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BY ORDER OF THE AIR FORCE INSTRUCTION 11-2B-2,

SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE VOLUME 3

3 MAY 2010

Flying Operations

B-2--OPERATIONS PROCEDURES

COMPLIANCE WITH THIS PUBLICATION IS MANDATORY

ACCESSIBILITY: Publications and forms are available on the e-Publishing website at


www.e-publishing.af.mil for downloading or ordering.

RELEASABILITY: There are no releasibility restrictions on this publication.

OPR: HQ AFGSC/A3TO Certified by: HQ USAF/A3O-A


Supersedes: AFI11-2B-2V3, 11 (Col Scott L. Dennis)
September 2009 Pages: 44

This volume establishes effective and safe operations of the B-2 and implements AFPD 11-2,
Aircraft Rules and Procedures; AFPD 11-4, Aviation Service; and AFI 11-202V3, General
Flight Rules. It establishes the minimum Air Force operations procedures for personnel
performing duties in the B-2. This publication applies to the Air National Guard (ANG).
MAJCOMs, Direct Reporting Units (DRU) and Field Operating Agencies (FOA) will forward
proposed MAJCOM/DRU/FOA-level supplements to this volume to HQ AFFSA/A3OF, through
HQ AFGSC/A3TO, for approval prior to publication IAW AFPD 11-2, paragraph 4.2. Copies of
approved and published supplements will be provided by the issuing office to HQ
AFFSA/A3OF, HQ AFGSC/A3TO, and the user MAJCOM/ DRU/FOA offices of primary
responsibility (OPR). Field units below MAJCOM/DRU/FOA level will forward copies of their
supplements to this publication to their parent MAJCOM/DRU/FOA OPR for review and
approval prior to publication. NOTE: The above applies only to those DRUs/FOAs that report
directly to HQ USAF. Keep supplements current by complying with AFI 33-360, Publications
and Forms Management.

Waiver authority to this publication is set out in paragraph 1.3. See paragraph 1.3. for guidance
on submitting comments and suggesting improvements.

This instruction requires the collection or maintenance of information protected by the Privacy
Act of 1974. The authority to collect and maintain the records prescribed in this instruction are
37 USC 301a, Incentive Pay; Public Law 92-204 (Appropriations Act for 1973), Section 715;
Public Law 93-570 (Appropriations Act for 1974); Public Law 93-294 (Aviation Career
Incentive Act of 1974); DOD Instruction 7730.57, Aviation Career Incentive Act of 1974 and
Required Annual Report; AFI 11-401, Aviation Management; and E.O. 9397, Numbering
System for Federal Accounts Relating to Individual Persons as amended by Executive Order
2 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

13478, Amendments to Executive Order 9375 Relating to Federal Agency Use of Social Security
Numbers, November 18, 2008. System of records notice F011 AF/XOA, Aviation Resource
Management System (ARMS), applies.

Records Disposition. Ensure that all records created as a result of processes prescribed in this
publication are maintained in accordance with AFMAN 33-363, Management of Records, and
disposed of in accordance with the Air Force Records Disposition Schedule (RDS) located at
https://www.my.af.mil/gcss-af61a/afrims/afrims/. Contact supporting records managers as
required.

This instruction contains references to the following field (subordinate level) publications and
forms which, until converted to departmental level publications and forms may be obtained from
the respective MAJCOM publication distribution office.

SUMMARY OF CHANGES

This document has been changed to reflect the transfer of the bomber global strike mission from
Air Combat Command (ACC) to Air Force Global Strike Command (AFGSC).

Chapter 1INTRODUCTION 5
1.1. Scope and Responsibilities. ................................................................................... 5
1.2. References, Abbreviations, Acronyms, and Terms. ............................................... 5
1.3. Waivers. ................................................................................................................. 5
1.4. Deviations. ............................................................................................................. 5
1.5. Distribution. ........................................................................................................... 5

Chapter 2MISSION PLANNING 6


2.1. Responsibilities. ..................................................................................................... 6
2.2. Map/chart preparation. ........................................................................................... 6
2.3. CBRNE. ................................................................................................................. 7
2.4. Fuel Conservation. ................................................................................................. 7
2.5. Briefing/Debriefing. ............................................................................................... 7
2.6. Unit Developed Checklists/Local Pilot Aids. ........................................................ 7
2.7. Personal Equipment. .............................................................................................. 8

Chapter 3NORMAL OPERATING PROCEDURES 9


3.1. Ground Communications. ...................................................................................... 9
3.2. Ground Visual Signals. .......................................................................................... 9
3.3. Preflight. ................................................................................................................ 9
3.4. Taxi. ....................................................................................................................... 9
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 3

3.5. Takeoff. .................................................................................................................. 9


3.6. Formation. .............................................................................................................. 10
3.7. Air Refueling. ........................................................................................................ 13
3.8. Approaches and Landings. ..................................................................................... 14
Table 3.1. Traffic Pattern and Landing Limitations and Restrictions. .................................... 15
3.9. Airshow/Flyby Profiles. ......................................................................................... 16
3.10. Chase Formation. ................................................................................................... 16
3.11. Reduced Lighting Training. ................................................................................... 16
3.12. After Landing Procedures. ..................................................................................... 16
3.13. Hot Pit Refueling (HPR). ....................................................................................... 17
3.14. Fuel minimums. ..................................................................................................... 17

Chapter 4INSTRUMENT PROCEDURES 18


4.1. Approach Category. ............................................................................................... 18
4.2. Simulated Instrument Flight Procedures. ............................................................... 18
4.3. Flight in Precipitation/Icing Procedures. ............................................................... 18
4.4. INS/GPS/RVSM Flight. ......................................................................................... 18
Figure 4.1. B-2A RVSM Envelope Limitations. ...................................................................... 19
4.5. B-2 BRNAV, RNP-10, MNPS RNP-12. ............................................................... 20

Chapter 5PILOT OPERATIONAL LIMITATIONS AND RESTRICTIONS 21


5.1. Scope. ..................................................................................................................... 21
5.2. Crew Requirements. ............................................................................................... 21
5.3. General Limitations. .............................................................................................. 21
5.4. Pilot and Aircraft Limitations. ............................................................................... 21

Chapter 6AIR-TO-SURFACE WEAPONS EMPLOYMENT 22


6.1. References. ............................................................................................................. 22
6.2. General. .................................................................................................................. 22
6.3. Off-Range Simulated Weapons Employment. ....................................................... 22
6.4. Weather Minimums/IMC Weapons Deliveries. ..................................................... 23
6.5. Hung weapons procedures. .................................................................................... 23
6.6. Jettison procedures. ................................................................................................ 23
6.7. Exercise participation. ........................................................................................... 23

Chapter 7ABNORMAL OPERATING PROCEDURES 24


4 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

7.1. General. .................................................................................................................. 24


7.2. Ground Aborts. ...................................................................................................... 24
7.3. Takeoff Aborts. ...................................................................................................... 24
7.4. Air Aborts. ............................................................................................................. 24
7.5. Radio/IFF-SIF Failure. ........................................................................................... 25
7.6. Lost Wingman Procedures. .................................................................................... 25
7.7. Spatial Disorientation (SD)/Unusual Attitudes. ..................................................... 25
7.8. Armament System Malfunctions. .......................................................................... 25
7.9. In-flight Practice of Emergency Procedures. ......................................................... 25
7.10. Search and Rescue Combat Air Patrol (SARCAP) Procedures. ............................ 26

Chapter 8LOCAL OPERATING PROCEDURES 27


8.1. General. .................................................................................................................. 27
8.2. Forms Adopted. ..................................................................................................... 27

ATTACHMENT 1GLOSSARY OF REFERENCES AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION 28

ATTACHMENT 2AIRCREW OPERATIONS IN CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL,


RADIOLOGICAL, AND NUCLEAR THREAT ENVIRONMENT 34

ATTACHMENT 3FLIGHT BRIEFING GUIDES 36

ATTACHMENT 4FORMATION BRIEFING GUIDE 40

ATTACHMENT 5STRANGE FIELD PROCEDURES 43


AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 5

Chapter 1

INTRODUCTION

1.1. Scope and Responsibilities. This volume, in conjunction with other governing directives
in Attachment 1, outlines those procedures applicable to the safe operation of B-2 aircraft under
most circumstances, but is not to be used as a substitute for sound judgment or common sense.
Operations or procedures not specifically addressed may be accomplished if they enhance safe,
effective mission accomplishment. With complementary references, this volume prescribes
standard operational procedures for all USAF B-2 crews.
1.2. References, Abbreviations, Acronyms, and Terms. See Attachment 1. Training units
may develop phase manuals from the procedures contained in these documents. Phase manuals
may be used to augment initial and mission qualification training at operational units. Phase
manuals may expand these basic procedures--in no case will they be less restrictive.
1.3. Waivers.
1.3.1. Forward waiver requests through appropriate channels to MAJCOM/A3 for approval.
1.3.2. Unless specified in the waiver approval message, the waiver remains in effect until the
next AFI 11-2B-2V3 version.
1.3.3. Submit changes to this volume on AF Form 847, Recommendation for Change of
Publication (flight publication) using local procedures.
1.4. Deviations. Deviations from these procedures require specific approval of MAJCOM/A3
unless an urgent requirement or an aircraft emergency dictates otherwise. In such a case, the
aircraft commander will take the appropriate action to safely recover the aircraft.
1.5. Distribution. Each pilot is authorized a copy of this volume.
6 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

