitted
Possible Benefits:
infections
have lighter or no
periods, less cramps

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Instructions: Pretend you work for an ad agency that promotes your method of contraception. Design a one minute television commercial to market your contraceptive method to teens. Be sure to describe the method , and
emphasize what makes the method effective and easy to use for teenagers. Include advantages and disadvantages.
Method
Description
Effectiveness
Advantages
Disadvantages
Birth Control Pills
There are two
91%
Effective
Requires
types:
or
Quite private, so
prescription
combination
For every 100
others wont know
Must be taken at
of estrogen
women using this
shes taking a pill
the same time every
and progestin,
method, 9 will
Possible Benefits:
day, which can be
or progestin
become pregnant
acne may improve,
hard to remember
alone. Teens
within first year.
have lighter periods
for some teens
are most likely
and less cramps,
Possible Side
prescribed the
reduce risk
Effects: increased
combination.
endometrial cancer
risk of blood clots,
Each works to
and anemia (low
stroke,
prevent the
iron in blood)
hypertension,
ovaries from
headaches, nausea
releasing eggs,
Does not protect
so sperm cant
against sexually
get to it.
transmitted
infections

Instructions: Pretend you work for an ad agency that promotes your method of contraception. Design a one minute television commercial to market your contraceptive method to teens. Be sure to describe the method, and
emphasize what makes the method effective and easy to use for teenag ers. Include advantages and disadvantages.
Method
Description
Effectiveness
Advantages
Disadvantages
Vaginal Ring
A ring placed
92%
Easy to use
Requires
in the vagina
or
Safe and effective
prescription
once a month.
For every 100
Fairly affordable,
Can be hard for
It has
women using this
costs between $0-80
some teens to
hormones that
method, 9 will
per month
remember to replace
prevent the
become pregnant
Can be worn for
the ring each month
ovaries from
within first year.
three weeks
Possible Side
releasing an
Possible Benefits:
Effects: increased
egg, so sperm
acne may improve,
risk of heart attack,
cant get to it.
have lighter periods
stroke, or blood
The ring is in
and less cramps
clots, headaches,
place for 3
nausea, irregular
weeks, and
bleeding
then removed
Does not protect
for 1 week.
against sexually
transmitted
infections

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REALITIES OF TEEN PARENTHOOD FACTS AND STATISTICS: FACILITATOR GUIDE
Finances
o For a middle income family who makes between $61,000 and $106,000,
having a child is estimated to be $14,970 a year. To raise a child to 18 will
cost, on average, $245,340.
o Teen fathers earn less over time than men who have children when theyre
older. One study found that the fathers of children born to teen mothers
earned an estimated average of $3,400 less per year than the fathers of
children born to mothers who were 20 or 21, over the course of 18 years
following the birth of their first child.
o 26% of teens believe that they would need welfare to support a child; in reality,
56% receive public assistance to cover the cost of delivery and 5% receive public
assistance by their early 20s.
Education
o Teen parents are 20-25% less likely to earn their high school diplomas.
Children of Teen Parents
o Children of teen parents suffer health, economic, and social consequences because
33% of pregnant teens do not receive the prenatal care they need.
o Children of teens are more likely to be poor, abused, and neglected than those
women who wait until they are older to have children.
o Children of teenagers are likely to have low academic achievement and more
behavioral problems.
o Kids born to teen mothers are less likely to graduate from high school, more likely to
be unemployed, and more likely to become teenage parents themselves than those
born to women who delay childbearing.
Crime
o Teen dads are more likely to engage in delinquent behaviors such as alcohol
abuse or drug dealing.
Relationships
o 51% percent of teens believe that if they were involved in a pregnancy they
would marry the baby's mother or father; in reality, 81% of teenage births are
to unmarried teens.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum


Lesson 3: Contraceptive Commercial Slides

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Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson
Instructions: This form should be completed by the instructor at the completion of each
lesson.
Instructor Name: __________________________
Lesson Number: ______

Cohort (Grade Level):_______

Date of Lesson: ________


Number of Participants: ________

Please answer the following questions:


1. Were you able to complete all of the lesson activities in the allotted timeframe? If
not, which activities were you unable to cover?

2. Did any questions come up that you felt unable to answer based on the information
provided in the lesson materials? If so, please describe.

3. Did anything unexpected happen during the lesson? If so, please describe.

4. Were there any activities in this lesson that you felt the students were not receptive
to or just didnt work for whatever reason?

5. Based on the exit slips that students provided, please summarize the main points
that students took away from the lesson.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Lesson 4: STI Prevention, Testing, and Condom Use


Total Time 1 hour
Lesson Overview:
In this session students will learn about the most common STIs, as well as STI prevention
methods and testing resources within their community. This session also provides
knowledge on condom use as a method for preventing STIs and unintended pregnancies.

Lesson Goal
Students will be able to identify symptoms, modes of transmission, prevention methods,
and testing services for STIs.

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of the session, students will be able to:
-

Identify 3-5 of the most common STIs.


List 5 steps of how to use condoms correctly and consistently.
State at least 1 benefit of getting tested for STIs.
Identify at least 1 STI testing site in their community.

Timeframe
Activity
Part 1: Review
Part 2: The HIV Name Game
Part 3: HIV and STI Lesson
Part 4: The Condom Trivia Game
Part 5: STI Testing
Part 6: Role Play Scenarios
Part 7: Conclusion

Time
3 min
10 min
10 min
10 min
5 min
15 min
3 min

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Materials Checklist:
-

Whiteboard/blackboard
Dry-erase markers/chalk
Flip chart paper
Tape (masking or duct)
Notecards (1 per student)
Pens, pencils
Colored Sharpies
Scissors
Candy prizes
Optional: Music (iPhone, computer, or other music source)
Index cards
Plastic Ziploc bags (enough for each student and facilitator)
1 bag of Hersheys Kisses & Hugs
Small brown paper bag

Handouts and Evaluations


-

How to Use a Condom


Role Play Scenarios
Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson

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Teacher Preparation: Before Class Starts


You may wish to invite an organization that offers free STI testing to come in and
speak with the students. If you do, include this at the end of the session.

Print the following:


o How to Use a Condom (enough for entire class)
o 1 Role Play Scenarios handout
o 1 Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson

Obtain the Safe Space Ground Rules flip chart paper or poster board created in
Lesson 1. Then, tape it in the front of the classroom where students can easily
reference them during the lesson.

For Part 1:
o On flip chart paper, write the following questions. Leave space to write
correct answers. Tape it in front of room where it can be easily seen.
Q1: What are some general advantages of using contraception?
Q2: What are some of the outcomes of becoming a teen parent?

For Part 2:
o In each participant's plastic bag (except one) place a mixture of
approximately 10 Hersheys Kisses and one index card. In one
participant's bag put 10 Purple (dark chocolate) Kisses (instead of
Hersheys Kisses) and an unmarked index card. Put a star (*) on the
bottom of the bag with Purple Kisses.
o Mark the bottom corner of two index cards with a small "C." Place each
card in a different bag with Hersheys Kisses.
o Mark two additional index cards with a small "CS." Place each card in a
different bag with Hersheys Kisses.
o Write on one card: Do not participate. When asked, tell anyone who wants
to exchange candy, 'I do not want to exchange kisses.' Place the card in a
bag with Hersheys Kisses and put an "A" on the bottom of the bag.
o Do not place any of the marked cards in with the bag with Purple Kisses.

