New Magicks for a New Age

Volume 1: A New Order of the Ages – Appendices: Appendix 5, Bibliography Page 1

Yael R. Dragwyla Email: Polaris93@aol.com http://polaris93.livejournal.com/

First North American rights 72,200 words

NEW MAGICKS FOR A NEW AGE
Appendices
Volume I: A New Order of the Ages
Book 5: Bibliography
Part 2: Exoterica (History, the Objective Sciences, Mathematics, and other nonfiction reference)

2.1: Mathematics – the Queen of the Sciences 2.1.1: General Mathematics Barr, Donald R. and Willmore, Floyd E. College and University Mathematics: A Functional Approach. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, Inc., 1968. Cantor, Georg. Contributions to the Founding of the Theory of Transfinite Numbers. Philip E. B. Jourdain, translator. New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 1955. Eves, Howard and Newsom, Carroll V. An Introduction to the Foundations and Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1958. Gleick, James. Chaos: Making a New Science. New York/London: Penguin Books, 1987. Hofstadter, Douglas R. Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid. New York: Vintage Books, 1980. Holmes, Cecil Thomas, Ph.D. Trigonometry. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company. Johnson, Richard E. and Kiokemeister, Fred L. Calculus With Analytic Geometry, Second Edition. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, Inc., 1960. Kemeny, John G.; Mirkil, Hazleton; Snell, J. Laurie; and Thompson, Gerald L. Finite Mathematical Structures. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1959. Lefort, G. Algebra and Analysis: Problems and Solutions. Bernard R. Gelbaum, translation editor. Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders Co., 1966.

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Mandelbröt, Benoit B. The Fractal Geometry of Nature. New York: W. H. Freeman and Company, 1983. _____. Form, Chance, and Dimension. New York: W. H. Freeman and Co., 1977. Schroeder, Manfred. Fractals, Chaos, Power Laws: Minutes from an Infinite Paradise. New York: W. H. Freeman and Co., 1991. Steen, Lynn Arthur. “Fractals: A World of Nonintegral Dimensions.” In Science News, Vol. 112 (Aug. 20, 1977). 2.1.2: Computer Science 2.1.2.0: General Works Braun, Eric. The Internet Directory. New York: Fawcett Columbine Books, 1994. Crowder, Norman A. The Arithmetic of Computers: An Introduction to Binary and Octal Mathematics. Garden City, NY: Doubleday and Co., Inc., 1960. Dern, Daniel P. The Internet Guide for New Users. New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc., 1994. Diebold, John, editor. The World of the Computer. New York: Random House, 1973. Gibbs, Mark and Smith, Richard. Navigating the Internet. Carmel, IN: Sams Publishing, 1993. Horowitz, Ellis and Sahni, Sartaj. Fundamentals of Data Structures. Potomac, MD: Computer Science Press, Inc., 1977. IBM. System/370 Reference Summary. Fourth edition. White Plains, NY: IBM Corporation, Technical Publications/Systems, 1976. Kent, Ernest W. The Brains of Men and Machines. Peterborough, NH: Byte/McGraw Hill, 1981. Mandl, Matthew. Fundamentals of Electronic Computers: Digital and Analog. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1967. Maurer, Ward Douglas. Programming: An Introduction to Computer Languages and Techniques. San Francisco: Holden-Day, Inc., 1968. 2.1.2.1: Cybernetic security: problems and solutions Schneier, Bruce. Applied Cryptography: Protocols, Algorithms, and Source Code in C. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1994. 2.1.3: Chaos Science Hall, Nina, editor. Exploring Chaos: A Guide to the New Science of Disorder. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 1993. 2.1.4: Reference CRC Mathematical Tables. 21st Edition. Selby, Samuel M., Ph.D., Sc.D., editor. Cleveland, OH: The Chemical Rubber Company, 1973. 2.2: The Objective Sciences 2.2.0: General McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Science and Technology. Sybil P. Parker, editor-in-chief. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1984. Rossotti, Hazel. Fire. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993. On the technology, symbolism, ecology, science, and hazard of fire.

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2.2.1: Physics Barrow, John D. Theories of Everything: The Quest for Ultimate Explanation. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991. Bass, L. “A Quantum-Mechanical Mind-Body Interaction.” Foundations of Physics 5: 159 (1975). Bell, J. S. “On the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox.” Physics 1, 195 (1964). Boslough, John. Masters of Time: Cosmology at the End of Innocence. New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company/A William Patrick Book, 1992. Cramer, John G.. “The Transactional Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics.” Reviews of Modern Physics 58, 647 (1986). Davies, Paul and Gribbin, John. The Matter Myth: Dramatic Discoveries That Challenge our Understanding of Physical Reality. New York: Touchstone Books/Simon & Schuster, 1992. Dewitt, B. S. and Graham, R. N. The Many-worlds Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1971. Hall, Joseph; Kim, Christopher; McElroy, Brien; Shimony, Abner. “Wave-packed Reduction as a Medium of Communication.” Foundations of Physics 7: 759 (1977). Herbert, Nick. Elemental Mind: Human Consciousness and the New Physics. New York: Dutton, 1993. _____. Faster Than Light: Superluminal Loopholes in Physics. New York: New American Library, 1988. _____. “Mechanical Mediums.” Psychic Magazine July/August 36 (1976). _____. “Notes Towards ‘A User’s Guide to the Quantum Connection.” In The BVI-Pacifica Journal, Vol. 1, No. 4 (Leo/Summer 1988), p. 4. _____. Quantum Reality: Beyond the New Physics. New York: Doubleday, 1985. Kaku, Michio. Hyperspace: A Scientific Odyssey Through Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and the 10th Dimension. New York: Oxford University Press, 1994. Livingston, Dorothy Michelson. The Master of Light: A Biography of Albert A. Michelson. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1973. Pirani, F. A. E. “Noncausal Behavior of Classical Tachyons.” Physical Review 1D, 3224 (1970). Price, Huw. Time’s Arrow and Archimedes’ Point: New Directions for the Physics of Time. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. Drop an ice cube into a bowl of hot soup. Energy from the soup will flow into the ice, breaking down its crystalline structure and cooling the soup. Now imagine reversing the process – ice spontaneously forms, and the lost energy heats up the soup! Of course, this scenario is prohibited by the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Entropy – the energy that is not available to do work – must always increase. In Time’s Arrow and Archimedes’ Point, Huw Price sheds new light on the question of why this is so. Then, in a brilliant and original contribution to the philosophy of science, Price shows how a proper understanding of time’s arrow can also account for the mysterious results of quantum theory. Price offers a lively criticism of major figures like Stephen Hawking and Richard Feynman, showing how most physicists have been misled by the human perspective from within time. Proposed explanations of the difference between the past and the future turn out to rely on a difference which has slipped in at the beginning, when the physicists themselves treat the past and future in different ways. Price calls this the ‘double standard fallacy,’ and blames it for our inability to be objective about time. What is required is an ‘Archimedean standpoint’ outside of time, a ‘view from nowhen.’ Just as the Copernican revolution called for a dramatic perspective shift, the physics of time demands that we distinguish how time is from how it merely appears to us. Once we make this paradigm shift, Price argues, we will find that quantum mechanics is simply the kind of theory we ought to have expected all along. From review in Library of Science Newsletter No. 186, Alternate Selection Robinet, Loris. “Do Tachyons Travel More Slowly Than Light?” Physical Review 18D, 3610 (1978). Sachs, R. G. “Can the Direction of Time’s Flow Be Determined?” Science 140, 1284 (1963).

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Seely, Doug, and Baker, Michael. “The Fundamental Principle of the Physical Universe and the Genesis of Inflation.” Flaxley, South Australian Centre for Sacred Science, 1990. Shimony, Abner. “Role of the Observer in Quantum Theory.” American Journal of Physics, 31: 755 (1963). Do we change the nature of what we observe by the fact of observing it? If so, what does this imply about the place of mind in the physical universe and the way in which mind and matter interact? Smoot, George, and Davidson, Keay. Wrinkles in Time. New York: William Morrow and Co., Inc., 1993. Thorne, Kip S. Black Holes and Time Warps: Einstein’s Outrageous Legacy. New York: W. W. Norton and Company, 1994. Wheeler, John A., and Zurek, Wojciech H. Quantum Theory and Measurement. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1983. Wigner, Eugene. Symmetries and Reflections. Bloomington: University of Indiana Press, 1967. Wolf, Fred Alan. Parallel Universes: The Search for Other Worlds. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1988. 2.2.2: Astronomy Berry, Richard. “Approaching Neptune.” In Astronomy Vol. 17, No. 8 (August 1989), pp. 30-36. Binzel, Richard P. “Pluto.” In Scientific American, Vol. 262, No. 6 (June 1990), pp. 50-58. Burnham, Robert, Jr. Burnham’s Celestial Handbook: An Observer’s Guide to the Universe Beyond the Solar System. Revised and enlarged edition. In three volumes. Volume I: Andromeda Through Cetus. Volume II: Chameleon Through Orion. Volume III: Pavo Through Vulpecula New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 1978. The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy. Simon Mitton, ed. New York: Crown Publishers, Inc., 1977. Chaisson, Eric. Universe: An Evolutionary Approach to Astronomy. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: PrenticeHall, 1988. Greeley, Ronald. Planetary Landscapes. Boston: Allen & Unwin, 1987. Grossinger, Richard. The Night Sky. San Francisco: Sierra Club Books, 1981. Hartman, William K. Moons & Planets, Third Edition. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Company, 1993. Hawking, S. W. and Ellis, G. F. R. The Large-Scale Structure of Spacetime. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1973. Henbest, Nigel. The Planets: A Guided Tour of Our Solar System Through the Eyes of America’s Space Probes. New York: Viking, 1992. Miller, Ron and Hartmann, William K. The Grand Tour: A Traveler’s Guide to the Solar System. The revised edition. New York: Workman Publishing, 1993. Moore, Patrick, editor. The International Encyclopedia of Astronomy. New York: Orion Books, 1987. _____ and Garry Hunt. Atlas of the Solar System. New York: Rand McNally and Co., 1983. Morrison, David. Exploring Planetary Worlds. New York: Scientific American Library, 1993. Muller, Richard A. “The Cosmic Background Radiation and the New Aether Drift.” Scientific American May 1978, p. 64. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology. “To Uranus and Beyond.” NASA Publication EP-260; JPL publication 400303. Washington, DC: Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing office, 1987. _____. “Voyager at Uranus: 1986.” JPL documents 400-268. Washington, DC: Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, 1985. Preston, Richard. First Light: The Search for the Edge of the Universe. New York: Random House, 1987, 1996. First Light is perhaps the best book about astronomy ever written. It tells the story of the men and women at the Palomar Observatory in the San Gabriel Mountains of California who peer through the amazing Hale Telescope at the farthest edges of space, attempting to solve the riddle of the beginning of time. ‘Science is a lot weirder and

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more human than most people realize,’ Preston writes in his foreword to this revised and updated edition of his first book, and he skillfully weaves together stories of the eccentricities of his characters and the technical wonders of their work to create a riveting narrative about what scientists do and why they do it. The telescope itself is the main character. It is huge, seven stories tall, the heaviest working telescope on earth, with a mirror that is two hundred inches wide and took fourteen years to cast and polish. The telescope is used by astronomers like James E. Gunn, a ‘gadgeteer’ who scavenges for junk parts and fashions them into sensitive instruments he uses to look into the glittering depths of the universe. Preston’s rendering of the obsessions and adventures of Gunn and his colleagues is a witty and illuminating portrait of scientists in action and a luminous story of what modern astronomy is all about. -- From the inside jacket blurb Roy, Archie. Oxford Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Universe. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992. Sheehan, William. Worlds in the Sky: Planetary Discovery from Earliest Times Through Voyager and Magellan. Tucson: The University of Arizona Press, 1992. Sky and Telescope Magazine, Vol. 85, No. 1 (January 1993), “News Notes,” p. 15. Stephens, Sally. “The Excesses of Youth (Wild and crazy T Tauri stars are testing astronomers’ stellar evolution theories).” Astronomy Magazine Vol. 24 No. 9 (September 1996), pp. 37-41. Stern, Alan. “Chiron: Interloper from the Kuiper Disk?” In Astronomy, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1994) pp. 26-33. Weissman, Paul R. “Comets at the Solar System’s Edge,” Sky and Telescope Vol. 85 No. 1 (January 1993), pp. 26-29. Astronomical Periodicals Sky & Telescope (ISSN 0037-6604). Published monthly by Sky Publishing Corporation, 49 Bay State Rd., Cambridge, MA 02138. Email: skytel@skypub.com. Please mail all written correspondence to PO Box 9111, Belmont, MA 02178-9111. To order from the U.S. and Canada, call 1-800-253-0245; all others please call +1-617-864-7360. Subscriptions cost $36 (US) per year (as of 1996 e.v.). Editorial access: contact skytel@skypub.com (Internet) or 70007,2762 (CompuServe). The editors of Sky & Telescope are available to answer general inquiries by telephone between 2 and 3 p.m. Eastern time at (617) 864-7360. Editorial fax: (617) 576-0336. One of the finest periodical reviews of all astronomical subjects available. Advertising includes numerous ads for some of the finest astronomical software on the market. A must for the amateur or professional astronomer, Magus, astrologer, or anyone with a good, inquiring mind and a heart still eager for wonder.

2.2.2.1: Cosmology and Stellar Evolution Cornell, James, editor. Bubbles, Voids, and Bumps in Time: The New Cosmology. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1989. Dressler, Alan. Voyage to the Great Attractor: Exploring Intergalactic Space. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994. The story of a decade-long study undertaken by the author and six colleagues to determine whether the universe has expanded smoothly and symmetrically since its creation. The team ultimately discovered that our Milky Way galaxy and its neighbors are moving toward a “Great Attractor,” a gigantic mass, mostly invisible, containing thousands of galaxies. They concluded that the galaxies are collected into huge superclusters separated by vast, empty voids, the pattern of which could ultimately reveal the nature of matter and energy in the first moments after the big bang, during which time events took place that determined the nature and future of our universe – and thus ourselves.

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Velan, A. Karel. The Multi-Universe Cosmos: The First Complete Story of the Origin of the Universe. New York: Plenum Press, 1992. 2.2.2.4: Planetary Science Baliunas, Sallie and Soon, Willie. “The Sun-Climate Connection.” In Sky & Telescope Vol. 92 No. 6 (December 1996), pp. 38-41. Comins, Neil F. What If the Moon Didn’t Exist? Voyages to Earths That Might Have Been. New York: Harper Collins, Publishers, 1993. Dowling, Timothy. “Big, Blue: The Twin Worlds of Uranus and Neptune.” In Astronomy Vol. 18, No. 10 (Oct. 1990), pp. 42-53. Lovelock, James E. The Ages of Gaia. New York: W. W. Norton, 1988. _____. Gaia: A New Look at Life on Earth. New York: Oxford University Press, 1979. Reader, John. Africa: A Biography of the Continent. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1998. From the primeval cataclysms that formed the continent to the civil wars and genocide that ravage it today – a work of startling grandeur and scope that provides a remarkable panoramic history of Africa, by a deeply intelligent writer who has spent most of his adult life there. We all originated in Africa, and no matter what our race, our most ancient relationship is with that continent. Reader tells the story of our earliest ancestors’ adaptation to Africa’s ferocious obstacles of jungle, river, and desert, and of how its unique array of animals, plants, viruses, and parasites has over millions of years helped and hindered human progress to a degree unknown anywhere else on Earth. Illustrated with many of the author’s own beautiful photographs, which capture the staggering diversity of human experience in every part of the continent – from the inland estuaries of the Niger and the rain forests of the Equator, to the deserts of the north and the high veld of the south – this book weaves together into a richly fluent narrative the rise and fall of ancient civilizations, the changing patterns of indigenous life over the millennia, the complex history of slavery, the devastating impact of European settlers, and the fragile reemergence of independent nations. John Reader has given us an extraordinary biography of an infinitely fascinating continent. – From the inside jacket blurb 2.2.3: The Life Sciences 2.2.0: General Biology and Ecology Alvarez, Walter. T. rex and the Crater of Doom. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1997. Sixty-five million years ago, a comet or asteroid larger than Mt. Everest slammed into the Earth, causing an explosion equivalent to the detonation of a hundred million hydrogen bombs. Vaporized impactor and debris from the impact site were blasted out through the atmosphere, falling back to Earth all around the globe. Terrible environmental disasters ensued, including a giant tsunami, continent-scale wild fires, darkness, and cold, followed by sweltering greenhouse heat. When conditions returned to normal, half the genera of plants and animals on Earth had perished. This horrific story is now widely accepted as the solution to a great scientific murder mystery – what caused the extinction of the dinosaurs? In T. rex and the Crater of Doom, the story of the scientific detective work that went into solving the mystery is told by geologist Walter Alvarez, one of the four Berkeley scientists who discovered the first evidence for the giant impact. It is a saga of high adventure in remote parts of the world, of patient data collection, of lonely intellectual struggle, of long periods of frustration

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ended by sudden breakthroughs, of intense public debate, of friendships made or lost, of the exhilaration of discovery, and of delight as a fascinating story unfolds. Controversial and widely attacked during the 1980s, the impact theory received confirmation from the discovery of the giant impact crater it predicted, buried deep beneath younger strata at the north coast of the Yucatán Peninsula. The Chicxulub Crater was found by Mexican geologists in 1950 but remained almost unknown to scientists elsewhere until 1991, when it was recognized as the largest impact crater on this planet, dating precisely from the time of the great extinction sixty-five million years ago. Geology and paleontology, sciences that long held that all changes in Earth history have been calm and gradual, have now been forced to recognize the critical role played by rare but devastating catastrophes like the impact that killed the dinosaurs. From the inside jacket blurb Archibald, J. David. Dinosaur Extinction and the End of an Era: What the Fossils Say. New York: Columbia University Press, 1996. A member of the Critical Moments in Paleobiology and Earth History Series. An outstanding overview of the subject. Includes a detailed analysis of the state of the biosphere at the time of the K/T Event (which, whatever it was, apparently put paid to the dinosaurs and a wealth of other life-forms with which they shared our world at the time), and implications for us today in the context of habitat destruction and decreasing biological diversity due to human mal-exploitation of our world. Chase, Alston. In a Dark Wood: The Fight Over Forests and the Rising Tyranny of Ecology. Boston: Richard Todd Books, 1995. . . . [In a Dark Wood concerns] the battle over the old-growth forests of the Northwest, the biggest environmental conflict in American history. But its ultimate subject is nothing less than our way of thinking about the natural world. In this penetrating study, Alston Chase invites us to examine our basic assumptions about the environment – about the way we manage and protect resources, about the rights of animals and their habitat and the rights of human beings. What is the ‘balance of nature’? Is ecology a science or a philosophy? What is an ecosystem? In a Dark Wood is rich with ideas and illuminated by personal accounts. Chase interweaves the lives of loggers, foresters, activists, scientists, and Wall Street financiers, all of whom are caught up in a struggle powered not only by self-interest but by conflicting ideals. Though the saga of the old-growth forests includes plenty of outright bad behavior, the reader will find surprisingly few villains: Chase demonstrates that most of those involved are driven by ideas whose import they do not fully understand. Chase provides the most thoughtful account yet written of radical environmentalism. Its proponents, the members of Earth First!, lost the battle of the northwestern forests, but, Chase argues persuasively, they may have won the war. The philosophy of ‘biocentrism,’ which holds that human beings are no more important than other living things, has become a significant doctrine of many mainstream environmental groups and even some government agencies. Chase’s analysis of the origins and implications of this concept will startle many readers. In a Dark Wood is a book destined to change our intellectual landscape. Ibid., from the inside jacket blurb Darlington, C. D., F. R. S. The Little Universe of Man. Boston: George Allen and Unwin, 1978. Ellis, Richard. The Search for the Giant Squid: An Authoritative Look at the Biology and Mythology of the World’s Most Elusive Sea Creatures. New York: The Lyons Press, 1998.

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Lurking in the depths of the ocean is a fearsome creature of proportions that stagger the imagination. At least sixty feet long and weighing more than a ton; with two elongated, whip-like tentacles and eight grasping arms studded with toothed suckers; with a huge beak between its arms and two lidless eyes the size of dinner plates – this is the giant squid, one of the largest animals on earth and one of the least known. Until now. In THE SEARCH FOR THE GIANT SQUID, one of the foremost authorities on ocean life, Richard Ellis, provides the first definitive study of the most mysterious and elusive of all sea creatures. Like a modern-day, aquatic Sherlock Holmes, Ellis uncovers almost everything that is known about the giant squid, revealing both the facts and fictions surrounding this remarkable beast. Delving into myth, literature, and science, he brings us face-to-face with Architeuthis as it terrifies sailors and fishermen throughout history; entices medieval clergymen to swear they have seen a horrifying sea serpent, and battles for its life against the great sperm whale. Ellis continues his exploration of the fabled cephalopod into the modern era – when scientists rush to study the rare carcass, and moviemakers and writers feature this monsters in horror stories. He also provides a thorough, compelling study of what is known and what is still to be discovered about this exotic animal, which has never been studied alive. Interweaving his engrossing narrative with a wealth of fascinating illustrations and photographs, Ellis gives us the first comprehensive history of the only living animal for which the term ‘sea monster’ is truly applicable. -- From the inside jacket blurb Farlow, James O. and Brett-Surman, M. K. The Complete Dinosaur. Indianapolis, IN: Indiana University Press, 1997. What did dinosaurs eat? How did they care for their young? Will it ever be possible to isolate dinosaur DNA? The answers to these questions and hundreds more are to be found in the pages of The Complete Dinosaur, an exuberant celebration of dinosaurs and of our ongoing fascination today. This book is the single most authoritative and accessible source for the general reader on dinosaur science today. In the past decade, dinosaur paleontology has experienced an explosive growth. So rapidly has the field expanded that no individual can hope to master all its aspects. The editors have brought together 47 experts in subjects ranging from functional morphology and paleobiology to biogeography and systematics to present a thorough survey of dinosaurs from the earliest discoveries through the contemporary controversies over their extinction. Where contention exists, as over the question of whether dinosaurs were warm-blooded or cold-blooded, the editors have let the experts agree to disagree. Technical jargon is kept to a minimum, and there is a glossary of less familiar terms. A sumptuously illustrated, scientifically accurate, and up-to-the-minute guide, The Complete Dinosaur is a feast for serious dinosaur lovers everywhere. Over 350 illustrations, including many new or rarely seen drawings and paintings of dinosaurs, and 16 pages of color. • Includes the latest dinosaur discoveries. • New information on the warm-blooded/cold-blooded debate. • New insights into the possibility of isolating dinosaur DNA. • All about dinosaur birth and growth, diet, illnesses, and injuries. • Each chapter written by an expert in dinosaur studies. . . . • Covers each of the dinosaur groups, the evolution of dinosaurs, and the plants and other animals that inhabited the world of the dinosaurs.

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• A special chapter on dinosaurs in the media. • A time-line of the history of dinosaur science, and much, much more! Britain From the inside jacket blurb Fastovsky, David E. and Weishampel, David B. The Evolution and Extinction of the Dinosaurs. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996. This book, aimed at nonspecialists, is a comprehensive treatment of dinosaurs as scientists see the group. Designed as a textbook suitable for first- or second-year-level college courses, The Evolution and Extinction of the Dinosaurs will also interest the general reader. It is a detailed survey of dinosaur origins, diversity, and their extinction. Beyond this, it covers topics of interest in dinosaur paleobiology, including cladistic methods in systematics, “hot-blooded” dinosaurs, aspects of dinosaur functional morphology, and the relationships of dinosaurs to birds. In lively and accessible language, The Evolution and Extinction of the Dinosaurs presents dinosaurs as paleontologists see them. In treating dinosaur relationships using cladistic methods, it is the only comprehensive book taking an explicitly phylogenetic treatment of the group. In addition, it stresses the geological context of dinosaurs and presents dinosaurs in the context of contemporary plate tectonic and climatic settings. To accomplish the twin missions of providing a “cutting edge” yet entertaining introduction to dinosaurs, chapters are presented as a series of sequentially building essays; each can be read individually, yet each constitutes a link in a cohesive framework of knowledge dealing with things dinosaurian. Extensive illustrations, most specially commissioned for this book, illustrate the text, and fourteen original color plates reconstruct ancient environments through time and space. – From the back cover Gordon, David George. The Compleat Cockroach. Berkeley, CA: Ten Speed Press, 1996. COCKROACHES. You either love ‘em or, like most people, you hate ‘em. Indeed, a government study declared the humble roach America’s most hated creature, ahead of mosquitoes, wasps, and even rattlesnakes. With this book, David George Gordon – biologist, science writer, and bug lover extraordinaire – sets out to change all that. Cockroaches, we learn, are intelligent, hardworking, and well-groomed, as well as being one of the oldest and most successful beings on Earth (340 million years old, and able to withstand a nuclear blast). They’ve been the subject of paintings and poetry, starred in major motion pictures, and made appearances everywhere from the halls of Congress to the Apollo XII command module. The Compleat Cockroach tells it all: • The life history of the roach, including what they eat (just about anything), where they live (everywhere from tropical caves to microwave ovens), and the steamy details of their sex lives (antenna fencing, anyone)? • Cockroaches in human culture – from La Cucaracha to archy and mehitabel to Joe’s Apartment, the rich legacy of roaches on song, dance, and even cuisine (they are three times as protein rich as chicken and taste like shrimp). • Home roach control – what works, what doesn’t, and why. Includes a visit to the Raid™ Research Institute, where scientists breed as many as 80 thousand roaches a week. . . . and much, much more in this indispensable guide to the insect we love to loathe. From the back cover blurb

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Notwithstanding its subject manner, this is one of the most delightful and entertaining books I have ever read. “If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em.” Cockroaches have been around for 340 million years or more, as opposed to our own poor, pitiful 3-4 million year sojourn on this world, and they are likely to be here long after we have ceased even to be a memory. Assuming that eventually we make it to the Stars, they will surely go right along with us, as hitch-hikers as well as, perhaps, laboratory animals and food-sources – and will probably be found there, wherever we choose to make our homes out in space, long after we’ve disappeared there, too. So perhaps its time to make friends with the little dickenses – you just never know, do you? ( Harbinson, W. A. Genesis. New York: Dell, 1991 (first edition 1982). _____. Inception. New York: Dell, 1991. Hillyard, Paul. The Book of the Spider: From Arachnophobia to the Love of Spiders. New York: Random House, 1994. A fascinating and highly entertaining exploration of the world of the spider, from arachnian evolution, physiology, behavior, and ecology to the folklore, myths, and literature of the spider, as well as intriguing discussions of the impact of the spider on human psychology. Knight, Clifford D. Basic Concepts of Ecology. New York: The Macmillan Company, 1965. Malthus, Thomas Robert. An Essay on the Principles of Population as it Affects the Future Improvement of Society. 1798. Milne, Lorus J. and Milne, Margery. The Biotic World and Man. Third Edition. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1965. Morris, Simon Conway. The Crucible of Creation: The Burgess Shale and the Rise of Animals. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998. We live on a wonderful planet that not only teems with life, but shows a marvellous [sic] exuberance of form and variety. From condors crossing tropical storms at altitudes as high as 6000 metres, to microscopic bacteria living many kilometres below the Earth’s crust, life is pervasive. No one yet knows the precise total of species that presently inhabit the Earth, nor how many once existed but are now extinct, but the total must run into many billions. With such a vast array of life, it is perhaps surprising that only one species, our own, is able to understand its origins. Because we are different in so many ways from any other life form that has evolved on Earth, how do we know that our origins and history can be traced here, rather than as extra-terrestrial immigrants? The reason is simple: our evolutionary pedigree is stamped on every feature of our faces and bodies, and by looking at the fossil record, we can trace our progress back to and beyond those primitive fish whose basic brain structure is our inheritance today and whose fins and then limbs first propelled us through and then out of the water. In this book, renowned palaeontologist Simon Conway Morris explores how a single unit of rock, located in the west of Canada, and known as the Burgess Shale, has placed the history of life in a new set of contexts and so by implication has shed new light on our place in the scheme of evolution. He takes us through the fantastic discoveries of hitherto unknown species which were discovered in this isolated outcrop, where the processes of decay have been held in abeyance so that a window into the Cambrian period is opened to reveal the true richness of ancient life. We meet animals such as trilobites and molluscs, with tough, durable skeletons, but also, uniquely, soft-bodied animals from more than half-a-billion years ago. The Burgess Shale, with its remarkable richness of fossil remains, has become an icon for anyone studying the history of life – a reference point of equal significance to Darwin’s finches, which exemplifies the central role of adaptation. Professor Conway Morris guides us through the Burgess Shale and its significance, through the personalities involved, the mistakes they made, and most important of all

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considers whether the discoveries made there necessitate a radical reconsideration of the whole concept of evolution in the Darwinian framework. -- From the inside jacket blurb While (judging from the inside jacket blurb, quoted above, this book tends to be unnecessarily speciesist, its presentation of life’s early history on our world is utterly fascinating. Fully documented and indexed, containing a detailed glossary of terms used within this book that is extremely helpful to the biological novice, this book contains a wealth of illustrations, photographs, and plates which, along with its highly readable text, and the sometimes puckish sense of humor of the author, make it a treat to read even for laybeings in the field, and a treasure for anyone interested in evolutionary biology. Phillips, Kathryn. Tracking the Vanishing Frogs: An Ecological Mystery. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1994. Schaechter, Elio. In the Company of Mushrooms: A Biologist’s Tale. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1997. We might slice them into a salad, savor them in a sauce, wonder at their power to intoxicate or poison, marvel at their multifarious presence in the forest – but few of us realize that mushrooms, humbly thriving on decay, are crucial to life on Earth as we know it. In this book a distinguished biologist, long intrigued by the secret life of fungi, reveals the power of the curious organisms – not quite animal, not quite plant – to enchant and instruct, to nourish and make way for all sorts of superior forms of nature. In a style at once learned and quirky, personal and commanding, Elio Schaechter imparts the fascinating minutiae and the weighty implications of his subject – a primarily microscopic life form that nonetheless accounts for up to two tons for matter for every human on the planet. He shows us how fungi, the great decomposers, recycle most of the world’s vegetable matter – from a blade of grass to a strapping tree – and thus prevent us from sinking under ever-accumulating masses of decaying matter. With the same expertise and contagious enthusiasm that he brings to the biology of mushrooms, Schaechter conveys the allure of the mushroom hunt. Drawing on his own experience as well as that of seasoned pickers and amateur mycologists, he explains when and where to find mushrooms, how they are cultivated, and how they are used in various cultures. From the delectable to the merely tolerable, from the hallucinogenic to the deadly, a wide variety of mushrooms are covered in this spirited presentation. -- From the inside jacket blurb A fascinating overview of one of the most wonderful aspects of Hades’ kingdom, this book is a must not only for the serious Hermeticist, but also for the aspiring chef – or anyone who ever delighted in the wonders of the natural world and a walk through the woods after a good rain. Schaefer, Jack. An American Bestiary: Notes of an Amateur Naturalist. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1975. In a series of leisurely and loving portraits, Jack Schaefer describes a whole ark-full of creatures great and small, who mostly live beyond the din of traffic and the glare of city lights, from the industrious pika, whose sophisticated stockpiling permits him to live in comfort on the desolate rockslides of the high Rockies, to the magnificent pronghorn, whose very appearance represents a perfection of successful adaptation. This book is packed with a thousand bits of information, much of it surely unfamiliar even to the well-read naturalist: the special conditions of a bat’s pregnancy, the subterranean architecture of the gopher, the seasonal frustrations of the stolid porcupine. But more important is the overall warmth and geniality of the author’s vision – one would like to call it his humanity, but, alas, at the present stage of our development

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‘animality’ seems a more appropriate word. In any case, the reader will end up a better mammal, and perhaps even a wiser and more understanding human being. From the inside front jacket blurb Magick is biology and biology is Magick. What better Magickal symbols for our country than these, who constitute the original furry mind of the continent, and did so long before human beings ever trod its soils, drank its waters, breathed its air, or polluted its environment. Turner, Alan and Antón, Mauricio. The Big Cats and Their Fossil Relatives: An Illustrated Guide to Their Evolution and Natural History. Text by Alan Turner and illustrations by Mauricio Antón. New York: Columbia University Press, 1997. Renowned paleontologist Alan Turner and acclaimed artist Mauricio Antón collaborate to produce a fascinating natural history linking extinct larger felid species with those still living, including lions, tigers, cougars, and cheetahs. Using superb fullcolor and black-and-white illustrations to supplement the text, The Big Cats and Their Fossil Relatives chronicles twenty-five million years of evolution, revealing the common ancestry of today’s familiar big cats. From the inside jacket blurb Watson, Lyall. Beyond Supernature: A New Natural History of the Supernatural. New York: Bantam Books, 1988. _____. Dark Nature: A Natural History of Evil. New York: HarperCollinsPublishers, 1995. _____. The Dreams of Dragons. New York: William Morrow and Company, 1987. _____. Gifts of Unknown Things. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1976. _____. Heaven’s Breath: A Natural History of the Wind. New York: William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1984. Lyall Watson, the best-selling author of Supernature and Lifetide, has established a reputation for writing finely researched and provocative accounts of previously untackled subjects. In Heaven’s Breath he turns his encyclopedic mind to the deceptively simple subject of air in motion. In his freethinking style, Watson gives a fascinating survey of the geography, biology, physics, sociology, physiology, psychology, history, and philosophy of the wind. He shows how winds provide the circulatory and nervous systems of the planet, distributing warmth, making soil, and generally bringing the world to life. There are excellent chapters on wind sensitivity, including the creation of a new Beaufort scale of wind forces, an entertaining dictionary of winds, and a look at how the föhn, mistral, sirocco, Santa Ana, and other ‘ill winds’ alter human body chemistry and psychology to an extent that can lead to disease, suicide, and even murder. The historical section recalls how trade winds have shaped imperial destinies and how the dramatic winds of war determined the outcome of the conflict between the Greeks and the Persians, the Mongol invasion of Japan, and the fate of the Spanish Armada. All in all, Lyall Watson reveals the pervasive workings of wind in our everyday lives and shows in a thousand interesting ways how we are affected by one of the greatest forces of nature. – From the inside jacket blurb _____. Lifetide: The Biology of the Unconscious. New York: Bantam Books, 1980. _____. Lightning Bird: One Man’s Journey Into Africa’s Past. New York: E. P. Dutton, 1982. ‘This is the true story of Adrian Boshier, a young Englishman who arrived in Africa at the age of sixteen and ventured into the bush alone, on foot, equipped with nothing

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more than a pocket knife and a plastic bagful of salt, to look for a world described a century earlier by Livingstone and Selous.’ So begins Lyall Watson’s deeply absorbing account of an amazing modern adventure. For not only did Boshier survive alone in the inhospitable bush, he also succeeded in learning some of the secrets of tribal life. Two features won him the respect and trust of the African people: his extraordinary ability to handle the deadliest of snakes and his susceptibility to epileptic seizures, both traits which marked him as a ‘man of the spirit’ – a being Lyall Watson compares to Africa’s mysterious lightning bird. Here are the thrilling stories of Boshier’s initiation as a witch doctor; of his courageous struggles with adversity, danger, and infirmity in the untravelled bush; and of his dramatic rescue of a dying culture, just prior to his own death at the age of 39. The author also tells of Boshier’s remarkable discoveries during his years in Africa: his findings of bone tools, rock gongs, and prehistoric cave paintings; his contribution to research on what may be one of mankind’s earliest scripts; and his discovery of the oldest known mine in the world – all providing startling evidence that modern man, as well as early man, was born in Africa. Boshier’s unique experience – and Lyall Watson’s sensitive retelling of it – add to our own knowledge of paleontology, prehistoric art, African culture, witchcraft and snake lore. Together, this born adventurer and the acclaimed writer who pursued his story have given us an unusually rich first-hand account of the real Africa. – From the inside jacket blurb _____. The Nature of Things: The Secret Life of Inanimate Objects. New York: Destiny Books, 1992. _____. The Romeo Error: A Matter of Life and Death. Garden City, New York: Anchor Press/Doubleday, 1975. ‘The only thing that makes death distinct from all other diseases and disorders is that everybody gets it,’ writes Lyall Watson. Here he present an intriguing and completely original look at our ideas of and our knowledge about that inescapable phenomenon, which, he suggests, may be only the beginning of a far more fantastic existence than what we call life. Combining fifteen years scientific research with his own theories and experiences, Watson discusses all that is known about the biology of life, and therefore of death. He explores the very real problem of deciding when death actually occurs, and considers our psychological and social attitudes toward death to show how we are programmed from childhood not to look beyond it. But death may in no way be final, he speculates, describing the many varieties of reincarnation, the activities of spiritualists, and both out-of-the-body and other-body experiences as manifestations of another realm of being. Focusing on these extraordinary happenings, THE ROMEO ERROR leaves little doubt that there is far more to both life and death than we are able to comprehend by the poor evidence of our five senses – that in fact the two may be indistinguishable, with what we call death merely a change of state, often temporary and sometimes even curable. – From the back jacket blurb _____. Supernature. New York: Anchor Press/Doubleday, 1973. Do the sun, moon, and planets influence man’s life on earth? Does the human mind have power over objects? Do some people have a ‘sixth sense’? In this book, a professional scientist shows why the answer to all these questions is ‘Probably yes.’ Dr. Lyall Watson penetrates the fog of mysticism and superstition that surround the ‘occult arts’ to demonstrate a sound, scientific basis for many supernatural phenomena. Documenting his case with an impressive array of scientific literature, he

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ranges across traditional boundaries, separates the clearly preposterous from the truly provocative, and speculates on facts that are undeniable and once seemed inexplicable. This ‘natural history of the supernatural,’ he explains, ‘is an attempt to fit all of nature, the known and the unknown, into the body of Supernature and to show that, of all the faculties we possess, none is more important at this time than a wide-eyed sense of wonder. – From the inside jacket blurb _____. The Water Planet: A Celebration of the Wonder of Water. With images by Jerry Derbyshire. New York: Crown Publishers, 1988. Water, one of the simplest and most common chemical compounds on our planet, is also one of the most mysterious and awe-inspiring substances we know. As the distinguished marine biologist and best-selling science writer Lyall Watson tells us, water breaks all the rules. Unlike other materials, water is less dense as a solid than as a liquid. Ice floats when it shouldn’t, and this makes life possible in the seas. Water is benign enough to support life – indeed, all living things are bathed in it – yet it is corrosive enough to dissolve metal. Water also manifests itself in a great variety of forms – the delicacy and geometric precision of a snowflake, the brooding magnificence of a thunderstorm, the irresistible energy of the pounding surf, the ephemeral beauty of a rainbow, the hypnotic expanse of the limitless sea. Water is also a source of power, in all its connotations. Flowing water took us out of the Dark Ages. Water made the first clocks and machines work. Flooding rivers produced the first civilizations. Water means commerce and trade between nations. Water has built and sustained empires. And the absence of water kills thousands every year. Water is, quite literally, everything we are. In this wide-ranging meditation on water and its influences on life, nature, and human history, Dr. Watson has collaborated with nature photographer Jerry Derbyshire to produce a photo-essay of beauty and eloquence. Derbyshire’s stunning photographs are as poetic as Watson’s prose images. Together they tell the story of water’s role in earth’s creation – how it has shaped civilizations, influenced religions, and inspired artists of every kind. Here, too, is a discussion of the physics and chemistry of water, far more complex and bizarre than one would imagine. – From the inside jacket blurb Wilford, John Noble. The Riddle of the Dinosaur. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1985. With 34 blackand-white illustrations and 7 full-color lithographs by Douglas Henderson. The startling new evidence that has come to light in the last two decades, overturning many long-held ideas about the dinosaur, is only one of the many attractions of John Noble Wilford’s new book. In it the Pulitzer Prize-winning science writer for the New York Times examines both the myths and the truths that until now have formed our vision of the great prehistoric beast, and the recent explosion of new theory and conjecture. Telling the stories of the ingenious paleontologists who, since the early 1800s, have pursued the riddle of the dinosaur, Wilford relates their curious and adventurous exploits in the service of science as well as the often astonishing hypotheses they put forth. He writes about the early devotees, many of them amateurs, who first found remains in the English countryside: Mary Anning, the barely literate girl who from the age of eleven supported her widowed mother by selling fossil shells she found in the cliffs at Lyme Regis and recognized as remarkable; and Gideon Algernon Mantell, the surgeon who put together the teeth and bones of the first skeleton to be verified as a dinosaur. Here, among America’s pioneer dinosaur hunters, are Othniel Marsh and Edward Cope, who, driven by their unceasing rivalry (they spied on, brawled with, and sabotaged each other

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through the 1870s), became responsible for the most wide-ranging, systematic study of dinosaur life that existed until the middle of this century. And here is the burst of discovery since the 1960s – new fossil and geophysical clues, a multitude of new remains unearthed, at least fifty hitherto unknown types of dinosaurs identified – that has revolutionized dinosaur theory. Here is evidence, for example, that contrary to the previous image of a languid, cold-blooded beast, some dinosaurs were warm-blooded and quick-moving some cared devotedly for their young. Finally, Wilford discusses the most radical change in the concept of the dinosaur: the contention that its disappearance from the earth sixty-five million years ago was the result not of maladaptation but of a massive catastrophe such as global floods, asteroids colliding with the planet, or exploding stars. Richly informative, lucid, lively, scientifically impeccable, The Riddle of the Dinosaur will stand as the book on its subject. A large and fascinating view of the largest and perhaps the most fascinating animal that has ever walked the earth. From the inside jacket blurb Zimmer, Carl. “The Light at the Bottom of the Sea.” In Discover Vol. 17 No. 11 November 1996), pp. 6373. Two miles below the surface of the sea, a mysterious glow emerges from cracks in the Earth. In that glow, the first steps to photosynthesis may have taken place, 3.8 billion years ago. Editorial comment At midocean ridges, where new ocean floor rises up in the form of molten rock from the interior of our Planet, the otherwise eternal Stygian darkness of the ocean floor is lit up by the glowing vents. Admittedly this light isn’t much, but it is more than enough to allow organisms with simple eyes – non-discriminatory photoreceptors that can sense light but do little more – to orient themselves by it in ways that genuinely enhance their chances of survival. Recently, shrimp which lack eye-stalks but do possess simple eyes located, of all places, on their backs have been found thriving around these vents. This finding has extremely important implications concerning the evolutionary origins of eyes and lightsensing organs of all kinds, and suggests that the first eyes of any kind, as well as photosynthesis, may have come into being almost four billion years ago, in organisms living around geothermal vents on the ocean floor. If so, this would clear up a tremendous mystery, one that Darwin himself despaired of ever answering: how did the eye first come into being?

2.2.3.1: Biophysics and Biological Cryptophenomenology Nota bene: If you, the reader, are wondering why so many publications concerning the nature of consciousness and the possible mechanisms that facilitate it are included here, think: what biological phenomenon is there that is more mysterious as to its ultimate origins than conscious awareness? The ability to react to situations in a manner that is biologically appropriate doesn’t require consciousness, just proper programming. So why consciousness? It isn’t necessary to anything. Therefore it is sui generis – and perhaps, as the Buddhists believe, it is the ultimate origin of all other things. Hence the inclusion in this section of various articles, books, and other works on sentience and its biological correlates. Berlitz, Charles. Charles Berlitz’s World of the Odd and Awesome. New York: Fawcett-Crest, 1991. Dragwyla, Yael. “The Intraterrestrial Paradigm: Two Research Papers on a Possible Ecological Explanation of the Origin and Nature of Certain Classes of Unidentified Flying Objects.” Las Vegas: The National UFO Museum, 1991.