Chapter 2

MISSION PLANNING

2.1. Responsibilities. The pilot in command of each aircraft and the designated flight lead are
ultimately responsible for mission planning. Crewmembers are personally responsible for
maintaining adequate knowledge of system operations, normal, and emergency procedures. The
Weapons and Tactics Flight will provide supplemental planning information as required to
effectively accomplish the assigned mission.
2.1.1. Accomplish flight planning to insure safe accomplishment of all phases of flight. As a
minimum, flight planning includes takeoff/landing data, fuel requirements, target
study/weapons delivery procedures/briefing (if applicable), formation procedures (if
applicable), and chart preparation. Review bird advisory and bird hazard information IAW
AFI 91-102 and AFPAM 91-212. Consider and factor in foreseeable safety risks and risk
mitigation factors in accordance with Operational Risk management (ORM).
2.1.2. Standards. Groups may develop OG/CC approved Group/Wing standards. OG/OGV
will review all standards to ensure standardization and compliance with AFI 11-series
guidance.
2.1.3. Mission planning time. SQ/CCs will provide pilots sufficient time to mission plan.
SQ/CCs should schedule no less than four hours for mission planning when pilots have
standardized/stereo products available (show and go flight profiles). SQ/CCs should
schedule a minimum of eight hours of mission planning for actual weapons deliveries,
airshow/flyby profiles, or any non-standard mission.
2.2. Map/chart preparation.
2.2.1. Local Area Charts. A local area chart is not required if the unit in-flight guide includes
jettison areas, divert information, controlled bailout areas, and provides sufficient detail of
the local area to remain within assigned training areas.
2.2.2. Enroute Charts. Pilots may use Flight Information Publication (FLIP) enroute charts
instead of maps on navigational flights within areas that adequately covered by FLIP. These
charts will be of sufficient scale to provide navigation and terrain/obstacle avoidance.
2.2.3. PFPS/Sectional Charts.
2.2.3.1. Pilots flying under VFR, inside the MTRs, in low-altitude MOAs, or performing
VFR flybys in the CONUS will supplement existing mission planning materials (e.g.
CHUM, FLIP AP/1B, etc.) with one of the following:
2.2.3.1.1. PFPS/Falcon View with the following overlay options selected:
airports/heliports, airspace boundaries, airways, MTR, parachute jump and SUAS
boundaries.
2.2.3.1.2. Sectional aeronautical charts.
2.2.4. Low Level Charts. Low level charts and route books used during flight will be
annotated with location and dimensions of Class A/B/C/D airspace, civil/military airfields
and other potential high density traffic areas (e.g., parachute activity areas and ultra
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 7

light/hang glider/glider sites, etc.) within 5 NM of any planned VFR route or MTR lateral
boundary. Applicable airfield approach control frequencies in the vicinity of Class A/B/C/D
airspace will be annotated and briefed on all such flights. In addition, annotate and brief the
intersection of other VR/IR routes (if applicable) and any other possible areas of conflict.
2.2.4.1. Low level charts and route books will also be annotated with a minimum safe
altitude (MSA) or route abort altitude (RAA) for each leg, updated by the Chart Update
Manual (CHUM), and annotated for all man-made obstacles above the planned flight
altitude.
2.2.5. Pilots flying outside CONUS will follow gaining MAJCOM, theater or host nation
guidance on mission planning. If no gaining MAJCOM, theater or host nation guidance
exists, use the best charts or Falcon View overlay options available to comply with this
instructions requirements.
2.3. CBRNE. Procedures for operation in a CBRNE-threat environment are contained in
Attachment 2.
2.4. Fuel Conservation. Manage aviation fuel as a limited commodity and precious resource.
Design procedures for optimal fuel use and efficiencies throughout all phases of mission
execution, to include ground operations, flight plans, power settings, and climb/descent profiles.
Incorporate enroute tasks to make maximum use of airborne learning opportunities.
2.5. Briefing/Debriefing.
2.5.1. The aircraft commander (AC) or flight lead (FL) establishes mission goals and
objectives.
2.5.2. AC/FL will present a logical briefing to promote the safe and effective mission
accomplishment. AC/FL will brief contracts, roles, and responsibilities for all crew/flight
members.
2.5.3. All flight members must attend the flight briefing unless previously coordinated with
squadron supervision. Anyone not attending the flight brief must receive a briefing on
mission events and emergency procedures. If the interval from the initial briefing to takeoff
exceeds 72 hours, a complete review and briefing must be re-accomplished. All crews
involved in a formation flight must attend a formation briefing.
2.5.4. AC/FLs will brief all items required by Air Force Instructions (AFIs) and the flight
crew information file (FCIF). AC/FLs may use locally developed briefing guides that cover
all AFI briefing requirements. Those items published in AFIs, Air Force Tactics, Techniques
and Procedures (AFTTPs) Manuals, or squadron/wing standards and understood by all flight
members may be briefed as standard.
2.5.5. Alternate mission. AC/FLs will brief an appropriate alternate mission.
2.5.6. Debriefing. AC/FLs will formally debrief every mission for all flight/crew members.
As soon as possible after each mission, AC/FLs will review audio/visual mission recording
media, if available.
2.6. Unit Developed Checklists/Local Pilot Aids.
8 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

2.6.1. Except for -25 checklists, unit developed checklists may be used in lieu of flight
manual checklists provided they contain all items (verbatim and in order) listed in the
applicable checklist.
2.6.2. Units will produce a pilot aid that includes as a minimum:
2.6.2.1. Briefing guides.
2.6.2.2. Local VHF/UHF/HF/VSAT/LINK-16 channelization.
2.6.2.3. Airfield diagram.
2.6.2.4. NORDO procedures.
2.6.2.5. Impoundment procedures.
2.6.2.6. Fuel dump and weapons jettison areas.
2.6.2.7. Divert/alternate base information.
2.6.2.8. Recovery with ferried, retained, or hung weapons on board.
2.6.2.9. On-scene commander procedures for CSAR operations.
2.6.2.10. Other information as deemed necessary by the unit, such as stereo flight plans,
ERCC/taxi-back procedures, local training areas/MOAs/ATCAA diagrams, alert
procedures, and maintenance brevity codes.
2.7. Personal Equipment. Pilots will fly with adequate flight gear to ensure safe mission
completion. Pilots will wear survival vests on all sorties utilizing combat step procedures from
fence-in to fence-out. Pilots will carry survival vests on ocean crossing flights. Crewmembers
will wear gloves during engine start, takeoff, and landing.
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 9

Chapter 3

NORMAL OPERATING PROCEDURES

3.1. Ground Communications. Pilots will brief ground crews as required. Use operational
headsets to the maximum extent possible during all engine starts, pre-taxi checks, and when
technicians perform tasks on the aircraft. Use hand signals as a last resort or if required during
alert scrambles or combat operation.
3.2. Ground Visual Signals. When ground intercom is not available, use visual signals IAW
AFI 11-218. All signals pertaining to operation of aircraft systems will originate with the pilot.
The crew chief will repeat the signal when it is safe to operate the system. Pilots will not activate
any system that poses a danger to the ground crew prior to receiving proper acknowledgment
from ground personnel.
3.3. Preflight.
3.3.1. Icing. Do not take off with visible icing (snow, frost, or ice) on any part of the
aircraft.
3.3.2. Flight control BITs (ABIT). Pilots will complete an ABIT of the FCS after
performing any flight control (FC) memory reads. Pilots will not perform FC air event
memory reads.
3.4. Taxi.
3.4.1. Minimum taxi interval is 500 feet.
3.4.2. Do not taxi with a reported RCR of less than 6 anywhere on the taxi route. Taxi
routes must be cleared to a minimum of 75 feet wide for taxi RCR purposes.
3.4.3. During normal operating procedures, maximum taxi speed is 15 knots groundspeed
and 10 knots during turns or high gain operations. Refer to command guidance for taxi limits
greater than 15 knots.
3.4.4. Taxi over cables from BAK-9/BAK-15 as slow as possible not to exceed 10 knots
ground speed.
3.5. Takeoff.
3.5.1. Do not takeoff if any of the following conditions exist:
3.5.1.1. The RCR is less than 9 (can be waived by OG/CC).
3.5.1.2. Standing or pooled water is on the runway.
3.5.1.3. The computed takeoff roll exceeds 80% of the available runway (can be waived
by OG/CC).
3.5.1.4. The tailwind exceeds 10 knots (can be waived by OG/CC).
3.5.1.5. Any attitude indicator, heading indicator, or standby instrument is inoperative.
3.5.1.6. One or more engines are inoperative from the start of takeoff roll.
10 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

3.5.1.6.1. During emergency evacuations and at the discretion of the wing


commander or with higher headquarters approval, aircraft may takeoff with one or
more engines inoperative. Under no circumstances should a crew take off with a
computed takeoff distance that exceeds 95 percent of runway available.
3.5.2. Intersection takeoffs require OG/CC approval.
3.5.3. Runways must be cleared to 150 feet width (+/-75 feet of centerline).
3.5.4. Do not takeoff over any raised web barrier (MA-1A or 61QS11). Do not start takeoff
roll or land prior to approach end cables. Takeoffs accomplished beyond approach end cables
must have 10,000 feet runway remaining, plus 1000 feet overrun and still comply with
applicable takeoff restrictions.
3.6. Formation.
3.6.1. Responsibilities. FLs are responsible for ensuring contracts, roles and responsibilities
of each flight member are established, briefed, executed, and debriefed. If any flight member
cannot meet their responsibilities, contracts, or assigned tasks then they will immediately
communicate that information to the FL.
3.6.2. Maximum formation size is normally three aircraft, but can be as many as 6 aircraft.
3.6.3. Maintain a minimum of 500 feet vertical altitude separation between aircraft.
3.6.4. Notify ATC when operating as a non-standard formation on flight plans, on initial
ATC contact, and when contacting each subsequent controller.
3.6.5. Radio Procedures.
3.6.5.1. Except for wingman acknowledgement, preface all communications with the
complete flight call \sign. Transmit only information essential for mission
accomplishment or safety of flight.
3.6.5.2. Make a knock-it-off (KIO) or terminate call IAW AFI 11-214. Any flight
member may call KIO or terminate. All participants will acknowledge a KIO by
repeating the call.
3.6.5.3. Acknowledge radio checks which do not require the transmission of specific
data by individual flight members in turn (i.e. 2, 3). Acknowledging indicates that the
appropriate action is complete, in the process of completion, or the flight member
understands.
3.6.5.4. All flight members will acknowledge the initial air traffic control (ATC)
clearance. Acknowledge subsequent ATC instructions when directed by lead.
3.6.6. Takeoffs. Formation takeoff spacing is one minute minimum but can be waived to 30
seconds by the OG/CC. Nuclear training multi-ship minimum interval takeoffs (MITOs)
require OG/CC approval.
3.6.6.1. Use caution for wake turbulence on departure, and adjust climb routing to avoid
areas of potential wake turbulence. Appropriate fan headings will be flown for all MITOs
to account for preceeding aircrafts wake turbulence. If wake turbulence is encountered,
smoothly adjust flight path laterally to exit turbulence. Do not adjust throttles and use
caution for G limitations
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 11