For Part 6:
o From the Role Play Scenarios handout, cut out each scenario so there is a
total of 3 slips.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Part 1: Review (3 minutes)


1) Remind students that the Safe Space Ground Rules are post in the front of class for
their reference throughout the lesson.
2) SAY:
Hello! Welcome to class. Today we are going to continue discussing sexual health
with an emphasis on sexually transmitted infections, testing, and condom use, but
first, we will review some key points from last lesson.
3) Ask each review question written on the flip chart paper, and SAY:
Shout out your answers!
4) Allow students to respond.
5) Award prize candy to students who volunteer correct answers, and write them on
the flip chart underneath the corresponding question on the flip chart.
6) Spend about 1-2 minutes on each question. If students have trouble recalling, finally
reference the answers in italics and write each answer underneath the corresponding
question on the flip chart.

Note to Teacher
What are some general advantages of using contraception?
Prevents pregnancy long-term, inexpensive, no need for prescription, small, easy to
use or carry, often available through medical provider
What are some of the outcomes of becoming a teen parent?
Changes to daily schedule, expensive, less likely to graduate, negative health, social,
and economic impact on children
7) SAY:

Good review, guys! Lets get started.

Part 2: The HIV Name Game (10 minutes)


1) SAY:

Lets pretend that we are at a party! Many are drinking and having a good
time. Everyone feel free to stand up, dance, and chat with friends as I hand out
these bags of Kisses.

2) Hand out the bags of kisses to the students randomly, but keep the bag with the
Purple Kisses for yourself.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

3) Turn on the music if you are using it for this activity.


4) SAY:

Now pull the index card out of your bag and follow the instructions if there are
any. Do not tell anyone what your card says. You will have 3 minutes to
exchange one candy per person with 3 of your peers. Write down the names of
the people you exchange kisses with on your index card.

5) Give the students time to exchange kisses with 3 other students. After time is up,
stop the music.
6) SAY:

Anyone who has a Purple Kiss, please stand up. Because you exchanged with
me, this means you were exposed to HIV. In the game, I had HIV and infected
the people who I exchanged with. In real life, this can happen through
unprotected sex.
Everyone who is still seated, check your index cards for the name of anyone who
is standing. Please stand up if you see the name of someone who is standing on
your index cards.

7) Continue to instruct seated participants to stand if they see someone standing


whose name is on their card.
8) SAY:

Now students with a "C" written on your card, you may sit down. The "C" means
you always used condoms when having sex, and therefore you protected
yourselves from getting HIV. In the game, you are not infected with HIV.
Students with "CS" written on your cards, you may sit down. (Pause for a few
seconds).
Now, you may stand right back up. You used condoms each time, but you used
them incorrectly. For this game, you are exposed to HIV just like everyone else
who is standing.

SAY:

Did anyone notice anyone who did not stand up?

9) Introduce the "abstinent" participant.


10) To the abstinent participants, ASK:
How did you feel when not playing? (Wait for student to respond.)

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum


Why is it difficult not to participate when everyone else is participating? (Wait
for student to respond.)
11) Address the entire class, ASK:
How did you all feel when this student refused to exchange Kisses with you?
(Wait for student to respond.)
12) Explain that this game could apply to other STIs as well, such as herpes, syphilis, or
gonorrhea.
13) ASK:

What did you all learn from this lesson? (Wait for student to respond.)
How do you think you can use this new information when you communicate
with your partner about sex? (Wait for student to respond.)

Part 3: HIV and STI Lesson (10 minutes)


1) SAY:

Sexually transmitted infections (or STIs) should be a serious concern for anyone
who decides to have sex, and they are easily caught if you do not protect
yourself.
STIs are infections that are transmitted from person to person through
sexual activity.
Q&A

will
an
the
2) SAY:

I will first give a brief overview of some common STIs, and then well have a
to test your knowledgeso make sure you listen carefully and ask questions
when you need clarification!
Remember that STIs are very common. Getting tested and treated, which we
discuss later today, is the most important first step if you think you may have
STI.
Also, if you feel you need additional information or have more questions after
session, please know that I am here for you as a mentor and that anything you
share with me is confidential!
There are two main types of STIs: bacterial and viral. There are also STIs that
are parasites, one of which we will discuss today.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum


3) Using the whiteboard/blackboard or flip chart paper, write and go over the most
common STIs. It should look something like this:
Bacterial STIs:

Viral STIs:

Types:
Types:
Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and HIV, Hepatitis B, and Herpes
Syphilis
Caused by viruses
Caused by bacteria
Transmitted through sex
Transmitted through sex
and in some cases skin-toskin contact
Can be cured with
antibiotics
Cannot be cured, but may
be treated with medication

4) SAY:

Parasites:
Types:
Trichomoniasis
Transmitted through sex
Can be cured with
antibiotics

There are over 25 different types of STI, and this lesson will focus on the most
common ones. Now well begin a little Q&A activity.

5) Ask the following questions and allow students time to respond. If they have trouble
answering, provide them with the answer.

Q: How do people get STIs?


A: Having unprotected sexvaginal, anal, oral, genital rubbing
Q: How do people avoid getting STIs?
A: Examples of correct answers:

Abstinence
Using condoms
Emphasize: It is important to know your status and that of your partner(s)!

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Q: What are some symptoms associated with STIs?


A: Examples of correct answers:

Burning when urinating


Discharge
Blisters, bumps, or sores on or around the genital area
Rash
Stomach pain
Flu-like symptoms (i.e. fever, chills)

Q: Of all of the symptoms or things people experience when they have an STI, which is the
most common?

A: Correct answer:

NO SYMPTOMS!

Note to Teacher Take this time to emphasize the importance of getting tested
regularly, especially if students are sexually active, because it is common for a person to
show no symptoms if they have an STI.
6) SAY:
HIV is a type of STI. It is important that you know the 4 main fluids that contain HIV.
They are:
1. Semen
2. Vaginal Fluids
3. Blood
4. Breast Milk
7) SAY:
To debrief, there are two main types of STIs: bacterial and viral. There are also STIs
that are parasites. STIs can be easily spread by having unprotected sex. It is common for
someone with an STI to have no symptoms, and that is why it is important to get
tested, and treated if you have an STI.
8) ASK:
What questions do you have about STIs?
9) Allow for and answer questions, if any.

Note to Teacher If there are questions, try your best to answer them. If you do not
know the answer, let students know that you can refer them to community resources such
as an STI testing center. It may be a good idea to reach out to the testing center, ask any
student questions, and let them know that you have students who may be getting in touch
with them for follow up.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Part 4: The Condom Trivia Game (10 minutes)


1) SAY:

Having condoms available is the first step towards preventing unintended


pregnancies and STI transmission if you are sexually active. Lets play a
condom jeopardy game to test your knowledge. We will divide into 3 groups,
and 1 point will be awarded to the team who answers each question correctly.
Whoever raises their hand first gets a chance to respond first. If their answer is
incorrect, the other group will get a chance to gain the point. If nobody
answers correctly, no points are awarded but I will tell everyone the correct
answer. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins prizes.
Lets begin!