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Eccles, John C., editor. Brain and Conscious Experience. New York: Springer Verlag, 1966. _____. “Do Mental Events Cause Neural Events Analogously to the Probability Fields of Quantum Mechanics?” Proceedings of the Royal Society of London (Biology), 227 411 (1986). _____. Evolution of the Brain – Creation of the Self. New York: Routledge, 1989. May, E. C.; Radin, D. I.; Hubbard, G. S.; Humphrey, B. S.; Utts, J. M. “Psi Experiments With Random-Number Generators: An Informational Model.” Proceedings of the 28th Annual Parapsychological Association Convention. Medford, MA: Tufts University, 1985. Murchie, Guy. The Seven Mysteries of Life. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1978. Norwich, Julia. “Explaining the Unexplainable.” “Body & Soul” column, in Elle (Sept. 1996 (Vol. XII, No. 1; No. 133), pp. 248-254. Life after death? Mind over matter? Julia Norwich visits the Princeton research center that’s looking for answers – and seems to be finding them. – Editorial introduction Cutting-edge paratechnology that actually works. A lucid and well-written description of rigorously controlled experiments conducted by Dr. Robert Jahn et al. at the Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research (PEAR) Laboratory, Princeton University, New Jersey, that conclusively demonstrate that “wild talents” and paranormal phenomena not only exist, but exist in a quantifiable, controllable form that anyone can learn with just a little practice. (More information on these studies is available from the PEAR Laboratory, Princeton University.) Ring, Kenneth, Ph.D. The Omega Project: Near-Death Experiences, UFO Encounters, and Mind at Large. New York: William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1992. Schmidt, Helmut. “The Strange Properties of Psychokinesis.” Journal of Scientific Exploration, 1: 103 (1987). Vesco, Renato. Intercept/UFO. New York: Zebra Books, 1971. (Also published as Intercept – But Don’t Shoot [NY: Zebra Press, 1971].)

2.2.3.2: Ecology Woodwell, George M. “The Energy Cycle of the Biosphere.” Scientific American, Vol. 223, No. 3 (Sept. 1970), pp. 64-74.

2.2.3.3: Evolutionary Science and Sociobiology Altman, S. A. “A Field Study of the Sociobiology of Rhesus Monkeys, Macaca mulata.” Unpublished Harvard University thesis, 1960. Alee, W. C.; Nissen, H. W.; and Nimkoff, M. F. “A Reexamination of the Concept of Instinct.” In Psych. Rev. 60 (5) (1953), pp. 287-297. Ardrey, R. African Genesis. New York: Atheneum, 1961. _____. The Territorial Imperative: A Personal Inquiry into the Animal Origins of Property and Nations. New York: Atheneum, 1966. Barnett, S. A. “An Analysis of Social Behavior in Wild Rats.” In Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond. 130 (1958): 107-152. _____. “Experiments on ‘Neophobia’ in Wild and Laboratory Rats.” In Brit. Jour. Med. Psychol. 49 (1958a): 195-201. _____ and Spencer, M. M. “Feeding, Social Behaviour and Interspecific Competition in Wild Rats.” In Behaviour 3 (1951): 229-242.

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Bartell, G. T. Group Sex. New York: Peter H. Wyden, 1971. Bateson, Gregory. Mind and Behavior: A Necessary Unit. New York: Dutton, 1979. _____. Steps to an Ecology of Mind: Collected Essays in Anthropology, Evolution, and Epistemology. San Francisco: Chandler Publishing Company, 1972. Beach, F. A. “Bisexual Mating Behavior in the Male Rat: Effects of Castration and Hormone Administration.” In Physiol. Zool. 18 (1945): 390. _____. “The Descent of Instinct.” In Psych. Rev. 62 (6, 1955): 401-410. Beeman, E. A. “The Effect of Male Hormone on Aggressive Behavior in Mice.” In Physiol. Zool. 20 (1947: 373. Bingham, H. C. Gorillas in Native Habitat. Publication Number 426. Washington, D.C.: Carnegie Inst. of Washington, 1932. Bliss, E. L., editor. Roots of Behavior. New York: Hafner, 1968. Cartwright, Frederick F. and Biddiss, Michael D. Disease and History. New York: Dorset Press, 1972. Comfort, Alexander. I and That: Notes on the Biology of Religion. New York: Crown Publishers, 1979. Crick, F. H. C. “The Origin of the Genetic Code.” In Journal of Molecular Biology, 38: 367-79 (1968). Darwin, Charles. The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection: or, the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. London: John Murray, 1868. Dawkins, Richard. The Selfish Gene. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976. Denton, Derek, Dr. The Pinnacle of Life: Consciousness and Self-Awareness in Humans and Animals. New York: HarperSanFrancisco/Harper Collins Publishers, 1993. Dixon, Dougal. After Man: A Zoology of the Future. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1981. _____. Man After Man: An Anthropology of the Future. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1990. Eibl-Eibesfeldt, Irenaus. Ethology: The Biology of Behavior. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1970. Eiseley, Loren. All the Strange Hours. New York: Scribner, 1975. _____. Darwin’s Century. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1958. _____. The Firmament of Time. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1960. _____. The Immense Journey. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1957. _____. The Invisible Pyramid. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1970. _____. The Man Who Saw Through Time. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1975. _____. The Night Country. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1971. _____. The Unexpected Universe. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1969. Eldredge, Niles. Fossils: The Evolution and Extinction of Species. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers, 1991. This fascinating exploration of fossils overturns the traditional view of evolution as a slow and inevitable process and shows that lifeforms generally do not evolve to any significant degree until after massive extinction. This rhythm of life – stability punctuated by bursts of change – is revealed by the fossilized remains of the earth’s ancient flora and fauna. From the jacket review I love this book because it embodies such a fine marriage of these two modes of our central vision – palpable photographs of material things with a distinctive text on the patterns of life’s history. – From the introduction by Stephen Jay Gould, ibid., p. xii _____. The Miner’s Canary: Unraveling the Mysteries of Extinction. New York: Prentice-Hall Press, 1991. Erwin, Douglas H. The Great Paleozoic Crisis: Life and Death in the Permian. New York: Columbia University Press, 1993. The Great Paleozoic Crisis carefully examines the events recorded at the major Permo-Triassic boundary sections and documents the patterns of extinction and survival

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among the major groups of marine and terrestrial plants and animals. Erwin also provides a detailed summary of the climatic, geologic, geophysical and geochemical events of the Late Permian and Early Triassic. – Blurb on back cover of trade paperback edition Forsyth, Adrian. A Natural History of Sex: The Ecology and Evolution of Sexual Behavior. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1986. Hinde, Robert A. Animal Behavior. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1966. Hrdy, Sarah Blaffer. The Woman That Never Evolved. Cambridge, MA: The Harvard University Press, 1981. Kummer, Hans. Primate Societies: Group Techniques of Ecological Adaptation. New York: AldineAtherton, 1971. Lorenz, Konrad. King Solomon’s Ring. New York: Crowell, 1952. Lotka, Alfred J. Elements of Mathematical Biology. New York: Dover, 1956. Lumsden, Charles J. Genes, Mind, and Culture: The Coevolutionary Process. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1981. Marler, Peter R. and Hamilton, William J., III. Mechanisms of Animal Behavior. New York: Wiley, 1966. Montagu, Ashley, ed. Sociobiology Examined. New York: Oxford University Press, 1980. Whitfield, Philip. From So Simple a Beginning: The Book of Evolution. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company, 1993. Wickler, Wolfgang. The Sexual Code: The Social Behavior of Animals and Men. Francisca Gravie, translator. Garden City, NY: Anchor Press/Doubleday, 1973. Wilson, Edward O. Sociobiology. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1978. _____. Sociobiology: The New Synthesis. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1980. Zimmer, Carl. “First, Kill the Babies.” In Discover Magazine Sept. 1996 (Vol. 17, No. 9), pp. 72-76, 77. In the early 1970s a chilling hypothesis laid bare the evolutionary logic of infanticide. Twenty-five years later it is still an explanation many researchers are loath to accept. – Editorial comment in table of contents of that issue, p. 4 Discusses a new hypothesis concerning the evolutionary origins of pair-bonding in primates, especially Homo sapiens in the need for both males and females to protect their infants and children from infanticidal members of their own species, especially other males. According to this model, it is in the best genetic interest of a father to bond closely with the mother of his children, so that he will always be around to protect his children by her from other males who might otherwise kill his children (to promote their own genes) and take his mate as their own, to have children with her themselves. (Also, it is in the best genetic interest of a mother to be prepared to defend her children from all comers, especially males but sometimes also females – hence the evolution of many behaviors characteristic of mammalian mothers in general.) The article also mentions corollary studies done on cats of various kinds, especially lions, concerning the tendency of female cats to forms social groups and look after one another’s cubs and kittens. 2.2.3.4: Anthropology and Xenology: The Study of Sentience Barrow, John D. Pi in the Sky: Counting, Thinking, and Being. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992. Benedict, R. “The Natural History of War.” In An American Anthropologist at Work. Margaret Mead, editor. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1934. _____. Patterns of Culture. New York: New American Library/Mentor, 1934. Bennett, E. L.; Diamond, M. C.; Krech, D.; and Rosenzweig, M. R. “Chemical and Anatomical Plasticity of the Brain.” In Science 146 (1964): 610-619.

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Berkowitz, L. “The Frustration-Aggression Theory Revisited.” In Aggression: A Social-Psychological Analysis, by L. Berkowitz (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1962). Also in The Roots of Aggression: A Reexamination of the Frustration-Aggression Hypothesis (L. Berkowitz, editor. New York: Atherton, 1969). _____. “Readiness or Necessity?” In Cont. Psychol. 12 (1967): 580-583. Berne, Eric. Games People Play: The Psychology of Human Relationships. New York: Grove Press, 1964. Beston, W. H.; Heron, W.; and Scott, T. H. “Effect of Decreased Variation in the Sensory Environment.” Can. Jour. of Psych. 8 (2, 1954): 10-76. Bird, Traveler. Tell Them They Lie: The Sequoyah Myth. Los Angeles: Westernlore Publishers, 1971. Black Elk. Black Elk Speaks: Being the Life Story of a Holy Man of the Oglala Sioux. As told through John G. Neihardt (Flaming Rainbow). New York: Washington Square Press (Pocket Books), 1972. Bleuler, E. Autistic Thinking, Organization and Pathology of Thought. New York: Columbia University Press, 1951. Boaz, Noel T, Ph.D. Eco Homo: How the Human Being Emerged from the Cataclysmic History of the Earth. New York: Basic Books, 1997. Did you ever wonder why people walk upright? Why we have such big brains? Why some people have dark skin and some have light? Why our early ancestors ever left Africa and started wandering over the globe? And perhaps even why we, with all our technological sophistication, still like to barbecue raw meat over an open fire? This book is about the immense forces of nature that formed and shaped the human species over millions of years. It is also about the new high-tech science that has allowed us to peer into the dark recesses of the past as never before and to reconstruct the trials, adaptive successes, and evolution of our ancestors. In Eco Homo, paleoanthropologist Noel T. Boaz presents a narrative of human evolution, a natural history of our origins, in the contexts of ecology and environmental change. Our story begins with the appearance of higher primates in the Old World tropics. We then narrow our focus to Africa and examine eight hypotheses that explain the major evolutionary divergences of the gorilla, the chimpanzee, and finally human ancestors, or hominids. The events in this evolution only make sense from a standpoint of the adaptations that our ancestors made to changing environments, different geography, and fluctuating climates. Ecological change, characterized by increasingly severe environmental fluctuations of greater and greater amplitude during the late Pleistocene period, forced the evolution of culture as we know it. Culture in the hands of the first agriculturists 10,000 years ago increased population densities, created diseases unknown to earlier hominids, built the first villages and temples, and gave humans the pervasive misconception that they were above the laws of nature, even as they rushed headlong into a despoilment of their habitat unknown in any other species. The message of Eco Homo for the ecological future of the species is that we cannot escape nature. If we attempt to do so – to step outside the bounds of our basic biological adaptations – we suffer the consequences. Culture needs to be brought under control and to be made to serve human adaptation, not vice versa. If we can tame runaway culture, we may be able to regain a measure of the ancestral equilibrium between our adaptation and a sustainable environment. -- From the inside jacket blurb On the other hand, the need to establish ourselves and a broad spectrum of the rest of earthly life in space, on other planets and moons of the Solar System and of other stellar systems as well as in LaGrange-type and orbital space-station artificial space environments, mandates that our cultures keep evolving ever more rapidly to get us into space and allow us to stay there. As was beautifully demonstrated on July 16-20, 1994 e.v., when 23 enormous chunks of Comet Shoemaker-Levy impacted Jupiter, thereby creating the most spectacular light-show ever observed in the Solar System since Galileo’s discoveries, every body in the Solar System – Earth included – is a target in a cosmic shooting gallery that has gone on since the Planets formed and will continue until the universe ends.

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The guns – comets, asteroids, and other bodies – vary from a few microns in size to over 200 kilometers or more in diameter. One of them, which hit the Yucatan Peninsula some 65 million years ago, put an end to the dinosaurs and most of their terrestrial neighbors – some 56% of all terrestrial species then extant – and radically changed the ecological dynamics of our world. Something even nastier happened to our living world about 245 million years ago, ending the Paleozoic and ushering in the Mesozoic Era of Earthly life, killing off over 96% of all species then living in Earth. And there have been numerous other lesser, but still spectacular extinctions on our world, occurring on average about 26-33 million years apart, some smaller, some greater, all disastrous for many or most organisms then living on Earth. That interval is just about right for the extremes of motion of the Solar System up and down across the plane of our galaxy, the Milky Way, during its revolution around the galactic hub; and since that motion brings the Solar System in close proximity to other stellar systems and the enormous swarms of comets which, as is the case for our own stellar system, doubtless ring most of them, the likelihood is very great that many or most of those tremendous wipe-outs of Earthly life could well have been due to the impact of one or more large comets and/or asteroids that were swept into the Solar System from others due to our motion past them. Thus it’s only a matter of time until another cosmic intruder once again targets our world, an intruder we might never see until it is right upon us, since so many comets and asteroids are dark. If by that time we have not established a viable and permanent presence in space, not only in the Solar System but beyond, within other stellar systems, our species and many or most of those with which we share the Earth – perhaps even life on Earth as a whole – may thereby become history, a history only visiting alien archeologists, if anyone, will ever be able to document. But we can’t attain the Stars if we bring cultural change to a standstill. We have to keep learning, inventing, changing – and the impact of those changes could well drive us over the brink into a self-destructive orgy that by itself could do the same job that the next comet might do. We walk a very narrow tightrope now, between too rapid, too radical and too little, too mediocre cultural change. The first could drive us collectively insane, so that we become extinct by our own hand; the latter would make us, and all the rest of Earth’s life, sitting ducks for the next celestial Big One. Boaz has half the picture, has it very well. Who will provide the other half, the half we must have to complete the picture begun by Boaz if we are to finally fulfill our niche as Earth’s best and most likely candidate for our world’s reproductive equipment? Bowlby, J. Attachment and Love. London: Hogarth, 1969. International Psychoanalytic Library. _____. “The Nature of the Child’s Tie to His Mother.” In Int. Jour. of Psychoan. 39 (1958): 350-373. Brand, William; Shafer, Donna; and Andrews, Sperry. “Electrodermal Correlates of Remote Attention: Autonomic Reactions to an Unseen Gaze.” Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Parapsychological Association Convention. Chevy Chase, MD: 1990. Bullock, A. A Study in Tyranny. 1965 (no other publication data available). Bullock, T. H. “The Origins of Patterned Nervous Discharge.” In Behaviour 17 (1961): 48-59. Carter, Angela. The Sadeian Woman and the Ideology of Pornography. New York: Pantheon Books, 1978. Paul Corey. Are Cats People?: Notes of a Cat-Watcher. Chicago: Contemporary Books, Inc., 1979. When Paul Corey’s book Do Cats Think? came out, the question posed in the title got a variety of answers: “Of course, cats think!” or “How stupid! Cats don’t think! Only humans think!” One reviewer wrote, “I know cats think! It’s people I have my doubts about.” With a title like Are Cats People? a similar spread of reactions is anticipated: ‘Of course, cats are people!’ or “What sort of weirdo would ask such a question?” And the cynical reviewer who has no doubts about cats thinking might well say, “The real question is: are people people?” Are Cats People? is filled with marvelously funny and sometimes terribly poignant stories of the sixteen cats who have filled Paul Corey’s life -- stories that testify to the peoplelike emotions and behaviors of these felines. The book answers questions such as: Is there a feline IQ? When your cat talks, do you listen? Are felines psychic? It also discusses areas such as ‘Felis Domestica and the Learning Process,’ ‘Cats and the Conditional Response Method of Learning,’ and ‘The Feline Personality.’

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Combining his experiences and observations with [those] of others, the author has written an enjoyable book for cat lovers -- one that will also help them derive more enjoyment out of relationship with the cats they know. -- From the inside jacket blurb Today, the real question is: Why not run a cat for president? And the answer is: It sure as hell couldn’t be nearly as bad as what’s in the White House these days! ;-) For more about this book see http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=0809273357/hydrodragonenterA/ _____. Do Cats Think? Notes of a Cat-Watcher. Edison, NJ: Castle/Book Sales, Inc., 1977. Cats remember. Cats communicate. Cats learn. Cats . . . think? Paul Corey believes they do. And in this fascinating book, filled with anecdotes and descriptions of cat behavior from decades of personal observation, he points the way to learning more about your cat and, perhaps, yourself. He also makes a strong case for cat-watching as a delightful, productive hobby in an automated age. As researchers have pointed out, in many ways cats are surprisingly similar to man. They may even surpass him, Corey believes, in dignity and independence. Without attempting to anthropomorphize, he shares example after example of intelligent behavior exhibited by the cats he and his wife have taken in over the years. Do Cats Think? Deals with cat communication (from what the author calls ‘the silent miaow’ to what appear to be tears) and learning (such as the ‘kitten-garten,’ in which a mother cat trains her young to hunt, play, groom, and observe the rules of the house). It debunks many of the myths about cats, setting the record straight: Neutered males do not become fat and lazy, a well-fed cat is the best hunter, cats can be trained, and they do give and receive affection. Using Corey’s suggestions, you will be able to standardize your own observations and, perhaps, provide science with tools for the further investigation of communication between species. – From the inside jacket blurb Damasio, Antonio R, M. D. Descartes’ Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain. New York: Grosset/Putnam Books, 1994. Davis, Philip J.; Hersh, Reuben; and Marchisotto, Elena Anne. The Mathematical Experience. Study edition. Boston: Birkhäuser, 1981, 1995. Mathematics has been a human activity for thousands of years. Yet only a few people from the vast population of users are professional mathematicians, who create it, teach it, foster it, and apply it in a variety of situations. The authors of this book believe that it should be possible for these professional mathematicians to explain to nonprofessionals what they do, what they say they are doing, and why the world should support them at it. They also believe that mathematics should be taught to nonmathematics majors in such a way as to instill an appreciation of the power and beauty of mathematics. Many people from around the world have told the authors that they have done precisely that with the first edition, and they have encouraged publication of this study edition complete with exercises for helping students to demonstrate that understanding. – From the back cover blurb

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Mathematics is something that all sentience, regardless of its species or even planetary origins, is likely to have in common. An understanding of the history and philosophy of mathematics is therefore essential to the disciplines of xenology, anthropology, and general ethology. This book is an invaluable aid to attainment of such understanding. Dennett, Daniel C. Consciousness Explained. New York: Little, Brown, 1991. Dick, Steven J. The Biological Universe: The Twentieth-Century Extraterrestrial Life Debate and the Limits of Science. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996. Throughout the twentieth century, from the furor over Percival Lowell’s claim of canals on Mars to the sophisticated Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), otherworldly life has often intrigued and occasionally consumed science and the public. Is our species biologically unique – in the sense of mind and intelligence – in the universe? Are there other histories, religions, and philosophies outside of those on Earth? Do extraterrestrial minds ponder the mysteries of the universe? The attempts to answer these often-asked questions form one of the most interesting chapters in the history of science and culture, and The Biological Universe is the first book to provide a rich and colorful history of those attempts during the twentieth century. Covering a board range of topics, including the search for life in the Solar System, SETI, the origins of life, UFOs, and aliens in science fiction, Steven J. Dick’s study shows how the concept of extraterrestrial intelligence is a worldview of its own, a” biophysical cosmology” that seeks confirmation no less than do physical views of the universe. No matter how much we learn about the varied life forms of Earth and the physical nature of the universe of which we are part, the question of biological uniqueness is central to the quest, for who we are and what our role in nature may be, questions as much a part of religion and philosophy as of science. This history is not only important to an understanding of the nature of science, but is also central to any forward-looking concept of religion, philosophy, and other areas of human endeavor. Donald, M. J. “Quantum Theory and the Brain.” Proceedings of the Royal Society of London 427 A 43 (1990). Dossey, Larry. Recovering the Soul – A Scientific and Spiritual Search. New York: Bantam Books, 1989. Eccles, John C., editor. Brain and Conscious Experience. New York: Springer Verlag, 1966. _____. “Do Mental Events Cause Neural Events Analogously to the Probability Fields of Quantum Mechanics?” Proceedings of the Royal Society of London (Biology), 227 411 (1986). _____. Evolution of the Brain – Creation of the Self. New York: Routledge, 1989. Eckert, Allan W. A Sorrow in Our Heart: The Life of Tecumseh. New York: Bantam Books, 1992.F Ferreira, Hugo Gil, and Marshall, Michael W. The Biophysical Basis of Excitability. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985. Fogelson, Aaron L. and Zucker, Robert S. “Presynaptic Calcium Diffusion from Various Arrays of Single Channels.” Biophysical Journal 48: 1003 (1985). Froelich, Herbert. “Coherent Excitation in Active Biological Systems.” In Modern Bioelectrochemistry. Felix Guttermann and Hendrik Kayzer, editors. New York: Plenum Press, 1986. Goodall, Jane. See entries under “Van Lawick-Goodall, Jane, Baroness.” Goswami, Amit. The Self-Aware Universe. Tarcher-Putnam, 1993. Griffin, Donald H. The Question of Animal Awareness. New York: Rockefeller University Press, 1972. Herbert, Nick. Elemental Mind: Human Consciousness and the New Physics. New York: Dutton, 1993. _____. Faster Than Light: Superluminal Loopholes in Physics. New York: New American Library, 1988. _____. “Mechanical Mediums.” Psychic magazine July/August 36 (1976). _____. “Notes Towards ‘A User’s Guide to the Quantum Connection.” In The BVI-Pacifica Journal, Vol. 1, No. 4 (Leo/Summer 1988), p. 4. _____. Quantum Reality: Beyond the New Physics. New York: Doubleday, 1985. Hille, Bertil. Ionic Channels of Excitable Membranes. Sunderland, MA: Sinauer Associates, 1984. Hillman, James. The Dream and the Underworld. New York: Perennial Library, 1979.

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Here, James Hillman develops an extension of Jung’s ideas of the collective unconscious into a new theory of dreams and dreaming. He returns to classical theories for the poetics of mythology, relating our dreaming life to the myths of the Underworld, the dark side of the soul, its images and shadows, and to the Gods and archetypes of death. This leads to a re-visioning of dream interpretation in relation to the psychology of death and dying. Hillman concludes with a long section on specific dream images and themes as they appear in psychological praxis. This work is a sequel to his The Myth of Analysis and Re-Visioning Psychology as well as his many essays on archetypal themes. _____ and Ventura, Michael. We’ve Had a Hundred Years of Psychotherapy and the World’s Getting Worse. New York: HarperSanFrancisco, 1992. One of Carl Jung’s most brilliant and accomplished students, James Hillman deftly and elegantly critiques the psychoanalytic movement and its impact on Western civilization, making clear what we all suspected all along: that getting in touch with your Inner Narcissist is probably not the best collective endeavor we should have embarked on during this most extreme of centuries. Classical psychoanalysis turns the patient inward upon him- or herself, detaching him/her more and more from awareness of the real world and the vital issues that perturb it, thus rendering him/her less and less able to participate intelligently and appropriately in any attempt to deal successfully with those issues. On a collective level it has helped to turn our civilization into a herding of narcissists, thereby crippling the spirits and intellectual competence of the very people most needed to deal with the ever-increasing and ever more serious problems confronting us now, at the end of the 20 th century and the beginning of the 21st. Worse, it has helped to infantilize this culture and turn more and more of its adult members into self-absorbed emotional cripples whose mental horizons are no wider than the psychic navels on which their analysts teach them to meditate. Whereas Elizabethan England, plagued as it was with endemic emotional illness, deadly epidemics, and a host of other ills yet produced some of the greatest thinkers, writers, and works of art the West has ever known, our own age and culture, thanks to the attitudes into which they have been cozened by the psychoanalytic movement and its multifarious spin-offs, has tried to wall itself off completely from the exigencies and certainties of biological reality, from birth to death, without coming anywhere near to producing a Shakespeare, an Elizabeth I, or any of the other great shining lights of that “primitive, backward” time. We have, in short, sold our collective soul for a mess of psychoanalysis – with far-reaching and pervasive results, results that could spell our doom. James Hillman’s outstanding dissection of our over-psychologized culture should become required reading for anyone who still has enough brain left to think with after what the Psychobabble Culture has done to it. Hintze, Naomi A. and Pratt, J. Gaither, Ph.D. The Psychic Realm: What Can You Believe? New York: Random House, 1975. Ask any group of a hundred Americans whether they had ever had a psychic experience, and between ten and fifty of them will say ‘Yes.’ Some of these people feel they have received a message without any worldly channels of communication; some have had a premonition of death or of a great danger; some have sensed the presence of a beloved person who has died; others have seen the ouija board give strangely accurate answers to obscure questions. Those of us who have had these or similar experiences have wished to have them explained in a way that we could accept and understand. Now parapsychologist Gaither Pratt and popular author Naomi Hintze have joined forces to write a book which examines all the facets of psychic phenomena, introducing new material from life and from the laboratory, in a responsible yet readable way that allows the reader, finally, to pick his way through the debris of the occult explosion. This goal has been accomplished by the book’s unique format. First Mrs. Hintze takes on a subject – ESP in animals, for example. She tells of Chris, a dog who apparently could do arithmetic problems and could communicate complicated messages. She describes, as another example, poltergeist phenomena, as in the warehouse in Miami where objects flew off shelves or hurtled to the ground without any apparent natural explanation. (Police and scientists on the scene, in this case, confirmed that these events

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were taking place, but they could find no evidence whatever of trickery or physical causes.) In the second half of each chapter, Dr. Pratt explains what happened – sometimes pointing to a misinterpretation of simple physical phenomena; sometimes concluding that, indeed, a psychic event has apparently taken place. Many of the most interesting psychic phenomena are discussed: precognition, altered states of consciousness, poltergeists, people who can move physical objects without touching them, healers, possession, mediums, survival after death – and more. In addition, in one of the most valuable chapters of the book, the authors tell how we can test ourselves to see whether we have ESP or other extraordinary abilities. As Rosalind Heywood has written, The Psychic Realm ‘is the book both the public and parapsychologists have been waiting for.’ Hooper, Judith, and Teresi, Dick. The Three-Pound Universe. New York: Macmillan, 1986. Jacobs, Barry L. “How Hallucinogenic Drugs Work.” American Scientist, 75:386 (1987). Jahn, Robert G., and Dunne, Brenda J. Margins of Reality – The Role of Consciousness in the Physical World. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1987. Jones, Prudence and Pennick, Nigel. A History of Pagan Europe. New York: Routledge, 1995. . . . fills an important gap among worlds of history, and does so splendidly. No specialist in any particular form of European paganism can read this book without learning something from it . . . it does not have a rival. – Ronald Hutton, University of Bristol A sourcebook and a central text in the ‘ancient or modern’ debate about Paganism. . . . Stunning! – Pagan Voice Josephy, Alvin M., Jr. 500 Nations: An Illustrated History of North American Indians. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994. Kilmer, W. L.; McCulloch, W. S.; Blum, J. “Towards a Theory of the Reticular Formation.” In W. C. Corning and M. Balaban, editors, The Mind: Biological Approaches to its Functions. New York: Wiley, 1968. Kowalski, Gary. The Souls of Animals. Walpole, NH: Stillpoint Publishing, 1991. Lewin, Roger. “Is Your Brain Really Necessary?” Science, 210: 1232 (1980). Libet, Benjamin. “Subjective Referral of the Timing for a Conscious Sensory Experience.” Brain, 102: 1193 (1979). Maine, Sir Henry Sumner. Ancient Law. Dorset Press, 1986. Marshall, I. N. “Consciousness and Bose-Einstein Condensates.” New Ideas in Psychology, 7: 73 (1989). Masson, Jeffrey Moussaieff. Dogs Never Lie About Love: Reflections on the Emotional World of Dogs. New York: Crown Publishers, Inc., 1997. Dogs fill our lives with love, our hearts with devotion, and our minds with wonder, yet their complex emotional lives have remained unexplored since Darwin 125 years ago. Now Jeffrey Masson, the controversial psychoanalyst and best-selling author of When Elephants Weep – the taboo-breaking book about the emotional lives of animals in the wild – turns at last to the species that first brought him to his love of animals as a child, exploring the rich inner landscape of ‘our best and truest friend.’ As he guides readers through the surprising depth of canine emotional complexity, Jeffrey Masson draws from myth and literature, from scientific studies, and from the stories and observations of dog trainers and dog lovers around the world. But the stars of the book are Masson’s own three dogs – Sasha, Sima, and Rani – whose delightful and mysterious behavior provides the way to exploring a wide range of subjects – from emotions like gratitude, compassion, loneliness, and disappointment to speculating what

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dogs dream of, how they perceive of [sic] other species (including humans), and how their powerful sense of smell shapes their perception of reality. As he sweeps aside old prejudices on animal behavior, Masson navigates through the rich universe of dog feeling to its essential core, their ‘master emotion’: love. Like the dogs he loves, Masson’s writing will captivate you with its playful, mysterious, and serious sides. Its surprising insights provide a new dimension of understanding for dog lovers everywhere and will forever change the way you look at – and think about – dogs. – From the inside jacket blurb _____ and McCarthy, Susan. When Elephants Weep: The Emotional Lives of Animals. New York: Delacorte Press, 1995. For over 100 years a chasm has separated animals lovers – who know that their dog, cat, horse, or parrot have [sic] complex emotional lives – and scientists, to whom attributing any emotions to animals has been equivalent to heresy. And while a groundswell among a new generation of scientists has begun chipping away at this traditional taboo, and animal lovers eagerly consume whatever they can find about the subject, no one book has yet gathered all the available information into an engaging and authoritative portrait of animals’ emotional lives. Not, that is, until now. With chapters on love, joy, anger, fear, shame, compassion, and loneliness, all framed by a provocative reevaluation of how we treat animals, When Elephants Weep is the first book since Darwin’s time to explore the full range of emotions throughout the animal kingdom, and it features of cast of hundreds. Meet Siri the Indian elephant, whose expressive sketches have been praised by artists Willem and Elaine de Kooning. Meet Koko, a bashful gorilla proficient in sign language who loves to play house with dolls – but only when no one is looking – and Michael, another signing gorilla, who cannot be disturbed whenever Pavarotti sings on television. Then there’s Moja, the joyful mongoose who waltzes with squirrels; Toto, the steadfast chimpanzee who literally nursed his malaria-stricken human observer back to health; and Alex, an African grey parrot with an astonishing vocabulary, who, when left at the veterinarian’s office, shrieked, ‘Come here! I love you. I’m sorry. I want to go back.’ By contrast, you’ll also meet scores of biologists, ethologists, and animal behaviorists whose anecdote-rich field notes and studies paint compelling portraits of their subjects’ rich emotional lives, yet whose conclusions frequently appear as fancy footwork around the obvious. When Elephants Weep also draws upon the illuminating experiences of animal trainers – from Sea World and the Ringling Bros. Circus to Guide Dogs for the Blind – and is sprinkled with insights from pet owners, literature, myth, and fable to create a riveting and revolutionary portrayal of animals’ lives that will permanently change and enrich the way you look at animals. – From the inside jacket blurb Mellars, Paul. The Neanderthal Legacy: An Archeological Perspective from Western Europe. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1996. . . . [W]hat exactly are the central issues in current studies of the Neanderthals? The question which lies at the heart of the present debate centres on the precise relationships of the Neanderthal populations of Europe with the ensuing populations of anatomically and behaviourally modern humans, a transition which seems to have taken place in most regions of Europe between ca 40,000 and 35,000 years ago. Specifically, the major critical issues in this context can be reduced to three critical questions: 1. To what extent, if at all, did the Neanderthals contribute to the genetic ancestry of later populations in Europe?

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2.

How far, and in what ways, did the behaviour modern populations?

3. If we can document major contrasts between the behavioural patterns of Neanderthal and modern populations, how should these contrasts be explained? Do they reflect simply a gradual, progressive increase in the overall complexity of different behavioural systems over the course of time? Or do they represent a much more sudden and radical shift in behavioural patterns, which reflects an equally profound shift in the associated mental and cognitive capacities for behaviour of the populations involved? These questions, addressed primarily to the archaeological records from western Europe, form the central focus and subject mater of the present book. – Ibid., p. 2 Highly detailed and extremely well-done treatment of the subject. Miller, William Ian. The Anatomy of Disgust. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1997. The Anatomy of Disgust is a superb book. Its phenomenological account of disgust is subtle and rich. Miller has proven the depth and perceptiveness that can be achieved through a sensitive, common sense observation of psychological phenomena. He also makes an insightful and original contribution to the relations between emotions and politics, especially the complex challenge posed to liberal ideals by hierarchical emotions such as contempt and disgust. The book is moral psychological at its best. -- Moshe Halbertal William Miller embarks on an alluring journey into the world of disgust, showing how it brings order and meaning to our lives even as it horrifies and revolts us. Our notion of the self, intimately dependent as it is on our response to the excretions and secretions of our bodies, depends on it. Cultural identities have frequent resource to its boundary-policing powers. Love depends on overcoming it, while the pleasure of sex comes in large measure from the titillating violation of disgust prohibitions. Imagine aesthetics without disgust for tastelessness and vulgarity; imagine morality without disgust for evil, hypocrisy, stupidity, and cruelty. Miler details our anxious relation to basic life processes: eating, excreting, fornicating, decaying, and dying. But disgust pushes beyond the flesh to vivify the larger social order with the idiom it commandeers from the sights, smells, tastes, feels, and sounds of fleshly physicality. Disgust and contempt, Miller argues, play crucial political roles in creating and maintaining social hierarchy. Democracy depends less on respect for persons than on an equal distribution of contempt. Disgust, however, signals dangerous division. The high’s belief that the low actually smell bad, or are sources of pollution, seriously threatens democracy. Miller argues that disgust is deeply grounded in our ambivalence to life: it distresses us that the fair is so fragile, so easily reduced to foulness, and that the foul may seem more than passing fair in certain slants of light. When we are disgusted, we are attempting to set bounds, to keep chaos at bay. Of course we fail. But, as Miller points out, our failure is hardly an occasion for despair, for disgust also helps to animate the world, and to make it a dangerous, magical, and exciting place. William Ian Miller is Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School. -- From the inside jacket blurb Moffett, Mark W. “Dance of the Electronic Bee.” National Geographic, January 134 (1990). Morgan, Elaine. Descent of Woman. New York: Stein and Day, 1972.

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_____. The Scars of Evolution: What Our Bodies Tell Us About Human Origins. New York: Oxford University Press, 1994. Morris, Desmond. The Naked Ape. London: Jonathon Cape, 1967. Murray, Margaret A. The God of the Witches. New York: Oxford University Press, 1970. Ommaya, A.; Hirsch, E.; Flamm, E. S.; Mahoni, R. H. “Cerebral Concussion in the Monkey: An Experimental Model.” Science 153: 211 (1966). Orlov, Yuri F. “The Wave Logic of Consciousness: A Hypothesis.” International Journal of Theoretical Physics, 21: 37 (1982). Pearce, Joseph Chilton. The Crack in the Cosmic Egg: Challenging Constructs of Mind and Reality. New York: Washington Square Press/Pocket Books, 1971. Penrose, Roger. The Emperor’s New Mind. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989. _____. “Naked Singularities.” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 224, P125 (1973). _____. Shadows of the Mind: A Search for the Missing Science of Consciousness. New York: Oxford University Press, 1994. Piattelli-Palmarini, Massimo. Inevitable Illusions: How Mistakes of Reason Rule Our Lives. Translated by Massimo Piattelli-Palmarini and Keith Botsford. New York: John Wiley and &, Inc., 1994. Why should we be most skeptical when we’re most confident we know the truth? Why do we often think we should have foreseen entirely unpredictable events? Why do conclusions that seem eminently logical turn out to be wholly irrational? The answers lie in the startling scientific discovery that the human mind is ‘hard-wire’ to make mistakes in judgment. The renowned cognitive scientist Massimo Piattelli-Palmarini charts this terrain by explaining how cognitive illusions lead to inevitable errors in thinking. . . . [H]e shows us why we are vastly overconfident of our intuitive judgment. – From the jacket blurb) Pickover, Clifford. The Science of Aliens. New York: Basic Books, 1998. If extraterrestrials ever landed on Earth, they would find us extremely strange. Their first intimation of our existence might well be a presidential speech or the Olympic Games, a mud-wrestling match or 3rd Rock from the Sun. But, of course, others might seem equally strange to us. How strange? Their senses could be entirely different from ours – they might see in the infrared or ‘hear’ radio-waves – and they might look completely different from us. What would aliens look like? An intelligent octopus-like creature is certainly plausible. What about odd numbers of limbs – a three-legged aliens with three arms and three eyes? Could there be an entire planet of immobile, silicon-based ‘trees’ that communicate with each other via electrical signals? The Science of Aliens gets weirder still. Could a giant interstellar cloud be ‘alive’ and intelligent? Could creatures live at extremely high pressures and temperatures? Would they have any interest in abducting us? Would they want to have sex with us? In classic Pickover style, here is scientifically based speculation at the far edge of knowledge – and beyond? -- From the inside jacket blurb I was rather disappointed with this book. It wasn’t just the blatant and all-too frequent grammatical errors that detract from what should have been a highly entertaining as well as scientifically illuminating work. What truly bothered me about it were the extremely numerous, untested and unfounded a priori assumptions about various aspects of the biology, psychology, and spiritual dimensions of many known terrestrial species. Does have its fine moments, though. Among other things, as Pickover points out, Earthly crustaceans and arthropods, extinct as well as extant, include organisms so weird that one has great trouble imagining they could exist – organisms that are virtually inconceivable until one makes one’s first acquaintance with them. After them, alien weirdness might

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seem rather anticlimactic. And the many gorgeous illustrations, detailed and elegant color plates, and photographs make it worth the read all by themselves, in spite of it all. Plutchik, Robert. Emotion: A Psychoevolutionary Synthesis. New York: Harper & Row, 1980. Radin, Dean, and Nelson, Roger D. “Evidence for Consciousness-Related Anomalies in Random Physical Systems.” Foundations of Physics 19: 1499 (1989). Reader, John. Man on Earth. Austin, Texas: University of Texas Press, 1988. Human beings are the most adaptable animals in the world. We successfully occupy every corner of the globe, from the tundra to the rain forest, from the high Andes to the blazing Kalahari. Nearly hairless, small of tooth and weak of limb, we human beings have nevertheless made ourselves at home everywhere. The reason, explains John Reader in this provocative study of human ecology, is that humans uniquely possess the most effective adaptive mechanism of all: culture. Moving into all kinds of environments, human beings have devised sets of beliefs, rules, and technologies specifically designed to ensure survival in the face of whatever obstacles the land, the weather, and that particular environment raise. The possibilities are endless: • The island of Yap can support about 30,000 people; unrestrained human fertility could overwhelm its resources in a few generations. The Yap Islanders have developed a culture in which restrictions on land use and ownership make the raising of large families so onerous that fertility limitation is built into the system. Maine lobstermen are a notoriously clannish group. Access to fishing grounds is allocated by common consent within the group; outsiders attempting to fish will quickly find that their marking buoys have been cut free and their lobster pots destroyed. On the island of Bali are some of the world’s most fertile rice fields and a dense and thriving population. Community organizations, in which membership is mandatory, distribute irrigation water to the fields. An elaborate and demanding religious culture reinforces the family and communal solidarity that makes cooperative agriculture possible. Successful cultures are stable, but the world itself is not static. External influences always crate new problems and, with them, new challenges. The Nembi Highlanders of Papua New Guinea once grew a great variety of vegetables in their gardens, raising pigs only as a sideline. The coming of the sweet potato – ideal pig fodder – and a money economy made raising pigs, and the potatoes to feed them, an end in itself. Now pigs abound in Nembi, but nutritional levels have declined. The Nembi Highlanders are caught in a race between extinction and the creation of a new culture. And so are we all. The pace of change in the modern world is unprecedented; nothing like the modern city has ever been seen before. Will we adapt in time? The challenge is a formidable one, but this timely and important book provides heartening evidence of the resourcefulness with which human beings, everywhere and at all times, have responded to the challenges that have faced man on earth. -- From the inside jacket blurb _____. Missing Links: The Hunt for Earliest Man. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1981. Modern man is both puzzled and intrigued by the mystery of his origins. Ever since Charles Darwin proposed his theory of evolution, scientists have eagerly hunted for evidence of the ‘Missing Link’ – a creature whose place in the evolutionary chain lies between apes and Homo sapiens – believed to have existed more than three million years ago. Missing Links is a superb account of this search, and of the few dedicated men and women who have devoted their lives to it. The elusive objects they seek are far rarer than diamonds or gold, and their work is an interesting mixture of science and treasure hunt.

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Using interviews, diaries, letters, newspaper reports and scholarly articles, John Reader narrates a dramatic story that begins with the discovery of Neanderthal Man in western Europe in 1857, and moves quickly through the Far East and southern Africa to a plain in Tanzania. There, on an August morning in 1978, paleontologist Mary Leakey uncovered several fossilized hominid footprints probably 3.6 million years old, the earliest indisputable evidence of mankind’s upright walk. Reader’s startling color photographs of the original fossil imprints, bones, and tools found by Leakey’s team, and by others over the years, convey their tantalizing fascination: unique, tangible links with our remote forebears and their culture. Seeing their wonder and beauty, it becomes clear why scientists such as Eugene Dubois, Raymond Dart, Robert Broom, Don Johanson, Louis, Richard and Mary Leakey have been so passionately committed to their own discoveries and theories. And seeing how little evidence exists – the entire significant hominid collection would barely cover a billiard table – it is easy to understand why most of these theories are controversial. Some of the heroes in Missing Links have made historic finds, some have made inspired guesses, and some have been proved wrong. In telling their stories, Reader discloses as much about the individual scientists as about the science of paleoanthropology, as much about human nature as about our primitive ancestors who stood erect and left their footprints on the evolutionary path that led to modern man. -- From the inside jacket blurb Rocha, Adriana and Jorde, Kristi. A Child of Eternity: An Extraordinary Young Girl’s Message from the World Beyond. New York: Ballantine Books, 1995. On December 8, 1981, Kristi Jorde gave birth to her first child, a beautiful baby girl named Adriana. But as the months and years went by, Kristi began to wonder if something could be wrong with her daughter. Experts insisted Adri was normal. Not until she was four years old did an astute doctor diagnose Adri’s problem. Adri is autistic. Kristi soon learned about Facilitated Communication, a keyboard technique that allows autistic people to communicate with others. Adri’s first attempts at FTC astonished her mother; clearly, Adri had long been aware of everything around her. Then something happened that was so startling, so breathtaking, that Kristi could barely believe it. Adri began to tell Kristi about her past lives, about Jesus, about the concept of spiritual masters – and about the guides that were available to help Kristi on her own path to enlightenment. From the inside jacket blurb A unique perspective on past-life experience as well as on autistic dysfunction, this book is a valuable resource for those interested in either of these issues. Rose, Robert M.; Gordon, Thomas P.; and Bernstein, Irwin S. “Plasma Testosterone Levels in the Male Rhesus: Influences of Sexual and Social Stimuli.” In Science 178: 643-45 (1972). Rose, Steven. The Conscious Brain. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1973. Rubik, Beverly, ed. The Interrelationship Between Mind and Matter. Philadelphia: The Center for Frontier Sciences at Temple University, 1992. Available from CFS, Temple University, Ritter Hall 003-00, Philadelphia, PA 19122. Rucker, Rudy. Infinity and the Mind – The Science and Philosophy of the Infinite. Boston: Birkhauser, 1982. Searle, John. Minds, Brains and Science. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1984. Sheldrake, Rupert. The Presence of the Past (Morphic Resonance and the Habits of Nature). New York: Times Books, 1988. On the physics of life, mind, and Magick.