3.6.7. Join-Up/Rejoin.
3.6.7.1. Lead will ensure a minimum of 1000-foot altitude separation between each
aircraft for formation rejoins.
3.6.7.2. IMC. Until all wingmen report either visual or tied, FL will report passing every
5000 feet with current and planned rollout heading (if applicable). Wingmen will echo
their respective current altitudes and heading. Wingmen will not climb through
preceding aircrafts altitude until visual or tied. Wingmen will delay turns until over the
same point as the previous aircraft.
3.6.7.3. VMC. Wingmen may use visual cutoff to expedite rejoins. Avoid flight through
wingtip vortices and jet wash. If encountered, immediately decouple the autopilot (if
engaged) and unload the aircraft to approximately 1G.
3.6.8. Formation breakup. FL will not break up formation until each wingman has a positive
fix to navigate with, and to (visual, INS, GPS, or TACAN).
3.6.9. Changing Leads/Position Changes:
3.6.9.1. Accomplish lead changes from a stabilized and wings level attitude.
3.6.9.2. Maintain a minimum of 500 feet vertical separation during lead/position
changes.
3.6.9.3. Initiate lead changes with a radio call. Wingmen will acknowledge the radio
call.
3.6.9.4. The lead change is effective upon acknowledgment.
3.6.9.5. The former leader then moves to the appropriate wing position.
3.6.9.6. VMC Lead/Position Changes. FL announces intention for a position/lead
change. After wingman acknowledgement, the affected wingman moves to a line
Abreast position with a minimum of 1000 feet wing tip spacing. Lead then directs the
position/lead change. After wingman acknowledgment, aircraft then change altitudes
appropriate for their new positions. The former lead/new two will move aft to the
trailing wingman position and assume radar trail.
3.6.9.7. IMC Lead/Position Changes.
3.6.9.7.1. Formation Position Change--Any Aircraft Moves to Lead:
3.6.9.7.1.1. Step 1. Lead determines the aircraft to move forward (maneuvering
aircraft). The maneuvering aircraft will echelon (normally right) using 30
degrees of bank and turning 30 degrees off heading. When aircraft is 30 degrees
off heading, reverse the turn using 30 degrees of bank and return to formation
heading. This provides approximately 2 NM offset.
3.6.9.7.1.2. Step 2. After established in echelon, the maneuvering aircraft will
accelerate forward, increasing airspeed 30 KIAS maximum. The maneuvering
aircraft should resume formation airspeed and stabilize approximately 1 NM
forward from the original lead. When the maneuvering aircraft is in the forward
echelon and positive visual and/or radar contact is established, conduct the
required altitude changes. Note: altitude changes may be accomplished in
12 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

Stabilized aft echelon position so long as all trailing aircraft maintain visual
and/or radar contact with the preceding aircraft.
3.6.9.7.1.3. Step 3. The maneuvering aircraft will then assume lead position and
clear the formation members to fall into trail position.
3.6.9.7.1.4. Step 4. The formation lead should be advised by the last aircraft after
the formation is reformed.
3.6.9.7.2. Formation Position Change--Any Aircraft to the End of the Formation:
3.6.9.7.2.1. Step 1. Lead determines the aircraft to move aft (maneuvering
aircraft). The maneuvering aircraft will echelon (normally right) using 30 degrees
of bank and turning 30 degrees from the formation heading. After turning 30
degrees off heading, reverse the turn using 30 degrees of bank and return to
formation heading. This will provide approximately 2 NM of offset.
3.6.9.7.2.2. Step 2. After establishing in echelon, the maneuvering aircraft will
decelerate toward the end of the formation, decreasing airspeed 30 KIAS
maximum. The maneuvering aircraft should resume formation airspeed and
stabilize approximately NM aft of the last aircraft. When the maneuvering
aircraft is in the aft echelon position and positive visual and/or radar contact is
established, formation lead directs required altitude changes. Note: Altitude
changes may be accomplished in a stabilized forward echelon position so long as
all trailing aircraft maintain visual and/or radar contact with the preceding aircraft.
3.6.9.7.2.3. Step 3. The maneuvering aircraft will then move into trail position
using no more than 15 degree heading corrections.
3.6.9.7.2.4. Step 4. The formation lead should be advised by the last aircraft after
the formation is reformed.
3.6.10. Formation Deconfliction.
3.6.10.1. General. FL will brief deconfliction contracts and ensure that all wingmen
understand their responsibilities. Wingmen have the primary responsibility for safe
separation and are responsible for executing the FL contracts.
3.6.10.2. Loss of visual/radar lock. Use the following procedures if any flight member
loses visual/radar contact within the formation:
3.6.10.2.1. Wingmen will call blind/broke lock when unable to monitor preceding
aircrafts position.
3.6.10.2.2. After a blind/broke lock call from any formation member, lead
immediately will communicate current heading and altitude and then repeat heading
and altitude parameters every 1000 feet until all formation members are tied or visual.
3.6.10.2.3. If there is not a timely acknowledgement of the original blind/broke
lock call, then the flight member initiating the call will maneuver away from the last
known position of the other flight members and obtain a separate clearance.
3.6.10.3. Broke Lock and Lost Comm. If a wingman becomes "broke lock" and is
unable to contact the lead aircraft, the wingman will utilize all available communications
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 13

devices on board the B-2 to establish contact with lead. Simultaneously, the wingman
must take positive steps to ensure separation. If in straight and level flight, maintain
established altitude separation and previously cleared flight path. If straight ahead and in
a climb or descent, turn fifteen degrees away from leads last known heading. If in a turn
and in a climb or descent, roll out to obtain separation and ensure flight path clearance. If
all attempts to regain contact with lead aircraft fail, attempt to contact ATC to obtain a
separate clearance.
3.6.10.4. Mid-mission/late rejoins. Rejoining aircraft require radio contact, visual or
radar contact, and 1000 feet altitude separation before rejoining any formation. If
applicable, accept military assumes responsibility for separation of aircraft (MARSA)
with ATC only after ensuring altitude separation.
3.6.11. Formation air refueling.
3.6.11.1. Initial Rejoin. Cross the rendezvous point in trail formation. If IMC, lead
directs wingmen to move to echelon after the formation is rolled out behind the tanker(s).
If VMC and pre-briefed by FL, wingman may automatically assume echelon position
with the tanker(s) in sight.
3.6.11.2. Post refueling rejoins. After completing air refueling, lead moves to a two mile
left 60 degree echelon position stacked down 2000 feet from the air refueling base
altitude of the lead tanker. After completing refueling, the number two aircraft stacks
down 1500 feet, and assumes a trail position behind lead. Post refueling, number three
stacks down 1000 feet and moves to a trail position behind two. Lead will coordinate
with the tanker lead for a larger altitude block, if required.
3.6.11.3. Comply with further formation air refueling procedures IAW ATTP-56(B).
3.7. Air Refueling.
3.7.1. Air refueling operations are authorized along published routes/tracks. Random air
refueling is authorized with ARTCC approval. After completing the rendezvous, maintain
formation with the tanker. The tanker is responsible for navigation.
3.7.2. Air Refueling Restrictions.
3.7.2.1. Do not conduct air refueling with control stick steering engaged.
3.7.2.2. Do not conduct air refueling with an FCS CAUTION, except when necessary for
safe recovery of the aircraft.
3.7.2.3. Do not conduct air refueling when encountering turbulence which, in the opinion
of the pilot-in-command or boom operator, denies a safe margin of control of either
aircraft or boom.
3.7.2.4. Do not conduct air refueling with less than four engines operating, except when
necessary for safe recovery of the aircraft. Simulated engine out air refueling is permitted
under IP supervision. Pilots will place no more than one throttle to idle to simulate the
loss of one engine.
3.7.2.5. Do not conduct air refueling when the tanker has less than all engines operating,
unless required for safe recovery of the aircraft.
14 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

3.7.2.6. Do not conduct air refueling when any flight control problems are suspected or
encountered in flight which, in the opinion of the receiver aircraft commander, would
deny a safe margin of control.
3.7.2.7. Do not conduct air refueling when tanker aircraft is unable to retract landing
gear.
3.7.2.8. Discontinue air refueling after loss of all tanker disconnect capability, except
during the following conditions:
3.7.2.8.1. During an emergency fuel situation (limit contact time to that required to
obtain fuel).
3.7.2.8.2. Operational missions, ORI, emergency evacuations or deployments/re-
deployments (limit contact time to that required to obtain fuel).
3.7.2.9. Boom wet downs from the contact position with JP-4 (Emergency/Alternate
fuel) are acceptable as long as the total quantity passed does not exceed one percent of
total fuel in tanks.
3.7.3. Breakaway Training.
3.7.3.1. The tanker pilot, boom operator, and receiver pilot will brief breakaway training
prior to initiation. The briefing must include when the maneuver will occur and who
gives the execution command.
3.7.3.2. Do not accomplish breakaway training while in contact.
3.7.4. Boom Limits Demonstration.
3.7.4.1. Boom envelope demonstrations require IP supervision.
3.7.4.2. The boom operator and the receiver pilot will confirm normal disconnect
capability prior to the start of the demonstration.
3.7.4.3. The receiver pilot will inform the boom operator when starting the
demonstration, the limit demonstrated, and when terminating the demonstration.
3.7.5. Override Boom Latching Procedures. Override boom latching procedures training
require an instructor pilot. Pilots and boom operators will pre-brief procedures. Both tanker
and receiver systems must be fully operational.
3.8. Approaches and Landings.
3.8.1. Maximum bank angle in the traffic pattern is 45 degrees.
3.8.2. Landing touchdown zone. The normal touchdown zone for full stop and touch and go
landings is 750 -2500 feet beyond the threshold on runway centerline. Pilots should consider
a go-around for landings outside the normal touchdown zone.
3.8.3. Autopilot. When flying coupled instrument approaches, disengage the autopilot no
lower than decision height or minimum descent altitude.
3.8.4. Landings beyond approach end cables will be accomplished with at least 10,000 feet
runway remaining plus 1000 feet of overrun. When 1000 feet of overrun are not available,
reserve 1000 feet of the runway to satisfy the minimum overrun requirements.
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 15

3.8.5. Table 3.1. provides traffic pattern and landing limitations and restrictions.

Table 3.1. Traffic Pattern and Landing Limitations and Restrictions.