2) Count off the students by 1 and 2 to form teams, or simply divide the room of
students in half.
3) Read the following questions to the students, and whichever team raises their hand
first gets to answer first. Complete correct answers are provided.

Note to Teacher Use your best judgment to decide if the students answered the
question correctly. You may also award the point, and then give a further explanation of
the correct answer to teach students.

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NGM Sexual Health Curriculum

Question:

Correct Answer(s) Include:

1. Where can you get free


condoms?

Clinics

2. Where can you buy


condoms?

Drug stores (i.e. CVS, Walgreens)

Community-based organizations

Grocery stores
Most gas stations and convenience stores

SAY: Buying condoms can feel embarrassing and confusing,


even for adults. I encourage you to find places where its
comfortable for you to buy condoms and think about the
number, type, size, etc., before you purchase.
3. Name 2 different types of
condoms

Male latex condoms


Female condoms

SAY: There are also polyurethane condoms for people who


are allergic to latex.
4. Where should condoms
be stored?

A cool, dry place

5. Where should condoms


not be stored?

Glove compartment of a car for a long time


Wallet for a long time
Any place where they would be exposed to heat or sun
for a long time

6. What do you need to do


before opening a package
of condoms?

Check the expiration date and do the pillow test.

SAY: Check the expiration date and examine the package.

Do not use a condom if its past its expiration date, or if the


package is damaged. Give a gentle push between your
fingers to the condom wrapper to ensure that there is
some air in it (the pillow test).

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7. What do you do after you Open the package carefully


check the expiration date
and do the pillow test?
SAY: Do not use your teeth or sharp objects because these
can damage the condom.
8. When should you roll on
a condom?

When the penis is hard and before genital contact and


penetration

SAY: It is never too late to put on a condom. If you forget to

use a condom, start penetration in the heat of the moment


and then remember to put on a condom, do so. Although it is
still risky, some condom use is better than none (especially
for pregnancy prevention). Make sure you figure out which
way the condom unrolls.
9. What should you do if
you start to put the
condom on upside
down?

Throw it away and use a new condom

10. How do you unroll a


condom?

Pinch the top of condom between your thumb and first


finger to keep air out.

SAY: Pre-cum on the tip of the penis may include an STI. If


the condom touches the tip of the penis and is then turned
over the correct way, the partner can be infected.

Continue to hold the tip of condom, and place it against


the head of the erect penis.
Use the other hand to unroll the condom over the penis,
all the way to the base of the penis.
11. What do you do with the
condom after you finish
having sex?

Hold the rim of condom around the base of the penis.


Pull the penis out of your partner while it is still hard
(erect).
Take the condom off away from your partners body.
Throw the used condom away. Throw it in a trash can.
Do not flush it down a toilet.

SAY: Never use a condom more than once. Also, use only one
condom at a time!

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12. What can you do if


condom slips off or
breaks?

If the condom slips off in the middle of intercourse, stop


having intercourse, discard the used condom, and roll on
another condom.

SAY: If a male is with a female partner, she can take

emergency contraception if she is not using another form of


birth control. Make sure both partners get tested for STIs.
If a male is with a male partner, make sure both partners get
tested for STIs. Also ask your STI testing center or doctor
about PrEP, which is a drug that can be taken to prevent HIV
for men who have sex with men.
13. Why do people use
lubricants with
condoms?

Easier penetration
Increased sensation and pleasure when using condoms

SAY: People can buy lubricants at the same places they buy
condoms. Some condoms are already lubricated on the
outside. Only water-based lubricants should be used with
latex condoms because oil-based lubricants, such as
petroleum jelly or lotion, will break the condom.

4) Give one How to Use a Condom handout to each student.

Part 5: STI Testing (5 minutes)


1) SAY:

2) ASK:

The only way to know for sure whether or not you have an STI is by getting
tested. Testing is critical because the most common symptom of most STIs is no
symptom at all.

What are things you have heard about STI testing? (Allow for students to
respond.)

3) Write students answers on the whiteboard/blackboard.

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4) SAY:

What youre being tested for will determine what type of test you may get. For
example, for men who are being tested for chlamydia or gonorrhea, it may just
be a urine sample.
For women, the test for chlamydia, gonorrhea and trichomoniasis can be given
with a vaginal swab.
For others such as HIV, it is most commonly an oral swab. However, some
clinics may use a blood test through a finger prick. Syphilis requires a blood
sample, too. If you have no blisters, herpes can be detected through blood
samples.
For HPV, there are no tests for men, but a Pap smear (for women) can test for
precancerous cells resulting from HPV. Yes, you heard that right! There are no
tests for men. For this reason, consistent condom use is especially important in
preventing the spread of HPV. Fortunately, there is a vaccine for some strains of
the virus for both women and men.

5) SAY:

When should you get tested?


Responses may include:
Annually
Frequently if you have symptoms
If you have a new partner

Part 6: Role Play Scenarios (15 minutes)


1) Divide the class into 3 groups.
2) Provide each group with one scenario from the Role Play Scenarios handout that
you cut out earlier.
3) SAY:
As a group read, answer the question, and plan a role-play presentation acting out
the scenario that highlights the problem and a solution. The entire group or only a
few members can choose to come up and present. You will have 7 minutes to plan
and 2 minutes to present.
4) After 7 minutes, SAY:
Time is up!

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5) Have the groups present their role play for the class. Monitor time to make sure
presentations do not exceed 2 minutes. Remember to give positive comments to
each group on what their skit taught about STIs and communication.
6) After each skit, ask students what went well during the skit. (Wait for students to
respond.)
8) Finally, debrief the entire activity using the following questio ns by ASKING:
What are the most effective ways to prevent STI and HIV? (Wait for students to
respond.)
If a person suspects that he or she has an STI or HIV, what should they do?
(Wait for students to respond.)

Note to Teacher Do not assume all relationships are heterosexual. Make every effort
to use inclusive language.

Part 7: Conclusion (3 minutes)


1) Handout one notecard to each student, and instruct the students to write down the
most important, interesting, or useful thing they took away from the days lesson.
2) Give students one minute to write down their responses. While they are writing,
SAY:
Remember, if you feel you need additional information or have more questions
after todays session, please know that I am here for you as a mentor and that
anything you share with me is confidential! To close, it is important to know
how to protect yourself from getting STIs if you choose to have sex. It is also
important to practice speaking with your partner about using protection and
getting tested for STIs. Good communication is key!
3) Collect their notecards.

Post Lesson
1) Complete the Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson evaluation.