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_____. Seven Experiments That Could Change the World: A Do-It Yourself Guide to Revolutionary Science. New York: Riverhead Books, 1995. Dr. Rupert Sheldrake, a former research fellow of the Royal Society and former director of studies in biochemistry and cell biology at Cambridge University, is one of the most innovative scientists of our times. A quintessential scientist, he is also a cogent and pithy social critic, particularly of science and scientists: There is nothing particularly mysterious about the experimental method. It is a specialized form of a fundamental process found in all human societies, and indeed throughout the animal kingdom, namely learning by experience. The Latin word expirire, to try out, is the root of our English words “experience” and “experiment” (and also “expert” and “expertise”). In French, expérience means both experience and experiment, as does the Greek empeiros, the source of our word “empirical.” Scientific experiments are deliberately and consciously contrived to give answers to questions. Experiments are ways of questioning nature. They can be used to decide between rival hypotheses, by allowing nature herself to speak through the data. Experiments are in this sense modern forms of oracles. The traditional diviners and interpreters of oracles included shamans, soothsayers, sages, seers, prophets and prophetesses, priests and priestesses, witches and magicians. In the modern world, scientists have taken on many of these roles. Ibid., General Introduction, p. xvi Sheldrake is one of the foremost modern pioneers in research into the nature of the mind-matter interface and the role that sentience plays in the physical universe. According to the inside jacket blurb: How do pets know when their owners are coming home? How do they find people who have moved and left them behind? Can we really sense when someone is staring at us? Can a person feel the touch of a phantom arm? These are common examples of some of the extraordinary abilities which human beings and animals all have, but which have been ignored, left unexplained by science. Celebrated biologist Rupert Sheldrake is the first scientist to develop simple experiments that anyone can perform to unravel the mysteries that science has refused to acknowledge. These seven simple experiments, now being performed all over the world, could revolutionize our understanding of reality, and the Institute of Noetic Sciences has begun the Seven Experiments Project to track people’s results. Readers will find themselves on a journey of discovery – of how migrating birds find their way across thousands of miles to continents they have never been to before, of how the earth’s gravitational pull is anything but constant – that will continue long after they finish this book. Seven Experiments That Could Change the World represents a broadbased research program and an open invitation for widespread participation in creating new science. Sirag, Saul-Paul. Hyperspace Crystallography: The Key to Matter and Mind. Singapore: World Science Publications (in preparation). Spoerri, T. Über Nikrophilie. Basel: 1959. Stapp, Henry. “A Quantum Theory of the Mind-Brain Interface.” Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Preprint LBL-285-74 (1990). Steward, Julian. Evolution and Ecology: Essays on Social Transformation. Jane C. Steward and Robert F. Murphy, editors. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 1977. Strauss, Stephen. The Sizesaurus: From Hectares to Decibels to Calories, a Witty Compendium of Measurements. New York: Kodansha International, 1995.

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The Sizesaurus is a book for every bewildered baker who’s puzzled over how skimpy a ‘scant’ teaspoon of cinnamon should be, for every rock ‘n’ roll fan who’s wondered about the potential hearing damage from amplified music, and for every armchair scientist who’d like to know how big the Big Bang really was. Stephen Strauss’s entertaining compendium of measurement facts and comparisons will help readers answer hundreds of perplexing questions that are rarely solved in conventional reference books. Strauss considers the entire world of measuring, and discovers that every method of measurement – from biblical times to the present – speaks volumes about the cultural assumptions of the society in which each originates. Strauss examines the controversy that flared in colonial American when a ten-day week was suggested by some early settlers; churchgoing colonists feared this new measure would overlook the traditional Sabbath, and they accused innovators of being the Devil’s agents. Strauss’s essays on assaying cover such topics as earthquake measurement, the role of the French Revolution in the creation of the metric system, the importance of measurement in the kitchen, and how bureaucratic inefficiency may be measured by his unique ‘Porkometric’ system. In later sections Strauss moves on to the Wordsaurus, a complete glossary of measurement terms, and finally to the Sizesaurus itself, in which detailed conversion tables provide common equivalents of scientific measurements. These handy conversion tables compare ounces against centigrams, inches against centimeters, Celsius against Fahrenheit, and so on. The Sizesaurus is truly a thesaurus of measurements that allows readers to understand how measurement affects everything in our world, from sound to heat to food to computers to electricity in outer space. This engaging book will be fun to browse, even for the science-averse, and an absolutely essential reference for everyone using science and measurement in their everyday lives. Tattersall, Ian. The Last Neanderthal: The Rise, Success, and Mysterious Extinction of Our Closest Human Relatives. New York: Peter N. Nevraumont Books/Macmillan, 1995. No early human relative has triggered more scientific debate or more strongly captured our imagination than Neanderthal Man. Why, after brilliantly surviving several severe Ice Age glaciations to thrive for 200,000 years – twice as long as modern humans have been on Earth – did Neanderthals all of a sudden drop out of sight? That they disappeared astonishingly recently – less than 30,000 years ago, just when early Homo sapiens were appearing in Europe – makes they mystery even more tantalizing. Scientists have long known that the popular image of the Neanderthal as a primitive, hairy, heavily browed, club-wielding brute is not supported by the fossil evidence. But to date, no such consensus has existed on the riddle of Neanderthals’ disappearance. Did they interbreed with our direct ancestors, so that we see Neanderthal traits in our population today? Or were they wiped out in some sort of prehistoric battle-of-thespecies when a more advanced group – our direct ancestors – appeared on the scene? The Last Neanderthal, written by one of the most respected authorities on the subject and supported with a dazzling wealth of visual material, paints the first full – and fully illustrated – portrait of the most familiar and haunting of human relatives. Drawing on the latest findings and sophisticated new techniques of analysis, Ian Tattersall marshals the best available evidence to unravel the mysteries of the Neanderthals – who they were, how they lived, how they succeeded for so long, and – the most intriguing question – what happened to them. From the inside jacket blurb Tavris, Carol. Anger: The Misunderstood Emotion. New York: Touchstone Books, 1984. _____ and Offir, Carole. The Longest War. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc., 1977. Thomas, Elizabeth Marshall. The Hidden Life of Dogs. New York: Peter Davison Books/Houghton Mifflin Company, 1993.

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In this beautiful account of thirty years of living with dogs, wolves, and dingoes and of the ways their lives intertwined with her own, Elizabeth Marshall Thomas brings us a completely new understanding of dogs by writing a sort of deeply truthful ethological poem, a loving yet absolutely unsentimental chronicle of the lives of a dozen dogs based on hundreds of thousands of hours observation. . . . Read this book, and you will learn more about how dogs think, and what dogs want, than you have ever suspected. What matters most to dogs? Simple: other dogs. But since dogs have been living with humans for thirty thousand years, ‘dogs need us more than we need them, and they know it.’ The Hidden Life of Dogs is a poignant, entertaining, sometimes heartbreaking little book, vividly illustrated with drawings of the ways dogs behave. This is no training manual (Thomas doesn’t train her dogs, but lets them train themselves), nor an abstract disquisition on canines. But whether or not a dog is part of your life, and no matter how much you think you know already, you will learn something more about dogs here – something no other book will tell you. From the inside jacket blurb _____. The Tribe of Tiger: Cats and Their Culture. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1994. Elizabeth Marshall Thomas has an instinct for animals and for what makes them behave the way they do. This time her subject is felines – housecats and their wild siblings. ‘As the cherub is to the angel, so the cat is to the tiger,’ she writes, ‘and although today we tend to put the relationship the other way around, saying that tigers are a kind of cat rather than that cats are a kind of tiger, the fact is that cats and tigers do represent the two extremes of one family, the alpha and omega of their kind.’ The story of this graceful, resourceful tribe begins with what cats are: meat-eaters, first and foremost. But as Thomas shows, within that stark equation abides an astonishing range of experience and expression. Contrary to popular belief, cats – even tigers – are not solitary beings, but are homebodies who ‘own’ property much as we do and favor extended clans when food supplies permit. They communicate eloquently with one another and with us – although they interpret our idioms better than we do theirs. Like dogs, they include us in their family structures, but while dogs treat us as friends and equals, cats relate to us hierarchically, as parents or children, and we tend to reciprocate. Most crucially, cats are, like us, individuals who – instinct notwithstanding – pass on, adapt, and invent codes of deportment as circumstances require. Cats, in other words, have culture. Whether they live among us or in the wild, as solo hunters or in circus troupes, they sustain an intricate, elegant, ever-changing web of community with us, among themselves, and with the other creatures, great and small, who dwell in the world. From the inside jacket blurb Thompson, William Irwin. The Time Falling Bodies Take to Light (Mythology, Sexuality, and the Origins of Culture). New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1981. Tiger, Lionel. Optimism: The Biology of Hope. New York: Touchstone Books, 1979. Toth, Jennifer. The Mole People: Life in the Tunnels Beneath New York City. Chicago: Chicago Review Press, Inc., 1993. Thousands of people live in the subway, railroad, and sewage tunnels that form the bowels of New York City. This book is about them, the so-called ‘mole people’ living alone and in communities, in the frescoed waiting rooms of long-forgotten subway tunnels and in pick-axed compartments below subway platforms. It is about how and why people move underground, who they are, and what they have to say about their lives and the treacherous ‘topside’ world they’ve left behind. There are even the voices of

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young children taken down to the tunnels by parents who are determined to keep their families together, although as one tunnel dweller explains, ‘once you go down there, you can’t be a child anymore.’ Though they maintain an existence hidden from the world aboveground, tunnel dwellers form a large and growing sector of the homeless population. They are a diverse group, and they chose to live underground for many reasons – some rejecting society and its values, others reaffirming those values in what they view as purer terms, and still others seeking shelter from the harsh conditions on the streets. Their enemies include government agencies and homeless organizations as well as wandering crack addicts and marauding gangs. In communities underground, however, many homeless people find not only a place but also an identity. On these pages Jennifer Toth visits underground New York with various straighttalking guides, from outreach workers and transit police to veteran tunnel dwellers, graffiti artists, and even the ‘mayor’ of a large, highly structured community several levels down. In addition to chilling and poignant firsthand accounts of tunnel life, she describes the fascinating and labyrinthine physical world beneath the city and discusses the literary allusions and historical points of view that prejudice our culture against those who ‘go underground.’ Toth has gained unprecedented access to a strange and frightening world, but The Mole People is not a daredevil journalistic account of a foreign place. It is one young woman’s personal examination of her society, the despair it permits, and her own inherited prejudices and fears. It is a thoughtful exploration of our times, when rising levels of urban poverty, drug addiction, and mental illness coincide with shortages in low-income housing, diminishing welfare services, and crime and brutality on the streets. With clarity and compassion this book exposes people too long hidden from view, individuals helping one another and even hoping for a better life as they struggle to survive their cruel portion of America. – From the back jacket blurb Turnbull, Colin M. The Mountain People. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1972. Observations on the culture and politics of the dreadful, the horrible, the awful Ik of Uganda, than whom there are nobody awfuller, horribler, or dreadfuller. Bad little anthropologists are warned by their parents that if they don’t behave, the Ik will be sicced on them . . . A classic study in the dehumanization and deterioration of an entire culture, due to the encroachments of the developed world. In The Mountain People, Colin M. Turnbull . . . describes the dehumanization of the Ik, African tribesmen who in less than three generations have deteriorated from being once-prosperous hunters to scattered bands of hostile, starving people whose only goal is individual survival. Forbidden by the Ugandan government to hunt game in the Kidepo National Park, the Ik are compelled to farm and forage for food in the barren mountain heights adjoining the park. Drought and starvation have made them a strange and heartless people, mistrustful of their own kind – their days occupied with constant competition and the search for food. Isolated from one another, each family is separated in its own compound within the village’s fortress walls. And each family is itself divided: husbands, wives, and children remorselessly avoid helping one another find food. Sad, disturbing, and eloquently written, the Mountain People is a moving meditation on human nature, our capacity for goodness, and the fragility of human society. It is a brilliant, modern classic of anthropology. Uttal, William R. The Psychobiology of Mind. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1978.

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Van Lawick-Goodall, Jane, Baroness. “The Behavior of Free-Living Chimpanzees in the Gombe Stream Reserve.” In Animal Behavior Monographs, J. M. Cullen and C. G. Beer, editors, Volume I, Part 3 (London: Bailliere, Tindall & Castle, 1968. _____. “Infant-Killing and Cannibalism in Free-Living Chimpanzees.” In Folia Primatologica 28: 259282 (1977). _____. In the Shadow of Man. New York: Houghton-Mifflin, 1988. Vayda, Andrew P. Environment and Cultural Behavior: Ecological Studies in Cultural Anthropology. Garden City, NY: The Natural History Press, 1969. Walker, Evan Harris. “The Nature of Consciousness.” Mathematical Biosciences, 7: 131 (1970). Watzlawick, Paul. How Real Is Real? Confusion, Disinformation, Communication: An Anecdotal Introduction to Communications Theory. New York: Vintage Books, 1977. Wills, Christopher. Children of Prometheus: The Accelerating Pace of Human Evolution. http://www.aw.com/gb/: Perseus Books, 1998. Are we still evolving? Or has our mastery of the environment stopped natural selection in its tracks? In Children of Prometheus, biologist Christopher Wills gives a surprising answer: that the evolution of Homo sapiens is actually accelerating. To make this controversial case, Wills takes us to the far reaches of the planet. To the Tibetan plateau, where the severe climate has prompted rapid, short-term evolutionary change. To Africa, where human-caused ecological upheaval continues to spawn ever more virulent strains of infectious diseases – diseases which in turn affect the evolutionary course of their hosts. To the hushed corridors of Whitehall, where job stress is taking some British civil servants to an early death. In each of these cases – and in the many others that Wills examines – our power over nature has done nothing to halt evolution’s unrelenting march. Spurred by a rapidly changing environment, and acting on our ever-expanding gene pool, natural selection will likely take us even deeper into uncharted territory. And Wills offers an exciting glimpse into this fascinating and frenetic future. What will become of our species as more and more of us wire our brains into vast electronic webs? Or pop ‘smart drugs’ that alter the brain’s very biochemical structure? Or adapt to bizarre conditions on extrasolar planets? The Greeks told the story of Prometheus, who stole fire from the gods and gave it to humans. It is a marvelous, mythical explanation of what sets humans apart from all other creatures. In this remarkable book, Christopher Wills offers the newest scientific understanding of what it means to be human. In the process, he confronts some of the most compelling issues in biology: Are we evolving ‘into’ something? If so, what might we be like a thousand years from now? The answers are sometimes unsettling, always thought-provoking, and guaranteed to amaze. -- From the inside jacket blurb Jerry Pournelle, among others, has argued that due to the protection offered to us by our highly sophisticated medical, environmental, and other technology, we have essentially eliminated all significant selective pressures on our species, and thereby halted our evolutionary course. This has always seemed a bit premature to me. Among other things, not only are we continuously subject to selective pressures from, e.g., microbial infections, unpredictable catastrophic weather conditions (and consequent damage to crops, etc.), earthquakes, and a host of other supremely effective non-human phenomena, but we also act as selective pressures on our own species. For example, we wage war on one another, engage in such ugly practices as infanticide and ultimately lethal wife-beating, and engage in serial killing and mass murder for a host of reasons or no reason at all; doctors perpetrate iatrogenic diseases on their patients by accident or design; unscrupulous scientists conduct experiments on human beings that frequently prove lethal or, at the very least, prevent their subjects from having children; and so on and on and on. So, one way or another, like all other forms of life we, too, are evolving. In what directions and to what ends, no one can be sure at this point. But certainly we are evolving, by our own hands as well as those of Mother Nature. Children of Prometheus explores this issue with tremendous wit and verve, and forms an eminently readable and highly thought-provoking look at the whithers and wherefores of human evolution.

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Wilson, Edward O. Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1998. ISBN 0679-45077-7. An enormous intellectual adventure. In this groundbreaking new book, the American biologist Edward O. Wilson, considered to be one of the world’s greatest living scientists, argues for the fundamental unity of all knowledge and the need to search for consilience – the proof that everything in our world is organized in terms of a small number of fundamental natural laws that comprise the principles underlying every branch of learning. Professor Wilson, the pioneer of sociobiology and biodiversity, now once again breaks out of the conventions of current thinking. He shows how and why our explosive rise in intellectual mastery of the truths of our universe has its roots in the ancient Greek concept of an intrinsic orderliness that governs our cosmos and the human species – a vision that found its apogee in the Age of Enlightenment, then gradually was lost in the increasing fragmentation and specialization of knowledge in the last two centuries. Drawing on the physical sciences and biology, anthropology, psychology, religion, philosophy, and the arts, Professor Wilson shows why the goals of the original Enlightenment are surging back to life, why they are reappearing on the very frontiers of science and humanistic scholarship, and how they are beginning to sketch themselves as the blueprint of our world as it most profoundly, elegantly, and excitingly is. -- From the inside jacket blurb Few have done more to open our eyes to the magnificence of nature’s handiwork and to the terrible risk of its unraveling. Here, Wilson pleads passionately and persuasively that if we are to save our common home, we must seek not only common ground but a common system of knowledge. Whether one’s beliefs are rooted in science, religion, or the humanities, we owe it to ourselves to future generations to heed his call. -- Kathleen McGinty, chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality Wilson’s sweeping thesis is that human biology, the information encased in our genes, rules all human activities and creations of the mind, from science to ethics. Science, adds Wilson, can account for the multiform expressions of literature, art, morality, and religious life. Wilson makes his case with characteristic verve and scholarship, with prose that is typically diaphanous, effective, and evocative. Consilience will be disquieting to some, controversial to most, stimulating to all. -- Francisco J. Ayala, University of California, Irvine, and former president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Wolf, Fred Alan, Ph.D. The Dreaming Universe. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1994. Wolf’s thesis in this work is that matter evolves into life-forms via dreaming as a means of developing selfconsciousness. That is, he believes, we dream in order to develop a sense of self. Wolf, a Ph.D. in theoretical physics, draws on data from the ancient Greek “historical temples” to the sleep research laboratories of today and his own background in physics, from Australian Aboriginal dreamers to the Tibetan monks’ “dream into being,” linking quantum physics to Freudian and Jungian models of consciousness to explain the nature and function of dreams. Woodward, James F.; De Klerk, Andre; Kahler, Gail; Leber, Katherine; Pompei, Peter; Schultz, Daniel; Stein, Sharon. “Photon Consciousness: Fact or Fancy?” Foundations of Physics 2: 241 (1972). Young, J. Z. An Introduction to the Study of Man. New York: Oxford University Press, 1971. Zohar, Danah. The Quantum Self – Human Nature and Consciousness Defined by the New Physics. New York: William Morrow & Company, 1990. 2.2.3.4.1: Forensic anthropology

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Ubelaker, Douglas, Dr. and Scammell, Henry. Bones: A Forensic Detective’s Casebook. New York: Edward Burlingame Books, 1992. A Smithsonian curator and top FBI consultant shows how archaeological discoveries help solve twentieth-century crimes – and how modern criminology has helped unveil the secrets of the ancients. A young woman is murdered in Virginia, the most provocative clue a wound to her hand, and police are stumped. A full decade drags by before new evidence turns up that may lead to her killer. The body must be exhumed, and because of the expected state of the remains, Dr. Douglas Ubelaker – one of the country’s top ‘bone men’ – is called in for the examination. The grave is opened, the coffin lid lifted, and there among the bones is a Ziploc bag enclosing the woman’s skeletal hand unmistakably labeled by Larry Angel, Doug Ubelaker’s predecessor at the Smithsonian. Thus is a ten-year-old crime finally solved in ‘A Helping Hand,’ the opening chapter in a collection that combines genuine science with the frisson of a thriller. With his cowriter [sic] Henry Scammell, Dr. Ubelaker traces the development of the fruitful collaboration between two vital institutions in the nation’s capital – the Smithsonian and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Here is where pure science and hard-nosed police work team up to produce breakthroughs that have helped solved some of the most tantalizing mysteries of humanity’s past and present. Tracking a crime wave that started in 40,000 B.C. and is still going strong 42,000 years later, Bones shows how forensic anthropology gives voice to the dead. Dr. Ubelaker demonstrates how to tell whether a cut on a bone is evidence of a fatal stabbing or an ancient burial practice; how to deduce just how a body turns to soap; how a skeleton disarticulates; and other hair-raising phenomena. Here too are the surprising discoveries that have helped scientists deduce how ancient civilizations worked, ate, worshiped, lived, and died. Illustrated with more than seventy-five photos and drawings, Bones takes us into the high-tech labs of the FBI and into courtrooms where a forensic expert’s testimony can mean the difference between a conviction and a miscarriage of justice – with field trips along the way to some of the most fascinating anthropological digs in any hemisphere. – From the inside jacket blurb 2.2.3.4.3: Sociology 2.2.3.4.3.1: General Sociology Andreski, S. “Origins of War.” In The Natural History of Aggression (J. D. Carthy and F. J. Ebling, editors. New York: Academic, 1964). _____. Social Science as Sorcery. London: A Deutsch, 1972. Bettelheim, Bruno. The Informed Heart: Autonomy in a Mass Age. New York: Macmillan/Free Press, 1960. Durkheim, Emile. Elementary Forms of the Religious Life, a Study in Religious Sociology. Joseph Ward Swain, translator. London: Allen and Unwin, Ltd., 1915. _____. Suicide: A Study in Sociology. Translated by John A. Spaulding and George Simpson. George Simpson, ed. The Free Press, 1951. Hoffer, Eric. The True Believer. New York: Harper, 1951. On the psychology of fanaticism and fascism. Richardson, James T.; Best, Joel; and Bromley, David G., editors. The Satanism Scare. New York: Aldine de Gruyter, 1991, A collection of scholarly articles about contemporary Satanism and anti-Satanism in late 20th-century Western society written by journalists, anthropologists, sociologists, law enforcement personnel, psychologists, and psychiatrists. Well-balanced, objective, scholarly, and thoroughly documented, the papers in this collection examine the sociocultural role of myths about Satanism and Satanists as well

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as real-life examples of Satanic groups and their activities. A valuable addition to any thinking American’s library, it provides a strong antidote to hysteria over alleged Satanist cults and their activities, while at the same time seriously examining the reality of the phenomenon and the extent to which most people are endangered by it. Singer, Margaret Thaler (with Janja Lalich). Cults in our Midst: The Hidden Menace in our Everyday Lives. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1995. Foreword by Robert Jay Lifton. An excellent overview of the subject by a world-renowned expert in the field. The author carefully analyzes the reasons for the enormous psychodynamic power of cults over their members, their techniques for recruiting new members, dangers presented to individuals and the public as a whole, and many other aspects of cults. Also of interest to those concerned with political uses of mind-control techniques as well as use of such techniques by individuals on other individuals for private purposes, e.g., in cases of spouse- and child-abuse, etc. On the downside, the author seems to feel that the danger to the public from cults of all kinds is so great that virtually any measures used to combat them are allowable, up to and including trashing the Bill of Rights in the process. There is also a “the government is always right, responsible citizens always uphold their governments, the government never does anything wrong, anyone who thinks the government has ever done anything truly wrong is paranoid, etc.” tone throughout this work that makes me extremely uneasy. It is as if, for this author, the only issue is that concerned with Cults & What to Do to Combat Them, and little else, a sort of fighting-fire-with-an-A-bomb attitude with frightening implications. It may be that on this score, I am reading things into her book that aren’t really there. I hope so. It is true that cults can be extremely harmful to both members and non-members in a variety of ways, direct and indirect, short-term and long-term. It is also, however, true that some ways of combating whatever dangers cults may represent are better than others – and that not all cults present such dangers, or present less danger than others. At times, the author seems to forget this. For example, she mentions David Koresh and his followers in the Branch Davidian compound at Waco, Texas. Koresh may or may not have been a “dangerous cult leader” – now we’ll never know, because all the dependable evidence concerning him and his followers seems to have been completely carbonized by agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms on April 19, 1993. I do not believe that it serves any good cause to summarily execute 87 people, including many utterly innocent children and foreign nationals (whose native country has, by the way, since raised holy hell with our State Department about it), by incinerating them alive, especially when the given excuse for it was “to protect the children [i.e., the ones who were cremated alive there in the compound that day by agents of the federal government] from child-abuse by the cult-leader.” Gee, sounds familiar, somehow – remember “We had to destroy that village to protect it from Communism”? It is becoming ever-more clear from testimony given before the United States Senate and elsewhere that agents of our federal government did indeed burn 87 people to death for no particularly good reason – or for very bad reasons that we may never learn, policy decisions made behind the scenes by Janet Reno, the head of the U. S. Department of Justice, and the rest of the Clinton administration. The author of this book doesn’t go into such issues as whether there is such a thing as going overboard in “combating cults,” and where to draw the line between legal intervention in a situation which has clearly gotten out of hand and does present serious dangers to innocent people, and overthrowing the Bill of Rights to suppress dissent in the name of “combating cults.” She mentions, for example, Ed Francis, the husband of Elizabeth Claire Prophet, who was arrested for “illegally purchasing weapon”; she does not, however, go into numerous violations of First and Second Amendment rights by the federal government that were part of that case, nor does she do so concerning the case of the Branch Davidians. Are the cultic rats in the sociopolitical basement really so bad that we must burn down the Constitutional house to get rid of them? At times, the author of this book seems to think just that. And that is where she and I part company. It must be remembered that in Nazi Germany, Hitler and his followers energetically “battled cults,” suppressing every group that might present an ideological or even mystical danger to the regime, from Rudolf Steiner’s theosophical followers and members of the O.T.O. to the Jehovah’s Witnesses, the Church of Latter-Day Saints, and the Psychoanalytic Movement founded by Sigmund

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Freud and his followers. Always the Nazi government put on it the face of “suppressing cults,” “battling dangers to right-thinking people,” etc. As bad as some of the cults in our country have become – and some of them are very bad, indeed; Singer’s descriptions of the more egregious criminal activities of, e.g., the Church of Scientology, Sun Myung Moon’s Unification Church, etc. are accurate, meticulously researched, and well-documented – there is far less danger presented to the American public and our freedom by a host of competing cults than there is one monolithic federal government given the power to dictate to us all what we will believe, feel, think, communicate, congregate, and in general live our lives. A group of actively competing evils not backed up by government sanction, however great their wealth and power, will tend to cancel one another out, at least in general and in the long run; but one overarching, all-powerful government, in whose hands are concentrated all the firepower and legal authority of the entire country, with no dissenting or rival institutions or agencies left to oppose it in any way, is a nightmare from which, once this country submits to it, we may never awake. Through Singer’s otherwise excellent work, there isn’t even a hint that she is aware of this. Finally, there is a disturbing lack of attention to the fact that those who join cults may do so for their own reasons; that sometimes by joining cults people go from bad to better, however bad (or not) the cult they join may be); and that at least in some cases, people could take more responsibility for what happens to them – and don’t, thereby making their situation worse. Sometimes members of bad cults can leave – and choose not to. Sometimes cults aren’t that bad. Sometimes – something that researchers have discovered in the last few years – cults can serve as “halfway houses” for people who need to get away from dysfunctional families but can’t yet manage to live independently due to a lifetime of training in dysfunctionality and dependency by their families. Yet Singer doesn’t go into this aspect of the matter, either. The implication is that anyone who joins a cult automatically thereby becomes a lifetime victim, a damaged soul that can never heal, that no one ever gets anything good out of a cult, that people must be protected from cults because they can’t protect themselves. Without some omniscient, omnipotent guardian in the form of the State to suppress cults and protect us from them, we will all inevitably fall into their clutches and become their absolute slaves – so the absence of anything to the contrary in this book implies. She seems to see all the rest of us as archetypal cultfodder, inherently irresponsible and incapable of resisting temptation, defending ourselves, or making appropriate life-choices – the solution to which is to make the country one big, huge cult of government to “protect” us all, maybe? And suppose we are all as susceptible to cult recruitment as Singer asserts. Suppose we are all that passive, all so weak and psychospiritually defenseless that we are, without exception, suckers for the first cult with an even mildly aggressive recruitment program that comes along. If so, one has to ask: How the hell did we come to be that way? What sociopsychological factors have conspired to turn us all from at least moderately mature, responsible Americans into a bunch of brain-dead, souldead, zombified sheep? In that case, Singer’s analysis of cults is timely – but all it attacks are the symptoms, not the underlying disease itself. Why the lack of such questions? Isn’t she herself aware of these missing or skewed dimensions of the book? It all makes you wonder whose agendas are being promoted by publication of this work, with or without Singer’s cooperation. 2.2.3.4.3.2: Psychology 2.2.3.4.3.2.1: General Psychology Adorno, T. W.; Frenkel-Brunswick, E.; Levinson, D. F.; and Sanford, R. N. The Authoritarian Personality. New York: Harper & Bros., 1950. Altman, J. “Effects of Early Experience on Brain Morphology.” In Malnutrition, Learning, and Behavior (N. S. Scrimshaw and J. E. Gordon, editors. Cambridge: M.I.T. Press, 1972). _____. “Postnatal Growth and Differentiation of the Mammalian Brain, with Implications for a Morphological Theory of Memory.” In The Neurosciences: A Study Program (G. C. Quarton, T. O. Melnechuk, and F. O. Schmitt, editors. New York: Rockefeller University Press, 1967). ____ and Das, C. D. “Autodiographic Examination of the Effects of Enriched Environment on the Rate of Glial Multiplication in the Adult Rat Brain.” In Nature 204 (1964), 1161-1163.

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Ammacher, P. “On the Significance of Freud’s Neurological Background.” In Psychological Issues (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1962). Bender, L. “Childhood Schizophrenia.” In Nerv. Child. 1 (1942): 138-140. Buss, A. H. The Psychology of Aggression. New York: Wiley, 1961. Steiner, Claude M. Games Alcoholics Play. New York: Ballantine Books, 1984. Strachey, J. editor. Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud. London: Hogarth, 1886-1939. 23 volumes.

2.2.3.4.3.2.2: Psychiatry 2.2.3.4.3.2.2.1: General Psychiatry 2.2.3.4.3.2.2.2: Forensic Psychiatry Califa, Pat. “A Thorny Issue Splits a Movement: The Age of Consent – An Issue and Its Effects on the Gay Movement.” In The Advocate 304: 17-23. On the controversy about same-sex pedophilia. Chase, Truddi (the Troops for). When Rabbit Howls. New York: Jove Books, 1990. The autobiography of a woman with 92 separate personalities, the etiology of her multiple-personality syndrome, and implications both for psychology and the occult. De Becker, Gavin. The Gift of Fear: Survival Signals That Protect us From Violence. New York: Little, Brown, and Company, 1997. We all know there are plenty of reasons to fear people from time to time. The question is, what are those times?  A stranger in a deserted parking lot offers to help carry a woman’s groceries. Is he a good Samaritan or is he after something else?  A fired employee says: ‘You’ll be sorry.’ Will he return with a gun?  After their first date, a man tells a woman it is their ‘destiny’ to be together. What will he do when she rejects him?  A teenager is obsessed with ‘death metal’ music and fascinated with guns. Is he going to kill someone?  A mother has an uneasy feeling about the nice baby-sitter she’s just hired. Should she cancel her plans?  A man is threatened by his girlfriend’s angry ex-husband. Should he go to the police? Now, Gavin de Becker, the nation’s leading expert on predicting violent behavior, proves that we are all qualified to answer life’s highest-stakes questions. ‘True fear is a gift,’ he says, because it is a survival signal that sounds only in the presence of danger; yet unwarranted fear has assumed a power over us that it holds over no other creature on earth. It need not be this way. In this extraordinary, groundbreaking book, de Becker shows that you can already predict violent behavior. Through dozens of compelling stories from his own career, he lays out the pieces of the human violence puzzle and shows how you can solve it by paying attention to the subtle – and sometimes blatant – signals of intuition. As he says, ‘You can refuse to be a victim.’ Filled with unique and surprising insights into human behavior, The Gift of Fear will help you separate real from imagined danger, give you confidence in a sometimes threatening world, and make your life measurably safer.

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-- From the inside jacket blurb Douglas, John. Journey Into Darkness: The FBI’s Premier Investigator Penetrates the Minds and Motives of the Most Terrifying Serial Killers. New York: Pocket Star Books, 1997. [John] Douglas’ pioneering work in behavioral profiling has brought him face-toface with both madness and unspeakable cruelty. It has also made him feel the horror and fear of the victim – a special insight that inevitably takes its toll. Here are the cases that will always haunt Douglas, all compelling glimpses into the darkest side of human nature. . . . The mind of a sociopath is typified not by the presence of some great, terrifying thing because of which he or she differs so greatly from the great majority of us, but rather by an equally terrifying absence: absence of feeling, conscience, and all the other qualities that enable us to function as social beings. While it may not be possible for most of us to comprehend the spiritual universe of the sociopath, it is possible to make accurate profiles of those most likely to develop into predators, their typical behavior patterns, and their typical targets, and to predict when, where, and how they are likely to strike again. This book is a fascinating, if horrifying, window into this aspect of our sociobiological universe. Hare, Robert D., Dr. Without Conscience: The Disturbing World of the Psychopaths Among Us. New York: Pocket Books, 1993. Do you know men or women who: • live on the edge, often changing jobs, schools, relationships, and homes? • never feel guilt or shame – even when they are caught lying? • act cold and distant one moment and incredibly emotional the next? • lack empathy, and live for the moment without the slightest regard for the welfare of others? • scheme their way into money, power, and relationships? They may be psychopaths, individuals who move through life with supreme selfconfidence – but without a conscience. It’s often thrilling to be around one. It can be dangerous to love one, work with or live with one. Psychopaths have none of the hallmarks of mental illness: They act normal, but they’re not. . . . They are manipulative, dangerous individuals who live and work in our communities, often leaving behind a wake of broken hearts, empty wallets, and ruined lives. Sooner or later, everyone will encounter a psychopath. . . . *** Based on twenty-five years of groundbreaking research, Without Conscience is a fascinating journey of these dangerous individuals. Are they born unable to feel empathy, or are they created by circumstance? How and why do they get away with cheating, conning, and murdering. Are they mad, or simply bad? In what Dr. Hare calls our ‘camouflage society,’ how can we recognize and steer clear of these predatory people? Without Conscience explores their shocking patterns – and exposes one of the most frightening, often-hidden social problems affecting our lives today. – From the inside jacket blurb I thought of placing this entry under “political science,” but finally decided to stick with the Library of Congress. Who knows what evil lurks in the heart of classification schemes? Only the Shadow knows, BWA-ah-ah! 

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Herman, Judith Lewis, M.D. Trauma and Recovery. New York: Basic Books, 1992. Jones, Aphrodite. Cruel Sacrifice. New York: Pinnacle Books, 1994. Keyes, Daniel. The Mind of Billy Milligan. New York: Random House, 1981. Knowlton, Janice (with Michael Newton). Daddy Was the Black Dahlia Killer. New York: Pocket Books, 1995. Contains a superb review of the biochemistry of memory and forgetting, particularly in the context of trauma. Laing, Ronald David. The Divided Self. Pantheon Books, 1969. _____. The Politics of Experience. Pantheon Books, 1967. _____ and Esterson, A. Sanity, Madness, and the Family. Basic Books, 1964. Miller, Alice. Poisonous Pedagogy. New York: Farrar-Straus-Giroux, 198? _____. Thou Shalt Not Be Aware: Society’s Betrayal of the Child. New York: Farrar-Straus-Giroux, 1985. Mones, Paul. When a Child Kills: Abused Children Who Kill Their Parents. New York: Pocket Books, 1991. Oksana, Chrystine. Safe Passage to Healing: A Guide for Survivors of Ritual Abuse. New York: HarperPerennial/HarperCollins Publishers, 1994. If you know or suspect that you are a survivor of ritual abuse, you are not alone. Safe Passage to Healing is an inspiring, comprehensive guide for the thousands of survivors of ritual abuse. In a clear and warmly sympathetic voice, Chrystine Oksana helps calm the terror many survivors feel and serves as a companion on the healing journey. Based on her extensive research, in-depth interviews with survivors, and her own experiences as a survivor of ritual abuse, Oksana helps demystify ritual abuse cults and their methods and offers groundbreaking healing strategies. Safe Passage to Healing offers invaluable hope and support for survivors and those who are about them and leads readers step by step through the healing process. From the back cover. Ressler, Robert K. and Shachtman, Tom. Whoever Fights Monsters: My Twenty Years Hunting Serial Killers for the FBI. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1992. Friedrich Nietzsche said, in thus Spake Tharathustra, Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And when you look into the abyss, the abyss also looks into you. In all his years working for the FBI, tracking down the most terrifying serial killers in American history, Robert Ressler never forgot that warning. His book makes it clear that the serial killer and the psychopath are not so very different from any of the rest of us, save in the exaggeration of certain potentials and the stunting of others – the potentials themselves are the same as are in all the rest of us. According to the inside jacket blurb: For most of his twenty years with the FBI, Robert Ressler has been the key person at the height of the kind of activity the Bureau dose better than any other law-enforcement agency – making the identification and capture of violent criminals a science and an art. Combining the legendary skills of a Sherlock Holmes – observation and deduction with modern psychology and forensics, Ressler has surpassed even that fictional master detective. He has been a leader in the emergence of criminal profiling as an astonishingly accurate way of describing unknown serial killers – true monsters who commit seemingly motiveless crimes. He played a major part in the development of the FBI’s Behavioral Science Unit, and in establishing VICAP, the computerized network of violent unsolved crimes countrywide.