Approach Notes Maximum Maximum Minimum IP Night Minimum
Type gross crosswind weather required RCR
weight
Full stop 1 311,500 30 Approach No Yes 9
landing mins
Normal low 300,000 N/A Approach No Yes N/A
approach mins
Touch and 2 270,000 20 300-1 (w/IP) No Yes 9
go
25 (w/IP) 500-1 1/2
(or nonprec
mins
whichever is
Normal 2, 3 270,000 25 higher)
300-1 Yes Yes 9
master
mode
touch and
Sim
go Eng 4, 5 270,000 N/A Note 6 No Yes N/A
Out Low
Apprch
Sim Eng 5 270,000 25 Note 6. Yes Yes 13
Out Touch
and
Go/Full
Stop
Notes:
Landing

1. OG/CC approval required for full stop landings at gross weights exceeding 285,000.
2. Do not accomplish touch and go landings with any of the following:
1. Any landing gear malfunction (including gear door malfunctions and
nosewheel steering malfunctions)
2. Any brake or anti-skid failure indications, any flight control caution or warning
3. Center of gravity outside landing limits
4. Runway length insufficient to abort a touch-and-go and stop in the remaining runway
5. Any live or inert weapons on board

3. Accomplish normal master mode approaches without approach mode and without
speed brakes extended.
4. Initiate low approach/go-around no lower than 200 height above touchdown.
5. Use four engines for non-briefed/unplanned go-arounds.
6. Weather required is 1,000 feet/2 miles visibility or circling minimums, whichever is
higher.
16 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

3.9. Airshow/Flyby Profiles. The following are approved airshow/flyby profiles:


3.9.1. Profile 1--Straight Thru Pass. Profile consists of a 1000 foot AGL (minimum altitude),
clean configuration pass over the runway at 200 to 250 knots based on aircraft gross weight.
If the show line is a non-runway environment then use 1000 feet above the highest obstacle
within 2000 feet. Following the straight thru pass, aircraft will climbout IAW ATC
instructions. If a high angle climbout is desired, this profile may be combined with the
climbout portion of Profile 2.
3.9.2. Profile 2--Tear Drop Pass. Profile begins via a straight run-in down the show line of
the viewing audience at 200 to 250 knots, based on aircraft gross weight. Minimum altitude
for this maneuver is 1000 feet AGL. If the show line is a non-runway environment then use
1000 feet above the highest obstacle within 2000 feet. Upon completion of the straight run-
in pass, track outbound approximately 1 nautical mile then execute a 240 degree turn away
from the show line (rolling out momentarily at 90 degrees to the show line for clearing) so as
to roll out directed towards show center tracking 30 degrees off runway or show centerline.
At show center accomplish a turn away from show center and track outbound 30 degrees off
runway or show centerline. All bank angles will be planned for 40 degrees (not to exceed 45
degrees).Execute turns so as to fly no closer than 1000 feet from the crowd line. If departing
after this profile, at show center, execute a climbing turn (at MCT) at 40 degrees of bank
away from the crowd line. Comply with climbout in accordance with ATC instructions.
3.9.3. Profile 3--360 degree (box pattern). Profile consists of a 1000 foot AGL (minimum
altitude), clean configuration pass over the runway at 200 to 250 knots based on aircraft gross
weight. If the show line is a non-runway environment then use 1000 feet above the highest
obstacle within 2000 feet. Following the straight thru pass, execute a turn away from the
crowd line and fly a rectangular box pattern to a second pass at 1000 feet AGL (roll out
momentarily at perpendicular headings to the show line for clearing). All bank angles will be
planned for 40 (not to exceed 45) degrees. At this time the aircraft will execute a level pass
and depart the area.
3.10. Chase Formation.
3.10.1. The OG/CC determines when a B-2 flight requires a chase flight.
3.10.2. Minimum chase spacing from a B-2 is 150 feet.
3.10.3. Chase aircraft will not fly directly over or under B-2 aircraft.
3.10.4. All aircraft in the chase formation will use a common UHF frequency.
3.11. Reduced Lighting Training. Conduct reduced lighting training only in approved
airspace.
3.12. After Landing Procedures.
3.12.1. Weapons bay doors. Do not open the weapons bay doors until the aircraft reaches its
final parking location and a ground observer is available.
3.12.2. Fuel distribution and center of gravity. To allow APU refueling, manually adjust
fuel so that each main tank fuel quantity is below 18,000#s, each inboard tank fuel quantity is
below 19,400#s, and each outboard tank fuel quantity is below 14,300#s. Accomplish fuel
adjustments after exiting the runway and prior to engine shutdown. Maintain CG within the
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 17

flight CG envelope during taxi. To avoid fuel venting overboard, ensure the outboard tanks
are below 14,300#s prior to engine shutdown following any preflight or alert cocking.
3.12.3. Unless maintenance requests otherwise, close aux air doors and open the ARSSI
prior to engine shutdown.
3.12.4. Pilots will complete a post-flight walk-around inspection of the aircraft and weapons
bays.
3.13. Hot Pit Refueling (HPR).
3.13.1. HPR certified pilots and ground crews may conduct HPR day or night.
3.13.2. HPR with a pentagraph requires a separate brake check area away from the refueling
pits. HPR with R-11 or R-12A trucks does not require a separate brake check area.
3.13.3. Outgoing ERCC crews normally perform HPR. Do not ERCC adjacent to aircraft
conducting HPR operations.
3.13.4. Do not conduct HPR if brake temperatures exceed 700 degrees Fahrenheit. After
brakes cool to below 700 degrees, HPR is permitted.
3.13.5. Pilots will monitor aircraft CG during HPR because with the ground refuel panel
powered, the FMMS does not monitor CG. The fuel panel fuel management switch position
(AUTO or MAN) will not prevent exceeding CG limits.
3.13.6. Pilots will verbally confirm to the maintenance crew that hands, feet and knees are
clear of all flight controls prior to commencing HPR.
3.13.7. Do not perform any avionics operations or maintenance operations during HPR.
Only transmit UHF/VHF if required for an emergency. Pilots will notify ground refueling
crews prior to any radio transmissions.
3.13.8. Do not HPR with weapons, live or inert, aboard the aircraft.
3.13.9. Do not HPR if fuel was dumped during flight or if fuel is in the surge tank.
3.14. Fuel minimums.
3.14.1. Normal fuel for recovery is 18,000 lbs.
3.14.2. Minimum fuel is 15,000 lbs.
3.14.3. Emergency fuel is 10,000 lbs.
3.14.4. Remote or island destination (IAW AFI 11-202v3 AFGSC Sup) fuel reserve is
30,000 lbs. If the remote or island destination requires an alternate due to weather, then the
fuel reserve must include enough fuel for two hours of holding.
18 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

Chapter 4

INSTRUMENT PROCEDURES

4.1. Approach Category. The B-2A is designated as an approach category D aircraft. If the
airspeed for a circling approach exceeds 166 knots, use category E minima.
4.2. Simulated Instrument Flight Procedures.
4.2.1. Synthetic ILS (SILS) and Synthetic TACAN (STACAN) approaches require VMC.
Visual glide path guidance is required at night.
4.3. Flight in Precipitation/Icing Procedures.
4.3.1. Lightning Strike/Static Discharge. In the event of a known or suspected lightning
strike or static discharge, terminate the mission and maintain below 250 KCAS when
practical.
4.3.2. Avoid thunderstorms laterally by 20 NM when below FL 200.
4.3.3. Avoid thunderstorms laterally by 40 NM when at or above FL 200.
4.3.4. When at or above FL 200, stay VMC when within 40 NM of any convective activity,
not just thunderstorms, which have built above FL 200.
4.3.5. Avoid cruising at altitudes in IMC, or in areas of precipitation, that are within +/-5000
feet or +/- 10 degrees Celsius of the forecast freezing level. Climb or descend through these
areas as rapidly as is safely possible.
4.3.6. Do not climb or descend through forecast or reported icing conditions greater than
light.
4.3.7. Do not cruise in any forecast or actual icing conditions.
4.3.8. Maintain Mach .65 or greater to minimize amount of ice accumulated (in icing
conditions).
4.3.9. Minimize throttle movements with anti-ice/rain removal operating
4.4. INS/GPS/RVSM Flight.
4.4.1. RNAV and GPS approaches are not authorized.
4.4.2. Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum (RVSM) Airspace. Airspace where RVSM is
applied is considered special qualification airspace. Both the aircrew and the specific aircraft
must be approved for operations in these areas. All B-2As are approved for restricted
operation within RVSM airspace as documented in Figure 4.1 B-2A RVSM Envelope
Limitations. Refer to FLIP GP and the following guidance for additional RVSM
requirements:
4.4.3. Required RVSM Equipment. Both altimeters (MDUs, one display before each pilot,
and the standby altimeter), the autopilot altitude hold function, the IFF transponder altitude
reporting (Mode C), and the flight control system (to include the air data ports and their
heaters) must be fully operational (defined as not more than single channel failed) before
entry into RVSM airspace. Should any failures of this equipment beyond the allowable single
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 19

channel failure occur, immediately notify ATC and coordinate further clearance. If failure
occurs before entering RVSM airspace, request a new clearance so as to avoid this airspace,
or request ATC special handling as a non-equipped aircraft.
4.4.3.1. Autopilot. The altitude hold function of the autopilot shall be engaged
throughout level cruise periods in RVSM airspace, except when special circumstances
dictate, such as when turbulence procedures require disengagement. Report any aircraft
deviations greater than 130 ft from the commanded altitude to maintenance.
4.4.3.2. Altimeters. Crosscheck primary altitude displays with standby altimeter, before
or immediately upon entry to RVSM airspace. After final level off in RVSM airspace the
PIC will ensure that the readings of all altimeters are recorded (AVTR of both VSDs)
and retained for use in case of deviation.
4.4.4. RVSM Operations. Monitor systems and crosscheck altimeters on primary displays to
ensure they agree +/- 10 ft.
4.4.4.1. Aircrews should limit climb and descent rates to a maximum of 1,000 feet per
minute when operating in RVSM airspace to reduce potential effects on other aircrafts
Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) operations, and to minimize risk
of overshooting desired altitude during level-off.
4.4.5. Post Flight. Document (in the AFTO Forms 781) malfunctions or failures of RVSM
required equipment, including the failure of this equipment to meet RVSM tolerances.