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Lesson 4: Handouts and Evaluations


How to Use a Condom
Role Play Scenarios

Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson

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STI Role Play Scenarios:


Scenario One: Sam and Corey have been dating for two months.
Sometimes they have sex. Corey suspects that Sam is having sex
with other partners, but isnt sure. What should Corey do?
__________________________________________________________
Scenario Two: Mark just learned that he has an STI. He wants to tell
his partner himself, but is afraid of what his partner will think. What
should Mark do?
__________________________________________________________
Scenario Three: Jo and Alex are about to have sex. Alex wants Jo to
use a condom, but is not sure how to ask. What should Alex say?
__________________________________________________________

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Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson
Instructions: This form should be completed by the instructor at the completion of each
lesson.
Instructor Name: __________________________
Lesson Number: ______

Cohort (Grade Level):_______

Date of Lesson: ________


Number of Participants: ________

Please answer the following questions:


1. Were you able to complete all of the lesson activities in the allotted timeframe? If
not, which activities were you unable to cover?

2. Did any questions come up that you felt unable to answer based on the information
provided in the lesson materials? If so, please describe.

3. Did anything unexpected happen during the lesson? If so, please describe.

4. Were there any activities in this lesson that you felt the students were not receptive
to or just didnt work for whatever reason?

5. Based on the exit slips that students provided, please summarize the main points
that students took away from the lesson.

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Lesson 5: Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity


Total Time- 1 hour
Lesson Overview:
Throughout the lessons duration, students will learn the difference between gender and
sex, gain a better understanding of sexual orientation, gender identities, and gender roles
and be able to use inclusive language in relation to sexual orientation and gender identity.

Lesson Goal:
Students will be able to strengthen their understanding of and acknowledge diverse sexual
orientations and gender identities.

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:
-

Define sexual orientation, biological sex, gender, and gender identity


Explain how gender is different from biological sex.
Name at least three different sexual orientations.

Timeframe
Activity
Part 1: Review
Part 2: Greeting Cards
Part 3: Seeing Gender
Part 4: Traffic Light Language
Part 5: Conclusion

Time
5 mins
10 mins
20 mins
20 mins
5 mins

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Materials Checklist:
-

Projector
Computer with PowerPoint access
Whiteboard/blackboard
Dry-erase markers/chalk
Flip chart paper
Tape (masking or duct)
Stack of notecards
Two greeting cards (for new baby)
Gender role stereotype photos
Envelopes
Pens, pencils
Markers
Seeing Gender: Photo Activity PowerPoint file
Handouts and Evaluation

Teachers Guide to Language


Additional Resources
Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson

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Teacher Preparation: Before Class Starts

Print the following:


o 1 Teachers Guide to Language
o 1 Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson

Obtain the Safe Space Ground Rules flip chart paper or poster board created in Lesson 1.
Then, tape it in the front of the classroom where students can easily reference them during
the lesson.

For Part 1:
o On flip chart paper, write the following questions. Leave space to write correct
answers. Tape it in front of room where it can be easily seen.
Q1: Why is it important to use condoms if you choose to have sex?
Q2: What is the most common symptom of an STI?

For Part 2:
o Purchase two greeting cards that would be given to someone who just had a baby.
Ideally, find two that are clearly gendered as male and female will work.
o On one piece of flip chart paper write the word Girl. On another piece of flip chart
paper write the world Boy.

For Part 3:
o Open the Seeing Gender: Photo Activity PowerPoint file.
o Search magazines or online to find photos of people who visually fu lfill gender role
stereotypes and those who do not visually fulfill gender role stereotypes. Each picture
should have only one person in it (no groups or couples). Use the sample photos in the
Seeing Gender: Photo Activity PowerPoint file as a guide and update as culture
changes.
o Print or cut out the pictures and place four different ones into one regular envelope.
Create enough individual envelopes for half the students in class, since the activity that
will use these will be done in pairs.
o To save time or if it is challenging to find that many unique pictures, you can copy
those you do find, so there is overlap. Please be sure the photos represen t a range of
ages, races, ethnicities, cultures, physical abilities and body type.

For Part 4:
o Arrange the space so that students are sitting in a circle.
o Write the following terms on notecards, one term per notecard:
Cards for the class: Heterosexual, Homosexual, Bisexual, Gay, Lesbian, Bi, Fag,
Dyke, Queer, Straight
Example cards for the instructor: African-American, Black, *The n word
DO NOT WRITE THE ACTUAL WORD. Write the n word.

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Part 1: Review (3 minutes)


1) Remind students that the Safe Space Ground Rules are post in the front of class for
their reference throughout the lesson.
2) SAY:
Hello! Welcome to class. Today we are going to continue discussing sexual health
with an emphasis on gender identity and sexual orientation. But first, we will
review some key points from last lesson.
3) Ask each review question written on the flip chart paper, and SAY:
Shout out your answers!
4) Allow students to respond.
5) Award prize candy to students who volunteer correct answers, and write them on
the flip chart underneath the corresponding question on the flip cha rt.
6) Spend about 1-2 minutes on each question. If students have trouble recalling,
reference the answers in italics and write each answer underneath the corresponding
question on the flip chart.

Note to Teacher
Why is it important to use condoms if you choose to have sex?
To protect myself from STIs, protect my partner from STIs, protect my partner from
unintended pregnancy (if in heterosexual relationship)
What is the most common symptom of an STI?
It is common to not have any symptoms and still have an STI! Thats why it is
important to get tested every 6 months if you are sexually active.
7) SAY:

Good review, guys! Lets get started.

Part 2: Greeting Cards (10 minutes)


1) SAY and ASK:
I wonder if you all could help me. A friend of mine just had a baby, and I went to
the store to get a congratulations card and narrowed it down to two, but I cant
decide on which to send. What do you think?
2) Hold up the two greeting cards to the class. Someone will ask right away, Is it a boy
or a girl?

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3) SAY:

Good question! Thats the same question thats asked when a baby is born so
they can announce the babys sex. Now, what determines if the baby is a boy or
girl?

4) Listen for penis, vagina, or private parts. If none of the above is said, SAY:
We look between the babys legs and call it a boy or girl based on what we find.
I want you all to help me come up with lists of what makes a boy a boy and
what makes a girl a girl.
5) Divide the students into two groups. Make sure there are even numbers in each
group.
6) Hand one group colored markers and the flip chart paper with Girl on top.
7) SAY:

I want you to come up with a list of what you think makes a girl, a girl.

8) Hand the second group colored markers and the flip chart paper with the word Boy
on top.
9) SAY:
4) SAY:

I want you to come up with a list of what makes a boy, a boy.

Work on this list in your groups for 3 to 5 minutes work. After, each group will
present your list to the class.

10) After time is up, go to the board and draw a vertical line down the middle. On the
left hand of the line write Girl. On the right hand side of the line write Boy. It should
look like this:
Girl

Boy___________

11) After time is up, SAY:


For the group who had the paper with the word Girl on it, please come and
put their list on the board under the column that says Girl.

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12) Have this group present their list.
13) SAY:
14) SAY:

You did a great job! Lets give them a hand!

Now, for the group who had the paper with the word boy on it, please come
and put their list on the board under the column that says Boy.

15) Have this group present their list.


16) SAY:
17) ASK:

You did a great job! Lets give them a hand!


Are there things missing from either list that we should add?

18) Allow students to respond. If they have an idea, have students walk to the lists and
add what they think is missing.
19) ASK:

So how did you all come up with these lists?