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Now, in whoever Fights Monsters, Ressler, with Tom Shachtman, tells us of his action-filled career. He shows how he uses the scene of the crime, the choice of victim, the method of murder, and seemingly insignificant details to delineate the unknown killer, and this gripping book cites numerous dramatic case examples. He tells of learning at the source: interviewing captured serial killers to understand and apply their perceptions. (Something of a maverick, Ressler began this practice on his own; it grew into hundreds of prison interviews, including those with such killers as John Wayne Gacy, Charles Manson, Ted Bundy, and scores of others equally infamous.) As Whoever Fights Monsters goes to press, Ressler is in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, consulting on the “guilty but insane” aspect of the trial of Jeffrey Dahmer – at the request of the defense. “For a former FBI agent to appear on the defense side in any case is highly unusual,” says Ressler, “and might be misunderstood.” But he explains very clearly in his discussion of the case in the book his reasons for feeling that a true expert has but one opinion, and it really doesn’t matter which side wants to call on that opinion, because it is based on facts and experience. Now retired from the Bureau, he is still constantly asked to consult with local lawenforcement agencies, to draw profiles of unknown killers, to lecture on criminology and hostage negotiation – to share in many ways the benefits of an experience rivaled by no other law-enforcement officer. The Twentieth Century has truly been called “the Hell Century” – but out of that Hell has come priceless new knowledge about ourselves, why we do what we do, what the prognosis is for the future of our species. Thanks to field-researchers such as Robert Ressler, in spite of everything, we know far more about ourselves, the nature of our souls and spirits, individually and collectively than we ever did at the beginning of this century – and inconceivably more than we did at the dawn of human history. That is no small thing, and in the end may have made this century worth it. Sakheim, David K. and Susan E. Devine. Out of Darkness: Exploring Satanism and Ritual Abuse. New York: Lexington Books/Macmillan Inc., 1992. The contributors provide a balanced, intelligent and detailed discussion of a deeply troubling subject. They make it clear that satanism, no matter what one’s perspective, is a serious contemporary problem. – Colin A. Ross, M.D., author, Multiple Personality Disorder. A comprehensive and objective overview of the subject by two professionals in the fields of psychology and psychotherapy that encourages a search for understanding rather than hysteria and scapegoating. A refreshing antidote to both Geraldo and those who dismiss the entire subject of ritual abuse out of hand as “superstitious demagoguery from the religious right.” Schatzman, Morton. Soul Murder: Persecution in the Family. New York: Random House, 1973. Schreiber, Flora Rheta. Sybil. Chicago: Regnery Press, 1973. Steele, B. F., and Pollock, C. B. “A Psychiatric Study of Parents Who Abuse Infants and Small Children.” In The Battered Child (R. Helfner and C. H. Kempe, editor. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1968. Thigpen, Corbett. The Three Faces of Eve. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1957. Vachss, Andrew Henry. “You Carry the Cure in Your Own Heart.” In Parade Magazine (The Seattle Times/Seattle Post-Intelligencer Sunday issue), Aug. 29, 1994, pp. 4-6. Wrangham, Richard and Peterson, Dale. Demonic Males: Apes and the Origins of Human Violence. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1996. Whatever their virtues, men are more violent than women. Why do men kill, rape, and wage war, and what can we do about it? Drawing on the latest discoveries about human evolution and about our closest living relatives, the great apes, Demonic Males

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offers startling new answers to these questions. Dramatic, vivid, and sometimes shocking, but firmly grounded in meticulous scientific research, Demonic Males will stir controversy and debate. It will be required reading for anyone concerned about the spiral of violence undermining human society. – From the inside jacket blurb From the outset, the authors make it clear that nature and nurture, working together, have jointly created violence-prone males – and, in some species, such as hyenas, females – among mammals, and that an understanding of the contributions of only one sub-set of a species to the phenomenon is not enough to truly comprehend its nature, roots, and potential cure. They show very clearly that the tendency for intraspecies violence among both males and females among the mammals, including Homo sapiens and our closest kin, the great apes, has evolved as a result of selective pressures favoring such behaviors and gradually working to eliminate their opposites. They also show that at least among ourselves and the great apes, conscious decision-making frequently tips the balance in favor of violence as individuals weigh up their options and their chances of personal and genetic survival under various scenarios and make conscious choices to engage in violent behavior, or encourage that behavior in others of their kind. In such a light, it becomes much easier to understand psychopathic serial killings, mass murders, and other seemingly demonic human behaviors as extreme expressions of tendencies present in all of us. “There but for fortune go you and I” – while such extremely violent behavior should never be condoned, the more understanding we have of its roots, the more able we will be to come to grips with the phenomenon and work to minimize its occurrence. As the authors of this fascinating work point out, even such repulsive behaviors as infanticide, strangerkillings, mate-battering, and other horrors are not nearly as rare as we would like to think, either among human beings or among such “peaceful” beings as gorillas, chimpanzees, and so forth. In many contexts these behaviors, horrible as they are, make perfect sense, evolutionarily speaking, in terms of the “selfish genes” of their practitioners. And even extreme forms of such behaviors, such as torture-murders of small children by their own parents, the grisly serial killings of Jeff Dahmer, the genocidal policies of Hitler, the hideous pseudo-medical experiments of Dr. Josef Mengele, etc. can be understood as warped, hyperactive expressions of things present in all of us, normally expressed in far less extreme forms. The authors also make it clear that the situation is not at all hopeless. On the contrary, our closest living kin, evolutionarily speaking, the bonobos or pigmy chimpanzees, who have not only displaced humanity as the “sexiest primate,” but literally make love rather than war. Human history could have taken a very different path – and the clues to how that could yet occur have come out of cutting-edge primatological field research. This book is a must for anyone who wants to know about how we came to be what we are – and what we could yet become. 2.2.3.4.3.2.2.3: Pharmacology

2.2.3.4.3.2.2.4: Neuropsychiatry

2.2.3.4.3.2.2.5: The Sociology of Psychiatry: Criticism, Controversy, Dissension, and Debate Concerning Psychiatric Theory, Models, and Practice Masson, Jeffrey M. Against Therapy. Monroe, ME: Common Courage Press, 1994. In this ground-breaking and highly controversial book, Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson attacks the very foundations of modern psychotherapy from Freud to Jung, from Fritz Perls to Carl Rogers. With passion and clarity, Against Therapy addresses the profession’s core weaknesses, contending that, since therapy’s aim is to change people,

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and this is achieved according to therapists’ own notions and prejudices, the psychological process is necessarily corrupt. With a foreword by the eminent British psychologist Dorothy Rowe, this cogent and convincing book has shattering implications. – From the back cover blurb _____. The Assault on Truth: Freud’s Suppression of the Seduction Theory. New York: Farrar-StrausGiroux, 1984. In 1981, J. M. Masson was fired from his position as Projects Director of the Sigmund Freud Archives, shortly after suggesting in a talk in New Haven that a key theory Freud had developed in 1895 and later repudiated – the so-called seduction theory – may have been valid after all. This talk scandalized the Freudian orthodoxy, as reported in Time, Newsweek, and The New York Times. Here for the first time are the letters from Freud, long kept from public view, which stirred this controversy. On the basis of these letters and other new information Masson discovered at the Archives and elsewhere in Europe, he has written a devastating and highly controversial exposé of the origins of psychoanalysis. In 1895, Sigmund Freud formulated what was perhaps his most profound theory: that emotional disturbances in adults stem from actual early traumatic experiences, the knowledge of which has been repressed. But Freud eventually renounced this theory in favor of a new view, that his women patients had ‘fantasized’ their early memories of rape and seduction – a view on which the whole of the budding science of psychoanalysis would be based. Masson makes available previously unpublished letters from Freud to his closest friend, Wilhelm Fliess, which reveal that Freud had grave doubts about abandoning the ‘seduction theory.’ Masson discovered that not only had Freud read the contemporary literature documenting the high incidence of sexual abuse of children, he had in all likelihood witnessed autopsies of children who had been raped and murdered. That he abandoned his seduction theory, Masson argues, was a failure of courage rather than a clinical or theoretical insight. As a result, most psychiatrist and psychoanalysts have in effect been reluctant to trust the memories of their patients, women in particular, about the traumas they experienced in childhood. Like Freud, they see such traumas as fantasy rather than reality. This cover-up of the truth, Masson asserts, has poisoned the entire profession. – From the inside jacket blurb _____. A Dark Science: Women, Sexuality and Psychiatry in the Nineteenth Century. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1986. Following The Assault on Truth, his highly controversial work on Freud’s abandonment of the seduction theory, Jeffrey Masson offers a new interpretation of the way female sexuality was viewed by the medical profession in nineteenth-century Europe. Masson has found that the attitude of nineteenth-century medical science toward women, their sexuality, and their illnesses (generally diagnosed as ‘hysteria’ or ‘moral insanity’) closely resembles the attitude found today among many doctors, lawyers, gynecologists, and psychotherapists -–an attitude based on massive ignorance and prejudice. To document his thesis, Masson has combed gynecological, pediatric, and psychiatric journals published between 1865 and 1900 in France and Germany and selected nine of the more shocking articles for inclusion in this volume. None of these articles has ever appeared in English before. In a comprehensive introduction, Masson examines current controversies regarding sexual assault, psychiatric abuse, pornography, and incest, showing how the debate over these issues is still fueled by nineteenth-century attitudes. He analyzes the roots of the mistaken belief that children fantasize experiences of sexual abuse; the not-souncommon practice of clitoral amputation and castration (removal of the ovaries); and

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the ‘blaming the victim’ response encountered by both victims of sexual attack and victims of the Holocaust. As Catherine MacKinnon says in her insightful preface: ‘Many scientists of the psyche continue to this day to deny the simple reality of sexual abuse and its formative role in fracturing women’s minds, something which surely cries out to be healed as well as stopped.’ A Dark Science is a disturbing reminder that what is represented as the result of careful scientific research is often nothing more than an expression of the prejudices of the time. – From the inside jacket blurb _____. Final Analysis: The Making and Unmaking of a Psychoanalyst. New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1990. A powerful volume which – along with his other books – must be read by all mental health professionals because of Masson’s passionate insistence that we confront the social realities, the value-systems, and the arbitrary abuse of power in actual life. It is a service to us all that Masson, since his first book, The Assault on Truth, steadily spotlights what John Mack, professor of psychiatry at the Harvard Medical School, has recently termed – applying to all guild structures (not just psychiatry) – a ‘malignant professionalism.’ – Dr, Margaret Brenman-Gibson, Clinical Professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School Sagan, Eli. Freud, Women, and Morality: The Psychology of Good and Evil. New York: Basic Books, 1988. Szasz, Thomas. Ceremonial Chemistry: The Ritual Persecution of Drugs, Addicts, and Pushers. Revised edition. Holmes Beach, FL: Learning Publications, 1985. _____. Insanity: The Idea and its Consequences. New York: Wiley, 1987. _____. The Manufacture of Madness: A Comparative Study of the Inquisition and the Mental Health Movement. New York: Harper and Row, 1970. Vonnegut, Mark. The Eden Express. New York: Praeger, 1975. On a journey into madness and out of it again, via unorthodox medicine. A scathing indictment of the inadequacy of allopathic medicine and psychiatry for treating biochemically mediated conditions such as schizophrenic psychosis. Mark Vonnegut, Kurt Vonngegut’s son, suffered a schizophrenic breakdown induced by a number of factors, and received no reliable help from either New Age panaceas or orthodox medicine. As he said, much of the problem may well have been related to chronic stress, and the use of psychedelic drugs such as mescaline may have escalated the process of his descent into madness by a great deal. But it was only when he turned to orthomolecular therapy – diet control and nutritional supplementation – that he was helped at all. This unorthodox but effective therapy cleared up his psychosis and kept him health and sane, where nothing else had done any good – and yet he was told by allopathic specialists that orthomolecular therapy was “quack medicine,” that he was only harming himself by it. The scary thing is that the attitude of regular medical practitioners has changed little, if at all, since then. 2.2.3.4.3.2.3: Do-It-Yourself Brain Surgery Self-Taught Bandler, Richard and Grinder, John. Frogs Into Princes: Neurolinguistic Programming.™ Steve Andreas, editor. Moab, UT: Real People Press, 1979. When I was first introduced to Neuro Linguistic Programming I was both fascinated and very skeptical. I had been heavily conditioned to believe that change is slow, and usually difficult and painful. I still have some difficulty realizing that I can usually cure a phobia or other similar long-term problem painlessly in less than an hour – even though I

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have done it repeatedly and seen that the results last. Everything written in this book is explicit, and can be verified quickly in your own experience. There is no hocus-pocus, and you will not be asked to take on any new beliefs. You will only be asked to suspend your own beliefs long enough to test the concepts and procedures of NLP in your own sensory experience. That won’t take long; most of the statements and patterns in this book can be tested in a few minutes or a few hours. If you are skeptical, as I was, you owe it to your skepticism to check this out, and find out if the outrageous claims made in this book are valid. From the forward by Steve Andreas, ibid., p. i. 2.2.3.4.6: Forensic and Other Legal Applications Blood, Linda. The New Satanists. New York: Warner Books, 1994. A former member of the neo-Satanic cult of the Temple of Set, the author takes you inside today’s subculture of the “Left Hand Path,” the complex and possibly highly dangerous world of modern diabolism. She provides extensive documentation to show that this world is directly linked to an exploding number of child-abuse cases, Nazism, drug-dealing, and other criminal undergrounds. Though her prejudices do show, she is careful to cite all her references and is otherwise an excellent and thoroughgoing scholar on her subject, as well as being someone who has had first-hand experience of it. Disturbing – not the least reason for which being its relatively sober tone and the painstaking research that obviously went into it. Mayer, Robert S. Satan’s Children: Case-Studies in Multiple Personality. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1991. Satan’s Children is a shocking and compassionate look into the minds and experiences of people who have been wrongly branded as liars or schizophrenics, people who suffer from . . . multiple personality. . . . In the course of his work with ‘multiples,’ Dr. Mayer discovered an alarming increase of adult patients apparently uncovering horrific and long-repressed childhood memories of satanic rituals. Gradually he became convinced that these barbarous scenes were actual experiences too unbearable for the conscious mind to acknowledge. He learned that the methods the cults used to ensure the loyalty of their members were so terrifying they maintained a hold into adulthood – and so savage that they could destroy a psyche and create a multiple. – Notes from the inside jacket review Modrow, John. How to Become a Schizophrenic: The Case Against Biological Psychiatry. Everett, WA: Apollyon Press, 1992. Extremely well researched and documented. 2.2.3.5: Biomedical Science and Technology Anderson, David, M.D.; Buegel, Dale, M.D.; and Chernin, Dennis, M.D. Homeopathic Remedies. Honesdale, PA: Himalayan International Institute, 1978. Bricklin, Mark. The Practical Encyclopedia of Natural Healing. Emmaus, PA: Rodale Press, 1976. Cameron, E., and Pauling, L. Cancer and Vitamin C. Menlo Park: The Linus Pauling Institute for Science and Medicine, 1979. _____. “The Orthomolecular Treatment of Cancer: Reevaluation of Prolongation of Survival Times in Terminal Human Cancer.” Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences, USA, 75:45384542, 1978.

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_____. “Supplemental Ascorbate in the Supportive Treatment of Cancer: Prolongation of Survival Times in Terminal Human Cancer.” Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences, USA, 63:3685-3689, 1976. Cathcart, Robert F, III. “C-vitaminbehandling till tarmintolerans vid infektioner och allergi.” Biologisk Medicin, 3:6-8, 1983. _____. “Clinical Trial of Vitamin C.” Letter to the Editor, Medical Tribune, June 25, 1975. _____. “The Method of Determining Proper Doses of Vitamin C for the Treatment of Disease by Titrating to Bowel Tolerance.” Journal of Orthomolecular Psychiatry, 10:125-132, 1981. _____. “Vitamin C Function in AIDS.” In “Current Opinion,” Medical Tribune, July 13, 1983. _____. “Vitamin C Function in AIDS.” Bay Area Reporter, Nov. 17, 1983, p. 18. _____. “Vitamin C in the Treatment of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).” Medical Hypotheses 14: 423-433, 1984. _____. “Vitamin C: Titrating to Bowel Tolerance, Anascorbemia, and Acute Induced Scurvy.” Medical Hypotheses, 7:1359-1376, 1981. _____. “The Vitamin C Treatment of Allergy and the Normally Unprimed State of Antibodies.” Submitted to Medical Hypotheses, Feb. 13, 1986. _____. “Vitamin C Treatment Protocol for AIDS.” Bay Area Reporter. January 5, 1984, pp. 14-15. Cerney, J. V., A.B., D.M., D.P.M. Handbook of Unusual and Unorthodox Healing Methods. West Nyack, NY: Parker Publishing Co., Inc., 1976. Chia, Mantak. Iron Shirt Chi Kung I: Once a Martial Art, Now the Practice That Strengthens the Internal Organs, Roots Oneself Solidly, and Unifies Physical, Mental and Spiritual Health. Huntington, NY: Healing Tao Books, 1986. Coren, Stanley. Sleep Thieves: An Eye-Opening Exploration Into the Science and Mysteries of Sleep. New York: The Free Press, 1996. In this engrossing, expansive look at the facts and folklore of sleep, . . . Stanley Coren provides . . . evidence that we are becoming an increasingly sleep-deprived society, and that this condition is seriously affecting our work, posing a danger to ourselves and others. He shows, for example, that the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the disaster involving the space shuttle Challenger, and the nuclear accidents at both Chernobyl and Three Mile Island were all associated with people suffering from sleep deprivation. Drawing on dramatic interviews with a range of professionals including doctors, airline pilots, stockbrokers, and truck drivers, Coren shows the risks that everyone now faces as more and more people in the work-force operate with insufficient sleep. He also looks at some of the more subtle and insidious effects of sleep loss on our physical and mental health and explains how to tell whether you are getting enough sleep. In addition Coren asks intriguing questions like: Do fish sleep? Are there really ‘morning’ people and ‘night’ people? Why is it virtually impossible to fall asleep during midmorning hours no matter how tired you are? And how is it that you can sleep for hours on a plane and never feel rested? Some provocative stories about sleep oddities are presented along with a description of some strange sleep disorders that affect a surprising large number of people. Finally, the book describes specific techniques to help children sleep through the night and to improve the quality and efficiency of your own sleep. From the jacket blurb. Cummings, Stephen, M.D. and Ullman, Dana, M.P.H. Everybody’s Guide to Homeopathic Medicine, Revised and Expanded. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1991. Contains a comprehensive overview of homeopathic medicine and philosophy, as well as giving detailed descriptions of homeopathic medicines and their uses. Homeopathy is a spin-off from Alchemy, based on a philosophy of health and the workings of the body analogous to that of Far Eastern medicine. This book is also an excellent introduction to certain aspects of Alchemical philosophy and applications that make it valuable as a textbook for the student or practitioner of Alchemy or Magick, as well. An outstanding reference work for the practitioner and a must for the home library.

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Davis, Adelle. Let’s Eat Right to Keep Fit. New York: Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich, Inc., 1970. _____. Let’s Get Well. New York: Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich, Inc., 1965. Dold, Catherine. “Hormone Hell.” In Discover Magazine Sept. 1996 (Vol. 17, No. 9), pp. 52-59. Industrial chemicals – from plastics to pesticides – paved the road to modern life. Now it appears that these same chemicals, by mimicking natural hormones, can wreak havoc in developing animals. And the road we once thought led to material heaven is heading somewhere else entirely. – Editorial introduction . . . [N]aturally occurring chemicals, such as phytoestrogens in plants, are known to disrupt animal reproduction. They have typically arisen through an ongoing evolutionary battle between plants and animals. If a plant happens to produce an estrogenic chemical that renders cows infertile, cow herds decline, and presumably populations of the nowuneaten plant flourish. Over time, though, cows that can somehow degrade the chemical will outbreed the infertile cows, and the plants will have to come up with a new defense. Humans, like cows and other animals, have evolved similar defenses against plant chemicals, says Louis Guillette, a reproductive biologist at the University of Florida who first reported the reproductive problems in alligators. We can usually make enough enzymes to degrade natural endocrine disrupters with little or no effect on bodily processes. But Gillette points out that the human species hasn’t had time to evolve similar defense mechanisms against something cooked up in a test tube only 30 or 40 years ago. – Catherine Dold, “Hormone Hell,” p. 59 Dragwyla, Yael (writing as “Magistra Polaris”). “Garlic: The Queen of Herbs.” Whetstone, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring 1989), pp. 18-31. Dufty, William. Sugar Blues. Rednor, PA: Chilton Book Co., 1975. In The F.I.F.E.

Still thinking of adding that extra spoonful of sugar to your cereal? Want another piece of candy? Some more ice-cream? Jonesin’ for a Marlborough? After you read this book, you might not . . . Garrett, Laurie. The Coming Plague: Newly Emerging Diseases in a World Out of Balance. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1994. Gray, Henry, F.R.S. Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical. A Revised American, from the Fifteenth English, Edition. Edited by T. Pickering Pick, F. R.C.S. and Robert Howden, M.A., M.B., C.M., with a new introduction by John A. Crocco, M.D. New York: Gramercy Books, 1977. With780 illustrations, 172 in color. This is a landmark edition of one of the greatest texts of our time. Gray’s Anatomy has been an international bestseller for 100 years; its appeal is not only to physicians and students, but to artists and the medically curious. As the new introduction by Dr. Crocco states: ‘Every living physician today has been exposed to Gray’s Anatomy and nearly every one has used it. It was Gray’s Anatomy that occupied most of the embryonic physician’s waking hours, whether at home or at the side of the cadaver. ‘There have been many imitations, but few real competitors. . . . ‘This stellar book represents the acme of anatomical descriptions over the last century and will probably still be the premier text in anatomy over the next one hundred years. This commemorative edition is a very fitting tribute to Dr. Henry Gray, Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, whose colossal work will be remembered by

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medical historians past and future and by twentieth-century physicians and surgeons as the anatomy text of our age.’ – From inside front cover Grossinger, Richard. Planet Medicine: From Stone Age Shamanism to Post-Industrial Healing. Revised edition. Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books, 1987. Karlen, Arno. Man and Microbes: Disease and Plagues in History and Modern Times. New York: Jeremy P. Tarcher/Putnam Books, 1995. Kassler, Jeanne, M.D. Gay Men’s Health. New York: Harper & Row, 1983. Klenner, F. R. “Massive Doses of Vitamin C and the Virus Diseases.” Journal of Southern Medicine and Surgery, 113:101-107, 1951. _____. “Observations on the Dose and Administration of Ascorbic Acid When Employed Beyond the Range of a Vitamin in Human Pathology.” Journal of Applied Nutrition, 23:61-88, 1971. _____. “The Treatment of Poliomyelitis and Other Virus Diseases With Vitamin C.” Journal of Southern Medicine and Surgery, 111:210-214, 1949. _____. “Virus Pneumonia and its Treatment With Vitamin C.” Journal of Southern Medicine and Surgery, 110:60-63, 1948. Lieber, Arnold L. The Lunar Effect. New York: Anchor/Doubleday, 1978. The first truly scientific study of the effects of Lunar transits on human biochemistry, psychochemistry, and behavior, by a prominent medical researcher. Love, I. N., M.D. “Peroxide of Hydrogen as a Remedial Agent.” Read before the St. Louis Medical Society, February 4, 1888. Lust, John. The Herb Book. New York: Bantam Books, 1974. McNeill, William H. Plagues and Peoples. New York: Monticello Editions/History Book Club, 1993. Moyers, Bill. Healing and the Mind. New York: Doubleday, 1993. Null, Gary. Healing Your Body Naturally: Alternative Treatments to Illness. New York: Wings Books, 1992. A doctor’s responsibility to a patient begins with a Hippocratic oath, “First do no harm.” Unfortunately, in today’s medical environment, the rapid pace of technological advancement and pharmaceutical research can depersonalize the process. Too often, it seems, the modern medical establishment says, “First prescribe drugs, then perform surgery.” Investigative journalist Gary Null, a respected consumer advocate and environmentalist, does not support a return to the days before technology. Nor does he suggest that medication or surgery, properly administered, are invariably harmful. He does, however, believe that you as a patient should know that there are safe, simple, and inexpensive alternatives [to surgery and allopathic medication, in many cases]. In this ground-breaking book, Gary Null explores the extraordinary variety of environmental, dietary, and lifestyle changes you can make right now to counteract a wide range of specific conditions and disorders, including heart disease, arthritis, cancer, back and leg ailments, allergies, diabetes, depression, digestive disorders, and more. . . . Healing Your Body Naturally places special emphasis on the treatment of each disease’s root rather than on the suppression of individual symptoms. The result could be a significant reduction in the cost of your health care and a dramatic improvement in your long-term personal well-being. – From the inside front cover Pauling, Linus. Vitamin C and the Common Cold. San Francisco: W. H. Freeman and Company, 1970. _____. Vitamin C, the Common Cold, and the Flu. San Francisco: W. H. Freeman and Company, 1976. Preston, Richard. The Cobra Event. New York: Random House, 1997. The Cobra Event is the story of a secret counter-terror operation. It is a dramatic, heart-stopping account of a very real threat, told with the skill and authority that made Richard Preston’s the Hot Zone an internationally acclaimed bestseller.

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The story begins one spring morning in New York City when a seventeen-year-old student wakes up feeling vaguely ill. She seems to be coming down with a cold. Hours later she is having violent seizures and has begun a hideous process of self-cannibalism. She is soon dead. When other gruesome deaths of a similar nature are discovered, the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta sends a pathologist, an expert in epidemiology, to investigate. What she finds precipitates a federal crisis. The details of this story are fictional, but they are based on a scrupulously thorough inquiry into the history of biological weapons. ‘The creation of advanced biological weapons using methods of genetic engineering and biotechnology is sometimes called “black biology,” ‘ Richard Preston writes. The extent to which the products of black biology are available nearly everywhere in the world is shocking. Preston’s sources for his story include members of the FBI and the United States military, public health officials, intelligence officers in foreign governments, and scientists who have been involved in the development and testing of strategic bioweapons. His account of what they have seen and what they expect to happen and how they plan to deal with it is chilling. -- From the inside jacket blurb In his introduction to The Cobra Event, author Richard Preston says: For many years the scientific community told itself and the public that biological weapons were not much of a problem, but recently there has been a painful shift in thinking. Many scientists have come to believe that biological weapons are a serious threat that has not been reckoned with. People close to this process have described it as an opening of the eyes. Even so, some experts are reluctant to talk too freely about biological weapons, for fear that the information could spark bioterrorism or might encourage countries to cross the threshold into biological weaponry. Other experts say that the problem has become so bad that the public simply must be told. I say that problems that aren’t moved into the light of general public discussion become less manageable as time goes by. Public awareness can help shape a constructive response from governments and scientists around the world far more effectively than the lone warnings of a few experts. -- Ibid., p. xiii Clearly, from certain stylistic considerations of this novel, the author is not a novelist, not used to the stylistic forms of fiction. Certainly he is not in fact a novelist; rather, Richard Preston is a journalist, one who has contributed to the New Yorker and has won numerous awards, including the McDermott Award in the Arts from MIT, the American Institute of Physics Award in science writing, and the Overseas Press Club of America Whitman Basso Award for best reporting in any medium on environmental issues. This novel, The Cobra Event, is his chosen medium for informing the American public about the potential dangers facing all of us from bioterrorism and biowarfare. In spite of stylistic considerations, it is one of the most gripping suspense novels I have ever read – I had trouble putting it down even to eat and sleep. It is also enough to scare the hell out of anyone with half a brain, because it is based squarely on fact. If anything, it is conservative in its portrait of what could easily happen tomorrow, due to the relative ease of creation and deployment, low expense, and ready availability of biowarfare materiel. _____. The Hot Zone. New York: Random House, 1994. The virus kills nine out of ten of its victims so quickly and gruesomely that even biohazard experts are terrified. It is airborne, it is extremely contagious, and it is about to burn through the suburbs of a major American city. Is there any way to stop it? In the winter of 1989, at an Army research facility outside Washington, D.C., this doomsday scenario seemed like a real possibility. A SWAT team of soldiers and

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scientists wearing biohazard space suits had been organized to stop the outbreak of an exotic ‘hot’ virus. The grim operation went on in secret for eighteen days, under dangerous conditions for which there was no precedent. The Hot Zone tells this dramatic story in depth for the first time, giving an absolutely hair-raising account of the appearance of rare and lethal viruses and their ‘crashes’ into the human race. From a remote jungle cave festering with deadly organisms, to an airplane over Africa that is carrying a sick passenger who dissolves into a human virus bomb, to the confines of a Biosafety Level 4 military lab where scientists risk their lives studying lethal substances that could kill them quickly and horribly, The Hot Zone describes situations that a few years ago would have been taken for science fiction. As the tropical wildernesses of the world are destroyed, previously unknown viruses that have lived undetected in the rain forest for eons are entering human populations. The appearance of AIDS is part of the pattern, and the implications for the future of the human species are terrifying. -- From the inside jacket blurb The first chapter of the Hot Zone is one of the most horrifying things I’ve ever read in my whole life . . . and then it gets worse. That’s what I keep marveling over: it keeps getting worse. What a remarkable piece of work. I devoured it in two or three sittings, and have a feeling the memories will linger a long time. -- Stephen King Radetsky, Peter. “The Good Virus.” In Discover Vol. 17 No. 11 (November 1996), pp. 50-58. As bacterial diseases develop resistance to antibiotics, medical researchers rediscover an older strategy: setting one microbe to kill another. –Editorial remarks An excellent discussion on research from the 1920s on to the present into the use of bacteriophages (microbes that prey on bacteria, in particular disease-causing strains) as a natural and more effective alternative to antibiotics, one not nearly as likely to create resistant strains of disease pathogens. Silverstein, Dr. Alvin and Silverstein, Virginia B. Headaches: All About Them. New York. J. B. Lippincott, 1984. From caveman to Sigmund Freud, people have complained of headaches. But what causes them? Why are some cured with a couple of aspirins, and others never cured at all? Clearly and simply, the Silversteins explore what scientists know about headaches and what still remains a mystery. They describe the various types of migraine, cluster, and muscle contraction (tension) headaches, and discuss their physiological and sometimes psychological roots. And they examine the many medications available, as well as the ways some sufferers can help themselves. Authoritative and lively, filled with anecdotes and commonsense advice, here is a thorough account of one of our most common ailments. Yes, but who wants to cure a great excuse?! And it still didn’t get rid of my brother-in-law!!  Sperber, Irwin, Ph.D. “AIDS Research and Social Policy; Historical and Iatrogenic Aspects of the AIDSSyphilis Connection.” In The F.I.F.E. Whetstone, Vol. I, No. 1 (Spring 1989), pp. 9-11, 58-81. Stone, I. The Healing Factor: Vitamin C Against Disease. New York: Grosset and Dunlap, 1972. Vertosick, Frank, Jr., M.D. When the Air Hits Your Brain: Tales of Neurosurgery. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1996.

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Day One. Neurosurgery Residency The Five Rules: 1. “You ain’t never the same when the air hits your brain.” 2. “The only minor operation is one that someone else is doing.” 3. “If the patient isn’t dead, you can always make him worse if you try hard enough.” 4. “One look at the patient is better than a thousand phone calls from a nurse. 5. “Operating on the wrong patient or doing the wrong side of the body makes for a very bad day – always ask the patient what side their pain is on, which leg hurts, which hand is numb.” Neurosurgery is an arrogant and yet intensely humbling occupation. Physicists might distill Creation into a few differential equations and biologists see life’s wonders in a DNA helix. Only the neurosurgeon actually touches the fleshy incarnation of Nature’s greatest mystery – the human brain – and runs the risks that come with it. The true mystery of neurosurgery lies in the lifelines of surgeon and patient. In this fragile bond, the real drama of ordinary patients and ordinary doctors rising to meet extraordinary situations is played out. For the patient, an operation is a single defining moment. For the neurosurgeon, each moment in the operating room represents the culmination of decades spent struggling to learn an unforgiving craft. When these two join there is drama, often too much of it. This book chronicles one man’s evolution from a naïve and ambitious young intern into a member of that singular breed of doctor – the neurosurgeon. Told through intimate portraits of his patients and unsparing yet fascinatingly detailed descriptions of surgical procedure, When the Air Hits Your Brain is a poignant and sometimes shockingly funny account of the mysteries of the mind and the operating room. – From the inside jacket blurb Watson, George. Nutrition and Your Mind: The Psychochemical Response. New York: Harper and Row, 1972. Wills, Christopher. Yellow Fever, Black Goddess: The Coevolution of People and Plagues. New York: Helix Books, 1996. Outbreaks of new and terrifying diseases – Ebola, Lassa fever, the Marburg virus – continue to make headlines. These news stories, as well as the success of such books as The Hot Zone and The Coming Plague, testify not only to our inherent fascination with devastating plagues, but also to our own feeling of vulnerability. Yellow Fever, Black Goddess turns the tables on past accounts, focusing not on the microbe hunters but on the microbes themselves, putting these exotic life-forms at center stage, telling their story as they fight to live at the very edge of the possible. Humans acknowledge the existence of our planet’s primitive coinhabitants only when they do their worst – emerging to strike down whole populations through rampaging epidemics. But in fact, the protozoa, bacteria, and viruses that cause such diseases as yellow fever and cholera – which is symbolized by the black goddess – lead complex lives in their own right, struggling ever further out on their evolutionary limbs. Moreover, the evolutionary interaction of microbes and humans has done much to shape our own species. The very genetic diversity that makes each of us unique also protects us from infection. In a reciprocal relationship, our own responses to disease affect the ways the pathogens themselves evolve. A similar phenomenon may have helped to shape the diversity of entire ecosystems. The tropical rain forest, with its teeming and varied life-forms, certainly would never have taken shape as it has without the evolutionary pressures of disease-causing organisms.

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In order to deal with these microbes, we must understand the entire evolutionary environment in which they function – from tropical breeding grounds to the resistant temperate zones, from insect viruses to human plagues – and through this alone can we hope to control them. By giving these organisms their due in this remarkable account, Christopher Wills points the way toward gaining that mastery. – From the inside jacket blurb 2.2.3.6: Life Sciences: General Works Cousteau, Jacques-Yves. The Shark: Splendid Savage of the Sea. Garden City, NY: Doubleday and Co., Inc., 1970. Gould, Stephen Jay, general editor. The Book of Life: An Illustrated History of the Evolution of Life on Earth. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1993. _____. Bully for Brontosaurus (Reflections on Natural History). New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1991. _____. Ever Since Darwin. New York: W. W. Norton, 1977. _____. The Flamingo’s Smile. New York: W. W. Norton, 1985. _____. Hen’s Teeth and Horse’s Toes: Further Reflections in Natural History. New York: W. W. Norton, 1983. _____. The Mismeasure of Man. New York: W. W. Norton, 1981. _____. “Punctuated Equilibrium – A Different Way of Seeing.” In New Scientist, 94: 137-41. _____. Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1989. _____ and Eldredge, N. “Punctuated Equilibrium; the Tempo and Mode of Evolution Considered.” In Paleobiology, 3: 115-51. Haldane, J. B. S. The Causes of Evolution. New York: Harper, 1930. Margules, Lynn. Origin of the Eukaryotic Cell: Evidence and Research Implications for a Theory of the Origin and Evolution of Microbial Plant and Animal Cells on the Precambrian Earth. New Haven, CT: Yael University Press, 1970. _____. Early Life. Boston: Science Books International, 1982. _____. Origin of the Eukaryotic Cell: Evidence and Research Implications for a Theory of the Origin and Evolution of Microbial Plant and Animal Cells on the Precambrian Earth. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1970. _____. Symbiosis in Cell Evolution. San Francisco: Freeman, 1981. _____ and Sagan, Dorian. Microcosmos. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1986. McMenamin, Mark and McMenamin, Dianna. Hypersea: Life on Land. New York: Columbia University Press, 1994. In a bold step forward from Gaia, Hypersea is a new theory of how life moved from the sea to the harsher environment of land, and how on land life diversified more than marine life ever has. . . . In the sea nutrients pass with relative ease between organisms. But when life first invaded land, it needed to evolve far more complex relationships to sustain itself – instead of accepting nutrients passively, land life was compelled to cooperatively direct the flow of nutrients. As a result, life on land displays an extraordinary degree of connectedness – to the point where it can be seen as one inclusive terrestrial land form. It is this intimately connected land form the authors call Hypersea. – Ibid., from the jacket blurb 2.2.4: General Cryptophenomenology 2.2.4.1: General Topics

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Coleman, Loren. Curious Encounters: Phantom Trains, Spooky Spots, and Other Mysterious Wonders. Winchester, MA: Faber and Faber, 1985. Coleman, Sidney. “Acausality.” In A. Zichichi (ed.), Subnuclear Phenomena, Part A. New York: Academic Press, 1970. Cremo, Michael A. and Thompson, Richard L. Forbidden Archeology: The Hidden History of the Human Race. San Diego: Bhaktivedanta Institute, 1993. Over the past two centuries, researchers have found bones and artifacts showing that people like ourselves existed on earth millions of years ago. But the scientific establishment has suppressed, ignored, or forgotten these remarkable facts. Why? Because they contradict dominant views of human origins and antiquity. Evolutionary prejudices, deeply held by powerful groups of scientists, have acted as . . . a ‘knowledge filter’ [which has] left us with a radically incomplete set of facts for building our ideas about human origins. According to Cremo and Thompson, we have come to accept a picture of prehistory that is largely incorrect. Forbidden Archeology is a call for a change in today’s arbitrarily rigid mindset.” – From the jacket blurb. _____. The Hidden History of the Human Race. Badger, CA: Govardhan Hill Publishing, 1994. In The Hidden History of the Human Race we accompany the authors on a fascinating intellectual expedition. We take part in the literary excavation of a vast store of hidden knowledge that adds a new dimension to our understanding of the history of our species. This journey of exploration takes us across five continents to key archeological sites – some long forgotten, some the center of ongoing research. Along the way we encounter many famous and infamous pioneers of prehistoric research, all with secrets to share. – From the jacket blurb. Herbert, Nick. Elemental Mind: Human Consciousness and the New Physics. New York: Dutton, 1993. _____. Faster Than Light: Superluminal Loopholes in Physics. New York: New American Library, 1988. _____. “Mechanical Mediums.” Psychic Magazine July/August 36 (1976). _____. “Notes Towards ‘A User’s Guide to the Quantum Connection.” In The BVI-Pacifica Journal, Vol. 1, No. 4 (Leo/Summer 1988), p. 4. _____. Quantum Reality: Beyond the New Physics. New York: Doubleday, 1985. Kafton-Minkel, Walter. Subterranean Worlds: 100,000 Years of Dragons, Dwarfs, the Dead, Lost Races, and UFOs from Inside the Earth. Port Townsend, WA: Loompanics Unlimited, 1989. Keel, John. Operation Trojan Horse. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1970. Vallee, Jacques, Ph.D. Confrontations: Scientists Search for Alien Contact. New York: Ballantine Books, 1990. _____. Dimensions: A Casebook of Alien Contact. Chicago: Contemporary Books, 1988. _____. Passport to Magonia: On UFOs, Folklore, and Parallel Worlds. Chicago: Contemporary Books, 1969, 1993. _____. Revelations: Alien Contact and Human Deception. New York: Ballantine Books, 1991. 2.2.4.2: Conspiratology

Daraul, Arkon. A History of Secret Societies. Secaucus, NJ: Citadel Press/Carol Publishing Group, 1995. Almost every social system has produced its secret societies. Here is a unique, sensational study of such societies from the earliest recorded times to the present, and an analysis of their forms, rituals, and beliefs.

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Much source material never before revealed is given by the author, who traveled extensively through Europe and the Middle East in order to track down survivals of secret societies, and to attend ceremonies held by clandestine organizations. The Charcoal Burners of Italy, the Castrators of Russia, the Old Man of the Mountains, and the Gnostics are but a few of the subjects discussed in the pages of this absorbing book. – From the back cover Howard, Michael. The Occult Conspiracy: Secret Societies – Their Influence and Power in World History. Rochester, VT: Destiny Books, 1989. . . . [T]hose who follow the occult path are heirs to an ancient tradition of esoteric knowledge which is thousands of years old. Experienced occultists who have proved the inner mysteries of this arcane tradition are the guardians of an Ancient Wisdom which is the secret teaching behind all established religions. While occultism, like all religious systems, has its fair share of eccentrics it also boasts members who are respectable people of high social standing. [This book] will prove, offering evidence gathered from both orthodox and unorthodox sources, that many of the famous historical personalities of the last 2,000 years, including statesmen, politicians, religious leaders and royalty, were actively involved in the occult, mysticism and magical practices. In addition it will show that many of the major historical events of the period have a hidden significance which can only be explained in terms of an occult conspiracy. The revealing of this conspiracy is integral to any true understanding of world history and the development of Western civilization because of its wide-ranging and far-reaching influence. – Ibid., from the preface, pp. vii-viii 2.2.4.3: UFOs Spencer, John and Anne. Fifty Years of UFOs: From Distant Sightings to Close Encounters. London: Boxtree/Macmillan, 1997. In 1947 a sighting in Washington State, USA led to the first use of the phrase, ‘flying saucer.’ It marked the start of research activity into a phenomenon which has gripped the public’s imagination for fifty years. What are UFOs? Where do they come from? And what can we know about them? With access to research material from all over the world, John and Anne Spencer have written a truly definitive study of every aspect of the UFO phenomenon. Their book divides into decades, highlighting the most significant cases and the most important developments in each ten year period – from the first reports of unidentified objects and lights in the skies, to alien sightings, claims of abductions, religious cults, crash retrievals and the emergence of witness support groups. Alongside these developments the Spencers discuss the cultural and social context for each stage, charting watersheds such as the release of the film 2001, the first man on the moon, political cover-ups such as Watergate and the science fiction boom of the 1950s and 1990s. Serious and considered, and written by two authors who are prominent and internationally respected for their work in this field, this is a fascinating attempt to pin down what the UFO phenomenon embraces, and what makes its study so crucial to us now, and in the future. – From the inside jacket blurb Lavishly illustrated with numerous superb photographs, this book is also, simply, beautiful, and a lovely addition to one’s library or coffee-table. Neither more nor less biased than any other treatise on the subject, it is well-documented, with numerous descriptions of evidence of all kinds, both pro and con, concerning the subject.

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2.2.5: The Objective Sciences – General Reference CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. Weast, Robert C., Ph.D., editor. 54th Edition. Cleveland, OH: CRC Press, 1973. Van Nostrand’s Scientific Encyclopedia, Fifth Edition. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, 1976. 2.3: The Humanities 2.3.1: History 2.3.1.1: General Works Abbott, Geoffrey. Rack, Rope and Red-Hot Pincers: A History of Torture and its Instruments. London: Headline Book Publishing, 1993. Rack, Rope and Red-Hot Pincers. A bloodcurdling account of instruments of torture throughout the ages. Includes: ‘Little Ease’: a cell only four feet square and nine feet high, in which it was impossible to lie down. Skull Crusher: an iron skull-cap secured by a metal strap with screws on each side, which were tightened until the strap forced the teeth out of the jaw. ‘The Duke of Exeter’s Daughter’ and ‘Skeffington’s Gyves’: two of the many excruciating versions of the rack. ‘The Pendulum’: a crescent-shaped, razor-sharp blade suspended from the end of a pendulum, which relentlessly swung ever closer to the victim below. ‘The Gridiron’: a low bench of parallel metal bars with a fire beneath them, which grilled the flesh and many more gruesome devices . . . -- From the back cover blurb While this book does not cover much of anything before 1100 e.v., indeed, giving something of an impression that torture did not exist before then, and giving detailed coverage only of the practice of torture in the West with scant mention of the Middle or Far East, it does give a thorough presentation of the many forms of the infliction of pain and torment upon others for reasons ranging from theological to penological. It also makes it clear why and how human beings dote on the concept of Hell: if we are made in God’s image, implying that all we are is but a reflection of various aspects of God’s nature, then God, too, must have a fondness for torture, and therefore has designed the perfect place for exercising that fondness upon His creation . . . Anonymous. Poem of the Cid. W. S. Merwin, translator. New York: Meridian Books/New American Library, 1959. English verse translation with the original Spanish text on facing pages. The Poem of the Cid was written by an unknown Castilian around 1140 e.v., nearly a century after the birth of its hero. The only great medieval epic surviving in its original form, this work tells of the exploits of Rodrigo Diaz de Bivar – El Cid – a man of vision and courage who rose from the provinces of Spain to become the defender of Christendom and the feudal order. Like the heroes of other great national epics, the Cid embodied all the archetypal virtues of the true hero: valor, self-control, dignity, piety, patriotism, magnanimity, and honor. A man of relatively humble origins, he triumphed over the Moors and the arrogant Spanish nobility by force and by law. In a land riven apart by invaders and constant, malignant internecine warfare, the Cid, a man far ahead of his time, had a vision of a nation where warring factions would be brought together in tolerance and unity, where justice would rule supreme and all men would be equal before the law as they were before God. In this edition, poet and

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translator W. S. Merwin renders the epic cantares of the Poem of the Cid into brilliant modern English, retaining all the strength and sweep of the original, and the force that has made El Cid a legend down the ages. Churchill, Sir Winston. A History of the English-Speaking Peoples. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1956-1958. 4 volumes. De Tocqueville, Alexis Charles Henri Maurice Clerel. Democracy in America. 1835. Duby, Georges and Perrot, Michelle, general editors. A History of Women in the West. Vol. I: From Ancient Goddesses to Christian Saints. Pauline Schmitt Pantil, Editor. Arthur Goldhammer, translator. Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. Vol. II: Silences of the Middle Ages. Christiane Klapisch-Zuber, editor. Arthur Goldhammer, translator. Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. Dudley, Donald R. The Civilization of Rome. New York: Mentor Books, 1962. Hourani, Albert. A History of the Arab Peoples. Cambridge: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1991. Hughes, Langston and Meltzer, Milton. A Pictorial History of the Negro in America. Third revised edition by C. Eric Lincoln and Milton Meltzer. New York: Crown Publishers, 1968. Hurst, J. Willard. Law and the Conditions of Freedom in the Nineteenth-Century United States. Madison, WI: The University of Wisconsin Press, 1967. The text of a series of lectures delivered under the aegis of the Julius Rosenthal Foundation of Northwest University School of Law in March 1955, this work shows the correlation between the conception of individual freedom and the application of law in the 19th-CenturyUnited States, the way men sought to use law to increase both their personal freedom and their opportunities for personal growth. The essays contained herein, which are a valuable contribution to the study of social and intellectual history in the United States, demonstrate the way in which legal “technicalities” express deep social, economic, and political issues in society. Kors, Alan C. and Peters, Edward. Witchcraft in Europe, 1100-1700: A Documentary History. Philadelphia: The University of Pennsylvania Press, Inc., 1972. Leckie, William H. The Buffalo Soldiers: A Narrative of the Negro Calvary in the West. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 1967. McCaslin, Richard B. Tainted Breeze: The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas 1862. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1994. Nixon, Richard. 1999: Victory Without War. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1988. In 1999, his seventh book, former President Richard Nixon draws on a lifetime of experience in international affairs to examine the crucial challenge facing the United States and the West: What must we do in the closing years of the twentieth century – the eleven years between 1988 and 1999 – to ensure that the twenty-first will be a century of peace, prosperity, and expanding freedom – to ensure, in fact, the very survival of the United States? – From the inside jacket blurb As a late friend of mine once said, whatever his crimes in office – and they were many and terrible – Richard Nixon more than redeemed himself after he left the Presidential office through his learned, exquisitely researched, sober, and careful analyses of world history and the impact of American policy upon it. These analyses, backed up by all his years in office first as Vice-President under Dwight D. Eisenhower and then as President himself, should be read by every thinking American, for they reveal aspects of modern history and American military and political policy that have never been adequately covered by the media, and which have had a critical impact on all our lives. For the sake of the future, read at least one of his post-Presidential books. This one is a good start. _____. Beyond Peace. New York: Random House, 1994.