Figure 4.1. B-2A RVSM Envelope Limitations.

NOTE: B-2 RVSM Restricted Operating Envelope.


20 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

4.5. B-2 BRNAV, RNP-10, MNPS RNP-12. 6. The B-2 aircraft is cleared for operations in
Basic Area Navigation (BRNAV), Required Navigation Performance-10 (RNP-10), and North
Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specification (MNPS) airspace.
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 21

Chapter 5

PILOT OPERATIONAL LIMITATIONS AND RESTRICTIONS

5.1. Scope. This chapter adds B-2 aircraft limitations and restrictions to those already specified
in flight manuals and other portions of this instruction and apply to all AFGSC aircrews.
5.2. Crew Requirements. The minimum crew is specified in T.O. 1B-2A-1. Waiver
information for special situations is in AFI 11-2B-2V 1.
5.3. General Limitations.
5.3.1. New/Modified Aircraft and Equipment. Pilots not qualified in the operation of new or
modified aircraft equipment will not operate that equipment unless under the supervision of
an instructor pilot qualified in that equipment.
5.3.2. Authorized Fuel Loads. Aircraft will be loaded with standard fuel loads IAW T.O.
1B-2A-5-2.
5.4. Pilot and Aircraft Limitations.
5.4.1. Brief all practice AFTTP 3-1 maneuvers or emergency procedures before the
maneuver.
5.4.2. Do not practice compound simulated emergencies during critical phases of flight
except those specifically authorized for Flight Instructor Course (FIC) training.
5.4.3. After taking the appropriate action to rectify a malfunction, resume training only if the
designated pilot in command determines no hazard to safe aircraft operations exists. In an
actual emergency, terminate all training and emergency procedures practice.
5.4.4. Pilots must be Combat Mission Ready to operate an aircraft armed with nuclear
weapons.
22 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

Chapter 6

AIR-TO-SURFACE WEAPONS EMPLOYMENT

6.1. References. AFI 11-214 contains air-to-surface procedures applicable to all aircraft. This
chapter specifies procedures applicable to B-2 operations.
6.2. General.
6.2.1. Do not release weapons if a release system, indicator, or weapon bay door malfunction
exists, unless the malfunction is only a loss of redundancy which does not affect weapons
accuracy or normal weapons release (e.g., single power drive unit controller failure).
6.2.2. Do not conduct simulated bomb runs, unusual maneuvers, or touch and go landings
while carrying weapons.
6.2.3. Do not complete weapon unlock/release enable/release consent for live or inert
weapons until the aircraft is on the range, cleared HOT by the controlling authority, and
weapons impact would be in the range danger area.
6.2.4. Do not release weapons during an inflight emergency or with an engine shutdown
(excluding combat).
6.2.5. Do not release weapons if the release exceeds or will result in exceeding technical
order limits, CG limits, briefed track/timing tolerances, safe escape requirements, wingman
deconfliction, or fragmentation deconfliction.
6.2.6. Do not open weapon bay doors during flight with weapons on board other than for
intentional release, jettison, or telemetry checks (if applicable).
6.2.7. A range control officer (RCO), chase aircraft, or the B-2 Mission Management System
(MMS) may confirm releases. Pilots may conduct simulated bombing training after they
release all live/inert weapons.
6.2.8. If communications are lost while on-range, immediately place release switches to the
safe/off position. Do not accomplish further releases until establishing communications and
receiving clearance to release. If communications cannot be established, the pilots will
remain in range airspace and attempt to contact the appropriate ARTCC by all means
possible. If communications cannot be established, then proceed IAW range procedures.
6.2.9. Do not operate in SIM mode when live or inert weapons are aboard the aircraft.
6.2.10. Do not practice simulated emergency procedures when weapons are loaded on the
aircraft.
6.3. Off-Range Simulated Weapons Employment.
6.3.1. Pilots will minimize use of weapons doors in-flight during simulated weapons
employment. Open weapons bay doors only for specific IQT/CT training.
6.3.2. Do not manually rotate RLAs in partial SIM without RLAs installed.
6.3.3. When conducting nuclear training missions using the simulation mode, pilots may
power off the simulated weapons and deselect the weapons display for departure. After
completing all simulated weapons deliveries, pilots should safe any retained simulated
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 23

weapons using the appropriate weapons checklist. Following completion of this procedure,
pilots may power off any remaining simulated weapons and deselect the weapons display.
6.4. Weather Minimums/IMC Weapons Deliveries. If range procedures permit, B-2 pilots
may release live or inert weapons in IMC.
6.4.1. Unless further restricted by range guidance, B-2 aircrews will adhere to the following
when conducting IMC operations or dropping through an undercast: With GPS FOM greater
than or equal to 4 requires one OAP or target direct aiming on a 0.8 NM CM map. Without
GPS and system buffers greater than 250 requires one OAP within 5 minutes of release (or
target direct aiming) on a 0.8 NM CM map. For Coordinate only releases: Do not release if
GPS FOM greater than or equal to 4. For non-GPS integrated releases do not release if
navigation system buffers are greater than or equal to 250. Buffer value must be verified via
radar within 10 minutes of release.
6.5. Hung weapons procedures.
6.5.1. General. If pilots receive hung munitions indications, they will terminate all
subsequent bombing activity scheduled for the sortie, accomplish post release checklist
actions to safe the weapons, and return to base.
6.5.2. Recovery. If recovering with hung weapons, accomplish the abort/post-release
checklist and return directly to base or other suitable landing base, avoiding over-flight of
populated areas. Accomplish air refueling if necessary for aircraft recovery.
6.6. Jettison procedures. Pilots will jettison weapons only if in the opinion of the pilot in
command, the retention of stores would adversely affect the safe recovery of the aircraft. After a
successful jettison with suspected or known hung munitions, do not accomplish any further
weapons delivery activity (peacetime).
6.7. Exercise participation.
6.7.1. B-2 crews may fly in penetration master mode during peacetime training missions that
comply with current security directives.
6.7.2. B-2 pilots will comply with all other training rules/SPINS including external lighting,
IFF, squawks, and altitudes.
6.7.3. The OG/CC may waive these restrictions IAW the appropriate classification guide.
24 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

Chapter 7

ABNORMAL OPERATING PROCEDURES

7.1. General. This chapter contains procedures to be followed when other-than-normal


situations occur. They do not, however, replace or supersede procedures contained in the flight
manual.
7.1.1. Accept no aircraft for flight with a malfunction which denies the crew the ability to
safely operate in all phases of flight or any malfunction that, if airborne, would require
mission termination.
7.1.2. Once a malfunctioning system is isolated and/or the fault corrected, do not use that
system again unless use in a degraded mode is essential for recovery. Do not conduct ground
or in-flight troubleshooting after completing flight manual emergency procedures.
7.1.3. Fuel dumping. Only conduct fuel dumping in order to reduce aircraft gross weight for
safety of flight. When circumstances permit, dump over unpopulated areas above 8,000 feet
AGL. Annotate fuel dumping in the AFTO Forms 781. If conditions permit, advise the
appropriate air traffic control agency of altitude and location and when the operation has
been completed.
7.1.4. Brake and nosewheel steering malfunctions. Do not taxi the aircraft with a brake
system malfunction. Do not taxi with a nose wheel steering malfunction with the exception
of using nose wheel steering override, or differential braking to clear the active runway. After
clearing the runway, the pilots will stop until the malfunction can be cleared. If nosewheel
failure occurs in-flight and cannot be cleared or reset, aircrews may taxi the aircraft clear of
the runway using NWS Override or differential braking and stop until the malfunction can be
cleared.
7.2. Ground Aborts. Delayed aircraft may join a flight at a briefed rendezvous point or fly a
briefed alternate mission. Flight leads will advise the appropriate agencies of applicable changes
after a ground abort.
7.3. Takeoff Aborts.
7.3.1. When a takeoff is aborted and hot brakes are suspected or computed, taxi to the hot
brake area, declare an emergency, and follow technical order procedures. Crews will
reference the B-2 Brake Energy Limit Chart in TO 1B-2A-1 and comply with local guidance.
7.3.2. Pilots will recalculate takeoff data and brake energy data prior to follow-on takeoffs
after an abort.
7.4. Air Aborts. Local guidance such as the B-2 Go/No Go Guide dictates specific causes for
mission abort.
7.4.1. Abort missions for any of the following:
7.4.1.1. Bird strike/FOD.
7.4.1.2. Over-G.
7.4.1.3. Flight control system anomalies (see local guidance).
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 25