Listen for we just knew, its what we see on TV or in the media, or
thats how a boy acts or girl looks.

20) Allow students to respond, and discuss for a few minutes.


21) ASK:

How do you know what makes a boy a boy and what makes a girl a girl?
Listen for whats between their legs, how they look, how they talk,
what they wear.

22) Allow students to respond, and discuss for a few minutes.


23) ASK:

Where did you learn this?


Listen for our parents, school, movies, TV, music.

24) Allow students to respond, and discuss for a few minutes.


25) SAY:

We learn in society what boys and girls typically look like or how they interact.
Blue is for boys and pink is for girls. Boys wear pants and girls wear dresses.
Boys dont cry and girls dont play sports. But, there are no rules to this. We just
make them up. Another word for boys and girls is called gender.

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26) Write gender on the board.


27) SAY:

And there are many different ways a person can express their gender. No one
way is the right way. How someone acts, what they wear, or who they like is not
always reflected by whats between their legs. Lets look at this another way.

Part 3: Seeing Gender (20 minutes)


1) SAY:

I have these terms that we sometimes use to talk about gender that I need help
defining. Lets go over these words and come up with a definition together.

2) Go to the board where gender is written and ASK:


When I say gender, what comes to mind?
3) Allow students to respond with definitions of what gender means to them. Write key
words of their definition to the left under the word gender. Listen for: how boys, girls,
men, and women should think or act.
4) After students have finished responding, write the correct definition to the right of
the students definition. Write: society's expectations about how people should think and
act as girls and boys, and women and men.
5) Write biological sex on the board and SAY:
Now lets come up with a definition for biological sex.
6) Allow students to respond with definitions of what biological sex means to them.
Write key words of their definition to the left under the word biological sex. Listen
for: body parts, penis, vagina, private parts.
7) After students have finished responding, write the correct definition to the right of
the students definition. Write: body parts, sex, and reproductive organisms.
8) SAY:

Now this one might be difficult, but I think we can come up with a definition
together.

9) Write gender identity on the board.


10) Allow students to respond with definitions of what gender identity means to them.
Write key words of their definition to the left under the word gender identity. Listen
for: how you identify your gender, what you wear, how you act.

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11) After students have finished responding, write the correct definition to the right of
the students definition. Write: how you feel about and express you gender.
Note to Teacher Review the meanings of the words gender, biological sex, gender
identity. The board should look like this at the end of the activity:

Gender
[students definition]

[correct defin ition]

Biological Sex
[students definition]

[correct definition]

Gender Identity
[students definition]

[correct def inition]

Correct definition of the words:


Gender: society's expectations about how people should think and act as girls and boys,
and women and men.
Biological Sex: includes genes, hormones, and body parts, especially sex and
reproductive organs
Gender Identity: how you feel about and express your gender.

12) SAY:

Now we are going to look a little closer at gender and gender identity. To do so,
please get into pairs.

13) After students get into their pairs, SAY:


Each pair is going to get an envelope. Inside are four pictures. You are going to
face each other. One person will start by taking out one of the pictures from the
envelope without showing it to the other person. They will then describe the
person in the picture and the other person needs to guess the gender of that
person. Seems easy, right?
14) SAY:

But wait there are a few rules!

15) Write key words of the directions on the board as you SAY:
The guesser may not ask questions; they can only go by whats shared by
their partner.

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No gender pronouns. You may not use any pronouns other than they or
them so no he or his or she or hers.
No gender words like masculine or feminine; man or woman; and so
on. For example, you cannot say, this person looks like a man, but isnt or
this person looks really girly. Just describe whats in the picture. For
example, this person has long hair. This person is a child. They are
playing football.
You may not refer to something in the picture as a girl or boy thing. For
example, you cannot say this person is playing with a girls doll.
If you recognize the person in the picture, please do not just say, Oh, its soand- so or describe what TV show or movie theyre in. Its all about what
they look like physically.

16) Open the Seeing Gender: Photo Activity PowerPoint slide with this sample photo.

17) SAY:

For example, if you had this person, you might say, This person is smiling. They
have dark hair that is styled up over their head. They are wearing lipstick and
other makeup. Then allow the other person to guess.

18) Darken the screen so the second PowerPoint slide cannot be seen.
19) Then describe the person in the picture, SAY:
Lets try another one only this time you wont see the picture, which is
what itll be like in the activity. This person has dark hair, thats sort of
spiked up. Theyre wearing eye makeup and a necklace and a leather
jacket.

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20) ASK:
a. So what gender did I just describe?
21) Once students have thrown out their guesses about the gender of the person in the
picture, show the second slide.
22) Distribute the envelopes, reminding students to take turns and not show their
pictures to their partners. As they work, walk around the room to see how they are
doing.
23) After about five minutes, asks students to stop their work. Generate discussion by
ASKING the following questions:
What was it like to do that? What was [insert participant responses] about it?
Did you find it easy to guess a persons gender? What was the language that
tipped you off?
What made it difficult to guess the persons gender?
What was it like to be the person giving clues? What was easy or challenging
about doing that?
24) SAY:

25) ASK:

In the photos, there were certain features that could apply to someone who is
or who we perceive to be female, to someone who is or we perceive to be male,
or to someone whose gender identity we do not know or who does not identify
as male or female.

If these terms can apply to someone of any gender, why do you think we gender
them in the first place? Why would we say, shes dressed like a guy vs. shes
wearing pants?

26) Allow students to respond and briefly discuss.


27) SAY:

28) ASK:

What we call ourselves is called our gender identity. And while you may
assume that someone who looks a particular way on the outside identifies the
same way on the inside, that may not necessarily be the case.

How many people feel they guessed the genders of the people in both of their
photos correctly?

29) Allow students to respond. Emphasize that, unless the photo you had was of a
famous person who has made their gender known, you actually wouldnt know for sure
what persons gender is unless you asked them.

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30) SAY:

No one has the right to tell someone else how they are supposed to express their
gender. Society will continue to give messages whether thats in the media or
from family or culture or religious groups. But in the end, every person has the
right to discover who they are and to let others know in ways that feel right to
them.

Part 4: Traffic Light Language (20 minutes)


1) On the board, make three columns. At the top of the first column write, Green Light
Language. At the top of the second column write, Yellow Light Language. At the top of
the third column write, Red Light Language. The board should look like this:
Green Light Language

2) SAY:

3) SAY:

4) ASK:

Yellow Light Language

Red Light Language

Theres a lot of discussion in the media right now about sexual orientation
some of which is true, some of which isnt. Lets look at some of the language
around sexual orientation, and correct a lot of the misinformation thats out
there.

To help us better understand what language to use and what language to


avoid, I have put up three different colors of language.

When youre at a traffic light and you see a green light what does that mean?

5) Listen for go.


6) SAY:
7) ASK:

Green means go. So Green Light Language is language that is acceptable to say.

What does a yellow light mean?

8) Listen for caution or slow down. If someone says speed up, SAY
Sometimes we may speed up, but we are really supposed to slow down.

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9) SAY:

The yellow light tells us caution or slow down. So Yellow Light Language is
language that might make some people feel uncomfortable.