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Beyond Peace is a manifesto for a new America, written with visionary insight and a realistic idealism by the thirty-seventh President of the United States. Richard Nixon offers a new agenda for the United States as it defines its role in the complex post-Cold War era. The collapse of communism, he argues, has offered the United States a unique opportunity for achieving an American renewal. The ultimate test of a nation’s character is not just how it responds to adversity in war, but how it meets and masters the challenge of peace: During the Cold War, we sought a peace with justice. If America is to remain a great nation, we now need a mission beyond peace. Nixon charts the course America should take in the future to ensure that the opportunities of this new era beyond peace are not lost. With his unrivaled experience in foreign affairs, he addresses the key issues facing the United States today: why the United States should continue to play the leading role on the world stage, and what our policies should be toward Russia, Europe, China, Japan, and the Middle East. Nixon’s answers are informed by a depth of knowledge gained over many years as a statesman in the international arena. His intimate portraits of world leaders, past and present, offer us a bird’s-eye view of leadership and international politics. Turning to America, the former President perceives a crisis of spirit that extends beyond foreign affairs. It manifests itself in crime, in education, in race relations, in a selective moralism, in a notion of rights without responsibility, and most of all in a corrosive entitlement mentality that he describes as ‘one of the greatest threats to our fiscal health, our moral fiber, and our ability to renew our nation.’ This book challenges us to seek a goal higher than peace alone. It must be a mission that will unify and inspire the country without war, built on peace but able to transcend it. Beyond Peace is Richard Nixon’s tenth – and possibly most provocative – book. – From the inside jacket blurb _____. In the Arena: A Memoir of Victory, Defeat and Renewal. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1990. In the Arena is the most personal, profound, and revealing memoir ever written by a major political figure. It is Richard Nixon’s frankest, most outspoken book to date – including the inside story of his resignation from the Presidency and its aftermath. – From the inside jacket blurb _____. No More Vietnams. New York: Arbor House, 1985. Since the Vietnam War ended in 1975 many Americans, relieved at having this searing, disruptive experience behind them, have avoided thinking deeply and critically about it. In the ensuing intellectual vacuum a variety of myths about Vietnam – our motives, our actions, our failures, our successes – have taken hold. Their combined effect, says our thirty-seventh president, has been a paralyzing Vietnam syndrome that he believes has prevented the United States from playing its proper role on the international stage. In writing No More Vietnams, Richard Nixon – with the unique perspective of the man who served as America’s commander-in-chief during the war’s most difficult stage – has set out to dispel the myths of Vietnam, to show why we failed in Vietnam, and to contribute to the development of policies that will help avoid such failures in the future. In doing so, President Nixon analyzes the role that four presidents, the military, the Congress, the media, and the antiwar movement played in the Vietnam debacle. This book is a comprehensive history of our longest war by one of the men who made that history. Richard Nixon participated in President Eisenhower’s councils at the time of Dien Bien Phu in 1954; made the difficult decisions to attack communist sanctuaries in Cambodia in 1970 and to bomb Hanoi in 1972; and concluded the Paris Peace Accords, which ended our involvement in the war and brought home our POWs in

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1973. In this book he combines an acute understanding of the history of the entire period with the insight that can only come from having been personally involved in critical decisions and great events. But No More Vietnams is more than a review of a sad, painful page in American history. President Nixon also looks forward by outlining a strategy for the United States in what he calls the “Third World War” – the high-stakes ideological clash now [1985 e.v] underway in the developing world between the West on the one hand and the Soviet Union and its proxies on the other. Military power, and the willingness to use it if necessary in the defense of freedom, are important aspects of this strategy, but by no means the only ones. He urges the United States and its allies to marshal their economic, cultural, and creative resources in a massive effort to share the means of their prosperity with the developing world. Only by offering these struggling people more than a sterile choice between the status quo and communism, write Richard Nixon, can we avoid more Vietnams. – From the inside jacket blurb _____. Real Peace. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1984. In this terse, closely argued book about geopolitical strategy, Richard Nixon asserts that while the tools of modern warfare have made war a practical impossibility, our differences with the Soviet Union remain profound, irreconcilable, and potentially deadly. How we can navigate between the impossible and the irreconcilable and establish a real, lasting peace is the sum and substance of the former President’s message. – From the inside jacket blurb _____. Seize the Moment: America’s Challenge in a One-Superpower World. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1992. In this brilliant and timely book, at once visionary and pragmatic, Richard Nixon defines the historic challenges – and opportunities – facing America today as the cold war ends and a new, far more complex era begins. With the collapse of communism, America is now the only superpower in a world no longer divided into two blocs inspired by two conflicting ideologies. While many call for America to withdraw into complacent isolationism in the aftermath of our victory in the cold war, only American leadership can guide the turbulent new world toward freedom and prosperity in what will become a new American century. Forcefully dismissing the three prevailing post-cold war ‘myths’ about American foreign policy – that ‘history has ended’ with the defeat of communism, that military power has become irrelevant, and that America is a declining power – Nixon charts the course America must take in the future to ensure that the extraordinary opportunities of this unique moment in history are not wasted. He asserts that now is not the time for complacency but instead for summoning the West to win the final battle for democratic and free-market principles in the East. Nixon deals in detail with the changes taking place in the former Soviet Union and explains how we can not only best help its people but also serve our own interests, basing his arguments on his long, unrivaled experience in Soviet affairs, as well as his recent personal contacts with Gorbachev, Yeltsin, and many of the leaders of the failed coup. Nixon’s firsthand portraits of the major Soviet political figures, at once penetrating and intimate, are both newsworthy and fascinating, essential reading for every American who wants to understand what is at stake, for them and for us. Bringing to every part of the world his own special fund of historical knowledge, political insight, and statesman’s common sense, Nixon goes on to examine the challenges confronting the United States in Europe, the Pacific Rim, the Muslim world, and the underdeveloped world. He ends with a cogent analysis of what is needed for a

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renewal of American, based on the three ideals – freedom, opportunity, and individual responsibility – that represents not only the key to America’s success but also the best hope for countries that wish to follow our example. Seize the Moment challenges us to seek a goal higher than a ‘new world order’ – to set our sights higher than securing peace and stability. In their last meeting, Mao Zedong asked President Nixon a profound question: ‘Is peace America’s only goal?’ Nixon replied that our goal was peace but a peace that was more than the absence of war – ‘a peace with justice.’ It is that kind of peace which is the subject of Richard Nixon’s ninth – and possibly most important – book. – From the inside jacket blurb Russell, Jeffrey Burton. Witchcraft in the Middle Ages. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1972. Truman, Harry S. Memoirs. Volume I: Year of Decisions. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Company, Inc., 1955. In 1945, President Harry S. Truman was given the unhappy privilege of making the decision to use the atomic bomb on Japan. From the beginning of his tenure in the White House, first as President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s Vice-President and then as President of the United States, Truman saw – and participated in – much of what may be the most critical historical events our world has ever known. From the end of World War II and the inception of the Atomic Age, through the “Red Scare” of the 1950s, and on into the Space Age, Harry S. Truman lived through one of the most momentous periods of human history, and did much to make it what it was, and what the future that would be born from it would be like. This and the following volume should be read by every thoughtful American and, indeed, by anyone who wishes to know the nature of the major events that have shaped our time and will continue to shape the future that our children and their children ultimately inherit. _____. Memoirs. Volume II: Years of Trial and Hope. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Company, Inc., 1956. Zinn, Howard. A People’s History of the United States. New York: Perennial Library, 1980. Periodicals American Heritage. Published by American Heritage, a division of Forbes Inc. Subscription information: American Heritage Subscription Dept., P. O. Box 5022, Harlan, IA, 51593-0522, or call 1-800-7771222. A cornucopia of information concerning every aspect of American history from before the American Revolution of 1776 to the Space Age. An untrammeled delight for the historian, the scholar – or anyone. The BVI-Pacifica Journal Vol. I, No. 4 (Leo/Summer 1988). Smithsonian. Editorial and publication offices: 900 Jefferson Drive, SW, Room 1901, Washington, DC 20560. Customer service and subscriptions: 1-800-766-2149. The Smithsonian Institute in Washington, DC contains treasures – of art, of history, of knowledge, of wonder and joy – from all over the world and countless cultures and ages. This periodical is a monthly review of the best of the Institute. A must for all thinking Americans – or anyone who wonders about the universe in which we live and our relation to it in time and space. (If ever someone nukes Washington, DC, or a comet does for it – please, please, PLEASE, along with the Library of Congress, leave the Smithsonian intact and functioning!) 2.3.1.2: The ancient world – the Neolithic

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2.3.1.3: The Bronze Age 2.3.1.4: The Iron Age 2.3.1.5: The Dark Ages (Europe) Peters, Edward. The Magician, the Witch and the Law. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1978. 2.3.1.6: The Middle Ages Netanyahu, B. The Origins of the Inquisition in Fifteenth Century Span. New York: Random House, 1995. . . . By examining Spanish anti-Semitism from its origins, Professor Netanyahu demonstrates that the brutal anti-converso movement that led to the Inquisition was the same one responsible for the massacre of Jews in Spain in 1391 and the ensuing mass conversion of Spanish Jews (at sword-point) to Christianity. The rapid rise of the conversos to high royal offices – higher, even, than those attained by their Jewish forefathers – made them the target of the same forces that had persecuted the Jews. It was to remove the conversos from their influential positions, and to prevent their intermarriage with the Spanish people, that they were accused of being secret Judaizers and members of a “corrupt” race that would “pollute” the Spanish blood. This was the first time that extreme anti-Semitism was wedded to a theory of race – a union that would dramatically affect the course of a modern history. Steering the reader through the labyrinthine politics of Church and State in fifteenthcentury Spain, Professor Netanyahu develops his . . . thesis within the context of a careful consideration of Spanish culture and society. The conversos, like their Jewish ancestors, were intimately linked with the Spanish monarchy, and, unlike the Jews, also with the Papacy, but by the end of the fifteenth century, both Church and State left their erstwhile allies to the mercy of the Inquisition. As Professor Netanyahu brilliantly shows, the Spanish sovereigns let the conversos be attacked in order to distract the outraged city masses and their leaders from turning against the royal establishment itself. From the jacket blurb. Reed, Leon. “Baphomet, Goat of Mendes: A Brief History of the God of the Knights Templar.” Seattle: Wortcunning, 1988. 2.3.1.7: The Renaissance 2.3.1.8: The Enlightenment 2.3.1.9: The First Industrial Revolution 2.3.1.10: America – from Revolution to Counterrevolution: Slavery and the Decline of Classical Liberalism in the United States Petry, Ann. Harriet Tubman: Conductor on the Underground Railroad. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Company, 1955. In the squalid slave quarters of a Tidewater plantation in Maryland, Harriet Tubman was born. She was a quiet girl, but a bright one, and her parents hoped that she might learn a trade so that she would not have to work in the fields. It was the most she could hope for, they said. But Harriet had a dream for a better life for her people. She heard the whisperings of slave revolts, escapes from other plantations, the underground railroad. She acquired amazing physical strength and moral courage; she learned to recognize the signs in nature that would enable her to escape. And escape she did. But freedom was not enough. After she escaped she went back for others. She walked, ran, hid, coaxed, cajoled, and prayed, until three hundred of her people had been

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delivered into freedom. She became the legendary ‘Moses’ whom every plantation owner feared, and none had ever seen. But all her life she remained the tender, understanding Tidewater girl she was born. Ann Petry brings all her controlled narrative skill to bear on the heroic story of a great woman. In vivid flowing style, she makes Harriet Tubman into a living figure and re-creates in vivid scenes an era of struggle, hardship, and unshakable faith. – Ibid., from the jacket blurb 2.3.1.12: The Second Industrial Revolution – from Steam to Electricity Standage, Tom. The Victorian Internet: The Remarkable Story of the Telegraph and the Nineteenth Century’s On-Line Pioneers. New York: Walker and Company, 1998. For thousands of years people had communicated across distances only as quickly as the fastest ship or horse could travel. Generations of innovators tried to develop speedier messaging devices, including ‘magical’ needles that relied more on telepathy than technology. Then, over the course of three decades in the mid-1800s, a few extraordinary pioneers at last succeeded. Their invention – the electric telegraph – nullified distance and shark the world quicker and further than ever before, or since. The Victorian Internet tells the story of the telegraph’s creation and remarkable impact, and of the visionaries, oddballs, and eccentrics who pioneered it. From the eighteenth-century French scientist Jean-Antoine Nollet, whose experiments proved that electricity could be transmitted over great distances, to Samuel F. B. Morse, who developed the first practical electric telegraph in 1837, to Thomas Edison, who began his career in the telegraph business and proposed to his wife by tapping Morse code on her hand, Tom Standage tells a colorful tale of scientific discovery, technological cunning, personal rivalry, and cutthroat competition. By 1865 telegraph cables spanned continents and oceans, revolutionizing the ways countries dealt with one another. The telegraph gave rise to creative business practices and new forms of crime. Romances blossomed over the wires. Secret codes were devised by some users, and cracked by others. The benefits of the network were relentlessly hyped by its advocates and dismissed by the skeptics. Government regulators tried and failed to control the new medium. And attitudes toward everything from news gathering to war had to be completely rethought. The telegraph unleashed the greatest revolution in communications since the development of the printing press. Its saga offers many parallels to that of the Internet in our own time, and is a fascinating episode in the history of technology. -- From the inside jacket blurb The hype, skepticism, and bewilderment associated with the Internet – concerns about new forms of crime, adjustments in social mores, and redefinition of business practices – mirror the hopes, fears, and misunderstandings inspired by the telegraph. Indeed, they are only to be expected. They are the direct consequences of human nature, rather than technology. Given a new invention, there will always be some people who see only its potential to do good, while others see new opportunities to commit crime or make money. We can expect exactly the same reactions to whatever new inventions appear in the twenty-first century. Such reactions are amplified by what might be termed chronocentricity – the egotism that one’s own generation is poised on the very cusp of history. Today, we are repeatedly told that we are in the midst of a communications revolution. But the electric telegraph was, in many ways, far more disconcerting for the inhabitants of the time than today’s advances are for us. If any generation has the right to claim that it bore the full

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bewildering, world-shrinking brunt of such a revolution, it is not us – it is our nineteenthcentury forebears. Time-traveling Victorians arriving in the late twentieth century would, no doubt, be unimpressed by the Internet. They would surely find space flight and routine intercontinental air travel far more impressive technological achievements than our much-trumpeted global communications network. Heavier-than-air flying machines were, after all, thought by the Victorians to be totally impossible. But as for the Internet – well, they had one of their own. -- Tom Standage, Epilogue to The Victorian Internet, op. cit., pp. 212-213 This is simply one of the most fascinating reads I’ve come across in a long, long time. It gives a brand-new perspective not only on the technological revolutions of the 19 th and 20th centuries, but on the impact they had on every possible aspect of life during that time, from moral and cultural to military, economic, and political facets of 19th- and 20th-century life the world over. Because of the telegraph, the whole world became the global village so named by the late Buckminster Fuller not during the 20th century, but rather in the middle of the 19 th. Civilization and life were transformed by the telegraph so greatly, in so many ways, that men and women from the last two decades of the 18th century would have been utterly overwhelmed by the changes in life that had occurred in just a few short decades, thanks to the telegraph, could they have been transported a century forward in time, finding the contrast between mid-19th century life and that of the preceding century greater than even that between their own times and that of Renaissance Europe – and far greater than that between the mid-19th century and our own times, at least as far as communications technology and its impact on the global civilization goes. In fact, as the author says, modern communications technology is essentially little more than a logical extension of the Victorian telegraphic network and its applications, and its impact on us has been far less radical than that of the telegraph on the people of the 19 th century. No one who wants to understand how we got here and where we are likely to go from here should be without this book – and if you don’t read this book, you’re a twit. 2.3.1.13: The American Civil War Lowry, Thomas P., M.D. The Story the Soldiers Wouldn’t Tell: Sex in the Civil War. Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 1994. The author’s opinions on the matters with which this book is concerned might be stated [as follows]: ‘If by sex, you mean the engine that moves the terrible wheels of lust, that carnal burr under the saddle that hurls men of the Gospel down from their pulpits, that tickle that causes the kings to abandon their thrones for a sniff of some sweet thing, that demon that turns the heads of captains and generals, so that they whisper breathless nonsense and military secrets into the ear of some doe-eyed double agent, that frenzy that leads men of common sense to thrust aside their loyal wives, weeping children, and vested pension funds to run off with secretaries half their years and education, that terrible strength that enables an underweight young man to couple with twenty different partners between Friday and Monday in a poorly lit Turkish bath, that dizzying blindness that allows those who brush twice a day and floss every night to risk heartbreak, herpes, AIDS, syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and lymphogranuloma venereum for the sake of a pelvic spasm, that force that causes altar boys to flog themselves silly in a soapy bathtub, torn between guilt and excitement, if that is what you mean by sex, then I am irrevocably opposed to it. However, if by sex you mean that delectable gift of heaven that showers its blessings upon the committed souls so that their hearts beat as one, that force that inspires the longmarried to walk holding hands in the cool of the evening, that urge to enjoy the fruit of such unions and provide the twenty-tow years of endurance, orthodontia, and tuition hikes that such offspring engender, that force that quickens the pulse when the loved one’s footsteps are heard on the porch, that ever-flowing font of shared memories, of

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binding pleasures, or that drive that causes a pair of geese to mate for life, ever-faithful to their troth, generous, companionate, and true, then I am four-square in favor of sex.’ – Ibid., from the Introduction, p. 7 The American Civil War was America’s Holy War – our only one. And because it is sacred to us, sex in the civil war has been an inadmissible topic. Dr. Lowry’s book admirably fills that gap. With humor, gusto, compassion, enormous erudition, scholarly care, and meticulous attention to historical and biomedical facts, Lowry presents a unique view of the Great American Jihad, one long in coming (!) and badly needed to clean out one of the darkest and dankest attics of the American collective unconscious. The men in blue and gray had a secret life, one that they and their families tried to hide from posterity. In examining the letters and diaries and memoirs that were left behind, readers see every dimension of soldier life but one. In the American Civil War, apparently, there was no sex. But of course there was, and in The Story the Soldiers Wouldn’t Tell, Dr. Thomas P. Lowry reveals this hidden dimension of the lives of Johnny Reb and Billy Yank. Most men left no record of their sexual activities, or if they did, their survivors expunged the record by destroying what the soldiers wrote. Using the few rare original documents that still exist, along with perceptive interpretation of official sources, Lowry has resurrected the secret life of the common soldier. – From the inside front jacket blurb 2.3.1.13: Global Empires, Pre-20th century – Great Britain, Russia, Spain, Imperial China, Imperial Japan, etc. 2.3.1.13.1: Spain

2.3.1.14: The Cairo Working of 1904 e.v. and What Came of It – World War I and Its Aftermath (or, O Thelema!) – Spiritual Revolution and Upheaval in the 20th Century Amnesty International, Inc. Torture in the ‘80s: An Amnesty International Report. London, UK: Amnesty International Publications, 1984. Anonymous. “The Benefits of Cannabis.” Author unknown. No copyright date. Distributed as a pro bono publication by Djehuti/Quetzlcoatl Press, a subsidiary of Hydro-Dragon, Seattle, WA, for $1.50 per copy to cover reproduction and mailing costs. You may also obtain a copy of this paper free of charge via email from polaris93@aol.com. Bamford, James. The Puzzle Palace: Inside the National Security Agency, America’s Most Secret Intelligence Operation. New York: Penguin Books, 1983. Connelly, Thomas L. Will Campbell and the Soul of the South. New York: Continuum, 1982. Gentry, Curt. The Last Days of the Late, Great State of California. New York: Putnam, 1968. This work is at once razor-keen satire and one of the most illuminating and affectionate works on the history of the state of California which I, a native ex-California with an ever-open jaundiced eye for anything even remotely kind to my dear, dead native state, have ever encountered. It is the story of California as it used to be, up until about 1967, the middle of the Psychedelic Age and the Era of Flower-Power and Vietnam, when – looking backward with the perfect 200-200 vision of hindsight that somehow only works about twenty years after it ought to

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– all the gold that was California began to undergo the Reverse Midas Touch of gross overpopulation, a state governor who hated and loathed higher education and everything it stood for and couldn’t see any value in either trees or the space-program, the business interests who used that governor as a front for culturally, physically, and psychospiritually strip-mining the state down to the primordial slime, environmental pollution, and the terminally stupid mis-uses of water for which the natives of Southern California are now legend. All the hell in which that poor state is now embroiled, from economic chaos to ecological catastrophe to cultural dementia to sociospiritual inferno, was still just beyond the horizon when this book was published, invisible but its presence nevertheless sensed by us all. We who lived there could still love our state, then, with a bittersweet love, perhaps, but true love nonetheless – the love that is the sine qua non of all successful satire, of which this book is a beautiful, moving example, the love without which any attempt at such satire becomes nothing more or better than the grossest form of lampoon. Which is all that that poor, benighted state deserves now, some 27 years after this gorgeous book was first introduced to the public. Written in the form of a science-fiction novel, it presents the appalling alternate-history scenario of the Big One of 1968, the ultimate earthquake that cracks California in two from the Bay Area South and causes everything West of the San Andreas fault and South of the Bay Area to fall off into the Pacific Ocean. Everything in that enormous slice of land, from the San Jose to Disneyland to Palomar Mountain to the dance-halls of Tijuana, disappears into the raging, ‘quake-tossed waters of the Pacific. All of it, gone forever.* How does the world react? What has been lost? What has been gained thereby? In a long, long flashback that comprises most of the book, from the opening chapter nearly to the very last, the author details the history of the state from its roaring boomtown days, when it had not yet become a part of the United States, when gold was discovered at Sutter’s Mill and the Great California Gold-Rush was on, to its halcyon, pre-World War I days, and so on down to the 1960’s, the Hippies, the Hell’s Angels, Governor Reagan, the Acid Revolution, and all the rest of that turbulent, apocalyptic era, showing what has been lost with the Great Quake. He then wraps up the book with a gruesomely detailed description of the damage done by the quake, the magnificent response of the survivors and the country as a whole to the catastrophe that has just befallen them and, indeed, the world, and a chillingly prophetic glimpse of Governor Reagan, who survives because he happened to have been in Auburn, California, East of the San Andreas when the quake hit, who “may be setting his sights on the White House.” This wonderful book made me laugh and weep at the same time – and still does today – over the state I once loved, that died and was buried in a tide of crass materialism and predatory politics and ecocatastrophe somewhere back in the early 1970s, and now writhes on, undead, a horrible embarrassment to all of us who once loved it and have fled it for saner pastures. Too bad the Big One of ‘68 didn’t happen – in Gentry’s novel, though hideously wounded, California survives and recovers, its spirit regenerated and renewed. Whereas in our time-line, it just joined the rest of the zombies somewhere down there in history’s boneyards, shuffling around purposelessly, bewildered, crushing and destroying all it comes across not even out of malice, but simply out of the clumsiness of a deteriorating body and mind and soul . . .

*Fortunately or otherwise, this scenario is not possible. The San Andreas is not an actual earthquake fault as such. Rather, it is the seam or join where two tectonic plates come together, the North American Plate, which supports most of the U.S., Mexico, and Canada, and the Pacific Plate, which includes the Western portion of California from the Bay Area down and the Pacific Basin (floor of the Pacific Ocean). In order that “everything West of the San Andreas in California” fall off into the Pacific Ocean, the Pacific Plate that underlies the Pacific Ocean would have to fall off into the Pacific, basically a process of falling off the floor, which isn’t possible. Alternatively, the Pacific Plate could be destroyed in that area and everything on top of it there could fall down into the underlying mantle – with results of such catastrophic nature and scope you don’t even want to think about it; it would probably total the whole Planet. (On the other hand, the San Francisco Chrocinle – pardon me, Chronicle, excuse the (ahem!) typos – had a good idea: everybody in California puts a chair on the very Western border of the San Andreas, stands on the chair, and jumps down from it onto the Eastern

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side of the fault. This of course causes everything East of the fault to break off and fall off into the Atlantic Ocean – a prodigy over which Californians would cheer forever . . . <g>)

Herer, Jack: The CMI/OMI White Papers and Digest [or] Everything you Should Know About Marijuana but Weren’t Taught in School [or] [the Real Title] the Emperor Wears no Clothes. Portland, OR: Queen of Clubs Publishing Co., 1985. Or, everything you ever wanted to know about hemp, but were too afraid to ask. Highfield, Roger and Carter, Paul. The Private Lives of Albert Einstein. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1993. Howe, Ellic. The Magicians of the Golden Dawn: A Documentary History of a Magical Order 1887-1923. York Beach, ME: Samuel Weiser, Inc., 1978. Johnson, Haynes. Divided We Fall: Gambling With History in the Nineties. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1994. Parfrey, Adam, editor. Apocalypse Culture. New York: Amok Press, 1987. Washington, Peter. Madame Blavatsky’s Baboon: A History of the Mystics, Mediums, and Misfits Who Brought Spiritualism to America. New York: Schocken Books, 1993. The New Age is not so new. Peter Washington traces it back to ideas that entered our cultural bloodstream just before the dawn of the twentieth century, when a mysterious renegade Russian aristocrat named Madame Blavatsky appeared in America. Darwin was wrong, she claimed. Man was not descended from apes but from spirit beings. As a reminder, she kept a stuffed baboon in her parlor dressed in wing collar, tail-coat, and spectacles, and holding a copy of The Origin of Species in its hand. Theosophy, the movement Madame Blavatsky founded, spawned competing gurus and sects which in the course of the century evolved into the New Age. Here is the incredible story of Rudolf Steiner and his breakaway anthroposophy, of the tyrannical and mysterious Gurdjieff with his Path, of Ouspensky, the rebel Gurdjeffian, and of Krishnamurti – a future ‘world leader’ spotted river-bathing in India as a boy by the pederast and grand panjandrum of Theosophy, Bishop (self-appointed, of his own church!), C. W. Ledbetter. These gurus and the alternative religions they founded had a powerful appeal particularly for women, who found in them a role denied them by conventional religions. They also attracted some of the most influential intellects of the age – Oscar Wilde, W. B. Yeats, George Bernard Shaw, Frank Lloyd Wright, Katherine Mansfield, Aldous Huxley, and Christopher Isherwood – all searching for an alternative to Western materialism and notions of spirituality. Needless to say, these movements also attracted a host of colorful adventurers, uncertified lunatics, wealthy and lonely spinsters, charlatans, and lost souls. Well-researched, thought-provoking, and often hilarious, Madame Blavatsky’s Baboon provides a fascinating and helpful perspective on the hopes and fears of our own day as well as those of a century ago. Highly interesting and entertaining – especially in view of the fact that the Baboon was a representative of God on Earth to many peoples, including the ancient Egyptians, the archetype of wisdom, sagacity, and justice. From which one is inspired to draw the conclusion that yes, Madame Blavatsky was quite right: we are not descended from baboon or any other form of ape – our progenitors more likely included the lower forms of life, such as lawyers, tax-collectors, and other denizens of the undersides of rocks . . . 2.3.1.14.1: The Cairo Working – Esoteric Spin-Offs

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King, Francis and Sutherland, Isabel. The Rebirth of Magic. London: Corgi Books, 1982. 2.3.1.14.1: Global Empires, post Cairo Working – the United States, Britain, the Soviet Union, Communist China, etc. 2.3.1.14.1.1: France 2.3.1.14.1.2: Great Britain

2.3.1.14.1.3: The United States of America

2.3.1.14.1.4: Germany – the Great Depression and the Rise of Hitler Angress, W. T., and Smith, B. F. “Diaries of Heinrich Himmler’s Early Years.” In Journal of Modern History 51 (September 1959). Braun, Eva. Diaries. Alexandria: Archives, 1935. Brennan, J. H. Occult Reich. London: Futura, 1974. History and the occult. On the occult beliefs and practices of the Nazi high command. Brosse, J. Hitler avant Hitler. Paris: Fayard, 1972. Buechner, Col. Howard. The Holy Lance Trilogy. Stelle, IL: Adventures Unlimited, n.d. Volume I: Secrets of the Holy Lance (with Capt. Wilhelm Bernhart). Volume II: Hitler’s Ashes: Seeds of a New Reich (with Capt. Wilhelm Bernhart). Volume III: Emerald Cup – Ark of Gold: The Voyages of Jesus and Joseph of Arimathea. Butz, Arthur R. The Hoax of the Twentieth Century. Port Townsend, WA: Loompanics Unlimited, 1985. An exploration of the issues of Holocaust Revisionism and of evidence in support of its theses. Davidson, Eugene. The Making of Adolf Hitler: The Birth and Rise of Nazism. New York: Macmillan, 1977. Dawidowicz, Lucy. The War Against the Jews, 1933-1945. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1975. De Wohl, Louis. The Spear. New York: Popular Library, 1964 (original 1955). Dülffer, Jost. Nazi Germany 1933-1945: Faith and Annihilation. Dean Scott McMurry, translator. New York: Arnold Books/St. Martin’s Press, 1996. Nazi Germany and the crimes associated with that regime have never left the public consciousness, even though the generation of those already adult in 1933-45 is slowly dying out. But the growing distance from the events of those years suggests new ways of viewing the subject. Historians are discovering not only fresh sources but are also changing their perspectives and trying out new models of interpretation. This new history provides ready access to the insights of recent study, weaving the analytical strands into the fabric of a narrative account of the period. The rise of the Nazi Party, the consolidation of power in 1933-8, preparations for way, and the nature of the Nazi state are each the subject of a chapter. The war, itself a particular focus of attention, is considered in relation to the military engagements, the persecution of the regime’s victims, the extermination and terror programme, and the policies of occupation carried out in numerous parts of Nazi-occupied Europe. Finally, there is discussion of issues of continuity beyond 1945 – an attempt to place the enormity of Nazi crimes in their proper context – and of the extent to which Nazism brought about a modernization of Germany. From the back cover blurb

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Dwork, Debórah and Van Pelt, Robert Jan. Auschwitz: 1270 to the Present. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1996. In the dedication of this book, the authors say: This book is dedicated to our relatives who experienced a world in which exceptional evil became an unexceptional occurrence and common courtesy became an uncommon kindness. Human history is replete with atrocities, but those perpetrated by Nazi Germany were unique, both quantitatively and qualitatively. An understanding of the 20th Century and the changes it has brought about in human nature and the course of human and planetary history must include a close study of Nazi Germany, for there are the heart and soul of the sickness of our times, as well as the apotheosis of the soul-sickness of humanity at any time. There is no better place to begin that study than at Auschwitz, Poland. According to the jacket-blurb: Sara Grossman-Weil was deported from Lodz ghetto to Auschwitz in August 1944. As she entered the camp, she ‘saw columns of women, half naked, shaven heads, stretching out their arms. “Food, food. Give me your bread!” Screaming, shouting. I was overwhelmed. I thought that I had found myself in an asylum, in a madhouse, in a place with only crazy people.’ This was the place she had heard about, in whispers and with dread. ‘They always called it Auschwitz, but we didn’t know what it meant.’ The crushing number of murders – over 1,200,000 of them – the overwhelming scale of the crime, and the vast, abandoned site of ruined chimneys and rusting barbed wire isolate Auschwitz from us. We think of it as a concentration camp closed in on itself, separated from the rest of the world by night and fog. In the 1940s, however, this epicenter of the Holocaust was located at the edge of a town that had become the focus of a Germanization program that included ruthless ethnic cleansing, massive industrial investment, and comprehensive urban construction. Auschwitz, 1270 to the Present elucidates how the prewar ordinary town of Auschwitz became Germany’s most lethal killing site step by step and in stages: a transformation wrought by human beings, mostly German and mostly male. Who were the men who conceived, created, and constructed the killing facility? What were they thinking as they inched their way to iniquity? Using the hundreds of architectural plans for the camp that the Germans, in their haste, forgot to destroy, as well as blueprints and papers in municipal, provincial, and federal archives, Debórah Dwork and Robert Jan van Pelt show that the town of Auschwitz and the camp of that name were the centerpiece of Himmler’s ambitious project to recover the German legacy of the Teutonic Knights and Frederick the Great in Nazi-ruled Poland. Analyzing the close ties between the 700-year history of the town and the five-year evolution of the construction camp in the suburbs, Dwork and van Pelt offer an absolutely and compelling interpretation of the origins and development of the death camp at Auschwitz. And drawing on oral histories of survivors, memoirs, depositions, and diaries, the authors explore the ever more murderous impact of these changes on the inmates’ daily lives. A work of impeccable scholarship and sensitive narration, Auschwitz, 1270 to the Present is the definitive history of the site that has come to epitomize evil. Fogelman, Eva. Conscience & Courage: Rescuers of Jews During the Holocaust. New York: Anchor Books, 1994, Gilbert, Martin. The Holocaust. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1985. Godwin, Joscelyn. Arktos: The Polar Myth in Science, Symbolism, and Nazi Survival. Grand Rapids, MI: Phanes Press, 1993. Arktos is the first book ever written on the archetype of the Poles: celestial and terrestrial, North and South. It is a hair-raising voyage through cosmology, spiritual

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philosophy, mystical experience, and the beliefs of the lunatic fringe which leads to startling revelations about the secrets of the Poles and the ice-bound lands. Many occult systems speak of a Golden Age, associated with an ancient race that lived in the Arctic regions. Much embraced by ethnologists and Theosophists, this “Aryan Race” entered the mythology of Nazi Germany with dreadful consequences. In a responsible and scholarly fashion, the author explores the origins of modern neo-Nazi ideology, it’s “polar” inspiration, and links with other occult myths including the survival of Hitler, Germany bases in Antarctica, UFOs, the Hollow Earth, and the hidden kingdoms of Agartha and Shambhala. Arktos is an important book which touches on the deepest mysteries of human and cosmic destiny – and the eternal problem of good and evil. –2 From the back cover

Goldhagen, Daniel Jonah. Hitler’s Willing Executioners: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1996. Daniel Jonah Goldhagen has revisited a question that history has come to treat as settled, and his researches have led him to the inescapable conclusion that none of the established answers holds true. That question is: ‘How could the holocaust happen?’ His own response is a new exploration of those who carried out the Holocaust and of German society and its ingrained antisemitism – and it demands a fundamental revision of our thinking about the years 1933-1945. Drawing principally on materials either unexplored or neglected by previous scholars, Goldhagen marshals new, disquieting, primary evidence – including extensive testimony from the actual perpetrators themselves – to show that many beliefs about the killers are fallacies. They were not primarily SS men or Nazi Party members, but perfectly ordinary Germans from all walks of life, men (and women) who brutalized and murdered Jews both willingly and zealously. And they did so, moreover, not because they were coerced (for, as he shows irrefutably, so many were informed by their own commanders that they could refuse to kill without fear of retribution) . . . not because they slavishly followed orders (a view seemingly supported by Stanley Milgram’s famous Yale “obedience experiment”) . . . not because of any tremendous social, psychological, or peer pressure to conform to the behavior of their comrades (for no such evidence exists) . . . and not for any reasons associated with Hannah Arendt’s disputed notion of the “banality of evil.” They acted as they did because of a widespread, profound, unquestioned, and virulent antisemitism that led them to regard the Jews as a demonic enemy whose extermination was not only necessary but also just. Again and again, it is the killers’ own words that give us a portrait, both shocking and immediate, of their world: the organization of their daily lives, how they did what they did, their reactions to it, even their recreations in the killing fields, which included everything from sports and entertainment to the hobby of taking snapshots of their deeds and victims – to be freely exchanged and collected among themselves – leaving a devastating record of self-indictment that the author reproduces here. All of Goldhagen’s documentary evidence is set within a fresh analysis of the phenomenon of German antisemitism itself, which revises many conventional views. He shows that it was already deep-rooted and prevalent in Germany society before Hitler came to power, and that there was a widely shared view that the Jews ought to be eliminated in some way from German society. When Hitler, ultimately, chose mass extermination as the only “final solution,” he was thus easily able to enlist vast numbers of Germans to carry it out. Hitler’s Willing Executioners will provoke intense debate, for it asks us to reconsider fifty years’ worth of accumulated views and assumptions. It will change the way that this greatest horror of the twentieth century is understood. –2 Ibid., from the inside jacket blurb

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Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas. The Occult Roots of Nazism: The Ariosophists of Austria and Germany, 1890-1935 (The Racist and Nationalist Fantasies of Guido von List and Jorg Lanz von Liebenfels and Their Influence on Nazi Ideology). Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, England: The Aquarian Press, 1985. Keneally, Thomas. Schindler’s List. New York: Touchstone Books, 1982, 1993. King, Francis. Satan and Swastika. London: ? Lagnado, Lucette Matalon and Dekel, Sheila Cohn. Children of the Flames: Dr. Josef Mengele and the Untold Story of the Twins of Auschwitz. New York: William Morrow and Co., Inc., 1991. Landau, Ronnie S. The Nazi Holocaust. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 1994. Levenda. Peter. Unholy Alliance: A History of Nazi Involvement With the Occult. New York: Avon Books, 1995. From Death’s Head to Skinhead – seven decades to pure evil. The Reich was to stand for a thousand years on the firm foundation of Adolf Hitler’s policies of terror, brutal repression and genocide. In their attempt to create an invincible empire, the Nazi High Command actively pursued forbidden ancient knowledge . . . and freely embraced the powers of Darkness. Author Peter Levenda has personally translated numerous Nazi documents relating to the exploitation of the occult for political and military purposes. He has breached the inner sanctum of the Colonia Dignidad, the Nazi’s hidden refuge in South America, which remains in operation to this day. And he has compiled a chilling and comprehensive history of a would-be ‘Master’s Race’s’ slavish devotion to Satanism, human sacrifice, Black Magic and the secret delights of Hell. It began with the Necronomicon and ended in the Andes Mountains four years later: a search for the roots of the evil that has corrupted our century. From Satan to Swastika, and back to Hell itself, Peter Levenda has come full circle with Unholy Alliance. – From the back cover blurb In spite of the blurb, this is a superbly researched, admirably objective in-depth treatment of the subject. Unlike so many books devoted to the subject, it does not rank either Aleister Crowley or Anton Szandor LaVey as either Nazis or stereotype Satanists. In fact, Levenda makes it clear that Crowley was highly cooperative with the Allied effort during World War II and, if anything, despised the Nazis and all their works, and that LaVeyan Satanism is “too fiercely individualistic” to permit followers to submerge themselves in cults which, like Nazism, demand that they completely and willingly subjugate their bodies, souls, and Wills to the control of cult-leaders of any kind. All too often, those who write on the subject lump both Crowley and LaVey, easy targets because of their extremely iconoclastic and individualistic stances, in which sorcerers such as the Nazis even when they know that the facts don’t fit such categorization. Levenda has ignored the easy targets and gone after the real thing with the zeal of a true historical scholar, and done ample justice to his subject. There are a few things here and there that one could quibble with – for example, he mentions the “Son of Sam cult,” but former FBI profiler John Douglas, in Journey Into Darkness: The FBI’s Premier Investigator Penetrates the Minds and Motives of the Most Terrifying Serial Killers (New York: Pocket Star Books, 1997), that David Berkowitz, the “Son of Sam” serial killer, quite freely admitted to him and his partner that the “Son of Sam” story he had originally given the police and courts was just that, pure fiction, which he had used to try to get a lighter sentence, and that there was no sign in the exhaustive tests done on him by forensic psychiatrists and psychologists that he had ever been psychotic or delusional in any way (see entry under 2.2.3.4.3.2.2.2: Forensic Psychiatry, above). By and large, however, the book stands up very well to whatever tests the interested historian or scholar wishes to apply to it. Overall, it is a terrifying portrait of one of the major forces that have driven the 20th Century, revealing that if anything, human sociopolitical reality is far more complex and muddy with irrationality than any of us want to think about in our nastiest nightmares. Lewin, Richard. Hitler’s Mistakes. New York: William Morrow, 1984. Lifton, Robert Jay. The Nazi Doctors: Medical Killing and the Psychology of Genocide. New York: Basic Books, 1986.

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Mosse, George Lachman. Nazi Culture: Intellectual, Cultural, and Social Life in the Third Reich. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1966. Pennick, Nigel. Hitler’s Secret Sciences: His Quest for the Hidden Knowledge of the Ancients. Suffolk, England: Spearman, 1981. Proktor, Richard. Nazi Germany: The Origins and Collapse of the Third Reich. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1970. Ravenscroft, Trevor. The Cup of Destiny. New York: Samuel Weiser, Inc., 1973. _____. The Mark of the Beast: The Continuing Study of the Spear of Destiny, Its Occult Powers and Its Role in the Final Apocalypse. New York: Citadel Press, 1992. _____. The Spear of Destiny: The Occult Power Behind the Spear Which Pierced the Side of Christ . . . and How Hitler Inverted the Force in a Bid to Conquer the World. New York: Samuel Weiser, Inc., 1973. Reuth, Ralf Georg. Goebbels. New York: Harcourt, Brace & Company, 1993 (original copyright by R. Piper GmbH & Co., KG, Munchen, 1990). English translation by Krishna Winston. The life of Joseph Goebbels, the Mephistophelean genius of Nazi propaganda. Ralf Georg Reuth’s biography is meticulously researched, comprehensive, definitive. With unusual objectivity Reuth reconstructs history from eyewitness accounts, Goebbels’ own diaries, and archival material – some of which was held by the East Germans and Russians and only recently became available. It is the story of a small spindly, highly intelligent man with a clubfoot and an inferiority complex who rose to power with Hitler and was, of all the Nazis, the greatest advocate of the extermination of the Jews. Ibid., from the jacket blurb Riefenstahl, Leni. Leni Riefenstahl: A Memoir. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1987, 1992. Rothchild, Sylvia, editor. Voices from the Holocaust. New York: New American Library, 1981. Shirer, William. The Nightmare Years 1930-1940. Volume II of 20th Century Journey: A Memoir of a Life and the Times. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1984. Born in 1904, the very year of Aleister Crowley’s Cairo Working with which began the Aeon of Horus, William Shirer is perhaps the foremost chronicler of the historical moment of the 20th century: the rise and fall of Adolf Hitler’s Third Reich and the havoc it wrought, directly and indirectly, the world over. This and his other works listed here are key documents of the history of this century, necessary to any real understanding of it and its implications for the future and the spirit of humanity. Further, Nazi Germany was the ultimate intrusion of the Qlipphotic side of Thelema and the Aeon of Horus, warping the 20th century so that it should be named “the Age of Atrocity.” A modern Hermetic education cannot be complete without serious study of Shirer’s work. And because the human spirit – the terrestrial spirit – was permanently, appallingly scarred by the horrors perpetrated by the Third Reich, scars that we and our descendants will bear forever, regardless of whatever far planets we may yet colonize for Mother Earth, the memories of what occurred in those times, in that place, must not become buried and forgotten. This is what the Old Adam can do when all constraints are off – if he is not to be let to do it again, we must forever remember, forever keep vigil within ourselves that this never, ever happen again. If ever a journalist was in the right place at the right time, it was William Shirer. Initially as a newspaperman and then as one of the first overseas radio correspondents, Shirer was everywhere it mattered in the 1930s and 1940s. . . . [Shirer] provides an eyewitness and intensely personal vision of the crucible out of which the Nazi monster appeared. Fluent in German, married to a Viennese, Shirer had an uncanny sense of the shaping of events and sources that enabled him to act on his intuition. He met, knew, talked to – and occasionally drank with – Göring, Goebbels, Himmler, Hess, Heydrich, Ribbentrop, Eichmann and dozens of High Command staff officers. Even Hitler he observed at first hand, close enough, he noted, ‘to kill him.’ Through articles, simultaneous translations of Hitler’s speeches, and his own broadcasts Shirer desperately tried to warn the Western World of this demonic

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scourge. To his intense frustration, while he was read and listened to, the urgency of his message was not believed. The Nightmare Years is not only a riveting, firsthand account of the events and men who set the world on fire, it is also the story of a young American caught in these titanic events, struggling to survive and provide a normal life for himself, his wife and infant daughter. Reading this life is – as living it must have been – fascinating, powerful, and terrifying. Shirer’s tale of these harrowing and historic times is enhanced by ninety-two photographs he took or collected through the period. Some of them have never appeared in print before outside Nazi Germany. Some have historic interest; others are a reflection of a young man and his family, trying to live normal lives in an abnormal time. They reinforce the warm, human voice telling a devastatingly inhuman story. Newspaperman, pioneer broadcaster (together with Edward R. Murrow, he invented worldwide, electronic journalism) and best-selling author of The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, William Shirer now lives in Lenox, Massachusetts. From the inside jacket blurb. _____. The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich: A History of Nazi Germany. New York: Touchstone Books/Simon & Schuster, 1981, 1990; originally published in London by Secker and Warburg, Ltd., 1964). Odin and the other Old Norse Gods must hate the Nazis for the crimes committed by Nazi Germany in Their names. Odin sacrificed one of His eyes and hung for nine days and nights upside-down on the World Tree in order to gain the wisdom that flowed from it (one of the themes of Tarot Trump XII, The Hanged Man, which is associated with Chokmah, Wisdom, and the Planet Neptune). William Shirer lost an eye in his youth, before the rise of Nazi Germany and his tenure there as a journalist for American news-media. One wonders if perhaps he was, all unknowingly, a messenger in the service of Hermes-Odin, Patron of Truth, Who hates injustice and evil, especially that perpetrated in His name . . . The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich is the complete history of Nazi Germany, written by its most distinguished observer. No other powerful empire ever bequeathed such mountains of evidence about its birth and destruction as the Third Reich. When the bitter war was over, and before the Nazis could destroy their files, the Allied demand for unconditional surrender produced an almost hour-by-hour record of the nightmare empire built by Adolf Hitler. This record included the testimony of Nazi leaders and of concentration camp inmates, the diaries of officials, transcripts of secret conferences, army orders, private letters – all the vast paperwork behind Hitler’s drive to conquer the world. The famed foreign correspondent and historian William L. Shirer, who had watched and reported on the Nazis since 1925, spent five and a half years sifting this massive documentation. The result is a monumental study that has been widely acclaimed as the definitive record of one of the greatest and most frightening chapters in the history of mankind. . . . From the jacket blurb. _____. The Start. 1904-1930. Volume I of 20th Century Journey: A Memoir of a Life and the Times. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, ? Sklar, Dusty. Gods and Beasts: The Nazis and the Occult. New York: Dorset, 1989. (Also published by Dorset as Nazis and the Occult, 1989.) Smith, Bradley. “Confessions of a Holocaust Revisionist.” Part I. Self-published, 1986. Copies available @ $4 from the author, 1765 N. Highland Ave., #645, Los Angeles, CA 90028. Speer, Albert. Inside the Third Reich. Richard and Clara Winston, translators. New York: Macmillan, 1970.