7.4.1.4. Engine flameout/stagnation.


7.4.1.5. Boom strike.
7.4.1.6. Confirmed or suspected fuel leaks.
7.4.2. Do not conduct training events such as air refueling (except when required for safe
recovery of the aircraft), live/inert bombing, dissimilar air training activity, or practice
patterns/landings, after an air abort.
7.5. Radio/IFF-SIF Failure. Comply with local procedures for radio failure. Immediately
notify controlling agencies if the IFF is inoperative, and provide accurate position reports for
separation from other traffic.
7.6. Lost Wingman Procedures. During climbs and descents, if visual and/or radar contact is
lost, flight leads will use all means to ensure proper formation spacing (lateral and vertical).
Wingmen immediately will call blind/broke lock when unable to monitor preceding aircrafts
position. After a blind/broke lock call, lead will broadcast heading and altitude every 1000 ft
until all formation member are either tied or visual.
7.7. Spatial Disorientation (SD)/Unusual Attitudes.
7.7.1. Practice unusual attitude recoveries are prohibited in flight.
7.7.2. Nose High Recovery Procedure. To recover from a nose high attitude, add power as
required, establish a bank angle of no more than 60 degrees, lower the nose to a minimum
minus three degree pitch attitude, then return the aircraft to level flight in both pitch and
bank.
7.7.3. Nose Low Recovery Procedure. Recover from a nose low attitude by reducing power
and extending speedbrakes as required, rolling wings level, then increasing stick back
pressure to return the aircraft to level flight.
7.8. Armament System Malfunctions.
7.8.1. After complying with technical order procedures and guidance, pilots will comply
with local guidance.
7.8.2. For peacetime missions, do not rotate a hung weapon from the release position.
7.8.3. If an inadvertent release occurs, accomplish post release checklist actions to ensure
switches are in the safe/off position. Do not accomplish any further weapons deliveries
(actual or SIM). If no weapons remain on the aircraft, any non-weapons related training may
be accomplished.
7.9. In-flight Practice of Emergency Procedures.
7.9.1. A simulated emergency procedure is any procedure that produces an effect which
closely parallels an actual emergency. Retarding a throttle to simulate the drag of a flamed
out engine would be an example of such a practice.
7.9.1.1. Do not practice aborted takeoffs except in a simulator.
7.9.1.2. Do not shut down an engine in flight to simulate an emergency.
7.9.1.3. Simulated engine out refueling with an engine in idle is permitted as part of
syllabus training with an IP.
26 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

7.9.1.4. Practice stalls and approach to stalls are prohibited inflight.


7.10. Search and Rescue Combat Air Patrol (SARCAP) Procedures. During an aircraft
mishap, immediately attempt to locate survivors and initiate rescue efforts.
7.10.1. Knock off maneuvering and the prebriefed mission.
7.10.2. Establish a SARCAP commander.
7.10.3. Notify controlling agencies of the situation, and change squawk as required.
7.10.4. Mark the last known position of survivors using any navigation means available.
7.10.5. Remain above the highest ejection altitude.
7.10.6. Deconflict with other aircraft to prevent mid-air collision.
7.10.7. Revise BINGO fuels or recovery bases to maintain maximum SARCAP coverage.
7.10.8. Relinquish SARCAP operations to designated rescue forces upon their arrival.
7.10.9. Follow briefed or local procedures following the arrival of designated rescue forces.
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 27

Chapter 8

LOCAL OPERATING PROCEDURES

8.1. General. This chapter is reserved for unit local operating procedures. IAW AFI 33-360,
the paragraph method is the only authorized way to supplement an AFI and added material must
be arranged according to the basic publication. Units composed of dissimilar aircraft may publish
guidance in a single, stand-alone local operating instruction instead of supplementing this AFI.
Added or stand-alone procedures will not be less restrictive than those contained elsewhere in
this volume. This chapter is not intended to be a single source document for procedures
contained in other directives or regulations. Avoid unnecessary repetition of guidance provided
in other established directives; however, reference to those directives is acceptable when it
serves to facilitate location of information necessary for local operating procedures. This chapter
is authorized to be issued to each B-2 pilot. Units may supplement the following paragraphs for
local operating guidance:
8.1.1. Section A. Introduction/Purpose.
8.1.2. Section B. Applicability.
8.1.3. Section C. Ground Operation.
8.1.4. Section D. Flying Operations.
8.1.5. Section E. Weapons Employment.
8.1.6. Section F. Abnormal Procedures.
8.1.7. Section G. Command and Control.
8.1.8. Section H. Fuel Requirements.
8.1.9. Section I. Divert Instructions.
8.1.10. Section J. Jettison Areas (IFR/VFR).
8.1.11. Section K. Controlled Bailout Areas.
8.1.12. Section L. Local Weather Procedures.
8.1.13. Section M. Approved Alternate/Other Missions.
8.1.14. Section N. Unit Standards
8.2. Forms Adopted. AF Form 847, Recommendation for Change of Publication. AFTO Form
781, ARMS Aircrew/Mission Flight Data Document. AFTO FORM 781 A, Maintenance
Discrepancy and Work Document.

PHILIP M. BREEDLOVE, Lt Gen, USAF


DCS, Operations, Plans and Requirements
28 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

ATTACHMENT 1
GLOSSARY OF REFERENCES AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION

References
AFPD 11-2, Aircraft Rules and Procedures, 14 Jan 2005
AFPD 11-4, Aviation Service, 1 Sep 2004
AFTTP 3-1V23, B-2 Tactical Employment, 1 Sep 2007
AFI 11-2B-2V1, B-2 Aircrew Training, 10 Nov 2006
AFI 11-202V3, General Flight Rules, 5 Apr 2006
AFI 11-209, Aerial Event Policy and Procedures, 4 May 2006
AFI 11-202V2 AFGSC Sup , Aircrew Standardization/Evaluation Program, 1 Feb 2010
AFI 11-205, Aircraft Cockpit and Formation Flight Signals, 19 May 1994
AFI 11-214, Aircrew, Weapons Director, and Terminal Attack Controller Procedures for Air
Operations, 22 Dec 2005
AFI 33-360, Publications and Forms Management Program, 18 May 2006
AFMAN 33-363, Management of Records, 1 Mar 2008
AFMAN 10-2602, Nuclear, Biological, Chemical and Conventional (NBCC) Defense
Operations and Standards, 29 May 2003
AFMAN 11-217V1, Instrument Flight Procedures, 3 Jan 2005
T.O. 1B-2A-1, Flight Manual, 15 Oct 2008
T.O. 1B-2A-25-1, Nuclear Bomb Basic Information, 1 Sep 2006
T.O. 1B-2A-34-2-1, Nonnuclear Weapons Delivery Manual, 26 Jan 2008
T.O. 1B-2A-5-2, Flight Manual Loading Data, 8 Jan 2008
T.O. 1-1C-1-37, B-2A Flight Crew Air Refueling Procedures, 2 Oct 2006
FAAH 7610.4J, Special Military Operations, 14 Feb 2008

Abbreviations and Acronyms


AFGSCAir Force Global Strike Command
AFGSCRAir Force Global Strike Command Regulation
AFGSCIAir Force Global Strike Command Instruction
AFMANAir Force Manual
AFRAir Force Regulation
AFSATCOMAir Force Satellite Communication
AFTTPAir Force Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 29

AGLAbove Ground Level


AHCAircraft Handling Characteristics
ALTRVAltitude Reservation
APIAircrew Position Indicator
ARIPAir Refueling Initiation Point
ARMSAviation Resource Management System
ATDAircrew Training Device
AVTRAircraft Video Tape Recorder
BQTBasic Qualification Training
BRABomb Rack Assembly
BSBomb Squadron
BWBomb Wing
BQBasic Qualified
CBIComputer Based Instruction
CCCommander
CDEChemical Defense Equipment
CFTRCombined Force Training
CHUMChart Update Manual
CMCoherent Map Mode of B-2 Radar
CMRCombat Mission Ready
COMSECCommunications Security
CPTCockpit Procedures Trainer
CSSControl Stick Steering
CTContinuation Training
CTPCompanion Trainer Program
CWChemical Warfare
DMPIDesignated Mean Point of Impact
DNIFDuty Not Involving Flying
DODirector of Operations
DTEDDigital Terrain Elevation Data
ECElectronic Combat
E&EEscape and Evasion
30 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

EEFIEssential Elements of Friendly Information


EMCONEmission Control
EOREnd of Runway
ERCCEngine Running Crew Change
FAAFederal Aviation Administration
FAAHFederal Aviation Administration Handbook
FENCEFuel, Emissions, Navigation, Communications, Expendables
FCDFlight Characteristic Demonstration
FCSFlight Control System
FEBFlight Evaluation Board
FICFlight Instructor Course
FLIPFlight Information Publication
FLOTForward Line of Own Troops
FTUFormal Training Unit
GCCGraduated Combat Capability
HATHeight Above Touchdown
HFHigh Frequency
HHDHigher Headquarters Directed
HHQHigher Headquarters
JDAMJoint Direct Attack Munition
IAWIn Accordance With
ICWTInitial Chemical Warfare Training
IFFIdentification Friend or Foe
IFRInstrument Flight Rules
IMCInstrument Meteorological Conditions
IOSInstructor Operator Station
IPInstructor Pilot
IQCInitial Qualification Course
IQTInitial Qualification Training
KIASKnots Indicated Airspeed
LCLost Communications
MAJCOMMajor Command
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 31

MARSAMilitary Assumes Responsibility for Separation of Aircraft


MCMission Capable/Mission Commander
MCMMulti-Command Manual
MCRMulti-Command Regulation
MITOMinimum Interval Takeoff
MOAMilitary Operating Area
MQTMission Qualification Training
MRRMinimum Runway Required
MSMission Support
MTMission Trainer
MTRSMilitary Training Route Structure
NAFNumbered Air Force
NMRNon Mission Ready
NORDONo Radio
NSSNavigation System
OGOperations Group
OMROptical Mark Reader
OPSECOperations Security
ORIOperational Readiness Inspection
OSSOperations Support Squadron
OT&EOperational Test and Evaluation
PFPSPortable Flight Planning System
RCORange Control Officer
RCRRunway Condition Reading
RCSRadar Cross Section
RLARotary Launcher Assembly
RQCRequalification Course
RWS/AATRange-While-Search/Air-to-Air Track Modes of B-2 Radar
RZRendezvous
SASituational Awareness
SAFESelected Area For Evasion
SEFEStan/Eval Flight Examiner
32 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