10) ASK:
What does a red light mean?
11) Listen for stop or dont go.
12) SAY:
The red light tells us to stop. So Red Light Language is language that is
unacceptable, and we do not say these words.
13) SAY:

14) SAY:

15) SAY:

A lot of times people are taught certain language around sexual orientation
that is outright offensive or wrong. Other times, there are words that are
sometimes okay to use and sometimes not. So depending on who or where we
are, we may need to exercise caution before using certain words or not say
them at all.

You all will be in pairs for this activity. I am going to give each pair a notecard
with a word on it and blank notecards. Do not turn over the card until I tell you
to. When I say so, turn over the card, come to the board, and tape the card in
the column where you think it belongs. Hold onto your blank notecards.

For example, I have three cards here: African-American, Black, and the N-word.
I would put the Black card in the Green Light Language column.

16) Tape the Black card on the board in the Green Light Language Column.
17) SAY:

I will tape the African-American card under the Yellow Light Language
because not all people who are Black are from Africa.

18) Tape the African-American card on the board in the Yellow Light Language
Column.
19) SAY:

I will tape the n-word card under the Red Light Language column because
that term is offensive and should never be used.

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20) Tape the n-word card under the Red Light Language Column.
21) ASK:

Are there any questions?

22) Allow for and answer questions if any.


23) Hand out one prepared card with the termthat you created before class and two
blank cards to each pair of students.
24) SAY:

You may now turn over the notecard and tape it on the board.

25) Give students a few minutes to tape their notecards to the board. The board should
look like this.
Green Light Language
Black
Heterosexual
Homosexual
Bisexual

Yellow Light Language


African-American
Gay
Lesbian
Bi
Straight
*Queer

Red Light Language


The N word
Fag
Dyke

26) Based on what students have posted under the column, read each word card by card.
Pause after reading each word, and ask the student who placed the card in that
Column to tell you why they think it should go there. Have the group discuss if they
agree or not.
27) Repeat for every card.
28) If you need to move a card, do so after the students have discussed why the card
shouldnt be in that category. If no one catches that this card was incorrectly placed,
SAY something like
This term is sometimes used as a ___ light language, but it is actually
a _____light language because _____. For example, queer is an interesting term
because it can be used as a derogatory for a man who is perceived to be gay.
However, some people use it as a general term for all LGBT individuals. Finally,
some people truly identify as Queer.
29) ASK:

Are there words that are up here that you arent sure about what they mean?

30) If so, discuss the term with the group and refer to the Teachers Guide to Language
in the Handouts section for the correct definition.

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31) SAY:

I want you all to write down a word or words that someone has used to
describe you on the blank note card. Tape the notecard in the column that you
think it should be.

32) Give students one minute to write.


33) ASK:

How did it make you feel when someone used this language to describe you?

34) Briefly discuss.


35) ASK:

How do you think it makes someone feel if we only used Yellow Light Language
or Red Light Language?

36) Briefly discuss.


37) SAY:

What are some ways we can better communicate appropriate language when
discussing gender identity and sexual orientation amongst friends or family?

38) Briefly discuss.


39) SAY:

Language is very important in general, but especially when discussing sexual


orientation. Just like with gender identity, we do not know someones sexual
orientation just by looking at them. So we should use terms that they prefer. We
can do this by using green light language, asking them what terms they prefer
or have them tell us. Using inclusive language is a process and it might take
some time to switch from using Yellow Light Language and Red Light
Language. However, if you see or hear someone use offensive language, you
should tell them it is offensive and offer up some Green Light Language to use.

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Part 5: Conclusion (5 minutes)


1) Handout one notecard to each student, and instruct the students to write down the
most important, interesting, or useful thing they took away from the days lesson.
2) Give students a couple of minutes to write down their responses. While they are
writing, ASK:
How can we use the information learned today to relate back to the life goals
you set in this course?
3) Allow for students to respond.
4) Collect their notecards.

Post Lesson
1) Complete the Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson evaluation.

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Lesson 5: Handouts and Evaluations


Teachers Guide to Language
Additional Resources

Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson

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Teachers Guide to Language
Asexual: A person who does not experience sexual attraction ever, or for a period of time.
Bisexual: A person who is romantically/sexually attracted to both men and women
sometimes, though not necessarily, at the same time.
Gay/homosexual: A man who is romantically/sexually attracted to men. It is sometimes
used to describe women who are attracted to women, but is often used to refer to men
exclusively.
Lesbian: A woman who is romantically/ sexually attracted to women. Same gender loving
woman is sometimes used in the African-American community.
Pansexual: A person who is attracted to people across the range of genders. Often used by
those who identify as transgender or genderqueer or who are attracted to people who are
transgender or genderqueer.
Straight/heterosexual: Refers to women who are romantically/sexually attracted to men,
and men who are attracted to women
Transgender: An umbrella term for people whose gender identity and/or gender
expression differs from what is typically associated with the sex they were assigned at
birth
Note: This is a gender identity not a sexual orientation. Some students might be confused
because they have heard transgender referred to in LGBTQ.
Queer: Historically a derogatory term for gays, this word is now used positively by many
lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people and allies. It is sometimes used to describe an
open, fluid sexual orientation and/or gender identity/expression.
Source: Sexual Orientation: An Introduction, Our Bodies, Ourselves.
http://www.ourbodiesourselves.org/health-info/sexual-orientation-an-introduction/

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Additional Resources
Advocates for Youth Rights, Respect, Responsibility: A K-12 Curriculum.
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/3rs-curric-lessonplans
Advocates for Youth Sex Education Resource Center
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/for-professionals/sex-education-resourcecenter?task=view
Planned Parenthood Sexual Orientation and Gender
https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/sexual-orientation-gender
Our Bodies Our Selves Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity
http://www.ourbodiesourselves.org/health-topics/sexual-orientation-gender-identity/
Gender Spectrum Understanding Gender
https://www.genderspectrum.org/quick-links/understanding-gender/
NEA Diversity Toolkit: Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity
http://www.nea.org/tools/30411.htm
GLSEN Educator Resources
http://www.glsen.org/educate/resources/guides

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Instructor Feedback Form: Individual Lesson


Instructions: This form should be completed by the instructor at the completion of each
lesson.
Instructor Name: __________________________
Lesson Number: ______

Cohort (Grade Level):_______

Date of Lesson: ________


Number of Participants: ________

Please answer the following questions:


1. Were you able to complete all of the lesson activities in the allotted timeframe? If
not, which activities were you unable to cover?

2. Did any questions come up that you felt unable to answer based on the information
provided in the lesson materials? If so, please describe.

3. Did anything unexpected happen during the lesson? If so, please describe.

4. Were there any activities in this lesson that you felt the students were not receptive
to or just didnt work for whatever reason?

5. Based on the exit slips that students provided, please summarize the main points
that students took away from the lesson.

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Lesson 6: Risk Reduction and Goal Setting


Total Time 1 hour
Lesson Overview
This final lesson is intended to be a culminating experience that brings together all the
sexual health knowledge the students have acquired during the previous 4 lessons.
Students will partake in a group review exercise to gauge how much student sexual health
knowledge has increased over the course of the curriculum. Students will discuss why
making positive decisions related to sex may have helped real-life role models achieve
success, and how it can do the same for them.