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Stranges, Frank. Nazi UFO Secrets and Bases Exposed. Van Nuys, CA: New International Evangelism Crusades, n.d. Suster, Gerald. Hitler and the Age of Horus. New York: Samuel Weiser, Inc., n.d. (Also published under the title Hitler: The Occult Messiah [New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1981]). Sydnor, Charles W., Jr. Soldiers of Destruction: The SS Death’s Head Division, 193301945. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1977. . . . Charles Sydnor displays all the best qualities of American scholarship. . . . [His] research has been meticulous, yet his narrative flows unencumbered. . . . The trackrecord of Theodor Eicke, founder and first commander in battle of the Totenkopf, has been pieced together in a remarkable way, and remarkably it throws light on a Germany . . . where the amoral, the nihilist, the ideologue, the bent and the mindless were kings. For the military historian Professor Sydnor’s account of the Totenkopf Division in Russia makes compulsive reading. . . . -- Ronald Lewin, The Times Literary Supplement Charles W. Sydnor, Jr., has written a splendid study of the evolution and wartime activities of one of the most notorious of Nazi Waffen-SS divisions, that which eventually became the Third SS Panzer Division Totenkopf. It is an impressive example of scrupulously documented administrative and battlefield history. . . . Woven throughout the narrative is a convincing demonstration of Totenkopf’s close association with the SS-run mass-murder system. -- James J. Weingartner, The American Historical Review Toland, John. Adolf Hitler. Two volumes. New York: Doubleday, 1976. Whiting, Charles. The Hunt for Martin Bormann. New York: Ballantine Books, 1973. On the night of May ½, 1945, a fat man began to run. That terrifying night the undersized forty-five-year-old German with the pugnacious shoulders and chin of a runto-seed boxer started the greatest adventure of his long bureaucratic life. Against the blood-red, burning background of a dying Nazi Berlin he scurried down the ruined streets for his life. Dodging and twisting, his heart thumping painfully in his chest with the unaccustomed exercise, he tried to save himself from the terrible revenge the victors would take on him if he were captured. Then he fell into the hands of a Russian patrol! The worst had happened. Yet the fat little man’s eye for the possible, which had taken him from obscurity to the most powerful man in Nazi Germany after Hitler himself, saw a way out. While his trapped comrades faced up to the drunken Russians in their earth-brown smocks and battered boots, he sidled away from the light of the bonfire. Behind followed Hitler’s doctor, Ludwig Stumpfegger, already designated as a ‘war criminal’ for experiments carried out in concentration camps. They started to run again. Thereafter the two of them – the little bureaucrat and the tall SS doctor – were never seen again alive. Thus Martin Bormann disappeared from history. –2 Ibid., blurb on page facing front cover The crimes committed by the Nazis were so egregious, so far beyond the bounds of the morally comprehensible, that the most successful works on the Nazi regime and era, such as the superb autobiographical works by William Shirer, cited above, save the hyperbole and let the hideous fact speak for themselves. Unfortunately, the author of The Hunt for Martin Bormann fails to take the cue from other authors; his otherwise highly informative and enlightening narrative is badly marred by a strong tendency to purple prose and hyacinth hyperbole – a pity, because this little book is a good read and sheds a great deal of light on the

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mysterious life and death of one of the most feared and hated of all the movers and shakers of Hitler’s murderous empire. Wynants, Eric. “The Wynants File: Notes on the Occult/Conspiracy Connection and Hitler. Notes on the Nazis, UFOs, the Holy Lance, the Vril and Thule Society, and Antarctica.” In Critique, vol. 7, p. 41 (n.d.). Yahil, Leni. The Holocaust: The Fate of European Jewry. Ina Friedman and Haya Galai, editors. New York: Oxford University Press, 1990. 2.3.1.14.1.5: The Soviet Union King, David. The Commissar Vanishes: The Falsification of Photographs and Art in Stalin’s Russia. New York: Henry Holt & Co., 1997. I am not exaggerating when I say that I literally could not put this book down until I got to the end. It is an extraordinary work of documentary history. David King, who years ago did a splendid photographic history of Trotsky, managed to gain access to the picture archives of the communist party of the Soviet Union following the regime’s collapse in 1991. This brought to a successful end his long search for photographic evidence on the party’s history that began in 1970 when he was first denied permission to examine these materials. The results are the hundreds of photographs, some of them never before published, that form the core of this book. King’s work in assembling these pictures adds documentary evidence of a new kind to our knowledge of Soviet history – the power of the forged photograph – as a specific contribution toward the analysis of the Stalin terror. Never before have we been able to see exactly how the medium of photography in books, journals, and newspapers was manipulated by Stalin and his acolytes to, on the one hand, celebrate him and his momentary favorites, and, on the other, to punish the ‘enemies of the state.’ – From review by Martin A. Miller in the Fall 1997 issue of the History Book Club bulletin Orlando Figes. A People’s Tragedy: A History of the Russian Revolution. 1997 (?). Orlando Fige’s excellent account of the era of the Russian Revolution skillfully documents the period between the disastrous famine of 1891 and the death of Lenin n 1924. It is a balanced assessment of the important issues, and uses newly available archival materials. – From the Fall 1997 issue of the History Book Club Bulletin (offered as a companion to The Commissar Vanishes) 2.3.1.14.1.6: Communist China

2.3.1.14.1.7: Japan

2.3.1.14.2: World War I 2.3.1.14.3: World War II

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Dunnigan, James F. and Nofi, Albert A. Dirty little Secrets of World War II: Military Information No One Told You About the Greatest, Most Terrible War in History. New York: William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1994. Dirty Little Secrets is full of surprises about the inner workings of war-making machinery around the world. And, with war and rumors of war no more distant than the front page of today’s newspaper, Dirty Little Secrets is a useful briefing . . . a handbook for our times. -- Los Angeles Times Witty and informative . . . It will be equally useful for the serious student, the casual reader, or the citizen concerned about writing more intelligent letters to his or her congressional representative. -- Booklist Weinberg, Gerhard L. Germany, Hitler, and World War II: Essays in Modern German and World History. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1995. _____. A World at Arms: A Global History of World War II. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994. 2.3.1.14.4: The Bomb Allen, Robert L. “The Port Chicago Disaster and Its Aftermath.” In The Black Scholar, Vol. 13, Nos. 2, 3 (Spring 1982), pp. 2-29. (Reprinted in The F.I.F.E. Whetstone Vol. I, No. 1 [Summer 1989].) Did the United States Navy secretly test a prototype nuclear device on the little Navy town of Port Chicago, California, on Suisun Bay near San Francisco, in the summer of 1944 e.v.? This article makes a frighteningly solid case for that claim. Caldicott, Helen. Nuclear Madness. Revised edition. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1994. D’Antonio, Michael. Atomic Harvest: Hanford and the Lethal Toll of America’s Nuclear Harvest. New York: Crown Publishers, Inc., 1993. Ehrlich, Paul R.; Sagan, Carl; Kennedy, Donald; Roberts, Walter Orr. The Cold and the Dark: The World After Nuclear War (The Conference on the Long-Term Worldwide Biological Consequences of Nuclear War). New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1985. Holloway, David. Stalin & the Bomb: The Soviet Union and Atomic energy, 1939-1956. New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 1994. For forty years the Soviet-American nuclear arms race dominated world politics, yet the Soviet nuclear establishment was shrouded in secrecy. Now that the Cold War is over and the Soviet Union has collapsed, it is possible to answer questions that have intrigued policymakers and the public for years. How did the Soviet Union build its atomic and hydrogen bombs? What role did espionage play? What was the relationship between Soviet nuclear scientists and the country’s political leaders? This spellbinding book answers these questions by tracing the history of Soviet nuclear policy from the development of physics in the 1920s to the testing of the hydrogen bomb and the emergence of nuclear deterrence in the mid-1950s. In engrossing detail, David Holloway tells us how Stalin launched a crash atomic program only after the Americans bombed Hiroshima and showed that the bomb could be built; how the information handed over to the Soviets by Klaus Fuchs helped in the creation of their bomb; how the scientific intelligentsia, which included such man as Andrei Sakharov, interacted with the police apparatus headed by the suspicious and menacing Lavrentii Beria; what steps Stalin took to counter U.S. atomic diplomacy; how the nuclear project saved Soviet physics and enabled it to survive as an island of

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intellectual autonomy in a totalitarian society; and what happened when, after Stalin’s death, Soviet scientists argued that a nuclear war might extinguish all life on earth. This magisterial history throws light on Soviet policy at the height of the Cold War, illuminates a central but hitherto secret element of the Stalinist system, and puts into perspective the tragic legacy of this program today – environmental damage, a network of secret cities, and a huge stockpile of unwanted weapons. From the inside jacket blurb “I am the warrior Lord of the Forties; the Eighties cower before me, and are abased” (Liber Al vel Legis, Chapter 3, verse 46). The 40-year long Cold War had the armies (Peh, value 80, Mars) – and the general population of the world – trembling in fear before the specter of universal nuclear annihilation. Here is a detailed and superbly researched history of the Soviet side of that long, dark night of the anima mundi. Powers, Thomas. Heisenberg’s War: The Secret History of the Atom Bomb. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1993. Sagan, Carl and Turco, Richard. A Path Where No Man Thought: Nuclear Winter and the End of the Arms Race. New York: Random House, 1990. This is a tough-minded and at the same time hopeful book about what is by far the most serious threat ever identified to the global civilization and the human species. The first light of the Trinity nuclear explosion over the New Mexico desert in 1945 heralded the dawn of a new age of military power and unprecedented global insecurity. During the following decades, weapons of mass destruction were built at a breathtaking pace – each side convinced that the more it had, the safer it was – until the global arsenals were glutted with tens of thousands of nuclear weapons. Now, in a time of dramatic improvement in U.S./Soviet relations [this was written in 1990 e.v.], there is a temptation to believe that the danger is past. Even with existing and anticipated treaty reductions, though, there are still enough weapons in the world to devastate every city on Earth twenty-five times over. But that’s not the worst of it. Discovered in 1982-83, nuclear winter is the precipitous and widespread cold and dark that, it is predicted, would be generated in even a ‘small’ nuclear war, putting at risk billions of people all over the Earth. It was a landmark discovery, one that revealed in the starkest terms how vulnerable our global civilization is to the long-term environmental after-effects of nuclear war. Despite the much-heralded thawing of the Cold War, the fact remains: even a limited use of our current arsenals can provoke a planetary-scale nuclear winter, indiscriminate in its ravages. Years of intensive scientific research have further substantiated and refined nuclear winter theory, and, disturbingly, have confirmed its stunning prediction of climatic catastrophe, agricultural collapse, and world famine. Carol Sagan and Richard Turco were instrumental in the discovery and development of the nuclear winter theory. . . . In recognizing the threat of nuclear winter, they have exposed dangerous inadequacies in U.S. and Soviet nuclear policy and doctrine that have yet to be addressed in the current climate of apparent good will. . . . Ibid., from the jacket blurb Schell, Jonathan. The Fate of the Earth. New York: Avon Books, 1982. Udall, Stewart. The Myths of August: A Personal Exploration of Our Tragic Cold War Affair With the Atom. New York: A Cornelia & Michael Bessie Book/Pantheon Books, 1994. Vogel, Peter. “The Last Wave from Port Chicago.” In The Black Scholar Vol. 13, Nos. 2, 3 (Spring 1982), pp. 30.48. Reprinted in The F.I.F.E. Whetstone Vol. I, No. 1 (Spring 1989), pp. 6-8 and 4157. (See entry, this section, under “Allen, Robert L., above.)

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2.3.1.14.5: The Space Age Mitchell, Dr. Edgar and Williams, Dwight. The Way of the Explorer: An Apollo Astronaut’s Journey Through the Material and Mystical Worlds. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1996. An Apollo astronaut’s remarkable quest to reconcile science and religion in a selforganizing universe. On January 31, 1971, Apollo 14 lifted off from Cape Kennedy, and three days later Edgar Mitchell and Alan Shepard walked on the lunar surface. It was an audacious time in the history of mankind. For Mitchell, however, the most extraordinary journey was yet to come. As he hurtled earthward through the abyss between the two worlds, Mitchell became engulfed by a profound sensation – ‘a sense of universal connectedness.’ He intuitively sensed that his presence, that of his fellow astronauts, and that of the planet in the window were all part of a deliberate, universal process and that the glittering cosmos itself was in some way conscious. The experience was so overwhelming Mitchell knew his life would never be the same. The direction his work would take for the next twenty-five years was another journey of sorts, one that would carry him inward as he explored the ineffable mystery of consciousness and being. Having been reared in a Southern Baptist family, and gone on to study the revolutionary sciences of the day at MIT, he felt the need to reconcile what had always been thought of as separate in his life and in the Western mind – science and religion. Consequently, in the early 1970s, Mitchell left NASA to found the Institute of Noetic Sciences. The Institute allowed him to initiate research in areas of study previously neglected by mainstream science. Through his work, Mitchell began to construct a theory that could explain not only the mystery of human consciousness, but the psychic event as well – what spiritualists refer to as ‘miracle’ and the scientist dismisses altogether. His story culminates in a new ‘dyadic’ model of reality that brings consciousness into the equation of how our self-aware universe works. What he reveals through this model is that we live in a universe that is not predetermined by the laws of physics nor preordained by deities, nor infinitely malleable. While human intentions are generally subject to the laws of physics, these laws are also influenced by mind. From the vantage point of an extraterrestrial, Mitchell brilliantly delineates how mankind’s exploration of both outer and inner space represents the next epoch in the evolution of life itself, a process over which human beings have increasing control. The Way of the Explorer traces the progress of two remarkable journeys. Together they fundamentally alter how we understand the miracle and mystery of being, and ultimately reveal mankind’s role in its own destiny. – Ibid., inside jacket blurb 2.3.1.14.6: The Heirs of Tyranny – Global Tyranny and Imperialism in the Post-Soviet World Bowen, Russell S., Brig. Gen., Ret., U. S. Army. The Immaculate Deception: The Bush Crime Family Exposed. Carson City, NV: America West Publishers, 1991. Paperback, $12.95. ISBN 0-922356-807. Despite the CAPITALS and the apparent hype, the following is no more than the literal truth. If anything, it understates the case: Immaculate Deception is perhaps the most shocking book written this century about TREASON committed by the highest leaders within the U. S. Government. This disturbing and thought provoking exposé is written by Ret. Brigadier General Russell S.

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Bowen, who has courageously come forward with the truth about his association with the OSS (Office of Security Services), and his ‘drug running’ activities in behalf of the ‘secret’ government which involves the HIGHEST U. S. ‘leaders’ and which few Americans known anything about. The most startling details are revealed regarding Bowen’s clandestine work including his work under the orders of President George Bush. You will learn about the unsavory past of George Bush and his family, as well as the unscrupulous and treasonous activities in which he has been and is current involved. Answers to the following and many other pressing questions are detailed. WHERE WAS GEORGE BUSH: • When during World War II his shipmates were drowning after the bomber plane Bush was piloting was shot down? • When the Bay of Pigs fiasco was planned and executed? • When President John F. Kennedy was assassinated? • When Presidential Candidate Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated? • When Martin Luther King was assassinated? • When a “deal” was made to hold the Iran hostages until the inauguration of Reagan? • When Ronald Reagan was nearly assassinated in Washington by a known Bush family associated? • When the truth about his association with Iraq should have been made clear to the American people? Says Bowen, “Don’t ask George Bush to answer the above questions. He’s more acquainted with deniability than telling the truth. KNOWING THE TRUTH WILL ARM YOU AS A CITIZEN OF OUR COUNTRY AGAINST THE TYRANNY OF OUR ‘LEADERSHIP.’ WE THE PEOPLE MUST UNITE WITH THE SWORD OF TRUTH AND KNOWLEDGE FOR THE ENEMY HAS INFILTRATED WITHOUT OUR VERY GOVERNMENT! IT IS TIME TO WAKE-UP AMERICA BEFORE THE SOVEREIGNTY GUARANTEED UNDER OUR U. S. CONSTITUTION IS ABOLISHED! From the back cover blurb About the Author When the author graduated from Los Gatos Military Academy in California in 1942, he already had been in uniform for nearly a decade. He spent his whole childhood in military training, attaining the rank of captain at the Castle Heights Military Academy. At the age of 17, he became an aviation cadet after passing the examination Sacramento, California. Still only a teenager, he spent the war years flying P-38s, dueling German planes in Italy as a “Top gun” fighter pilot. He was a highly decorated pilot with the famous 82nd Fighter Group which demonstrated their fearlessness, dedication and supreme skill by flying combat aircraft under murderous conditions. Following a meeting with the Pope at the Vatican in 1945, Bowen, at 19, was offered the chance to join the secret team of OSS directed by General William “Wild Bill” Donovan. Bowen became an undercover agent, involved in a variety of secret missions. Bowen was assigned in 1959 to visit Asunción, Paraguay, to familiarize himself with the traffic routes of drugs coming into the U. S. through Cuba. His information on routes passed on to U. S. Customs was described as ‘the most important piece of information’ they had received. In his military career and as a strict Catholic, Bowen had been trained to follow orders from his superiors without question. Forty-seven years as a mole and member of William Donovan’s secret team ‘Super spies,’ he received orders and reported directly to

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William Casey, William Pawley, and his brother in the Dominican Republic, John Knight. In 1958 and 1959 he reported to Batista’s Secretary Villalon, the Argentine who became the right hand man for Reagan. Still supported by several intelligence patriots Bowen survived operation ‘Silver Star,’ his last role. That same deference to authority led Bowen to carry out an operation that cost him six and a half years in a federal prison in Springfield, MO. Bowen, an undercover agent in a cocaine smuggling scheme that he was trying to expose, took the fall after diverting a drug load to Sylvania, Georgia rather than following orders which required him to deliver it to Homestead, Florida. Among his many awards and decorations for meritorious service is the Distinguished Service Medal. After World War II, he flew numerous emergency airlifts and rescue missions as a free-lance pilot. He served as a flight officer for such world figures as the United Nation’s leader Dag Hammarsköld, the Shah of Iran, and Cuban leader Fulgencio Batista. Among many other citations, Bowen received a commendation in 1956 from U. S. Army Major General J. F. H. Seitz for bravery rescuing a wounded army captain in Iran. Bowen even regulated the flight altitude to make his patient comfortable. ‘In the opinion of my surgeon, these actions by Captain Bowen may have meant the difference between life and death,’ wrote Seitz. Bowen regrets that in his youthful idealism and his desire to excel, he was misled by some American leaders who claimed to be the guardians of America. Instead, they were then and are now damaging the country. Acknowledging that in his zeal to expose wrongdoing, he himself committed illegal acts (under orders from his government), Bowen has dedicated his life to exposing our government’s ineffective and counter-productive efforts to curb the drug trade. He labels that current effort under the misguided control of U. S. President George Bush ‘nothing more than a war of words.’ And he asks that readers of this book who have information about the U. S. Drug Trade contact him through the publisher. Bowen is a retired Brigadier General in the U. S. Army. He lives in Florida. – Publisher’s Foreword, pp. i.-ii. Gore, Al, Senator. Earth in the Balance: Ecology and the Human Spirit. New York: Houghton Miflin Company, 1992. This would be a wonderful book – if the so-and-so had meant it, rather than putting together a very clever political document which sounds like ecological awareness but is actually propaganda for a “managed” (owned) culture. Kurtz, Howard. Spin Cycle: Inside the Clinton Propaganda Machine. New York: The Free Press, 1998. Bill Clinton is the most investigated president since Richard Nixon – facing inquiries into Whitewater, campaign fundraising abuses, and sexual misconduct – and yet he improbably began 1998 with approval ratings as high as those of Ronald Reagan. But the new year has brought a barrage of new allegations, and the president and his advisors face once again the challenge of spinning the news to their advantage, a challenge they have mastered many times before. In Spin Cycle, award-winning Washington Post reporter Howard Kurtz reveals the inside workings of Clinton’s well-oiled propaganda machine – arguably the most successful team of White House spin doctors in history. He takes the reader into closeddoor meetings where Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Mike McCurry, Lanny Davis, and other top officials plot strategy to beat back the scandals and neutralize a hostile press corps through stonewalling, stage managing, and outright intimidation. He depicts a White House obsessed with spin and pulls back the curtain on events and tactics that the administration would prefer to keep hidden, including: • The secret report that Hillary Clinton ordered on a reporter investigating the Whitewater affair as part of a plan to discredit her.

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• A tense, almost paranoid White House atmosphere in which the spinmeisters do not question the President about the various scandals because they don’t want to learn information they might have to reveal to prosecutors or the press. • The secret meeting between a Clinton operative and the editor of the New York Times that led to a presidential interview in which Clinton knew the questions in advance. • Bill Clinton’s success in reaping favorable publicity by secretly courting selected reporters and columnists in off-the-record White House meetings. Spin Cycle is an all-too-human drama in which political operatives wrestle with their consciences as they struggle to protect the boss. As the scandal drums beat louder and louder, Kurtz shows what it takes for the president and his people to survive, and what happens to the truth along the way. -- From the inside jacket blurb North, Oliver L.. With William Novak. HarperCollinsPublishers, 1991. Under Fire: An American Story. New York:

For the first time, Oliver North tells the whole story of his life. In this candid, revealing book, the man who has been at the center of the controversy called ‘Irancontra’ details what he did and why he did it. With a cast of characters that includes William Casey, Ronald Reagan, Bud McFarlane, John Poindexter, and George Bush, Under Fire is an astonishing look at how Washington’s wheels of power turn. When the story broke that the United States had secretly been selling arms to Iran, and when Attorney General Edwin Meese announced at a press conference that some of the profits from those sales had been funneled to the contras fighting the Sandinista government in Nicaragua, a firestorm erupted that engulfed the nation. Iran-contra threatened to topple a president, and it thrust a previously obscure Marine lieutenant colonel into the spotlight. To some, Oliver North was a national hero; to others, he was a villain. But no one could deny that he handled the scrutiny of the congressional hearings and his later trial with uncommon composure and dignity. Here is the Oliver North that the public has never before seen. Born in Texas and brought up in New York, he writes that his childhood was like a Norman Rockwell painting. But the serenity was permanently shattered when he was shipped off to fight in Vietnam. Under Fire includes some of the most powerful writing ever published about that conflict. After the war and other assignments with the Marines, North was ordered to the National Security Council staff at the White House. There he became head of a secret counterterrorism group and participated in planning, with the CIA and other organizations, some of the most sensitive covert operations undertaken by the United States government in recent years. In Under Fire, Oliver North tells for the first time the inside story behind the headlines. Among other operations, he was involved in the interception of the hijackers who seized the Achille Lauro cruise ship and in the American bombing of Libya, and he gives his unique perspective on those dramatic events. He also writes of the importance of his family and his enduring faith, which have seen him through the toughest times. From the inside jacket blurb The Politically Correct may now leave the room. Rollins, L. A. The Myth of Natural Rights. Port Townsend, WA: Loompanics Unlimited, 1983.

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Ruddy, Christopher. The Strange Death of Vincent Foster: An Investigation. New York: The Free Press, 1997. On a humid day in 1993, White House deputy counsel Vincent W. Foster was found dead in Fort Marcy Park in suburban Virginia. One of the nation’s highest-ranking federal officers, Foster was a boyhood friend of President Bill Clinton and a close confidant of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. His death sent shock waves throughout he White House and the nation’s capital. The death was quickly pronounced a suicide. According to the official story that soon emerged, Foster was depressed, angry, and isolated. With nowhere else to turn, he went to a secluded park near the Potomac River, put a gun in his mouth, and killed himself. But is that what really happened? In this compelling and fully documented report, investigative journalist Christopher Ruddy answers that critical question. Ruddy, who has covered the case almost from the start, details the disturbing inconsistencies surrounding Foster’s alleged suicide, chronicles the botched investigations, documents the frenzied illegal activity in the White House in the hours after Foster’s death, and notes the persistent failure of mainstream media to ask the right questions. Throughout his thorough investigation of the available forensic and circumstantial evidence, Ruddy weaves a disturbing tale of cover-ups, abuse of power, police and prosecutorial incompetence, and press indifference. His startling conclusion – that despite the official line, Foster could not have killed himself in Fort Marcy Park – will persuade event he most skeptical reader to demand a full public investigation into the mysterious circumstances of the death of Vincent Foster and the troubling events in its aftermath. Attacked by 60 Minutes and blacklisted by the White House, Ruddy has put his journalistic reputation on the line, and at a considerable personal cost he has dared to ask the hard questions and find the answers in this deeply disturbing case. -- From the inside jacket blurb Walker, Martin. The Cold War: A History. New York: Henry Holt & Co., 1993. 2.3.1.14.7: The Information Revolution 2.3.1.14.8: The Quantum Technology Revolution 2.3.1.14.9: The Cultural Revolution Bennett, Lerone, Jr. Confrontation: Black and White. Chicago: Penguin Books, 1966. Black, Bob. The Abolition of Work. Port Townsend, WA: Loompanics Unlimited, 1986. Branch, Taylor. Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1954-63. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1988. Branden, Nathaniel. Judgment Day: My Years with Ayn Rand. Boston: Marc Jaffe Books/Houghton Mifflin Company, 1989. Judgment Day is a passionately written, highly theatrical memoir and a psychological tour de force. It is the drama of an intense love affair between a literary genius and a brilliant young man twenty-five years her junior – against the background of a challenging and controversial philosophical movement. In following the course of a man’s intellectual and emotional evolution, we are led to a deeper understanding of the work and life of Ayn Rand, who was his friend, mentor, lover, and enemy. This is an odyssey that profoundly illuminates the relationship of reason and emotion – and the ability of the human spirit to overcome adversity and regenerate itself. I have never been overly fond of Ayn Rand, and have had even less affection for most of her followers, the Objectivists. Not knowing much about Branden other than the fact that at one point he had been

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her designated heir-apparent, literarily and otherwise, as well as her lover, I began reading this book from a somewhat adversarial position. By the time I had finished, however, I was swept by profound sorrow for both the late Rand and the still-living Branden, as well as countless numbers of Rand’s followers, all of them caught up in a tragedy of the stuff of Euripides’ best works. This is one of the most moving chronicles I have ever read, not to mention an extremely insightful and important overview of one of the most important political movements of modern times, Randian Objectivism and its major spin-off, anarcho-capitalistic libertarianism. No true Thelemite should go without at least reading this book, if not actually having it in his or her library. From the inside jacket blurb Brownmiller, Susan. Against Our Will: Men, Women and Rape. New York: Bantam Books, 1976. DiGregorio, Michael. “Kook du Jour: Far-Out Francis, Follower of Venusian Prince Val Thor.” In Far Out volume I, No. 1. Beverly Hills, CA: L.F.P., 1992. Dolnick, Edward. Madness on the Couch: Blaming the Victim in the Heyday of Psychoanalysis. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1998. In the golden age of ‘talk therapy,’ the 1950s and 1960s, psychotherapists saw no limit to what they could do. Believing they had already explained the origins of war, homosexuality, anti-Semitism, and a host of neurotic ailments, they set out to conquer one of mankind’s oldest and fiercest foes, mental illness. In Madness on the Couch, veteran science writer Edward Dolnick tells the tragic story of that confrontation. It is a vivid, compelling tale that is told here for the first time. Dolnick focuses on three battles in an epic war: against schizophrenia, autism, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Schizophrenia, the most dreaded mental illness, strikes its young victims without warning and torments them with hallucinations and mocking voices. Autism claims its victims even younger, at age one or two, and locks them away, cut off from the rest of us by invisible walls. Obsessive-compulsive disorder strikes at any age and entraps its hapless victims in endless rituals. Inspired by their hero, Freud, but bolder even than he, psychoanalysts set out to vanquish those enemies. Armed with only words and the best of intentions, they achieved the worst of outcomes. The symptoms of disease were symbols, these therapists believed, and diseases could be interpreted, like dreams. The ranting of a schizophrenic on a street corner, the retreat of an autistic child from human contact, the endless handwashing of an obsessive-compulsive were not simply acts but messages. And the message psychoanalysts decoded and delivered to countless families was that parents themselves – through their subtle hostility – had driven their children mad. That verdict was not overturned for more than a generation. Clear, dramatic, and authoritative, Madness on the Couch uses the voices of therapists as well as those of patients and their loved ones to describe the controversial methods used to treat the mentally ill, and their heartbreaking consequences. We see the leading lights of psychotherapy at work, including tiny, grandmotherly Frieda FrommReichmann; awkward Gregory Bateson, either a genius or a charlatan, depending on whom one asked; and birdlike R. D. Laing, a slender figure with dark, deep-set eyes and the charisma of a rock star. We meet, too, scientists and family members who fought the reigning dogma of the day. Bernard Rimland, for example, set out to refute the claim that autism was caused by ‘refrigerator’ parents whose coldness had turned their children into zombies. Rimland’s only ‘credential’ in his battle with the experts was the fact that his son was autistic. A gripping tale of hubris, arrogant pride, and terrible heartbreak, Madness on the Couch combines the immediacy of superb journalism with the depth of scrupulous history. It shows us convincingly that in attempting to cure mental illness through talk therapy, psychoanalysts did infinitely more harm than good. -- From the inside jacket blurb

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As illuminating as this book is in the areas of psychobiology and psychopharmacology, I found it disappointing in several respects. First, on a purely biochemical level, diseases and their symptoms are perceived as symbols by the body, that is, meaningful biochemical events, processes, and entities which signal to the body that it must get ready to fight for its well-being, perhaps even its life. From viral invasions to contact with allergens to major injuries, the biochemistry attending events and processes of injury and diseases are information – symbols – to which the body must react intelligently and appropriately if it is to survive. This may be a fundamental reason behind the phenomenon of hypnotic cures of medical conditions and disease processes which are truly physical in origin, from warts, which are caused by viruses, to certain genetically-caused and -controlled disease processes, such as “Elephant Man” syndrome, none of which seem to yield to any other form of treatment (save, perhaps, in the case of warts, time – eventually each wart simply ceases to be, once its function is complete, though others may replace it). Further, the many well-documented cases of hypnotic cures of physical, even genetically caused diseases does prove that the unconscious exists and that psychogenic cause and cures of disease are not only possible but have been accomplished many times, something Freud and his followers asserted. Thus clearly there are some cases in which the “talking cure” may be not only sensible, but appropriate and successful, though like any other cure, it should not have been seen and used as a universal panacea by mental health professionals. Then there are such issues as the consequences of long-term, extreme stress and what it can do to both mind and soul, particularly those of developing organisms. As even Sigmund Freud knew (though eventually he repudiated his first great theory, the Seduction Theory, based on that knowledge), chronic and prolonged physical and/or psychological abuse, molestation, terrorization, and/or physical torment of both children and adults, from child abuse to political and ritual torture, will eventually show itself in the victims in the form of behavioral and emotional scarring as well as adaptation that will show itself to others in the form of what seems to be, to those who don’t know the histories of the victims, bizarre behavior patterns of the sort normally believed to be the results of mental illness. As Jeff Masson and others (see 2.2.3.4.3.2.2.2: Forensic Psychiatry, supra) have clearly shown, the psychoanalytic and psychotherapeutic professions have known about since Freud’s time, yet dismissed it as “irrelevant” or even “non-existent,” making many of their members tacit accomplices to evil. Dolnick mentions nothing of this, nor does he go into the phenomenon of “shellshock,” another form of chronic trauma syndrome seen in military casualties perhaps going back to the Napoleonic Wars, thoroughly documented by, e.g., the Veteran’s Association in this country. From Freud’s earliest cases to the present, such cases demonstrate clearly that people can be driven into what seem to be “insane” behavior patterns by chronic physical and psychospiritual traumatization. In such cases, as many combat-arts teachers, orthomolecular therapists, and attorneys have demonstrated countless times, physically, nutritionally, and legally re-empowering the victims (not to mention removing them from the situations and people responsible for the torment to which they have been subjected) does far more good than all the “talk therapy” or psychochemotherapy ever expended. When victims of such maltreatment are given knowledge and tools that can be used effectively and successfully to defend themselves on physical, legal, and political levels, and are given the nutrients which prolonged stress has drained from their bodies, the symptoms of their “mental” illness go away. That Dolnick did not even touch on this phenomenon is a most disturbing oversight. Nor did he touch on the uses of psychiatry and mental hospitals as tools of personal and political intimidation both by conniving relatives and tyrannical governments. After all, terms such as “insanity” and “mental illness,” rather than being true medical terms, are in fact legal terminology first created in the 19 th century as a way of determining whether adult criminals knew right from wrong, and whether an adult was competent to manage his or her own affairs. Legal judgments that adults and even children would be “dangerous to self and/or others” if not put away in insane asylums or kept chemically straitjacketed with various psychoactive drugs have been used to railroad countless people of all ages into insane asylums and/or keep them chronically stupefied with powerful and potentially dangerous psychoactive chemicals for the convenience of relatives and governments throughout the 20 th century and even into part of the 19th, when, in fact, there was no observable abnormality about them at all. To be sure, this area is a moral and ethical quagmire that deserves – and has been elegantly enshrined in – a veritable library of work of its own, and one can’t blame Dolnick too much for ignoring it for reasons of space. Even so, this, too, demonstrates that a great deal more than a “tragic mistake” is involved n the psychoanalytic profession’s gung-ho application of psychoanalytic theory to everything from war to potty-training, from moral and spiritual

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issues such as Nazi crimes to the ‘true” meanings of great works of art and literature, but unfortunately Dolnick doesn’t touch on it at all. Finally, Dolnick doesn’t discuss or even mention such things as the successful use of “unconventional” therapies such as, e.g., orthomolecular therapy (which combines careful control of the diet and nutritional supplementation) to cure mental illness, or iatrogenic illnesses caused by misapplication of psychoactive chemicals, radical surgery such as prefrontal lobotomies, and other powerful and potentially injurious biomedical tools by mental-health professionals, usually out of well-intentioned ignorance but sometimes with deliberate punishing intent. There is also the issue of unwarranted, promiscuous use by school systems of puissant and potentially dangerous drugs of various kinds such as antispasmodic and anti-seizure medications such as e.g., Dilantin to medicate normal, normally active schoolchildren into dull-minded, passive zombies – a “therapy” that can do and has done tremendous damage to the developing nervous-systems of countless youngsters all across this country since the 1960s – all for the convenience of “teachers” and other pedagogical warehousers of our children. This is the downside of the “mental health revolution” of the 1970s and 1980s which Dolnick really should have discussed in order to offer something of a balance to his work. His lack of mention of it creates the impression that the “new psychiatry” of psychopharmacology can do only good, when in fact it can do and has done enormous harm when misapplied – which, all too often, it is and has been. As a result of such flaws, Madness on the Couch paints a too-rosy picture of the use of physical pharmacology and the like to cure mental illness, one that can be extremely misleading if these other issues aren’t taken into account. Which is a pity. For this book, which admittedly deals with only one of the many facets of the subject in a way that tends to create the impression that that is the only facet when it is just one among many such, however important a one it may be, nevertheless elegantly and trenchantly illuminates a part of our medical and social history in a way few other authors can even approach. Though one-sided, it contains complete documentation on everything discussed concerning the biology of mental illness and the history of our attempts to understand and treat it. For such reasons – not to mention the fact that it is extremely well-written and a fascinating read – it is well worth the investment necessary for its acquisition for one’s own library. Eisler, Riane. The Chalice & the Blade: Our History, Our Future. San Francisco: Perennial Library/Harper & Row, 1988. _____ and Loye, David. The Partnership Way: New Tools for Living and Learning, Healing Our Families, Our Communities, and Our World (A Practical Companion for The Chalice and the Blade). San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco/HarperCollins Publishers, 1990. Foreman, Dave and Haywood, Bill, editors. Ecodefense: A Field Guide to Monkeywrenching. Second edition. Tucson: Ned Ludd Books, 1987. Forest, Waves. Now What No. 1 (Fall 1987). Privately published serial publication. _____. “Two by Forest: Two Articles on Alternative Technology and Inexpensive, Non-Polluting HighEnergy Sources.” In The Fife Whetstone Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring 1989), pp. 12-15. Fox-Genovese, Elizabeth. “Feminism is Not the Story of My Life”: How Today’s Feminist Elite Has Lost Touch With the Real Concerns of Women. New York: Nan A Talese/Doubleday, 1996. In this startling and provocative new book, Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, the founder of the Institute for Women’s Studies at Emory University and the author of the controversial Feminism Without Illusions, says out loud what many women have only whispered: Feminism is not the story of my life.” In pursuing issues that primarily concern upscale career women, the leaders of the national feminist movement have lost sight of the reality of most women’s lives. Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, in extensive interviews and conversations with women from diverse backgrounds, uncovers the issues that the feminist elite has missed. Here are working-class women and professionals, single and married mothers, whites, Latinas, and African-Americans – all struggling to live independently and to have families. For these women, traditional feminism, with its dismissal of marriage and motherhood as oppressive and limiting, excludes them. Listening to their stories, teasing out attitudes and information from polls and trends, Elizabeth Fox-Genovese spells out a new kind of feminism, a “family feminism” based on the facts of women’s lives. It is a

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feminism that draws women together based on the things they have in common, that promotes their rights while taking into account their responsibilities, that trusts women to set their own priorities rather than try to live up to an unattainable ideal. Humane, practical, and realistic, “Feminism Is Not the Story of My Life” bring clarifying light to a complex and often acrimonious debate. In calling for a feminism that brings women together instead of dividing them, it heralds a change in thinking that may well refresh and renew the women’s movement. Ibid., from the inside jacket Well-documented, with an outstanding bibliography. Addresses issues that have been neglected or entirely ignored by radical feminists, and balances the demands of justice with the exigencies of the realities under which most women live with precision, wit, and enormous insight. The only quibble I have with this book is that the author misses some of the more disturbing implications such milestones of modern feminism as Roe vs. Wade, such as the fact that these involve the increasing dependence of the women’s movement upon legislation enacted and agendas created by the federal government of this country for whatever apparent gains it may have made. Roe vs. Wade and similar federal cases did not guarantee abortion on demand for women who want it so much as it established a precedent of government control over various aspects of women’s reproductive lives. In Zodiac, Neal Stephenson’s “novel of eco-terrorism” described elsewhere in this bibliography, the protagonist mentions “Sangamon’s Principle,” which states that “any process that can take place in one direction can go in the opposite direction.” Once the federal government had established that it had the right to dictate what women were allowed to do with their reproductive lives by means of Roe vs. Wade, it set the stage for a time when it would take away from women – or even a select group of women – what it had given them through roe vs. Wade. The implications of Roe vs. Wade, and the long-range precedent it sets, are much more powerful than the actual decision itself, with far greater scope. Unfortunately, the author does not discuss this aspect of the women’s movement, does not seem to be aware of it. Other than that, this is an outstanding book on the subject, one which addresses aspects of women’s lives of which the leaders of the feminist movement seem to be completely unaware – and about which they don’t seem to care. Friedan, Betty. The Feminine Mystique. New York: Norton, 1963. Gaillard, Frye. Race, Rock & Religion. Charlotte, NC: East Woods Press, 1982. Gitlin, Todd. The Twilight of Common Dreams: Why America is Wracked by Culture Wars. New York: Henry Holt and Co., 1995. Whites denounce affirmative action; Native Americans protest Columbus Day; conservatives attack school history curricula for political correctness. Multiculturalism, identity politics, national unit – such terms have by now generated so much heat that, judging by media coverage alone, it would be easy to believe that the ‘culture wars’ are the defining element of our national life. In The Twilight of Common Dreams, Todd Gitlin places the debates of the moment in a sweeping historical context and – sparing no sides – he argues that these highly charged conflicts are a sideshow, obscuring a seismic transformation in American political life. The Left, which once stood for universal values, has come to be identified with the special needs of distinct ‘cultures’ and select ‘identities.’ The Right, long associated with privileged interests, now claims to defend the needs of all. The consequences are clear: since the late 1960s, while the Right has been busy taking the White House, the Left has been marching on the English department. With dazzling range and acuteness, Gitlin’s analysis moves through American history and modern thought, from academic squabbles to the crisis in the Democratic Party, from embattled school boards to the right-wing exploitation of those scarlet letters, ‘PC.’ In the end, he maintains, the culture wars are evasions of America’s deepest trauma – inequality – and he eloquently contends that America is lost unless its obsession with cultural differences can be transcended in the name of the common good.

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– Ibid., inside front jacket blurb Gross, Paul R. and Levitt, Norman. Higher Superstition: The Academic Left and Its Quarrels with Science. Baltimore and London: The John Hopkins University Press, 1994. Klein, Stephanie. “Bizarro Processed World.” Self-published by the author. Available free from the author, Box 7353, Menlo Park, CA 94025. Laqueur, Walter. Fascism: Past, Present, Future. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. With the end of World War II and the defeat of the Axis powers, it was generally assumed that the era of fascism had ended. . . . [T]o some extent there is no reason, even now, half a century later, to revise this judgment. . . . [The various fascist] movements of the 1920s and 1930s . . . arose in certain historical conditions that no longer exist. . . . [E]ven if these corpses could be resurrected, they would still be irrelevant to today’s world. . . . But does this mean that the fascist genus no longer exists, that there is no longer a fascist impulse, that the fascist tradition is no longer relevant? . . . . Ibid., from the Introduction, p. 4 This book is a quest to discover the answer to those questions, one of the very best such I have ever encountered. Scholarly, thoughtful, it provides a disturbing overview of twentieth century fascistic movements, their followers and their philosophies, that is invaluable for anyone seriously trying to understand what our world is like today and how it got that way. Even more, it explores those aspects of human psychology that lend themselves to fascism and its glamour – the potential fascist lurking within each of us. Fascism is a romantic fantasy of power that is at its most appealing for those who are bewildered, confused, confronted by a world gone out of control with no signposts or directions to enable one to do anything to change it for the better. Deliciously beguiling for the powerless, it seduces them into sacrificing reason and objectivity for its lovely illusions of power, leading them down a road that can only end in disaster. Such a course has happened again and again during this century – and has been taken even by those who swore they could never be taken in by the lure of fascism. Self-knowledge and the knowledge of history are necessary for defense against that lure, and this book provides treasures of both. Loewen, James W. Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong. New York: The New Press, 1995. High school students hate history. When they list their favorite subjects, history always comes in last. They consider it ‘the most irrelevant’ of twenty-one school subjects; ‘bo-o-o-oring’ is the adjective most often applied. James Loewen spent two years at the Smithsonian Institution surveying twelve leading high school textbooks of American history. What he found was an embarrassing amalgam of bland optimism, blind patriotism, and misinformation pure and simple, weighing in at an average of four-and-a-half pounds and 888 pages. In response he has written Lies My Teacher Told Me, in part a telling critique of existing textbooks but, more importantly, a wonderful retelling of American history as it should – and could – be taught to American students. Beginning with pre-Columbian American history and ranging over characters and events as diverse as Reconstruction, Helen Keller, the first Thanksgiving, and the My Lai massacre, Loewen supplies the conflict, suspense, unresolved drama, and connection with current-day issues so appallingly missing from textbook accounts. A treat to read and a serious critique of American education, Lies My Teacher Told me is for anyone who has ever fallen asleep in history class. MacNutt, Karen L., J. D. “To Secure These Rights . . .” In her column, “Legally Speaking.” Women & Guns Vol. 6, No. 4 (May 1994), pp. 47-49.