SELOStan/Eval Liaison Officer


SILSSynthetic Instrument Landing System
SOFSupervisor of Flying
SQSquadron
SUASSpecial Use Air Space
TATerrain Avoidance
TACANTactical Air Navigation
TBDTo Be Determined
TDYTemporary Duty
TDZTouch Down Zone
TFTerrain Following
TRTransit Route
TRTTakeoff Rated Thrust
TRPTraining Review Panel
TSOTarget Study Officer
TTRTactics Training Range
UHFUltra High Frequency
UMDUnit Manning Document
VFRVisual Flight Rules
VHFVery High Frequency
VMCVisual Meteorological Conditions
WSTWeapons Systems Trainer
WXWeather Mode of B-2 Radar

Terms
Alternate Entry Control Point (Alternate Entry Fix)The route point(s) upon which a
control time for an alternate entry into the route is based.
Attempted ReleaseThe SMP issues a release pulse in either automatic or manual mode with
all switches correctly positioned.
BlindNo visual contact with the friendly aircraft/ground position; opposite of visual.
Broke LockLoss of radar contact with element or aircraft; opposite of tied.
End Maneuver AreaA control point terminating the weapon run area.
Entry Control TimeThe scheduled time over the Primary/Alternate Entry Control Point.
High Altitude ActivitySame as AFI 11-2B-2V1.
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 33

Hung WeaponA live or inert weapon that does not separate from the aircraft following an
attempted release.
Live WeaponActual munitions containing a primary explosive charge (JDAM, Mk 84, CBU-
87, etc.).
Low Altitude ActivitySame as AFI 11-2B-2V1.
Maneuver AreaThe portion of an IR between the SMA and End Maneuver Area (EMA).
MASMS (Military Airspace Management System)The term MASMS in this instruction
refers to the automated scheduling system operated by Detachment 1, HQ ACC/DOR, the
Military Airspace Management System Office at Offutt AFB, NE.
Medium Altitude ActivitySame as AFI 11-2B-2V1.
Mountainous TerrainTerrain that varies more than 1000 feet in elevation in 10 NM along
published track.
Operating AltitudesAltitudes for all routes will be published in FLIP AP/1B or AP/3. TF
altitudes will be based on a minimum altitude published for the route, the clearance plane
settings developed by local airspace managers at the originating activity, Tech Order minimums,
or training restrictions, whichever is higher.
Practice WeaponA weapon intended for training or practice and containing no primary
explosive charge.
Primary/Alternate Exit PointThe final waypoint published in FLIP for the primary or
alternate exit of a route.
Primary/Alternate TF Initiation Point (Start TF)The FLIP waypoint at which air crew are
authorized to begin TF operations.
Primary/Alternate TF Termination Point (End TF)The point which denotes the end of TF
operations.
Primary Entry Point (PEP)Referred to as the Entry Fix. The route point upon which a
control time for route entry is based
Retained WeaponA weapon still on board the aircraft with no release attempted or after
successfully releasing the intended number of weapons in a partial load. Weapons not released
due to procedural errors are retained
SaddledInformative call from wingman indicating the return to briefed formation position.
Start Maneuver AreaThe point that defines the start of the weapon run area.
TiedPositive radar contact with element or aircraft.
Visual Contour FlightOperation at a predetermined altitude above the ground, following
contours visually with radar altimeter crosscheck.
WeaponAny live, inert, or training munitions.
34 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

ATTACHMENT 2
AIRCREW OPERATIONS IN CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, RADIOLOGICAL, AND
NUCLEAR THREAT ENVIRONMENT

A2.1. General Information. Potential use of CBRN weapons against friendly airfields presents
a serious threat to flying operations. Although the most effective way for aircrews to avoid this
threat is to be airborne before those weapons are detonated or dispersed and then land at a field
that has not been contaminated, all personnel must be prepared to operate from a field that has
come under CBRN attack. Each air base should publish detailed CBRN procedures. The
following information is for use when base-specific procedures are unknown or incomplete.
A2.1.1. Counter-CBRN actions can be grouped into environments. First is where
chemical or biological agents are dispersed from a munition or sprayed as an aerosol
resulting in a cloud or rain of minute droplets. The nuclear environment is within range of
any direct effect from a nuclear detonation. The radiological environments hazard is
radioactive dust that can originate as fallout from a detonation or from dispersal of
radioactive material without a nuclear detonation--a dirty bomb. Procedures in all
environments except nuclear are similar--use procedures and protective gear to avoid skin
contact with or inhalation/ingestion of agents or particles.
A2.2. Mission Preparation. Determine the CBRN status at planned launch, recovery and divert
bases. Know the current MOPP level for relevant sectors of the launch airfield. Plan ground ops
to minimize the time between leaving shelter and takeoff. If available, use other aircrew
members to perform preflight duties to minimize flight crew exposure. Arming and EOR
procedures may be conducted in the hardened aircraft shelter (HAS) or other non-standard
location.
A2.3. Travel To/From the Aircraft and Aircraft Preflight. Step in the appropriate protective
ensemble and carry other protective gear as required. If possible, travel to and from the aircraft
in an enclosed vehicle to prevent contamination from agents or dust settling from the air. If
travel on foot is unavoidable, choose a route that takes maximum advantage of available
overhead cover (sun shades, buildings, etc.). If the aircraft is contaminated, ensure maintenance
has accomplished spot decontamination and avoid contaminating your person during preflight.
Take steps to avoid bringing contamination into the aircraft on helmet bags, map bags, etc. In a
potential CBRN environment, keep aircraft buttoned up as much as possible when outside
protective shelter. Post-mission, if there is any suspicion of aircrew contamination process
through an aircrew contamination control area (ACCA).
A2.4. Ground Operations during Alarm Red (or Theater Equivalent).
A2.4.1. Before Taxi Out and After Taxi Back. If Alarm Red occurs while the crew is
outside the aircraft or in the chocks, shut down and exit the aircraft (if appropriate), take
cover and don appropriate MOPP. This may require use of the ground crew mask. A
hardened facility such as a HAS provides optimum protection. Ensure the safety of
supporting ground crew; use hand signals if necessary.
A2.4.2. Ground Operations Outside the Parking Spot. Maintain contact with SOF, ATC,
CP, etc. to remain aware of ground hazards and command direction. If Alarm Red occurs
while on the ground outside the chocks, there are two primary options. First is to taxi into
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 35

structure, preferably a hardened one, although a hangar or flow through will reduce exposure
to settling airborne agent. Use caution to not damage the aircraft or nearby people and
things. Shut down and close structure doors when able. The second option is to launch for
survival contingent on fuel state, arming status, proximity to runway, nature of attack, etc. If
shelter or takeoff is not possible, try to get out of the taxi flow. In extremis, especially if you
dont have a protective mask available, select 100 percent oxygen and consider turning off
the ECS and/or shutting down to avoid bringing agent/dust into the aircraft. Leave the
aircraft buttoned up and await assistance.
A2.5. Airborne.
A2.5.1. Contamination. Becoming contaminated by chemical or biological agents, while
airborne, is very unlikely. If chemical agent contamination occurred prior to takeoff, flight will
dissipate the agent to some degree, but will not achieve complete decontamination. Flights of at
least 2 to 4 hours are recommended, and lower altitudes are more effective than higher altitudes.
Fly with the aircraft configured (gear and speedbrakes extended) as long as possible to maximize
the airflow in and around as many places as possible. There is no simple guidance for biological
contaminants. If suspected, maintain maximum protective posture. If radioactive dust
contamination is suspected, take measures to avoid getting the dust on bare skin, breathing it in
(protective masks work for this) or getting it into your mouth. Seek decontamination assistance
after landing.
A2.5.2. During the Mission and RTB. Use command and control agencies to maintain
awareness of command intent and the status of primary and alternate landing locations. Do not
attempt to land during Alarm Red situations unless there is no other option. Follow C2
directions and hold or divert. If holding, try to wait until Alarm Red is terminated. When able,
obtain updates on airfield status, ground hazards, dearm and taxi routing. If landing in Alarm
Black, expect a contaminated environment and MOPP 4. Droplet settling following a chem or
bio airburst attack can take up to one hour. If you believe the aircraft was contaminated before
takeoff or while airborne, notify C2.
36 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

ATTACHMENT 3
FLIGHT BRIEFING GUIDES

NOTE: Ensure the majority of time is used for discussion of tactics, complicated mission
segments/special activities, and other new or important items. If regular briefing items have
already been discussed during mission planning or are standard, specialty checklist items, they
may be reviewed briefly or omitted as appropriate.
A3.1. Roll Call (Crew Number), Security Classification.
A3.2. Review of Weather Planning Factors:
A3.2.1. Takeoff.
A3.2.2. Low level (primary and backup).
A3.2.3. Air refueling.
A3.2.4. Recovery.
A3.3. Mission Profile:
A3.3.1. Priority of training events.
A3.3.2. Currency items/problems.
A3.4. Mission Data:
A3.4.1. Call Sign.
A3.4.2. Mission Date.
A3.4.3. Crew Rest/Show/Step.
A3.4.4. Arrive at aircraft.
A3.4.5. Crew/transition duty day.
A3.4.6. Taxi/takeoff/land time/duration.
A3.5. Aircraft Number/Maintenance/TCTO Status.
A3.6. Ground Operations/Emergencies:
A3.6.1. Emergency egress/emergency engine shutdown.
A3.6.1.1. With/without interphone.
A3.6.1.2. After taxi.
A3.7. Takeoff Performance Review:
A3.7.1. Fuel load/gross weight/weapons load.
A3.8. Takeoff/Departure:
A3.8.1. Procedures/crew coordination.
A3.8.2. Aborts.
A3.8.3. Emergencies after decision speed.
A3.8.4. Departure routing.
A3.8.5. Obstructions.
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 37

A3.8.6. Planned level off altitude and airspeed.