Lesson Goal
Students will be able to take control of their own lives by creating a short-term risk
reduction plan that will help them reach their long-term goals.

Lesson Objectives
By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:
-

Recall 5 key pieces of information that reflect the learning objectives of the 4
previous lessons (2-5) as a group.
Effectively teach 3 of the key concepts from 1 of the 4 previous lessons to their
classmates.
Identify at least 1 long-term, real-life outcome associated with the sexual health
behaviors discussed in each of the previous 4 lessons.
Set a personal short-term goal to abstain from 1 risky sexual health behavior and
perform 1 responsible sexual health behavior as a first step toward achieving a longterm goal.

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Materials Checklist
-

Projector
Computer with PowerPoint access
Whiteboard/blackboard
Dry-erase markers/chalk
Flip chart paper
Tape (maskng or duct)
Blank white paper (entire class
Slips of paper or large Post-it sticky notes (not stiff index cards)
Large bowl or bucket (e.g. mixing bowl or mop bucket)
Hershey Kisses (enough for each student to have about 2 or 3)
Wrapped miniature candies of different types (enough for each student to
have 1 or 2)
Pens, pencils
Markers
Scissors
Role Model Power Point file

Handouts and Evaluations


-

Personal Pledge Certificate


Teacher Cheat Sheet
Student Learning Assessment: Post-Curriculum
Instructor Feedback Form: Entire Curriculum

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Teacher Preparation: Before the Lesson

Print the following:


o Personal Pledge Certificate (enough for entire class)
o 1 Teacher Cheat Sheet
o 1 Student Learning Assessment: Post-Curriculum
o 1 Instructor Feedback Form: Entire Curriculum

Obtain the Safe Space Ground Rules flip chart paper or poster board created in
Lesson 1. Then, tape it in the front of the classroom where students can easily
reference them during the lesson.

For Part 1:
o On flip chart paper, write the following questions. Leave space to write
correct answers. Tape it in front of room where it can be easily seen.
Q1: What is one sexual orientation?
Q2: How can you tell someones gender identity or sexual orientation by
looking at them?
For Part 2:
o Use a marker to write a "P," "S," "C," or "I" on the bottom of each Hershey
Kiss (or another available candy). Write the number of each letter, ensuring
that there are enough pieces of candy for each student to have one. Place
the kisses in the bowl/bucket. The other candy can stay in its bag.

For Part 3:
o On 4 sheets of flip chart paper, write one the following lesson headings:
PREGNANCY PREVENTION (P), STI PREVENTION & TESTING (S),
COMMUNICATION (C), IDENTITY & SEXUALITY (I). Ensure only one heading
per flip chart paper.
o Tape the sheets to the wall in different areas of the room so students will be
able to gather around and write on them.
o If you prefer to use a whiteboard or chalkboard, write and space out the
lesson headings mentioned above.
For Part 4:
o Open Role Model Powerpoint file.
o If you will not be using post-it notes, you may want to cut the slips of paper
before the lesson period.

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Part 1: Reflection and Review (5 minutes)


1) Remind students that the Safe Space Ground Rules are post in the front of class for
their reference throughout the lesson.
2) SAY:
Today is the final lesson. We have fun activities planned. But before we wrap things
up, lets review some key points from last lesson.
3) Ask each review question written on the flip chart paper, and SAY:
Shout out your answers!
4) Allow students to respond.
5) Award prize candy to students who volunteer correct answers, and write them on
the flip chart underneath the corresponding question on the flip chart.
6) Spend about 1 minute on each question. If students have trouble recalling,
reference the answers in italics and write each answer underneath the corresponding
question on the flip chart.
Note to Teacher
What is one sexual orientation?
Heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual
How can you tell someones gender identity by looking at them?
You cant tell someones gender identity or sexual orientation by looking at them.
7) Ask how the students feel about the fact that this is the last lesson in the curriculum.
Use these questions to facilitate discussion, by ASKING:
Do you think you know more about sexual health than you did before the
course?
Do you think the information you learned will help you make better choices
than you could have in the past?
8) Once students have shared, SAY:
Well, I think it will! You guys know more than just the facts when it comes to
sex and sexuality. You also have good strategies to communicate with other
people about those things, and you know of local organizations that can help
you out when you need it. Talking about sex can be tough, but you guys proved
that you're mature enough to handle it. You're not quite off the hook yet,
though! We still have one more lesson, so let's move on.

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Part 2: Candy and Group Brainstorming (15 minutes)


1) SAY:

So, a lot of you probably have younger brothers or friends who could benefit
from all the stuff you have learned, right? Well, since now you are the sexual
health experts, let's play a little game and see how you do as teachers!

2) Put the Hershey Kisses (labeled) in the bowl or bucket and walk around the class,
having each student chose one. Tell them not to eat the candy yet.
3) Tell the students to look at the bottom of their candy and see what is written on it,
then get into groups with the other students who have the same letter.
4) Hand out paper, pens, and pencils if necessary.
5) Tell the students that the lesson topics correspond to the letters on their Hershey
Kisses.
6) Tell the students to work together to come up with the 3 pieces of information they
remember from their assigned lessons that they feel would be the most important for
younger boys to know.
7) Tell the students not to worry. You don't expect them to remember everything
you talked about in earlier lessons, and that they should just have fun and do the best
they can.
8) Tell the students they can eat their candy!
Note to Teacher While students are writing, place the small slips of paper in a
central location so students can grab them on the way back to their seats. Also, ensure
that you have your Teacher Cheat Sheet available for reference and your Learning
Assessment Form available to note student knowledge level.

Part 3: Students as Teachers (20 minutes)


1) Once students appear to be finished taking notes, hand out markers and tell them
to go to their large paper on the wall or their section of the chalkboard /blackboard.
2) Tell students to write down their 3 lesson points and choose one group member to
teach each one to the rest of the class.
3) Once students have finished writing, choose a group to begin teaching first.

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4) Intervene if students begin to stray off topic or if the information they ar e


presenting is inaccurate or incomplete (refer to applicable lesson plan if students
bring up a detail you are unsure of).
5) When each group finishes teaching, reference the applicable section of the Teacher
Cheat Sheet to see which pieces of key information have not been presented.
Supplement their presentation. SAYING:
Nice job! Another thing younger students might want to know (complete
sentence).
6) Congratulate students and tell them they can return to their seats. Ask that they
pick up one of the small slips of paper on their way.
Note to Teacher If students have used a chalkboard or whiteboard to write out their
lesson plans, do not erase what they have written. You may wish to reference back to
what they have written when completing the Student Learning Assessment evaluation.
We have chosen not to have students submit any of their group notes in writing on
paper, as we do not want them to feel as though they are being "tested." Students will
also be using the information on the flip chart paper/whiteboard as inspiration in the
next exercise.

Part 4: Relatable Role Model (15-20 minutes)


1) Lead a brief discussion about how the information the students just pre sented
relates to their lives using the following prompts.
2) ASK:

Okay great, but what happens now?