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Masson, Jeffrey Moussaieff. My Father’s Guru: A Journey Through Spirituality and Disillusion. New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1993. In My Father’s Guru, Jeffrey Masson has written a stunning coming-of-age story – an astonishing ‘prequel’ to his critically acclaimed Final Analysis: The Making and Unmaking of a Psychoanalyst. Masson grew up in the 1940s and 1950s with a guru in his house – the celebrated mystic Paul Brunton (‘P.B.’ to those who knew him), who numbered Masson’s parents among his handful of close disciples and singled out the young Jeff as a potential heir to his spiritual kingdom. In 1956, P.B. convinced the Massons that a third world war was imminent and recommended they move to Montevideo, a ‘safe’ location. From Uruguay, Masson went off at P.B.’s bidding to study Sanskrit at Harvard, where he came to understand the man was not what he presented himself to be. Written with wit an affection tinged with disillusion that is never bitter, My Father’s Guru is a fascinating memoir in the tradition of Geoffrey Wolff’s The Duke of Deception; a book not only about P.B., but about what it means to grow up in the shadow of a man who laid claim to such enormous power. In emerging from the hothouse world of spirituality, Masson began a journey through disillusion into a critical understanding of the roots of power and powerlessness. – From the inside jacket blurb McCullough, Christopher J., Ph.D. Nobody’s Victim: Freedom from Therapy and Recovery. New York: Clarkson Potter/Publishers, 1991. Never before has life seemed so unfair to so many. In the face of increasing economic pressures, diminishing opportunities, and inadequate community and familial support systems, it is all too easy to feel powerless, bereft of choices, a victim of others’ actions – or even our own uncontrollable impulses. Small wonder we are seeking guidance and validation from therapists and support groups in ever-growing numbers. But as Dr. Christopher McCullough explains in this compassionate and enlightening look at the phenomenon that has created what some have dubbed a ‘nation of victims,’ calling ourselves victims ultimately does more harm than good. With telling examples from his years of private practice, Dr. McCullough shows that rather than helping us find satisfying answers to life’s ultimate issues, therapy and recovery programs, under the guise of alleviating pain, actually reinforce our inadequacies, supporting the larger social myth: ‘If you suffer in some way, there is something wrong with you.’ Psychotherapy’s fascination with labels, McCullough asserts, falsely assigns disorders where none exist, pathologizing our suffering rather than addressing its source. In Nobody’s Victim, Dr. McCullough presents a new way of looking at the issue of victimhood. Victimhood, he tells us, is not the natural consequence of abuse. It is our attitude toward the abuse that determines whether or not we feel like a victim. By expanding our understanding of freedom, Dr. McCullough offers more lasting and authentic ways to escape the victimhood trap, knowing that living our freedom, with its attendant responsibilities, is the true path to becoming “nobody’s victim.” – From the inside jacket blurb McKibben, Bill. The Age of Missing Information. New York: Random House, 1992. Midgley, Mary. Science as Salvation: A Modern Myth and its Meaning. New York: Routledge, 1992. Paglia, Camille. Sex, Art, and American Culture. New York: Vintage Books/Random House, Inc., 1992. The essays in this collection are united by common themes. I want to rethink American cultural history in order to clarify the heritage of my generation of the Sixties, which heroically broke through Fifties conformism but which failed in many ways to harness or sustain its own energies.

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Popular culture is my passion. It created Sixties imagination. I define pop culture as an eruption of the never-defeated paganism of the West. Its brazen aggression and pornographic sexuality are at odds with current feminism, whose public proponents are in a reactionary phase of hysterical moralism and prudery, like that of the Temperance movement a century ago. We need a new kind of feminism, one that stresses personal responsibility and is open to art and sex in all their dark, unconsoling mysteries. The feminist of the fin de siècle will be bawdy, streetwise, and on-the-spot confrontational, in the prankish Sixties way. My essays often address the impasse in contemporary politics between ‘liberal’ and ‘conservative,’ a polarity that I contend lost its meaning after the Sixties. There should be an examination of the way Sixties innovators were openly hostile to the establishment liberals of the time. In today’s impoverished dialogue, critiques of liberalism are often naively labeled ‘conservative,’ as if twenty-five hundred years of Western intellectual history presented no other alternatives. My thinking tends to be libertarian. That is, I oppose intrusions of the state into the private realm – as in abortion, sodomy, prostitution, pornography, drug use, or suicide, all of which I would strongly defend as matters of free choice in a in a representative democracy. Similarly, I oppose the meddling of campus grievance committees in the issue of date rape. We should teach general ethics to both men and women, and sexual relationships themselves must not be policed. Sex, like the city streets, would be risk-free only in a totalitarian regime. We need a new point of view that would combine the inspiring progressive principles and global consciousness of the Sixties with the hard political lessons of the Seventies and Eighties, sobering decades of rational reaction against the arrogant excesses of my generation, who thought we could change the world overnight. . . . Ibid., from the Introduction, pp. vii-viii _____. Sexual Personae: Art and Decadence from Nefertiti to Emily Dickinson. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1990. In this brilliantly original book, Camille Paglia identifies some of the major patterns that have endured in western culture from ancient Egypt and Greece to the present. According to Paglia, one source of continuity is paganism, which, undefeated by JudeoChristianity, continues to flourish in art, eroticism, astrology, and pop culture. Others, she says, are androgyny, sadism, and the aggressive western eye, which has created our art and cinema. Paglia follows these and other themes from Nefertiti and the Venus of Willendorf to Apollo and Dionysus, from Botticelli and Michelangelo to Shakespeare and Blake and finally to Emily Dickinson, who, along with other major nineteenth-century authors, becomes a remarkable example of Romanticism turned into Decadence. Paglia offers provocative views of literature, art history, psychology, and religion. She focuses, for example, on the amorality, voyeurism, and pornography in great art that have been ignored or glossed over by most critics. She discusses sex and nature as brutal daemonic forces, and she criticizes feminists for sentimentality or wishful thinking about the causes of rape, violence, and poor relations between the sexes. She stresses the biologic basis of sex differences and sees the mother as an overwhelming force who condemns men to lifelong sexual anxiety, from which they escape through rationalism and physical achievement. She examines the culture and style of modern male homosexuals. She demonstrates how much of western life, art, and thought is ruled by personality, which she traces through recurrent types or personae such as the female vampire (Medusa, Lauren Bacall); the pythoness (the Delphic oracle, Gracie Allen); the beautiful boy (Hadrian’s Antinous, Dorian Gray); the epicene man of beauty (Lord Byron, Elvis Presley); and the male heroine (Baudelaire, Woody Allen). Her book will stimulate and awe readers everywhere. Ibid., from the jacket blurb _____. Vamps & Tramps: New Essays. New York: Vintage Books/Random House, Inc., 1994.

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The title of this book evokes the missing sexual personae of contemporary feminism. Vamps are queens of the night, the primeval realm excluded and repressed by today’s sedate middle-class professionals in their orderly, blazing bright offices. The prostitute, seductress, and high-glamour movie star wield women’s ancient vampiric power over men. That power is neither rational nor measurable. The Apollonian rules we pass to govern the workplace will never fully control the demonic impulses of Dionysian night. Sexual equality before the law – the first great goal of modern feminism – cannot so easily be transferred to our emotional lives, where woman rules. Art and pornography, not politics, show us the real truth about sex. I want a revamped feminism. Putting the vamp backs means the lady must be tramp. My generation of Sixties rebels wanted to smash the bourgeois codes that had become authoritarian totems of the Fifties. The ‘nice’ girl, with her soft, sanitized speech and decorous manners, had to go. Thirty years later, we’re still stuck with her – in the official spokesmen and anointed heiresses of the feminist establishment. White middle-class personae have barely changed. Getting women out of the kitchen and into the office, we have simply put them into another bourgeois prison. The panoramic Sixties vision, inspired by Buddhism and Hinduism, called the entire Western career system into question. But that insight has been lost. Ibid., from the Introduction, pp. ix-x Scarce, Rik. Eco-Warriors: Understanding the Radical Environmental Movement. Forward by David Brower. Chicago: The Noble Press, 1990. Schultz, Ted, editor. The Fringes of Reason: A Whole Earth Catalog. New York: Harmony Books, 1989. Shaffer, Butler D. Calculated Chaos: Institutional Threats to Peace and Human Survival. San Francisco: Alchemy Books, 1985. Sommers, Christina Hoff. Who Stole Feminism?: How Women Have Betrayed Women. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1994. Tarpley, Webster Griffin and Chaitkin, Anton. George Bush: The Unauthorized Biography. Washington, DC: Executive Intelligence Review, 1992. He’s the ‘Emperor of the New World Order’ – and a mystery man. Until now, the public knew only what he chose to say about himself, in carefully managed media shows and commissioned puff pieces. After an intensive search through national and private archives, months of interviews with presidential insiders and opponents, using exhaustive official documentation, Webster Tarpley and Anton Chaitkin have broken through the astonishing wall of silence around George Bush. Here are the details – frightening, gory, hilarious – the background and life of the President. • How the Bush family made its money promoting Adolf Hitler and the Nazi war machine. • Jupiter Island, Skull and Bones, and other bases of power. • The ‘war hero’ story. • George Bush and the secret government: from global population control, to Zapata’s Watergate burglars, to Iran-Contra. • Kissinger, China, and genocide in the Third World. • Bush’s Leveraged Buyout Mob, or the theft of a nation. . . . [The] authors have broken the code of silence which Anglo-American financial oligarchs have imposed around their conduct of U.S. affairs. Essential reading as long as this oligarchy continues to direct American politics, the Unauthorized Biography is a

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vivid X-ray of the private forces dominating both Republican and Democratic parties – and of the man who occupies the highest seat of power in the nation. – From the back cover blurb Meticulously researched and thoroughly documented, this outstanding, scholarly work is one of the most damning indictments of anyone I have ever encountered. If Dante Alighieri were alive today, I think even he would be taxed as to just where in the Inferno George Bush and his equally evil kin should be assigned. Before anyone begins ranting about Stalinist Russia, I really think we would do very well to take a good, long look at the Bush era of American politics. While the authors are obviously biased (they are supporters of Lyndon Larouche, they have not let their bias get in the way of their presentation of the damning facts about the life and career of George Herbert Walker Bush – if anything, they have been over-zealous in making sure that their own reactions to the facts have not done anything to distort or suppress those facts. Carefully citing all their sources, they give the reader every opportunity to check out the verity of everything they present here about their subject. A masterpiece of its kind. Toffler, Alvin. Power Shift: Knowledge, Wealth, and Violence at the Edge of the 21st Century. New York: Bantam Books, 1990. Tuccille, Jerome. It Usually Begins with Ayn Rand. New York: Stein and Day, Publishers, 1971. If you are satisfied with the present state of American politics, this book is not for you. It Usually Begins with Ayn Rand is an odyssey through the fractured Right of the American political spectrum. In search of a viable political alternative, many who were disenchanted with the elephants and donkeys sniffed a different animal in Ayn Rand’s defiantly individualistic novels of the 1950s. Some were drawn by Barry Goldwater’s jaw (was he John Galt in Atlas Shrugged?) – or jawing; others found Bull Buckley’s urbane conservatism more attractive. The book’s hero, a political Odysseus, runs the gamut of the Right, flirts with the radical Left, explores the possibilities of an alliance between Left-wing and Right-wing anarchists. He reminds us of where we’ve been, why we’ve been there, and points us in a new direction: middle-of-the-road anarchism. Tuccille’s odyssey will be immensely attractive to the millions of young people who are fed up with the Rigid Right and the Turgid Left and are fascinated by an old idea made new: libertarianism, or how to be free in a supposedly free country. From the inside jacket blurb Scathingly hilarious, with the insight of a laser this book shows us a chapter of American political history that is sadly neglected by many historians, that comprising the gradual alienation from all mainstream parties and political forms from 1950 e.v. to the present by increasing numbers of Americans in all walks of life. The dedication says it all: “. . . to deviationists all over the world.” Washburn, Katharine and Thornton, John F., editors. Dumbing Down: Essays on the Strip Mining of American Culture. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1996. In Dumbing Down passionate observers across the political, intellectual, and generational spectrum cast a worried eye on the accelerating downward spiral of American life, art, and thought – and not a moment too soon. The American scene, once so full of richness, promise, vitality, and achievement, now strikes many critics as a dispiriting carnival of follies, a spectacle of decline. In every areas of our lives – including, but not limited to, education, politics, journalism, literature, ethics, film, religion, popular culture, jurisprudence, psychiatry, and even cuisine – one can observe an ominous slippage, a shift towards the bizarre, the third-rate, the purely opportunistic. How did such a vibrant legacy of knowledge, tradition, and

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competence come to be so rapidly squandered in so short a time? And can this pancultural ‘dumbing down’ be halted or reversed? This volume collects twenty-three essays – most of them written for this book – that confront such developments with vigor, wit, learning, common sense, and urgency. Contributors include such superb critics and commentators as Philip Lopate, Cynthia Ozick, Michael Vincent Miller, Joseph Epstein, Sven Birkerta, George F. Kennan, Brad Leithauser, and John Simon. Various in their styles, concerns, and political allegiances, they are united in their dismay about a culture in the throes of dismantling itself. The essays in Dumbing Down, whether well-modulated or cries from the heart, are a call to action and renewal. – From the inside jacket blurb 2.3.1.14.10: Ad astra!: The Stars Our Destination – the future of Earthly life among the Stars Corso, Col. Philip J. (Ret.), with William J. Birnes. The Day After Roswell: A Former Pentagon Official Reveals the U. S. Government’s Shocking UFO Cover-up. Foreword by Senator Strom Thurmond. New York: Pocket Books, 1997. A landmark exposé firmly grounded in fact, THE DAY AFTER ROSELL puts a fifty-year-old controversy to rest. Since 1947m the mysterious crash of an unidentified aircraft at Roswell, New Mexico, has fueled a firestorm of speculation and controversy with no conclusive evidence of its extraterrestrial origin – until now. Colonel Philip J. Corso (Ret.), a member of President Eisenhower’s National Security Council and former head of the Foreign Technology Desk at the U. S. Army’s Research & Development department, has come forward to tell the whole explosive story. Backed by documents newly declassified through the Freedom of Information Act, Colonel Corso reveals for the first time his personal stewardship of alien artifacts from the crash, and discloses the U. S. government’s astonishing role in the Roswell incident: what was found, the coverup, and how these alien artifacts changed the course of twentieth-century history. In 1961 Corso, then a lieutenant colonel, was given command of one of the Pentagon’s highly classified weapons development budget and was made privy to the U. S. government’s greatest secret: the dismantling and appropriation of the Roswell extraterrestrial spacecraft by the Army. Now, identifying all those involved, Colonel Corso reveals how a deep-cover council officially discounted all UFO reports to the American public, and cleared the path for his R&D team at the Pentagon to analyze and integrate the Roswell artifacts into the military arsenal and the private business sector. The extent of the operation is startling. With unprecedented detail, Corso divulges how he spearheaded the Army’s reverseengineering project that “seeded” alien technology at American companies such as IBM, Hughes Aircraft, Bell Labs, and Dow Corning – without their knowledge. He describes the devices found aboard the Roswell craft, and how they were the precursors for today’s integrated circuit chips, fiber optics, lasers, and super-tenacity fibers. He also discusses the role alien technology played in shaping geopolitical policy and events: how it helped the United States surpass the Russians in space; spurred elaborate Army initiatives such as SDI, Horizon and HARP; and ultimately brought about the end of the Cold War. Laying bare some of the government’s most closely guarded secrets, THE DAY AFTER ROSWELL not only forces us to reconsider the past – but also our role in the universe. – From the inside jacket blurb One of the things that makes this book so appallingly convincing is the contrast between the tight, perfect internal consistency, coherency, and join between what I already knew about modern history and the subject of this book, on the one hand, and the literary ineptitude of the writer(s), on the other:

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nobody who was that half-baked a writer could ever come up with a work of fiction that was not only so perfectly put together but also so wondrous and stunning in both content and implications that I literally couldn’t bear to put it down until I had finished reading it. Literarily, due to inept sentence constructions, grammatical atrocities, and stylistic gaffes throughout the book – which only added to its authenticity, for this is exactly how an Army engineer would write on any subject – if it had not been for the detailed presentation of its subject matter, backed up by documentation included in the book itself, I would have tossed it away by page 4 or so. Instead, once I began reading I was hooked, unable to have done with it until the very last page. In this book Corso describes not only the times I lived through, times of terror and wonder unfolding week by week with technological miracles and spiritual horrors undreamed of by any century before ours, but also the times leading up to those times: the invention of the first computer, the “Analytical Engine” of Charles Babbage, in the 1830sand the evolution of the computer from Babbage’s gears-and-wheels glorified button-counter through Henry Hollerith’s business machines in the early part of this century, the inception of IBM, the first mainframes, and the increasing refinement and miniaturization of the computer culminating in the laptop PC; the revolutionary practical technological innovations of Thomas A. Edison which gave us the electric light, the electric motor, and all the technological creations dependent upon them; the vast theoretical quantum-leaps in physical science and technology springing from the unique mind of Nikola Tesla, which eerily presaged today’s particle-beam weapons, the laser, and a host of other examples of today’s cutting-edge military and technological creations. Corso describes the ins and outs of the Cold War, which lasted from 1945 until 1991 and the demise of the USSR – and then reveals for the first time some of the real reasons for the things that happened during those terrifying years, from the U-2 overflights of the Soviet Union through the Kennedy Years, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the assassinations first of John and then of Bobby Kennedy, to the events leading up to the end of the Soviet Union. Rather than merely muddying the historical waters and only adding to the confusion – which a paranoid confabulation or an example of government disinformation would do – the things revealed by Corso serve to make sense of certain otherwise incomprehensible episodes in modern history as nothing that has come out before ever has. Dovetailing neatly with the things revealed in David Morehouse’s stunning, moving Psychic Warrior (see below), The Day After Roswell will not only shake up all your previous paradigms about our world’s history, but it will change your conception of our place in the universe forever. Morehouse, David. Psychic Warrior: Inside the CIA’s Stargate Program: The True Story of a Soldier’s Espionage and Awakening. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1996. David Morehouse, a highly decorated, third-generation army officer, specialoperations infantryman, and one of the army’s elite air-borne ranger company commanders, was labeled ‘destined to wear stars’ by his superiors. But a mission in a remote desert valley in the Kingdom of Jordan changed his life forever. Wounded by a stray machine-gun bullet, he began to have inexplicable visions and haunting nightmares. His experiences redirected his brilliant future and led to a series of frightening glimpses into another world. When Morehouse disclosed these occurrences to military authorities, they earmarked him for recruitment into Stargate, a top-secret clan of psychic spies backed by the Central Intelligence Agency and the Defense Intelligence Agency. These extraordinary spies, labeled ‘remote viewers’ by the U. S. government, trained Morehouse to become one of their top operatives in the psychic espionage program. Psychic Warrior is the true story, told for the first time, of one man’s journey into the CIA’s most top-secret and successful psychic warfare operation. As Morehouse recounts his experiences, the reader becomes the ‘viewer,’ traveling to unknown worlds: to the pain, anguish, and horror of Dachau; to the searing heat of ground zero at Hiroshima; to classified counterterrorist missions; to the Ark of the Covenant; and to the choking smoke of Desert Storm’s aftermath, to name but a few. Soon after being recruited into Stargate, Morehouse realized that the government’s eventual purpose was to take ‘remote viewing’ into the realm of weaponry. Determined to prevent his gift from becoming an instrument of war, Morehouse embarked on a campaign to blow the lid off the top-secret government program. The consequences to

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his family included numerous attempts on his life and the lives of his wife and children, as well as phone taps and alarming calls in the night, culminating in a court-martial that resulted in his resignation under duress. Yet Morehouse persevered in his quest to reveal the chilling lengths to which certain factions of the U. S. government will go to hide the truth. Psychic Warrior is a fascinating examination of the untapped power of the human subconscious and a moving story of one man’s crusade to ensure that it is used for peace. – From the inside jacket blurb I read this book right before Col. Philip Corso’s The Day After Roswell (see entry immediately preceding this one). In the latter, the Stargate program in which David Morehouse took part is mentioned, though not by name, in the context of descriptions of many of the U. S. military and intelligence services’ more way-out programs conducted during the course of the Cold War. Further, Corso also mentions reports of a sort of telepathic broadcast emitted by the dying extraterrestrials that emerged from the craft downed at Roswell, NM that nearly overwhelmed members of the armed forces who moved in to take possession of the craft, its contents, and its occupants with the power and depth of the grief and sorrow it contained. The two books taken together show us a very different history of the mid- to late 20th century than that conceived not only by the general public but even the highly educated. If what these two books together report is true, we need to make tremendous revisions not only in our notions of human history, especially during the 20 th century, but also in our understanding of the nature of reality itself and our place in it. Nicholson, Ian. The Road to the Stars. New York: William Morrow, 1978.

2.3.1.14.11: Ave, atque vale, Gaia! – the Third Extinction, cosmic catastrophes, and the question of human survival on Earth Barker, Rodney. And the Waters Turned to Blood. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1997. It seems to be part science fiction, part murder mystery. It keeps the reader up all night turning the pages in horror and fascination. But it is not a work of the imagination. It’s real, and it’s true. First, beginning in the 1980s, in the estuaries of North Carolina, there were dead fish by the thousands, stripped to the bone. Then the fishermen were attacked, afflicted by open sores that would not heal. Only when the scientists studying the microscopic monster responsible for these incidents began to suffer from health effects that were mistaken for Alzheimer’s disease and multiple sclerosis did state officials reluctantly concede that they might be confronting a terrifying new plague upon our waters. Then, rather than investigating, they went after the messenger. Now, all along the eastern United States seacoast, a mysterious and deadly aquatic organism named Pfiesteria piscicida – scientists call it ‘the cell from hell’ – threatens to unleash an environmental nightmare and human tragedy of catastrophic proportions. From the inside front jacket blurb Like something out of a horror movie, the cell from hell attacks its victims in gruesome ways, frequently changing its body form with lightning speed. The unicellular animal, called Pfiesteria piscicida, has at least 24 guises it can assume in the course of its lifetime. It can also masquerade as a plant or lie dormant for years in the absence of suitable prey.

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Armed with a voracious appetite and vast reproductive powers, the microscopic animal moves through coastal waters to kill fish and shellfish by the millions and to poison anglers and others, producing pain, narcosis, disorientation, nausea, fatigue, vomiting, memory loss, immune failure and personality changes. Its toxins are so deadly that people who merely inhale its vapors can be badly hurt. From the New York Times, August 27, 1996 Capable of undergoing some 25 different morphological changes, from plant-like, encysted forms capable of surviving without water or any food other than sunlight for many years, to animal-like, active stages that actively prey on fish, to gigantic amoeboid stages that pursue any organisms that try to prey on the smaller forms of its cousins, this astounding dinoflagellate is utterly unique in the annals of biology. Closely related to the unicellular organisms that are responsible for “red tides” along all the coasts of North America as well as most other continents, Pfiesteria piscicida – the “cell from hell” – exhibits behavioral adaptations heretofore unknown, in terms of both quality and quantity. It can reproduce either asexually or sexually; under threat, colonies of the organism clearly exhibit the hallmarks of social organisms, banding together to protect one another and exhibiting diverse morphological adaptations in a way eerily reminiscent of honeybees, ants, and termites. It can secrete a horrifying stew of different, egregiously toxic chemicals, which it uses to attack and digest its prey and to defend itself from attack – toxins so deadly that the United States Army may have begun culturing it in order to develop horrifyingly deadly new weapons in its biowarfare arsenals. On top of everything else, it seems to have an uncanny sensitivity to the presence of human researchers, and during the course of experiments requiring its active phases it frequently retreats to its encysted form, sinking to the bottom of the tank and refusing to do anything at all as long as the researcher is there, as if somehow it were aware of whoever was studying it and did not want to be studied. Yet “Mother Nature always bats last.” Pfiesteria piscicida has only become a threat because of the damage done to North Carolina’s formerly pristine estuaries and coastal waterways as a result of human activities. If not for that, this organism would never have become a problem, for only egregiously stupid environmental policies and industrial activities could have degraded the environment so terribly that an opportunity was created for this creature to thrive and multiply to the extent it has. As the world’s foremost expert on the organism, Dr. JoAnn Burkholder of North Carolina State University, has stated, Pfiesteria piscicida may be one of the last wake-up calls we in North America will get concerning the state of our environment – and what we ourselves have done to bring it to that state. Brandt, John and Chapman, Robert. Rendezvous in Space. New York: W. H. Freeman, 1992. Calder, Nigel. The Comet is Coming! London: BBC Publications, 1980. Carson, Rachel. Silent Spring. Thorndike, ME: G. K. Hall & Co., 1962, 1997. Rarely does a single book alter the course of history, but Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring did exactly that. The outcry that followed its original publication in 1962 forced the banning of DDT and spurred revolutionary changes in the laws affecting our air, land, and water. Carson’s passionate concern for the future of our planet reverberated powerfully throughout the world, and her eloquent book was instrumental in launching the environmental movement. It is, without question, one of the landmark books of the twentieth century. Ibid., from the inside jacket blurb Clube, S. V. M., editor. Catastrophes and Evolution. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989. Clube, Victor and Napier, Bill. The Cosmic Serpent. London: Faber and Faber, 1982. In THE COSMIC SERPENT, two internationally respected astronomers propose radically new theories about the origins and future of the Earth, focusing on worlds shaped by catastrophe. They claim that impacts from comets, asteroid, and meteoric bombardments caused devastation on a global scale and brought on massive evolutionary changes, including the demise of the dinosaurs. And, they say, these cosmic events gave

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rise to ancient myths, inspired prophets and philosophers, and affected the creation of astrological sciences and ancient calendars. Warning that “there is something here to outrage everyone,” Clube and Napier present impressive and persuasive arguments that challenge established scientific thought, mythological and Biblical interpretation, and historical archaeological, and anthropological evidence. Hardly an area of modern knowledge remains unaffected, directly or indirectly, by the ideas put forth in this book. Astronomers will find many orthodox theories question: the evolution of spiral arms in galaxies, the origins of comets, and how the solar system “captures” comets, for example. The authors suggest, too, that asteroids were a major force in shaping the evolution of the biosphere, and that cometary impacts were responsible for causing sealevel changes, ice ages, mountain building, and earth plate and crust movement. Perhaps most provocative of all are assertions concerning both the Old and New Testaments. Here Clube and Napier reveal that cometary collisions with the Earth were responsible for the Great Flood of Noah’s time as well as the parting of the Red Sea during the Israelites’ Exodus from Egypt. They also offer a new interpretation of the Revelations of St. John the Divine, in which descriptions of cometary impacts can be derived from the symbolism. The authors make clear that . . . there is always the possibility of a comet’s colliding with the Earth. Even now, about 500 meteorites with minimal-impact energies enter the Earth’s atmosphere each year, most of them falling into the seas. But within any human lifetime there is a 1% or 2% chance that a cometary impact will take place somewhere on Earth with energies 20 times greater than the force of the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Controversial, highly entertaining, yet based on solid scientific evidence, THE COSMIC SERPENT is a book not just for the professional astronomer but for all Velikovsky and Sagan fans as well. Its amazing ideas are sure to generate controversy for years to come. – From the inside jacket blurb _____. The Cosmic Winter. Oxford: Blackwell, 1990. During five days in late June 1975, a swarm of boulders the size of motor cars struck the Moon at a speed of 67,000 miles per hour; on 30 June 1908 an object crashed on Siberia with the force of a large hydrogen bomb; and on 25 June 1178 the moon was also struck, this time by a missile whose energy was ten times that of the combined nuclear arsenals of the world. Why late June? What is the nature of such events? And what threat do they pose to mankind? The answers are revealed in this book by two internationally renowned astronomers. They argue that rains of fire that visit the earth from time to time, destroying civilizations and plunging mankind into dark ages. They uncover a lost tradition of celestial catastrophe, and underpin these amazing claims with concrete foundations based on the latest discoveries in space. They produce a risk assessment for this nervous nuclear age, so dependent on its temperature-sensitive green revolution crops. It is an assessment which reveals that civilization could well come to an abrupt end, destroyed by a rain of fire followed by an icy, cosmic winter. This is a disturbing book, which challenges many modern preconceptions and creates an altered perception of the relationship between mankind and the cosmos. Ibid., from the inside jacket blurb Davies, John. Cosmic Impact. London: Fourth Estate, 1986. Edberg, Stephen and Levy, David. Observing Comets, Asteroids, Meteors, and the Zodiacal Light. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.

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Francis, Peter. The Planets. London: Pelican, 1981. Gehrels, Tom, editor. Hazards Due to Comets and Asteroids. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1995. Glen, William. The Mass-Extinction Debates. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1994. Gribbin, John. In the Beginning. London: Penguin, 1994. _____. Companion to the Cosmos. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1996. _____ and Chown, Marcus. Double Planet. London: Gollancz, 1988. Gribbin, John and Gribbin, Mary. Being Human. London: J. M. Dent, 1993. _____. Fire on Earth: Doomsday, Dinosaurs, and Humankind. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1996. A fascinating and ominous history of how asteroid and comet collisions with the Earth have shaped human history, and the dangerous that may lie ahead. Ensconced in our tiny Solar system and warmed by the Sun, the Earth seems safely removed from the vast dangers and unpredictability of outer space. However, in Fire on Earth, authors John and Mary Gribbin explain that every so often, comets and asteroids from the depths of space collide with the Earth, wreaking havoc on its inhabitants and altering the course of history. Satellite photographs of the Earth taken from space show that the surface of our planet is pockmarked, evidence of numerous cosmic impacts that have occurred for millions of years. In 1990, one such crater was discovered in Yucatán peninsula, and was determined by scientists to have been caused by a huge asteroidal collision that led to the extinction of the dinosaurs. More recently astronomers have discovered a giant comet [Comet Hale-Bopp 9501] that is hurtling towards the Sun and that will provide a spectacular astral display as it shoots across the sky in 1997. Although it will not strike the Earth, it is similar in size and structure to the comet that did collide with our planet sixty-five million years ago, ushering in a devastating ice cage that caused dramatic environmental changes the world over. In Fire on Earth, . . . John and Mary Gribbin argue that such events have been instrumental in shaping the course of natural – and thus human – history. For example, how different might twentieth-century Russian history be had the ‘Tunguska Event’ of 1908 – in which a fireball exploded over the Siberia with the force of 2,000 atom bombs – occurred above St. Petersburg, 4,000 miles west, where a young revolutionary by the name of Lenin was living at the time? Tracing the history of these unpredictable and violent collisions, from prehistory to the present, the authors paint a sobering picture of the many dangerous our fragile planet faces, and discuss the disastrous environmental consequences that may ensure. Explaining that these impacts and close encounters occur far more frequently than we believe, the Gribbins address the unsettling but vital question of what we can do when an Earth-bound comet is discovered. From the inside jacket blurb Grove, Jean. The Little Ice Age. London: Methuen, 1988. Henbest, Nigel. The Planets. London: Viking, 1992. Hoyle, Fred. Ice. London: Hutchinson, 1981. Imbrie, John and Imbrie, Katherine Palmer. Ice Ages. New York: Enslow, 1978. Kaufmann, William J. Exploration of the Solar System. New York: Macmillan, 1978. Krinov, E. L. Giant Meteorites. London: Pergamon, 1966. Lamb, Hubert. Climate, History and the Modern World. London: Methuen, 1982. Lancaster-Brown, Peter. Halley and His Comet. Poole: Blandford, 1985. Lang, Kenneth and Whitney, Charles. Wanderers in Space. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991. Leslie, John. The End of the World: The Science and Ethics of Human Extinction. New York: Routledge, 1996.

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Nuclear war, holes in the ozone layer, disease, genetic engineering, asteroids and supernovas – any of these may bring human history to an end. But are we in imminent danger of extinction? John Leslie assesses the risks facing the human race and concludes: yes, we probably are. Leslie pays particular attention to the ‘doomsday argument.’ This argument, arising from the undeniable fact that we are a very young species, substantially increases the likelihood of our extinction. The danger of our extinction is real; it is time to stop belittling the risks, as so many politicians, scientists and philosophers still do. It is time to face the facts. – From the inside jacket blurb McCall, G. J. H. Meteorites and Their Origins. Newton Abbot: David and Charles, 1973. _____. Meteorite Craters. Stroudsburg, PA: Dowden, Hutchinson and Ross, 1977. Morrison, David. Exploring Planetary Worlds. New York: Scientific American/W. H. Freeman, 1993. _____, editor. The Spaceguard Survey. Pasadena, CA: Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, 1992. Muller, Richard. Nemesis: The Death Star. London: Heinemann, 1988. Norton, Richard. Rocks from Space. Missoula, MT: Mountain Press Publishing, 1994. Plato. Timaeus and Critias. H. D. F. Lee, translator. London: Penguin, 1971. Raup, David M. Extinction. New York: Norton, 1991. _____.The Nemesis Affair. New York: Norton, 1986. Sagan, Carl and Druyan, Ann. Comet. London: Guild Publishing, 1985. Smoluchowski, Roman; Bahcall, John; and Matthews, Mildred, editors. The Galaxy and the Solar System. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1986. Stanley, Steven M. Extinction. New York: Scientific American/W. H. Freeman, 1987. Steel, Duncan. Rogue Asteroids and Doomsday Comets. Chichester: Wiley, 1995. Ward, Peter. The End of Evolution: On Mass Extinctions and the Preservation of Biodiversity. New York: Bantam Books, 1994. The crystal-clear waters of the Philippine archipelago, eerily empty of sea life . . . a lust Hawaiian paradise now the scene of devastating depopulation and extinction . . . the mighty Columbia River, stripped of its once abundant salmon, now an empty series of damned lakes . . . wolves, at one time numbering more than 2 million in the continental United States, now dwindled to perhaps 2,000. Twice in the distant past, catastrophic extinctions have swept the earth, causing the ‘end’ of evolution for certain creatures – and the beginning for others. The first occurred 250 million years ago and marked the destruction of 90 percent of all living creatures – and the survival of our first mammalian ancestors. The second great mass extinction took place 65 million years ago and 50 percent of all species – including the last of the dinosaurs – perished in a cataclysm that may have been caused in part by the earth’s collision with an asteroid. Now Peter Ward, on a journey that traverses continents and travels into the past, searches for the clues to these disastrous events. His reason is urgent and chilling, for Ward and many other prominent scientists have documented signs that a third mass extinction has already begun on our planet. Could its primary cause reach back just 100,000 years, when the earth felt the impact of another wandering, potentially destructive force, a new ‘asteroid’ called Homo sapiens? Ward’s journey progresses from fossil hunting in Africa to following a dinosaur trail in Hell Creek, Montana, and finally to climbing high in the remote Caucasus Mountains of Soviet Georgia to see if its thick white limestone holds evidence of a long ago planetary destruction. At each stop along the way, Ward documents the rich diversity of life now endangered by changes in climate and the world’s burgeoning population. In this rich, accessible book Ward gives us reason to marvel and mourn, fear and hope – and clearly demonstrates the urgency of the need to preserve life as we know it before our time runs out.

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– From the inside jacket blurb Whipple, Fred. The Mystery of Comets. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institute Press, 1985. White, Michael and Gribbin, John. Darwin: A Life in Science. London: Simon and Schuster, 1995. 2.3.2: Linguistics and Languages Lipton, James. An Exaltation of Larks: The Ultimate Edition. New York: Viking, 1991. ‘Good Nigel – a nye of pheasants, even as it is a gaggle of geese or a badling of ducks, a fall of woodcock or a wisp of snipe. But a covey of pheasants! What sort of talk is that?’ Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Nigel This wonderful, gorgeous book lists more than a thousand collective terms, discussing the historical origins and evolution of each. As he says, however fanciful, even frivolous, many of these terms seem to us now, each of them at one time was either in general use as the only proper term for a group of whatever sort of organism it designated, or had acquired sufficient currency to warrant its inclusion in a list with the well-established hunting terms. A must not only for the astute linguist, historian, or student of English literature, but indeed for any truly civilized member of the English-speaking world, or aspirant thereunto. Beautiful designs and illustrations by Kedakai Lipton make this work a true bibliophilic treasure. Sakade, Florence, general editor. A Guide to Reading and Writing Japanese: The 1,850 Basic Characters and the Kana Syllabaries. Revised edition. Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Company, 1961. 2.3.3: Philosophy Gregory, Richard L., and Zangwill, O. L., eds. Oxford Companion to the Mind. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1987. 2.3.4: 2.3.5: Politics, Political Science, and Economics Fischer, David Hackett. The Great Wave: Price Revolutions and the Rhythm of History. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. ‘The history of prices is the history of change,’ writes David Hackett Fischer in this broad sweep of western history from the middle ages to our own time. Fischer has gained a reputation for making history come alive – even stories as familiar as Paul Revere’s ride, or as complex as the assimilation of British culture in North America. Now, in The Great Wave, he has done it again. As in Albion’s Seed and Paul Revere’s Ride Fischer combines extensive research and meticulous scholarship with lively prose to create a book for scholars and general readers alike. His primary sources are price records, which are more abundant for the study of historical change than any other type of quantifiable data. Fischer uses these materials to frame a narrative of price-movements in western history from the eleventh century to the present. He finds that prices tended to rise throughout this long period, but most of their increase happened in four great waves of inflation – which he calls the price-revolutions of the thirteenth, sixteenth, eighteenth, and twentieth centuries. The four waves shared many qualities in common. All had the same movements of prices and price-relatives, falling real waves, rising returns to capital, and growing gaps between rich and poor. They were also very similar in the structure of change. Each of them started silently, developed increasing instability, and ended in a shattering crisis that

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combined social disorder, political upheaval, economic collapse, and demographic contraction. These crises happened in the fourteenth, seventeenth, and late eighteenth centuries. They were followed by long periods of comparative equilibrium: the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and the Victorian era. In all of these eras prices fell and stabilized, wages rose, and inequalities diminished. Then another great wave began and the pattern repeated itself, but not in precisely the same way. Fischer quotes Mark Twain: history doesn’t repeat itself, but it rhymes. Through all of these movements, Fischer explores the linkages between economic trends, social tendencies, political events, and cultural processes. He finds that long periods of price-equilibrium were marked by a faith in order, harmony, progress, and reason. By contrast, price revolution created cultures of despair in their middle and later stages. Fischer examines the cause of these movements, and discusses the models that have been used to explain them. He also considers their consequences. One of his most important findings is repeated evidence of remarkably close correlations between pricerevolutions and growing inequality, violent crime, family disruption, drugs, and drink. Periods of price-equilibrium have been marked by opposite trends: falling crime rates, growing family cohesion, and less use of alcohol and drugs, and more equality. Today, we are living in the late stages of a great wave that has been gaining momentum since the 1890s. The troubles of our time are typical of great waves in the past. Fischer does not attempt to predict what will happen next, noting that ‘uncertainty about the future is an inexorable fact of our condition.’ Rather, he ends with an analysis of where we might go from here, and what our choices are now. This book should be required reading for anyone who is seriously concerned about the state of the world today. From the inside jacket blurb 2.3.5.1: Political Philosophy 2.3.5.1.1: Classical Liberalism and Libertarianism Flynn, Michael. In the Country of the Blind. New York: Baen Books/Simon & Schuster, 1990. Parts of this novel were originally published in Analog Magazine. What if it were all a plot? What if there really were a secret conspiracy running things behind the scenes . . . and they were incompetent? *** It is a little known fact that over a hundred years ago an English scientist-mathematician named Charles Babbage invented a mechanical computer that was nearly as powerful as the “electronic brains” of the 1950s. The history books would have it that it was unworkable, an interesting dead-end. The history books lie. In reality, the Babbage Machine was a success whose existence was hidden from view by a society dedicated to the development of a “secret science” that could guide the human race away from war and toward a better destiny. But as the decades passed their goals were perverted – and now they apply their knowledge to install themselves as the secret rulers of the world. Can they do it? Even though their methods are imperfect, unless they are stopped their success is assured. In the Country of the Blind, the one-eyed man is King. . . . Meticulously – and frighteningly – accurate in its attention to real historical detail as well as scientific concepts, this novel is an eye-opener. Tightly plotted and conceptualized, it reads like a dream. A must for libertarians who like their science-fiction straight up – or sideways in time.

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*** Gauntlet: Exploring the Limits of Free Expression (The Stephen King issue). No. 2 (1991). *** Koontz, Dean. Dark Rivers of the Heart. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994. A man and a woman – she is a figure of mystery; he is a mystery even to himself – meet by chance in a Santa Monica bar. Suddenly – first separately, and then together – they are fleeing the long arm of a clandestine and increasingly powerful renegade government agency: the woman hunted for the information she possesses, the man mistaken as her comrade in a burgeoning resistance movement. The architect of the chase is a man of uncommon madness and cruelty, ruthless, possibly psychotic, and equipped with a vast technological arsenal: untraceable access to the government’s electronic information banks, its surveillance systems, weaponry, and material [sic]. He is the brazen face of an insidiously fascistic future. And he is virtually unstoppable. But he has never before come up against the likes of his current quarry. Both of them – survivors of singularly horrific pasts – have lived hidden, nomadic, solitary lives. Both have learned to expect ‘savagery as surely as sunrises and sunsets.’ Both have long been emboldened by their experiences to fight with reckless courage for their own freedom. Now, they are plunged into a struggle for the freedom of their country and for the sanctity of their own lives. Dean Koontz is generally known as one of America’s premier authors of horror fiction. The most terrifying thing about this novel is that so much of it is based solidly on fact – and, indeed, frequently understates the enormity of the current state of what is left of the American republican democracy. A must for everyone who is at all concerned about liberty – and reclaiming the liberties we once had. *** Robert A. Heinlein, who was born in Missouri on the 4th of July, 1907 e.v and died in 1988 e.v., throughout his life loved the country with which he shared his birthday and the Goddess Liberty that is that country’s Angel with a fierce and unmitigated passion exceeded by no one. In his writing career, he wrote a tremendous number of novels, numerous short stories, and countless non-fiction articles, all of which testify both to his tremendous erudition and his profound libertarian convictions. Reading his work is an education in and of itself – above all, in the history of this country and its libertarian origins. Heinlein, Robert A. The Cat Who Walks Through Walls. New York: ACE Books, 1988. . . . Now, in THE CAT WHO WALKS THROUGH WALLS, [Heinlein} creates his most compelling character ever: Dr. Richard Ames, ex-military man, sometime writer and unfortunate victim of mistaken identity. When a stranger attempting to deliver a cryptic message is shot dead at his dinner table, Ames is thrown head first into danger, intrigue, and other dimensions where Lazarus Long still thrives, where Jubal Harshaw lives surrounded by beautiful women, and where a daring plot to rescue the sentient computer called Mike can change the direction of all human history. – From the back cover blurb _____. The Door Into Summer. New York: Ballantine Books, 1986.

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_____. _____. _____. _____.

Expanded Universe. New York: Ace Books, 1982. Farmer in the Sky. New York: Dell Publishing Co., Inc., 1968. Farnham’s Freehold. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1964. Friday. New York: Holt, Reinhart, and Winston, 1982. Friday is her name . . . She is as thoroughly resourceful as she is strikingly beautiful. She is one of the best interplanetary agents in the business. And she is an Artificial Person . . . the ultimate glory of genetic engineering. ... Friday is a secret courier. She is employed by a man known to her only as ‘Boss.’ Operating from and over a near-future Earth, in which North America has become Balkanized into dozens of independent states, where culture has become bizarrely vulgarized and chaos is the happy norm, she finds herself on shuttlecock assignment at Boss’s seemingly whimsical behest. From New Zealand to Canada, from one to another of the new states of America’s disunion, she keeps her balance nimbly with quick, expeditious solutions to one calamity and scrape after another. Desperate for human identity and relationships, she is never sure whether she is one step ahead of, or one step behind, the ultimate fate of the human race. – From the inside jacket blurb

_____. Grumbles from the Grave. Virginia Heinlein, editor. New York: Ballantine Books, 1989. Long before his death in 1988, Robert A. Heinlein had expressed the desire to have a selection of his letters published after he was gone, . . . entitled Grumbles from the Grave. But increasing pressure from his work and a series of major illnesses made it impossible for him to undertake the job of editing this himself. Now his wife, Virginia Heinlein, has taken on the labor of fulfilling his wish. Here are his letters, from his first one to an editor in 1939, through the long years of writing for the pulp magazine markets, through his ongoing conquest of the prestigious slick magazines, and for major book publishers. . . . Here are his most personal thoughts and opinions on publishers, travel, juvenile novels, adult novels, work-habits, fan mail, house-building and its demands and frustrations, reviews, and his writing methods, as well as the ethics he saw in writing good science fiction. These letters furnish an insight into Heinlein the man and Heinlein the generally acclaimed leading writer of speculative fiction. They also reveal why some things got put into, and many things got left out of, the final form of his works. To the millions who have read the works of Robert A. Heinlein, this book should be indispensable – and irresistible. Britain From the inside cover blurb _____. _____. _____. _____. _____. _____. _____. _____. _____. _____. _____. Have Space Suit – Will Travel. New York: Ballantine Books, 1977. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Del Rey Books/Ballantine Books, 1984. The Moon is a Harsh Mistress. Berkley Medallion Books, 1966. Orphans of the Sky. New York: Signet Books, 1965. The Past Through Tomorrow. New York: Putnam, 1967. Podkayne of Mars. New York: Baen Publishing Enterprises, 1989. The Puppet Masters. New York: Ballantine Books, 1951,1990. Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen Books, 1981. The Rolling Stones. New York: Ace Books, 1952. To Sail Beyond the Sunset. New York: Ace/Putnam Books, 1987. The Star Beast. New York: Ballantine Books, 1977.