A3.9. Enroute:
A3.9.1. Overview.
A3.9.2. Action/crunch points.
A3.9.3. Restricted airspace.
A3.9.4. High terrain.
A3.9.5. Emergency airfields.
A3.9.6. Late takeoff considerations or alternate mission.
A3.10. Air Refueling:
A3.10.1. Track/area.
A3.10.2. Tanker call sign/aircraft type.
A3.10.3. RZ type and altitude/block.
A3.10.4. C/R plan/EMCON procedures.
A3.10.5. Onload.
A3.10.6. End A/R request.
A3.10.7. Missed A/R considerations.
A3.11. Low Level:
A3.11.1. Pilot/mission commander specific considerations/brief.
A3.11.2. Letdown type.
A3.11.3. Level off altitude and considerations.
A3.11.3.1. Terrain elevation.
A3.11.3.2. Radar altimeter lock-on altitude.
A3.11.3.3. Roundout/level off altitudes.
A3.11.3.4. IFR altitude.
A3.11.3.5. Range-specific procedures.
A3.11.3.6. Withhold/Hung weapons procedures.
A3.12. Communications:
A3.12.1. Command Post (authentication/ launch/recovery).
A3.12.2. VHF/UHF/HF/AFSATCOM/MILSTAR/HAVE QUICK.
A3.12.3. Secure voice procedures.
A3.12.4. Recall procedures.
A3.13. Recovery:
A3.13.1. Hung/withheld weapon procedures.
38 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

A3.13.2. Fuel reserve.


A3.13.3. Divert options.
A3.13.4. Approach review.
A3.13.4.1. Crew coordination.
A3.13.4.2. Low vis landing procedures.
A3.13.4.3. Transition to landing.
A3.13.4.4. Safety check.
A3.13.5. Simulated Emergency Procedures.
A3.13.6. ERCC/Taxiback procedures.
A3.13.7. Warm seat swap procedures.
A3.14. In-Flight Emergencies:
A3.14.1. Crew coordination.
A3.14.1.1. Fly and navigate.
A3.14.2. Airmanship.
A3.14.2.1. Who flies vs. who accomplishes checklist.
A3.14.2.2. Loss of interphone/cockpit communications.
A3.14.2.3. Ejection procedures.
A3.15. Crew Coordination (General):
A3.15.1. Transfer of aircraft control and AFCS modes.
A3.15.2. Leaving/returning to seat/going on or off oxygen.
A3.15.3. Altitude calls.
A3.16. Specialized Briefings/Special Subjects:
A3.16.1. Target Study.
A3.16.2. Chase/Formation briefing.
A3.16.3. Unusual/special events--flyby, FCF.
A3.16.4. Range Considerations.
A3.16.5. Radar/Visual Search Responsibilities.
A3.16.5.1. Departure/Enroute/Recovery.
A3.16.5.2. High Density Traffic Areas.
A3.16.6. Mid-Air Collision Avoidance.
A3.16.6.1. From Other Military Aircraft.
A3.16.6.2. From Civilian Aircraft.
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 39

A3.17. Reminders:
A3.17.1. ACC Special Interest Items.
A3.17.2. Flight manual changes.
A3.17.3. Flight clothing and equipment.
40 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

ATTACHMENT 4
FORMATION BRIEFING GUIDE

NOTE: This minimum briefing guide is provided as an example to stress mission events and
objectives rather than reinforce technical order procedures. A standardized briefing format is
especially important when flying with other units. Brief only actions required to meet mission
and EMCON objectives.
A4.1. ROLL CALL:
A4.1.1. Time Hack
A4.1.2. Mission Changes
A4.1.3. Call Signs/pilots
A4.1.4. Tail Numbers
A4.1.5. Parking Locations
A4.1.6. Mx Status
A4.1.7. Weapons configurations
A4.1.8. Fuel loads
A4.2. WEATHER:
A4.2.1. Takeoff
A4.2.2. En route
A4.2.3. Air refueling
A4.2.4. Low level
A4.2.5. Destination
A4.2.6. Alternates
A4.3. MISSION OVERVIEW:
A4.3.1. Mission Objectives
A4.3.2. TGTs/Times
A4.3.3. Intelligence
A4.3.4. EW/GCI lines
A4.3.5. FLOT
A4.3.6. Route/Tgt Area Defenses
A4.3.7. Passive Detection
A4.3.8. SAR
A4.3.9. Tactical Considerations
A4.4. COMM PLAN:
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 41

A4.4.1. EMCON level


A4.4.2. Frequencies
A4.4.3. Change over times/points/procedures
A4.4.4. IFF/SIF
A4.4.5. Code words
A4.4.6. Bullseye points
A4.5. GROUND OPERATIONS:
A4.5.1. Taxi Route/Delays
A4.5.2. Takeoff Data Review
A4.6. TAKEOFF:
A4.6.1. Spacing
A4.6.2. Aborts
A4.6.3. Departure Route
A4.6.4. Joinup/Airspeed/Intermediate Level offs
A4.6.5. Late Takeoff
A4.6.6. Delayed aircraft rejoin procedures
A4.7. LEVEL OFF:
A4.7.1. Altitude Block/Planned Speeds
A4.7.2. Level Off/TF Checks
A4.7.3. Trail/Visual formation procedures
A4.7.4. Position Changes
A4.7.5. High Bomb Runs
A4.7.6. TGTs/TOTs/Alt stacks
A4.8. AIR REFUELING:
A4.8.1. Call Signs/CR Plan/Times/Onloads/Altitudes
A4.8.2. Receiver Assignments/Wingman Responsibilities/Positions
A4.8.3. Overruns & Breakaway
A4.8.4. Night/IMC procedures
A4.8.5. End AR plan
A4.8.6. Lost AR plan
A4.9. FORMATION LOW LEVEL: Formation low level is currently not authorized.
However, this does not preclude the use of formation procedures at ranges such as Smokey Hill,
when required for safe operations.
42 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

A4.9.1. A/A TACAN/R adios


A4.9.2. Penetration/Spacing/Split-up
A4.9.3. Threat Reactions
A4.9.4. Target area tactics
A4.9.5. Weapon fusing
A4.9.6. Release parameters
A4.9.7. With hold criteria
A4.9.8. Safe escape considerations
A4.9.9. Safe separation
A4.9.10. Route aborts/emergency airfields
A4.9.11. Route abort Altitude
A4.9.12. Rejoin
A4.10. RECOVERY/REJOIN:
A4.10.1. Location
A4.10.2. Altitudes/Airspeeds
A4.10.3. A/A TACAN/R adios
A4.10.4. Rejoin Point
A4.10.5. Routing/Penetration/Breakup
A4.11. SPECIAL SUBJECTS:
A4.11.1. Emergencies
A4.11.2. Broke Lock Procedures
A4.11.3. EMCON/Chattermark
A4.11.4. Fallout Plan ( Lead breaks etc. for multi-ship deputy flt lead)
A4.11.5. Lead Changes
A4.11.6. Mid Mission Rejoins
A4.11.7. Freqs/Air-to-Air/Speeds
A4.11.8. Bingo Fuels
A4.11.9. Hung Stores
A4.11.10. Alternate Mission/No later than times
A4.11.11. Debriefing
A4.12. Questions
AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010 43

ATTACHMENT 5
STRANGE FIELD PROCEDURES

A5.1. Mission Planning. During mission planning, crews should review the following
information for each base of intended landing:
A5.1.1. FLIP Enroute Supplement:
A5.1.1.1. Traffic pattern altitudes/airfield specific differences
A5.1.1.2. Navaids scheduled maintenance period(s)
A5.1.1.3. Facilities/services/fuels available
A5.1.1.4. Load bearing capacity
A5.1.2. FLIP Planning Documents:
A5.1.2.1. Special notices
A5.1.2.2. Preferred routings
A5.1.2.3. Terminal Control Areas
A5.1.2.4. ICAO information
A5.1.3. Instrument Approach Plates:
A5.1.3.1. Airfield layout/obstacles/runway length and width
A5.1.3.2. Final approach runway alignment
A5.1.3.3. Airfield lighting
A5.1.3.4. Navigation chart (review for local terrain features)
A5.1.4. Security Requirements:
A5.1.4.1. Aircraft security requirements
A5.1.4.2. Storage of classified materials
A5.2. Review of Arrival/Approach Procedures. Before departure from each base crews may
use the following guide as a means of reviewing the arrival/approach procedures for the next
intended landing base:
A5.2.1. Departure:
A5.2.1.1. Obstacles
A5.2.1.2. Rate of climb required
A5.2.1.3. Emergency/minimum safe altitudes
A5.2.1.4. SID/routing/navaids/altitude requirements
A5.2.2. Enroute Descent:
A5.2.2.1. Start descent point
A5.2.2.2. Rate of descent require
44 AFI11-2B-2V3 3 MAY 2010

A5.2.2.3. Transition altitude


A5.2.2.4. Terminal fix (IAF, FAF, PAR/ASR, etc. )
A5.2.2.5. Lost communication procedures
A5.2.2.6. Emergency/minimum safe/sector altitudes
A5.2.3. Published Penetration:
A5.2.3.1. IAF/holding fix
A5.2.3.2. Initial rate of descent required
A5.2.3.3. Transition altitude
A5.2.3.4. Altitude restrictions
A5.2.3.5. Emergency/minimum safe/sector altitudes
A5.2.3.6. Final approach fix
A5.2.3.7. Lost communication procedures
A5.2.4. Final Approach--Published or Radar:
A5.2.4.1. Rate of descent
A5.2.4.2. Timing
A5.2.4.3. Weather minimums/MDA/DH
A5.2.4.3.1. Aircraft/aircrew restrictions
A5.2.4.4. Missed approach procedures
A5.2.4.5. Lost communication procedures
A5.2.4.6. Transition to visual/runway environment/landing