Why does all of this matter to you all in your own lives?
Do you think some of these sexual health behaviors might impact your
ability to reach your long-term goals?

3) SAY:

Let's look at a real guy who has been very successful and think about how
his behavior may have helped him get to where he is today.

4) Open Role Model PowerPoint and briefly read through slides. Stop at slide
5.
Note to Teacher The Role Model PowerPoint provided describes the life of NBA
superstar Kevin Durant. Teen boys in 2016 are likely to recognize him and perhaps
perceive his as a relatable role model. In future years however, you may want to
substitute a more relevant figure.

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5) Once you have reached slide 5, tell students that you want them to think about the
individual lessons they just taught. Ask them to use their slips of paper to write
down one way that either:
A risky behavior related to their sexual health topic could have prevented
Kevin from getting where he is today.
OR
A responsible behavior related to their sexual health topic might have
created opportunities that allowed him to achieve such success.
6) Click to slide 6 to provide examples.
7) Tell students to make their slip of paper into a little ball once they have finished
writing.

Note to Teacher It may take students several minutes to complete this task. Choose
an area of the room where you can place the candy bowl or bucket so that students will
be able to stand about 7 or 8 feet away and try to shoot their paper balls into it.

8) Once students have finished writing, SAY:


Alright, now we're going to have a little fun! Let's see who can shoot like
Kevin Durant! You're going to come up and try and shoot your paper ball into
the candy bowl. If you make the shot you get to choose 2 pieces of candy!
It's a tough shot, though, so even if you miss you still get to choose 1.
9) Choose students to come up and shoot, then allow them to pick their candy before
returning to their seats.
10) Students can eat their candy right away if they choose to.
11) Collect any stray paper balls.
12) Unfold and read what the students have written on their slips of paper, briefly
discussing each and answering any student questions if they come up.
Note to Teacher The timing of this part of the lesson will vary significantly based on
the number of students in the class. If you are running short of time you may want to
simply unfold all the slips of paper on a table in front of you and choose those that you
think are most important to read aloud.

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Part 5: Personal Pledge (5 minutes)


1) SAY:

You all have done some great thinking, and I hope you have enjoyed yourselves
throughout the course.

2) Hand out the Personal Pledge Certificate.


3) SAY:

You all have the ability to be as successful as Kevin Durant or in whatever field
they choose.

4) Tell the students to take the Personal Pledge Certificate home with them, give it
some thought, and then complete it so they can discuss it with you at their next
individual meeting.

Post Lesson
1) Complete the Student Learning Assessment: Post Curriculum evaluation.
2) Complete the Instructor Feedback Form: Entire Curriculum evaluation.

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Lesson 6: Handouts and Evaluations


Personal Pledge
Teacher Cheat Sheet
Role Model PowerPoint

Student Learning Assessment: Post-Curriculum


Instructor Feedback Form: Entire Curriculum

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Personal Pledge
I have the ability to achieve great things. My dream is to become a
________________________________ when I am an adult.
I am committed to reducing risky behaviors that might prevent me from
reaching that goal, and I want to create opportunities for myself by
making smart sexual health choices. I can start today by setting these
goals for the rest of high school:
I will avoid_______________________________________________
_____________________ (negative outcome) by making sure I do not
__________________________________________________________________________________________
______________ (risky behavior).
By committing to ___________________________________________
___________________ (responsible behavior) I am more likely to be able to
____________________________________________________
______________________________________________ (opportunity).

Signed _______________________________

Date ________________

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Teacher Cheat Sheet


Another thing younger students might want to know
Pregnancy Prevention:
is that the only 100% effective way to not get someone pregnant is abstinence.
is that using two condoms or pulling out before ejaculation do not prevent pregnancy.
condoms and birth control pills are both highly effective forms of birth control, but
only when used exactly as the instructions say.
in general, teen fathers are significantly less likely to graduate from high school and
earn significantly less money than their peers with no children.
is that Grady Teen Health Center and Planned Parenthood offer confidential, free
services.
STI Prevention and Testing:
that although burning when urinating, blisters, discharge, and abdominal pain are
common symptoms of STI's, many people have no symptoms at all.
is that semen, vaginal fluids, blood, and breast milk are the 4 main fluids that contain
HIV.
is that condoms should be put on when the penis is already hard, and it should be
thrown away if it is put on inside out.
is that they should hold a condom near the ring when pulling it out after sex so semen
doesn't spill.
is that many people get STD's so it is nothing to be ashamed of, and that free
confidential STI testing is available at the Grady Teen Health Center and Planned
Parenthood.
Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity:
is that sexual orientation, biological sex, and gender identity are 3 different things.
is that sexual orientation is who you are attracted to, which could be more than one
gender.
is that gender identity is a person's internal association with one gender or another.
is that the most respectful way to refer to a guy who is attracted to other guys is gay,
and a girl who is attracted to other girls is lesbian.
is that it is perfectly normal to feel attracted to both males and females, which is called
being bisexual, or not to feel sexual attracted toward anyone, which is refered to as
asexual.

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Communication:
is that communication is an important part of any healthy relationship, sexual or not,
because it prevents misunderstandings and promotes respect of personal boundaries.
is that being a good communicator means being good at both expressing your own
feels and listening carefully to t other person's.
is that when you are talking to a partner, it is important to speaking clearly and
directly, and not to make assumptions about what he or she might be thinking.
is that as a listener, it is important to be patient, let the other person finish, and then
asking clarifying questions if you aren't confident about what the other person means.
is that consent must be clear and verbal, and that silence is not consent.

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Lesson 6: Role Model Slides

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Student Learning Assessment: Post-Curriculum


1. Describe the students' overall level of confidence in completing Lesson 6: Part 2 (Candy
& Group Brainstorming).
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
2. Below, please note whether the student groups able to generate 3 accurate key points
from each of the 4 previous lessons. Also, note what information each group came up with
for their specific content area, and whether you feel there were any particular gaps in their
knowledge.
Communication & Consent
__________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
Pregnancy Prevention___________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
STI Prevention, Testing, & Condom Use
______________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________
Gender Identity & Sexual Orientation ____________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
3. Describe the students' overall level of confidence in completing Lesson 6: Part 3
(Students as Teachers).
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
4. Please comment on whether you believe that the students saw value in the curriculum
and whether you think they plan to apply what they learned in their own lives.
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________

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Instructor Feedback Form: Entire Curriculum


Instructions: This form should be completed by the instructor at the completion of the
entire curriculum (after Lesson 6).
Instructor Name: __________________________
Cohorts (Grade Level): ________________

Date of Curriculum Completion ________


Number of Participants: ________

1. Do you feel that the amount of time between lessons impacted the students ability to
retain the information from previous lessons? If not, how could the spacing of the
lessons be improved?

2. In general, do you feel the amount of content in each lesson matched the one hour
timeframe? If no, how do you think it could be improved?

3. Do you feel that the topics covered throughout the curriculum were relevant to the
students? If no, please explain why or why not.

4. Are there any additional topics you would have liked to see included in the
curriculum? If so, which ones?

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