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_____. Stranger in a Strange Land (for the First Time the Original Uncut). New York: Ace/Putnam Books, 1961, 1991. _____. “They.” Collected in Worlds of Wonder and Introduction to Imaginative Literature, Fletcher Pratt, editor. Twayne, 1951. _____. Time Enough for Love. New York: Berkley Medallion Books, 1974. _____. The Worlds of Robert A. Heinlein. New York: Ace Books, 1966. _____. To Sail Beyond the Sunset. New York: Ace/Putnam Books, 1987. On page one of To Sail Beyond the Sunset Maureen Johnson wakes up in bed with a man and a cat. The cat is Pixel, well-known to readers of . . . The Cat Who Walks Through Walls. The man is a stranger to her, and besides that he is dead. This, Maureen says to herself, is not a good way to start the day. But it is a wonderful way to start to Sail Beyond the Sunset, the autobiography of Maureen Johnson, the mother of that most infamous Heinlein character, Lazarus Long. As we would expect in a Heinlein novel, straightforward plot description barely scratches the surface. Maureen Johnson is not only Lazarus Long’s mother but also eventually his wife, and perhaps his daughter as well; the twists of time and universes are full of paradox. As we bound along through the wonderfully intricate multiverses, we are reassured that both Pixel and other favorite characters are alive and well and apt to turn up in surprising new guises. As a wonderful side-order to this feast, Robert Heinlein adds more about his own life than has ever been told before. . . . He has always woven generous amounts of himself into his characters, but here as never before we feel the warmth and strength of his own long life radiating through the irresistible red-haired Maureen. . . . New Libertarian. Special Science-Fiction Issue # 8, Vol. IV, No. 20 and Vol. V, Nos. 9 & 10 (1990): Robert A. Heinlein Memorial issue. Available from Koman Publishing, PO Box 94, Long Beach, CA 90801-0094. *** Stephen King, born in 1947 under a conjunction of Pluto and Saturn in Leo frequently referred to by astrologers as “The Magus,” is as close to Shakespeare – and Sophocles, Aeschylus, and Euripides – as anything America has ever had. Like the plays of the ancient Greeks, his stories, novels, and films are vehicles for messages to use from the Gods, the Lords of the Collective Unconscious and the natural Intelligences of the living world. King needs no introduction to modern aficionados of the literature of horror and the supernatural, but not many realize that he is also a very subtle teacher of the value of freedom and the horror of oppression and slavery. He is for just such reasons one of the primary modern literary heirs of Robert A. Heinlein, whose works are also included in this section. As you can see, he also accurately described himself when he said, “I write like fat ladies diet.” He that lives long & desires death much is ever the King among the Kings. Liber Al vel Legis, Chapter 2, v. 74 King, Stephen. The Bachman Books: Four Early Novels by Stephen King. New York: NAL Books, 1992 (?). Contains his four novels Rage (1977), The Long Walk (1979), Roadwork (1981), and The Running Man (1982), originally published separately under the nom de plume “Richard Bachman.” _____. Carrie. New York: Doubleday, 1974. _____. Danse Macabre. New York: Berkley Books, 1983. _____. The Dark Half. New York: Viking, 1989. _____. The Dark Tower I: The Gunslinger. New York: Plume Books, Inc., 1988. _____. The Dark Tower II: The Drawing of the Three. New York: Signet Books, 1990. _____. The Dark Tower III: The Waste Lands. Plume Books, 1992. _____. Desperation. New York: Viking, 1996. By some strange coincidence, dovetails neatly with Richard Bachman’s posthumously published trunk-novel the Regulators (1996; see below).

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_____. Dolores Claiborne. New York: Viking, 1993. _____. The Eyes of the Dragon. New York: Signet Books, 1987. _____. Firestarter. New York: Signet Books, 1981. _____. Four Past Midnight. New York: Viking, 1990. _____. Gerald’s Game. New York: Viking, 1992. _____. The Green Mile Part 1: The Two Dead Girls. New York: Signet Books, 1996. _____. The Green Mile Part 1I: The Mouse on the Mile. New York: Signet Books, 1996. _____. The Green Mile Part II1: Coffey’s Hands. New York: Signet Books, 1996. _____. The Green Mile Part 1V: The Bad Death of Eduard Delacroix. New York: Signet Books, 1996. _____. The Green Mile Part V: Night Journey. New York: Signet Books, 1996. _____. The Green Mile Part V1: Coffey on the Mile. New York: Signet Books, 1996. _____. Insomnia. New York: Viking, 1994. _____. It. New York: Viking, 1986. _____. Misery. New York: Viking, 1987. _____. Needful Things. New York: Viking, 1991. _____. Nightmares and Geezenstacks. New York: Viking, 1993. _____. Night Shift. New York: Doubleday & Co., Inc., 1978. _____. Pet Sematary. New York: Doubleday, 1983. _____ (writing as Richard Bachman). The Regulators. New York: Dutton Books/Penguin Books, 1996. For some strange reason, this posthumously published trunk-novel of the late Richard Bachman dovetails neatly with Stephen King’s Desperation (1996). _____. Rose Madder. New York: Viking, 1995. _____. `Salem’s Lot. New York: Doubleday, 1975. _____. The Shining. New York: Doubleday, 1977. _____. Skeleton Crew. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1985. _____. The Stand. New York: Doubleday, 1978, 1990. _____ (under the nom de plume “Richard Bachman”). Thinner. New York: NAL Books, 1984. _____. The Tommyknockers. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, Inc., 1987. Underwood, Tim and Miller, Chuck, editors. Bare Bones: Conversations on Terror With Stephen King. New York: Warner Books, 1988. *** Rand, Ayn. The Fountainhead. New York: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, Inc., Publishers, 1943. *** Ross. John. Unintended Consequences. St. Louis, MO: Accurate Press, 1996. After the repeal of Prohibition, Congress passes an obscure federal gun law, written to promote massive noncompliance and thus give idled Prohibition agents something to do. Three decades later, a boy born into a well-to-do family becomes immersed in shooting sports, and firearms becomes his lifelong passion. An expert with rifle and pistol who gives free personal protection class to women, Henry Bowman is just one of the millions of people who comprise America’s ‘gun culture.’ Because of his upbringing, Henry is sensitized to government’s capacity to abuse its power. As years pass, Henry watches continued federal assaults on the gun culture with growing alarm. Concurrently, Henry’s adult life intersects with the lives of two very different people: Cindy, a woman whose instincts for survival help her survive virtual slavery inside an organized crime syndicate, and Ray, a lawyer who left the U.S. in 1963 and returns thirty years later. Now near middle age, Henry is alone at a friend’s house one night. He uses his skills to thwart an armed break-in only to discover that the assault was not a burglary but a raid. Henry’s victims are not street criminals but federal agents, and with mounting horror he listens to the captive survivors describe the operation they were carrying out.

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With the Ruby Ridge killings and the Waco massacre burned into his memory, Henry knows he has just given himself a death sentence. He faces the law enforcement assets of the entire U.S. Government as the country’s future hangs in the balance. Despite the odds, Henry has no intention of becoming a martyr. Henry Bowman is a resourceful man with money, intelligence, and motivation, and he has history on his side. -- Inside jacket blurb Unbelievably good . . . the only novel I’ve ever read that shows the way many people view the Bill of Rights. Well worth reading for the history alone – I couldn’t put it down. -- Kent Lomont, weapons consultant to U.S. Government contractors and Special Forces units. Riveting . . . This powerful book is a must-read . . . Ross has done his homework on a story that reads like tomorrow’s headlines. The only unlikely parts are the ones that are true. -- Peter G. Kokalis, technical editor of Soldier of Fortune magazine The truly horrifying thing is that not only have we been sold a bill of goods by our government about the nature of our rights and our ability to pursue them, but we have then gone ahead and bought into that particular bill of goods. In Stephen King’s novel The Stand, one character, who has been living in that part of the world controlled by the sorcerer Randall Flagg, upon seeing good men dragged out by Flagg’s henchmen to be quartered by tractors for the heinous crime of daring to question the evil done in Flagg’s name and attempting to protect their own people from it, noting that no one else there wants or dares to oppose such atrocities, cries out in outrage: “We used to be Americans! What’s happened to us?!” Flagg is a perfect metaphor for what the United States government has become in the last half of the 20th century – and the citizens of his pocket kingdom in the Western half of the United States are likewise perfectly representative of those Americans who support, or do not dare to question, the actions of that government. May the Gods have mercy on us, for our self-willed stupidity. For more on this novel, see http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=1888118040/hydrodragonenterA/ and http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=1888118059/hydrodragonenterA/ (paperback edition). *** Saberhagen, Fred. Berserker. New York: Ace Books, 1967. This and the other works included in Saberhagen’s “Berserker” series are moral tales with a difference: they are moral fables for libertarians, tales of the unquenchable spirit that often dwells within even the least and lowest of living things, human and otherwise. The Spirit of Life is capable of successfully opposing even the mightiest of oppressors and would-be destroyers, however inadequate its physical machinery and intellectual resources may seem. Fred Saberhagen’s “Berserker” stories are an ongoing celebration of that Spirit, its courage and resourcefulness and the power it can muster when pitting itself against seemingly overwhelming odds and opponents. Not just physical survival, but spiritual survival and freedom are at stake for all the human universe and its frail individual members who are opposed to the gigantic, utterly ruthless, almost preternaturally cunning Berserker Fleet which has as its ultimate goal the permanent elimination of all life from the universe. Somehow humanity manages not only to survive, but to push back the berserker machines, to win again and again against seemingly impossible odds – and to do so by means of frequently simple, even crude means that ordinary individuals (even as you and I) could come up with almost anywhere. Saberhagen’s heroes aren’t

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untouchable superheroes; rather, they are mortal souls, with all the frailty inherent in physical form and mortal mind, even, occasionally, wastrels, sociopaths, retarded men and women, social rejects of all kinds. Yet they manage not only to survive in the face of all-out attacks by monstrous robots which have all the resources of the physical universe available to them, but beat back the enemy, trick him and deceive him and, finally, destroy him again and again and again. Impossible? Saberhagen takes his scenarios from real history itself, more often than not – check it out and see. _____. Berserker Kill. New York: Tom Doherty Associates, 1993. _____. Berserker Man. New York: Ace Books, 1979. _____. Berserker’s Planet. New York: Ace Books, 1975. _____. Brother Assassin. New York: Ballantine Books, 1969. _____. The Ultimate Enemy. New York: Ace Books, 1979. *** Smith, L. Neil. Contact and Commune. New York: Popular Library, 1990. _____. Converse and Conflict. New York: Popular Library, 1990. _____. Pallas. New York: TOR Books, 1993. Nothing is more American than the frontier, and nobody writes about frontiers in space like L. Neil Smith. In Novels like Henry Martyn, Smith vividly conveys the excitement of space, and the particular energy of people who adopt libertarian principles of self-determination and freedom and build their own societies according to their beliefs. Never before has he created so believable and fully realized a frontier world as Pallas. An asteroid large enough to support a wide variety of climates and settlements, yet small enough to require terraforming and an artificial atmosphere, Pallas is an opportunity for settlers from Earth to start afresh – to make their way, live on their own land, earn their own place where they can have human dignity and personal freedom. Two major forces contend on Pallas. One is a colony founded by a United Nations task force. Run by former US senator Gibson Altman, the Greeley Project is comprised of the poor, the cast-off, the desperate. The people in the project all work together under a system that somehow doesn’t seem to work the way they had envisioned it when they signed on. In contrast to the Greeley project is the town of Curringer, named for the man whose vision and money terraformed Pallas. In and around Curringer the people are free – to starve, or find a way to earn their way. Many hunt for their own food; most carry guns, and all are fiercely independent. Two people vie for power on Pallas, Emerson Ngu, escaped to Curringer from the Project, and Gibson Altman, guardian and leader of the Project. Their lives and the conflicts between these two strongwilled leaders make PALLAS an extraordinary science fiction adventure of power, politics, and the destiny of humankind. The author of the Prometheus Award-winning Libertarian SF novel The Probability Broach has created his most entertaining and thought-provoking novel yet, carrying on the legacy of Robert A. Heinlein’s Libertarian Science Fiction tradition. _____. _____. _____. _____. _____. The Probability Broach. New York: Ballantine Books, 1980. Taflak Lysandra. New York: Avon Books, 1988. Their Majesties’ Bucketeers. New York: Ballantine Books, 1981. Tom Paine Maru. New York: Ballantine Books, 1984. The Venus Belt. New York: Ballantine Books, 1980. *** Wilson, Robert Anton. Cosmic Trigger: The Final Secret of the Illuminati. New York: Pocket Books, 1978. _____. Natural Law or Don’t Put a Rubber on Your Willy. Port Townsend, WA: Loompanics Unlimited, 1986. Wolfe, Claire. 101 Things to do ‘Til the Revolution: Ideas and Resources for Self-Liberation, Monkey Wrenching and Preparedness.. Port Townsend, WA: Loompanics Unlimited, 1996.

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We don’t need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows – but we do need the likes of Claire Wolfe and her book of pertinent tips for a culture in turmoil. As the author states in her Dedication: ‘This book is based upon the premise that, when government turns bad, the best people ultimately become criminals. The people don’t change; the laws do. Initiative, dissent, individuals pleasures, and exercise of one’s basic rights become ‘crimes.’ Obscure regulations and technical paperwork are used to destroy people who dare speak their minds. ‘The ideal citizen of a tyrannical state is the man or woman who bows in silent obedience in exchange for the status of a well-cared-for herd animal. Thinking people become the tyrant’s greatest enemies. ‘Before their thunder roars, there is a period of anticipation, in which more occurs than the literal-minded tyrant can ever understand. A few overt acts of sedition shatter the heavy peace. But the greater force, unrecognized, rolls forward in near silence, as millions of individuals quietly withdraw their consent from the state. The pundits call it apathy. They could not be more wrong. ‘That time is now. And we are those people. ‘This book is dedicated to you, the Enemy of the State.’ With that in mind, Wolfe offers 101 suggestions to help grease the wheels as we roll toward the government’s inevitable collapse. ‘Kill your TV . . . Join a gun-rights group . . . Fly the Gadsden flag . . . Buy and carry the Citizens’ Rule Book . . . Join the tax protesters on April 15 . . . Buy gold, guns, and goodies . . .’ Wolfe’s list is lengthy and thought-provoking, as she elaborates on each piece of advice, from generalities to precise instructions. For the concerned citizen who wishes to keep a low profile, protect his or her rights, and survive in the ‘interesting times’ which are sure to come, this book is essential reading. – From the back cover blurb *** Zelman, Aaron and Smith, L. Neil. The Mitzvah: For Those Who Love Freedom -- and for Those who Should. Hartford, WI: Mazel Freedom Press, Inc., 1999. ISBN 0-9642304-3-7. Distributed by Jews for the Preservation of Firearms Ownership, Inc. The Mitzvah is powerful stuff. This attention-grabbing novel tells the story of a Catholic priest forced to confront evidence that his birth parents were German Jews who hid their infant son with neighbors before being murdered in the Holocaust. As a non-Jew, I was fascinated by the priest's efforts to investigate his birthright and understand the fundamentals of the Jewish faith. His intellectual and spiritual journey became my own. What the priest discovers will alarm most readers. The Mitzvah clearly shows that in America, not only are many Jewish leaders and legislators ignoring the Bill of Rights, they are also ignoring the teachings of Judaism. Like a clear diagnosis of cancer, The Mitzvah is upsetting but must not be ignored. -- John Ross, author of Unintended Consequences One of the most important Second Amendment novels ever published. a penetrating and masterful focus on anti-gun liberals and their schizophrenic views on both firearms and self-preservation. A compelling, must-read page burner that will cause those for whom the Second Amendment is merely an embarrassment to squirm in their easy chairs. -- Peter G. Kokalis, Technical Editor, Soldier of Fortune Magazine

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Zelman and Smith have written a book the establishment doesn't want you to read. They don't want you to get the picture that reveals just how far government has gone beyond its limits under the Constitution. Read this book. Do something the freedomhaters won't like. -- Larry Pratt, Executive Director, Gun Owners of America Aaron Zelman and L. Neil Smith have accomplished something remarkable with The Mitzvah. It's unquestionably polemic -- with the same occasional 'set pieces' you'd expect in works by Ayn Rand or Robert Heinlein -- but at the same time very readable. I felt I came to know the protagonist, Monsignor John Greenwood, and enjoyed spending time with him. I even woke up in the middle of the night once, thinking about John and his journey of discovery. The Mitzvah makes arguments supporting the 2nd Amendment that badly need to be made. -- Andrea Millen Rich, President, Laissez Faire Books 2.3.6: Military Science and Combat Arts 2.3.6.1: General Military Science and History Alexander, Bevin. How Great Generals Win. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1993. Anderson, Commander William R., U.S.N. Nautilus 90 North. New York: Signet Key Books, 1959. Andradé, Dale. Trial by Fire: The 1972 Easter Offensive, America’s Last Vietnam Battle. New York: Hippocrene Books, 1995. The Easter Offensive took place primarily in the northern three military regions (out of a total of four) of South Vietnam. In the northernmost region, called I Corps, the North Vietnamese opened the attack on 30 March 1972 with a massive artillery barrage of an intensity unmatched since World War II. Worse, from an infantryman’s perspective, there were heavy tanks, also unprecedented on the battlefields of South Vietnam. Frightened South Vietnamese soldiers cowered in their positions, often refusing to fight. They abandoned many key positions and by the end of April most of Quang Tri Province, including the provincial capital, was in enemy hands and an entire South Vietnamese division had been destroyed. In II Corps and III Corps the battle began less dramatically, but with equally devastating effects. District capitals fell in quick succession in three provinces, and two key cities, Kontum and An Loc, came under siege. After savage fighting lasting more than a month, both cities managed to hold out, though they were largely destroyed. The key to this pyrrhic victory was American air power – lots of it – which bombed the besieging North Vietnamese troops around the clock. Statistics indicate that a vast majority of enemy casualties (there were probably some 30,000 killed and wounded) were inflicted by aerial attacks. Both sides claimed victory after the Easter Offensive, which officially ended in September 1972 with the recapture of Quang Tri City by South Vietnamese Marines. But the verdict is not so clear cut. North Vietnam had gained none of its goals of capturing and holding a provincial capital, nor had it decisively defeated the South Vietnamese Army. On the other hand, North Vietnam did gain considerable territory along the Laotian and Cambodian borders as well as the area just south of the Demilitarized Zone. Few people lived in these regions, but any ground gained played well at the Paris negotiating table. In the end, North Vietnam committed all but one of its divisions to battle, leaving only a skeleton force to guard the homeland against counterattack. This is unprecedented in military history and illustrates how confident Hanoi was that the Americans would not strike back. Indeed, the only U.S. response was renewed bombing of the North, the

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culmination of which was Operation Linebacker II, the “infamous” Christmas bombing. Whatever else it accomplished, the combination of North Vietnamese offensive and American bombing retaliation brought about final agreement on a peace treaty at Paris and allowed final U.S. disentanglement from Vietnam. Ibid., from the jacket blurb Asprey, Robert B. War in the Shadows: The Guerrilla in History (Two Thousand Years of the Guerrilla at War from Ancient Persia to the Present). New York: William Morrow and Co., 1994. Dunnigan, James F., and Macedonia, Raymond M. Getting It Right: American Military Reforms After Vietnam to the Gulf War and Beyond. New York: William Morrow and Co., Inc., 1993. Dupuy, Colonel Trevor N., U. S. Army, Ret. The Evolution of Weapons and Warfare. New York: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, Inc., 1980. Ebert, James R. A Life in a Year: The American Infantryman in Vietnam, 1965-1972. Novato, CA: Presidio Press, 1993. Holmes, Michael. King Arthur: A Military History. London: Blandford Books, 1996. Many books have been written about the legendary King Arthur, but here for the first time scientific logic is applied to historical fact to restore Arthur to his true place in English history. King Arthur: A Military History shows that Arthur, High King of Britain, was a real historical figure who had a profound influence on the development of English history. Dismissing the popular mythology, physicist Michael Holmes investigates Arthur’s military career in light of contemporary Celtic and Roman army tactics. Using historical documents compiled during Arthur’s time (c. AD 500), he compares events in Gaul and Britain, and the Celtic, Germanic and Roman backgrounds of the military leaders. By combining this information with the battle assessments recorded by historians of the day, Holmes shows how the expertise of the British leaders used in the defence of the island has its source in both Celtic and Roman culture. These arguments are strengthened by modern archeological and historical research as well as philology and genealogy. Using all these sources, Holmes has been able to outline a sequence of events in the Anglo-Saxon invasion of Britain which can be linked with Arthur’s major military and political decisions. As a consequence, the Arthurian role can be linked to the development of an Anglo-Saxon culture relatively undisturbed by Roman, Celtic or other external influences for some 500 years. Holmes also highlights the key role played by Arthur as Celtic High King in the creation of the English language as it is spoken today, and of English common law which is spread around the world. He presents the controversial conclusion that without Arthur’s influence we would be speaking a Romantic derivative language akin to Spanish, French and Italian. From the inside jacket blurb Whether we like it or not, throughout human history, warfare has been a continuous part of our experience. The study of military history is in a sense that of human history, so inextricably intermingled has warfare been with all other aspects of our life. In every part of today’s world, every aspect of human life, from science and technology to religion, morality, ethics, philosophy, and metaphysics owes something of its current status and form to the wars that its inhabitants have been caught up in. Surprisingly, until now few writers cared to speculate about “matter of Britain,” the Arthurian period of British history, from a military point of view, in spite of the fact that Arthur’s time was one during which the inhabitants of the British Isles and Western coast of Europe were engaged in numerous wars, and that Arthur himself was always characterized as a mighty war-leader as well as a just judge and law-giver. In this book, the author gives a detailed analysis of the actual historical context of that time and place, and gives carefully reasoned arguments that strongly support the contention that Arthur and his colleagues drew on Celtic and Roman culture for their military expertise, and that this in turn shaped the character of the times as well as that of the cultures that

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followed his. A unique and highly valuable window into a heretofore little-discussed aspect of the Arthurian period of British history. Kaufmann, J. E. and Kaufmann, H. W. Hitler’s Blitzkrieg Campaigns: The Invasion and Defense of Europe 1939-1940. Conshohocken, PA: Combined Books, Inc., 1993. Keegan, John. The Face of Battle. New York: Penguin Books, 1976. Exceptional in its scope, unrelenting in its detail, this monumental work forever changed the way that military history is written. Unwilling to repeat long-held myths and romantic revisions, John Keegan has instead written a scrupulous recounting of warfare as the soldier saw it in three distinct eras of military history. Here, the sights, the sounds, and the smell of the battlefield come to life: the clinging mud of the Western Front . . . the acrid scent of gunpowder at Waterloo . . . the drenching rain – and the showers of deadly arrows – at Agincourt. Keegan deftly conveys the total battlefield experience, showing you what combat meant to the men who marched into its bloody grip. Twenty years after its original publication, the Face of Battle remains unmatched in its compelling descriptions and illuminating insight. Ibid., from the jacket blurb _____. A History of Warfare. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994. Lewin, Richard. Hitler’s Mistakes. New York: William Morrow, 1984. Liddell-Hart, B. H. Strategy. Second Revised Edition. New York: Frederick A. Praeger, Publishers, 1967. Ma Youqing and Liu Jingru. Classical Baguazhang Vol. II: Cheng Shi Baguazhang (Cheng Style Baguazhang). Translated by Joseph Crandall. Pinole, CA: Smiling Tiger Martial Arts, 1993. Spear, Robert K. Survival on the Battlefield: A Handbook of Military Martial Arts. Burbank, CA: Unique Publications, 1987. Sun Tzu. Art of War. Ralph D. Sawyer and Mei-ch チ n Lee Sawyer, translators. San Francisco: Westview Press, 1994. Waller, Douglas C. Commandos: The Inside Story of America’s Secret Soldiers. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1994. Ward, Joseph T. Dear Mom: A Sniper’s Vietnam. New York: Ivy Books, 1991.

2.3.6.2: Combat Arts – The Way of the Warrior 2.3.6.2.1: General Works Ayoob, Massad F. In the Gravest Extreme: The Role of the Firearm in Personal Protection. Concord, NH: Police Bookshelf, 1980. _____. The Truth About Self-Protection. New York: Bantam Books, 1983. Barnes, Steven. The Total Success System LifeWriting/Total Success Workbook. Ronin Arts Productions, PO Box 2041, Canyon Country, CA 91386 (phone: 805-251-9393): Ronin Arts Productions, 1993. Steve Barnes is known to the public as having co-authored the wonderful Dream Park science-fiction novels with Larry Niven, as well as having written novels of his own. He is also a teacher of writing – and of combat arts. His “Total Success LifeWriting System” combines knowledge and wisdom from many different cultures and paths: Martial arts, Kundalini Yoga, Aerobics, Sri Chinmoy’s meditation practice, and more. It is intended to maximize your energy, and enable you to use it wherever and whenever you wish. Ibid., p. 10

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According to the author, LifeWriting invites you to live your life as an heroic adventure you are creating, one day at a time. You accept the challenge of creation. You crate a vision of what your ideal life would be. You decide what allies you will need along the way. You gain skills. You learn to conquer your fears, your negative memories and thoughts. And you set your feet upon the road to mastery, taking one step at a time. Ibid., p. 10 The LifeWriting System was born in an intuitive flash which occurred during a class called ‘The Inner Writer and the Outer Work,’ a workshop which I teach at the UCLA Extension Program. ‘The Inner Writer’ is a class designed to teach writers to balance a creative mind with a healthy life. One day, one of the students said, ‘Steve, the tools you’ve given us are great, but I don’t know how to use them. My wife doesn’t support me in my writing, my job eats up too much of my time, I don’t have enough energy . . .’ My reply surprised me. I said, ‘If you were writing about a character in a story, and that character had your life problems, what would you have him do?’ The astonishing thing was that the student immediately created his own answers. And LifeWriting was born. Adding the FIREDANCE energy generation/focus technologies, and organizing them according to the ‘Hero’s Journey’ . . ., gives us the TOTAL SUCCESS program. What TOTAL SUCCESS promises to do is give you new creativity, new perspective on your life, and new control over your negative emotions. You are going to learn how to double your energy in six weeks, and double the quality of your life in a year. Although no previous writing experience is necessary, students have also called it the best writing course they’ve ever taken. # # # A scholar named Joseph Campbell examined myths and stories from all over the world, and he discovered an amazing fact: IN ALL OF THE WORLD’S GREAT STORIES, ANCIENT AND MODERN, FROM EUORPE, AFRICA, OR ASIA, A COMMON PATTERN EMERGES (that of ‘The Hero’s Journey’). . . . This pattern is the story which human beings have been telling each other since the beginning of time. Probably the most famous example of it is the Star Wars trilogy by George Lucas. A simpler way to describe this pattern is ‘The Young Person Grows Up,’ and ‘The Old Person Faces Death.’ Any time you tell either of these stories, you will find an audience. Why? BECAUSE IT IS AN EXACT PARALLEL OF THE ACTUAL LIFE PATH OF EVERY HUMAN BEING ON THIS PLANET. When you were a child, how many times did you ask yourself: ‘What will it take to become an adult?’ And once grown, haven’t you wondered: ‘How do I find the courage, energy, commitment, and passion to pursue my dreams, and to fill my life with pleasure, growth, contribution, and success before I die?’ Therefore, almost any story which addresses either of these issues will be a success. WE ARE PROGRAMMED TO OPEN OUR EMOTIONAL GATES TO HEAR THESE STORIES. Since the cradle, we have heard them uncounted thousands of times. Every fairy tale, every adventure story, romantic fable, animated cartoon, and comic book tries to address these questions. Those that do become classics. Ibid., pp. 9-10

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The best part of it is – it’s all true. Try it – you might like it. (But avoid the Mos Eisley canteen on the way – I hear they only serve Coors there.) Johnson, Sifu Jerry Alan and Crandall, Sifu Joseph. Classical Pa Kua Chang Fighting Systems and Weapons. Available from Ching Lung Martial Arts Association, Inc., PO Box 52144, Pacific Grove, CA 93950. ISBN 0-9609950-0-8. 1990. Miyamoto, Musashi. A Book of Five Rings. Hanshi Steve Kaufman, translator. Boston: Charles E. Tuttle Co., Inc., 1994. _____. A Book of Five Rings. Victor Harris, translator. Woodstock, NY: The Overlook Press, 1974 (Overlook Press edition 1982). Redmoon, Ambrose Hollingworth. “No Peaceful Warriors! How Can You Call Yourself a Warrior if You Won’t Fight?” Gnosis, Fall 1991, pp. 40-44. Zelazny, Roger, editor. Warriors of Blood and Dream. New York: Avon Books, 1995. Parables on the Magick of Geburah and the Way of the Warrior. Includes, e.g., “Sand Man,” by Steve Barnes; “Doing the Angry Centipede,” by Karen Haber; “Guardian Angel,” by Victor Milán, “Blood Duty,” by Michael Stackpole, and others. With afterwords for each story by the author. Periodicals Women and Guns. Published monthly by the Second Amendment Foundation, a non-profit, tax-exempt, education, literary research and publishing organization. National Office: James Madison Building, 12500 NE Tenth Place, Bellevue, WA 98005 (phone: 206-454-7012). Subscriptions: one year (12 issues) $25.00; all subscriptions are cash in advance. Contains a wealth of information on every aspect of the title topic, from hardware, to legal issues, to Internet and WWW sites concerned with firearms. 2.3.6.2.2: Particular Schools 2.3.6.2.2.1: Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu Hatsumi, Masaaki, Dr. Essence of Ninjutsu: The Nine Traditions. Chicago: Contemporary Books, 1988. _____. The Grandmaster’s Books of Ninja Training. Translated by Chris W. P. Reynolds. Chicago: Contemporary Books, 1988. _____. Ninjutsu: History and Tradition. Burbank, CA: Unique Publications, Inc., 1981. _____. and Hayes, Stephen. Ninja Secrets from the Grandmaster. Chicago: Contemporary Books, 1987. Hayes, Stephen. The Mystic Arts of the Ninja: Hypnotism, Invisibility, and Weaponry. Chicago: Contemporary Books, Inc., 1985. _____. Ninjutsu: The Art of the Invisible Warrior. Chicago: Contemporary Books, Inc., 1984. Hoban, Jack. Ninpo: Living and Thinking as a Warrior. Chicago: Contemporary Books, 1988. Herbert, Anthony B, Lt. Colonel, U.S. Army (Ret.). Military Manual of Self-Defense: A Complete Guide to Hand-to-Hand Combat. Seago, Dale. Letter to editor in Gnosis, Winter 1992, in response to article in previous issue by Ambrose Hollingworth Redmoon, “No Peaceful Warriors!” _____. “Orientation to Bujinkan Ninpo Itachi Dojo.” Essay for entering students in Bujinkan ninpo combat arts. Can be obtained by contacting the author % Bujinkan Meiro Itachi Dojo, 433 Kearny St., #338, San Francisco, CA 94108. _____. “The Sword Which Gives Life.” On warrior training as a necessary part of attainment of one’s full potential as a healthy human being. Can be obtained by contacting the author % Bujinkan Meiro Itachi Dojo, 433 Kearny St., #338, San Francisco, CA 94108. _____. “Warriorship, Kobujutsu, and the Bujinkan.” Essay for students in Bujinkan ninpo taijutsu. Can be obtained by contacting the author % Bujinkan Meiro Itachi Dojo, 433 Kearny St., #338, San Francisco, CA 94108. 2.3.7: Religion, Ethics, and Morals

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Anonymous. Principia Discordia, or, How I found Goddess and What I Did to Her When I Found Her: The Magnum Opiate of Malaclypse the Younger, Wherein is Explained Absolutely Everything Worth Knowing About Absolutely Anything. Second Loompanics edition. Port Townsend, WA: Loompanics Unlimited, n.d. Arden, Harvey. Dreamkeepers: A Spirit-Journey into Aboriginal Australia. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1994. Augustinus, Aurelius (St. Augustine of Hippo). Confessions. New York: Penguin Books, 1961. Bachofen, J. J. Myth, Religion, and the Mother Right: Selected Writings of Johann Jakob Bachofen. J. Campbell, editor. Translated by R. Manheim. Prince: Princeton University Press, 1967. (Originally Das Mutterecht, 1861). Baigent, Michael and Leigh, Richard. The Temple and the Lodge. New York: Arcade, 1989. _____ and Lincoln, Henry. Holy Blood, Holy Grail. New York: Dell, 1983. _____. The Messianic Legacy. New York: Holt, 1987. Barnstone, Willis. The Other Bible: A Collection of Ancient, Esoteric Texts from Judeo-Christian Traditions, Excluded From the Official Canon of the Old and New Testaments. New York: HarperSanFrancisco/Harper Collins Publishers, 1984. Bawer, Bruce. Stealing Jesus: How Fundamentalism Betrays Christianity. New York: Crown Publishers, 1997. The time is past, says Bruce Bawer, when denominational names and other traditional labels provided an accurate reflection of Christian America’s religious beliefs and practices. The meaningful distinction today is not between Protestant and Catholic, or Baptist and Episcopalian, but rather between “legalistic” and “nonlegalistic” religions, between the Church of Law and the Church of Love. On one side is the fundamentalist right, which draws a sharp distinction between ‘saved’ and ‘unsaved’ and worships a God of wrath and judgment; on the other are more mainstream Christians who view all humankind as children of a loving God who calls them to break down barriers of hate, prejudice, and distrust. Pointing out that the supposedly ‘traditional’ beliefs of American fundamentalism – about which most mainstream Christians, clergy included, know shockingly little – are in fact of relatively recent origin, are distinctively American in many ways, and are dramatically at odds with the values that Jesus actually spread. Bawer . . . demonstrates the way in which these beliefs have increasingly come to supplant genuinely fundamental Christian tents in the American church and to become synonymous with Christianity in the minds of many people. Stealing Jesus is the . . . testament of a man who is equally disturbed by the notion of an America without Christianity and the notion of an American Christianity without love and compassion. Britain From the inside jacket blurb Buber, Martin. Good and Evil. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1953. Campbell, Joseph. The Masks of God. 4-volume set. New York: Crown Publishers, Inc., 1977. Campbell, Will. Brother to a Dragonfly. New York: Seabury Press, 1977. _____. Race and the Renewal of the Church. Philadelphia: Westminster Press, 1962. Carter, Stephen L. The Culture of Disbelief: How American Law and Politics Trivialize Religious Devotion. New York: Basic Books/HarperCollinsPublishers, 1993. We have sharp divisions over values in America. But that does not mean that no values are better than others. We have sharp divisions, too, on whether human beings evolved over millions of years from lower forms of life, or whether humans were specially created just a few hundred decades ago. But we still manage to make a choice that scientific creationism should not be taught in the schools. Is it really so great a leap to teach our children that theft, excess, and bigotry are wrong, or that respecting the persons, property, and privacy of others is right? Ibid., quoted on the back cover

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The First Amendment applies to everyone – not just “liberals.” Stephen L. Carter shows us the ways in which we have come to equate “religious freedom” with “irreligion,” and “religion” with “intolerance” – equations that are progressively harming our collective soul and spirit, and jeopardizing our future – and makes an eloquent plea for a reversal of this frightening trend. If the First Amendment doesn’t apply to all of us, then it applies to none of us, by its very nature. Left-liberal atheistic fascism or militant-Pagan religious fascism are no better than right-reactionary Christian religious fascism; both can destroy us as a nation and as the world hope of liberty. Fleeing the latter, we have embraced the former – and they are pulling us and our Constitutional political system and ideals on a downhill road to hell from which we have very little time to escape. Mene, mene, tekel, upharshin – and is it only “right-wing religious fascists” who still know what that means? God help us all, so.  _____. (Integrity). Basic Books/HarperCollinsPublishers, 1996. Integrity – all of us are in favor of it, but nobody seems to know how to make sure that we get it. From presidential candidates to crusading journalists to the lords of collegiate sports, everybody promises to deliver integrity, yet all too often, the promises go unfulfilled. In this thoughtful book, Stephen L. Carter, whose 1993 book the Culture of Disbelief changed the way we talk about the role of religion in American life, turns his critical eye to the mystery of why the virtue of integrity holds such sway over the American political imagination. Why do we care more about winning than about playing by the rules? What are our rules about following the rules? What are our rules about breaking them? He explains why integrity is first in importance among the elements of good character, as well as why it is so hard to attain. By weaving together insights from philosophy, theology, history, and law, along with examples drawn from current events and a dose of personal experience, Carter offers a vision of integrity that has implications for everything from marriage and politics to professional football. He discusses the difficulties involved in trying to legislate integrity as well as the possibilities for teaching it. Like Carter’s earlier books, Integrity is at once provocative and witty, sober and inspiring. The first in a trilogy of books on the most important elements of the character of the good citizen, Integrity presents a frank examination of the national mood and concludes that unless we find ways to place integrity at the center of both our private and public lives, the American idea may crumble – and the greatness of our democracy with it. From the inside jacket blurbs Caudill, Dr. Orley B, interviewer. An Oral History with Will Davis Campbell, Christian Preacher. Mississippi Oral History Program of the University of Southern Mississippi, vol. 157, 1980. Connelly, Thomas L. Will Campbell and the Soul of the South. New York: Continuum, 1982. Davidson, Gustav. A Dictionary of Angels Including the Fallen Angels. New York: Macmillan/The Free Press, 1971. Davis, Wade. The Serpent and the Rainbow. New York: Warner Books, Inc., 1985. Delbanco, Andrew. The Death of Satan: How Americans Have Lost the Sense of Evil. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1995. Americans once believed in God and in Satan; they were known to be obsessed with sin, and they pictured their own history as an epic struggle with evil. Today, however, while the repertoire of evil seems never to have been richer, as we daily encounter (and even relish) images of unimaginable horror, our grasp on the reality of evil nonetheless seems weak and uncertain, our responses to it flustered and sometimes indifferent. How has the crisis of incompetence come about.

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In this . . . book, . . . Andrew Delbanco proposes a fresh, persuasive interpretation of the American past – and present – that offers a way to resolve this crisis of moral imagination. In a kind of spiritual biography of the American nation, he shows us how writers of the past three centuries have depicted evil and how, by giving it form and meaning, they have tried to defy and subdue it. His nuanced and yet tough-minded analyses of religious leaders like Cotton Mather and Jonathan Edwards, political redeemers such as Jefferson and Lincoln, classic writers like Emerson and Melville, Thoreau and Whitman, and more recent figures, including Niebuhr and Trilling, Rachel Carson and Susan Sontag, show us the strategies by which these writers have recognized and done battle with evil. One way of talking about evil is to demonize and satanize it, depict it as a foreign ‘other,’ a monstrous reality far from ourselves. This way of understanding evil as something remote and alien seems to be on the rise again today. But as Mr. Delbanco’s superb study shows us, Satan has sometimes had a very different meaning in our history – as a symbol of our own deficient love, our potential for envy and rancor toward creation. Americans have always been engaged in a contest between these two ways of understanding evil; and it remains a struggle in which nothing less than America’s destiny is at stake. From the jacket blurb. Denning, Melita & Phillips, Osborne. Voudon Fire: The Living Reality of Mystical Religion. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1979. Egerton, John. A Mind to Stay Here: Profiles from the South. New York: Macmillan, 1970. Eliade, Mircea. Shamanism: Archaic Techniques of Ecstasy. Bollingen Series LXXVI. Cambridge, MA: Princeton University Press/Bollingen Foundation, 1964. Erdoes, Richard and Ortiz, Alfonso, editors. American Indian Myths and Legends. New York: Pantheon Books, 1984. Faber, Roger J. Clockwork Garden: On the Mechanistic Reduction of Living Things. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1986. Fenimore, Angie. Beyond Darkness: My Near-Death Journey to the Edge of Hell and Back. New York: Bantam Books, 1995. “Here is a shattering account of the dark side of the near-death experience as never before reported – a remarkable personal story of one woman’s harrowing journey to the edge of Hell and back. We would all like to think that at the end of life there awaits a realm of peace and light. But the truth is that our existence after death may just as easily be one of darkness and torment. . . . [C]linical death drew [the author] not to the light so well documented by Betty Eadie and other near-death survivors, but instead into a realm of darkness. Beyond the Darkness is an unforgettable account – told in frighteningly vivid detail – of Angie Fenimore’s journey to the brink of Hell.” From the jacket blurb. Frady, Marshall. Billy Graham: A Parable of American Righteousness. Boston: Little, Brown, 1979. _____. Southerners. New York: New American library, 1980. Fromm, Erich. The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1973. _____. The Heart of Man: Its Genius for Good and Evil. New York: Harper & Row, 1964. Frymer, Kensy-Tikva. In the Wake of the Goddesses: Women, Culture, and the Biblical Transformation of Pagan Myth. New York: The Free Press, 1992. Graves, Robert. The Greek Myths. Revised edition. Two volumes. New York: Viking Penguin Books, 1960. Hamilton, Edith. Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes. New York: Mentor Books/The New American Library, 1953. Heeren, Fred. Show Me God: What the Message from Space is Telling us About God. Wheeling, IL: Day Star Publications1997.

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Show Me God is a rare chance to hear about the latest space discoveries from the discoverers themselves – and to learn how their findings affect life’s big questions. In interviews for the book: • Stephen Hawing explains how God relates to his no-boundary proposal of spacetime (and the anthropic principle). • Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson describe how their Nobel prizewinning discovery led them away from their belief in an eternal universe to believing that the universe was created. • George Smoot tells how his discovery of cosmic ripples with NASA’s COBE satellite points not just to a haphazard big bang, but to a ‘finely orchestrated’ creation event. • Alan Guth, father of the inflationary big bang theory, speaks of the ‘fine-tuning’ of the universe. • John Mather (COBE satellite chief scientist) shows how science is still at a loss to explain how the universe could come out of nothing in any natural way. • Charles Steidel describes how his team of astronomers discovered the time when galaxies formed. • Princeton’s Jeremiah Ostriker explains why so many now believe in multiple universes. • Robert Jastrow (director of the Mt. Wilson Observatory) tells of ‘the most interesting result in all of science.’ Fred Heeren puts together all the evidence to come up with what he calls “the IIP God.” With the help of today’s foremost astronomers and cosmologists, Fred Heeren examines how their discoveries affect the big questions about creation, the fine tuning of the universe, the likelihood of extraterrestrials, why we’re here, and the nature of God. – From the inside jacket blurb Raises some very interesting questions – on both sides of the debate. At times, one is left with the feeling that each side is talking miles past the other, in both directions simultaneously. Questions that should have been raised, and weren’t, are noticeable by their conspicuous absence. The spiritual illiteracy and ignorance of many scientists is made clear, but similar sins on the other side of the debate show themselves, as well. And, of course, one is left with the question: All right, so how did God come into existence?  Hill, Greg and Thornley, Kerry Wendell. Principia Discordia, or, How I Found Goddess and What I Did to Her When I Found Her: The Magnum Opiate of Malaclypse the Younger (Wherein is Explained Absolutely Everything Worth Knowing About Absolutely Nothing). The legendary “5th Edition.” Port Townsend, WA: Loompanics Unlimited, n.d. The Bible of Chaos Magick and Discordianism. The Holy Bible. Old and New Testaments. Humphrey, Robert L., J.D. Values for a New Millenium. Manuscript edition. Maynardville, TN: The Life Values Press, 1992. From the experiences of childhood in the Great Depression, trips as a teenager in the Panamanian Merchant Marines, national-class boxing, the awe-inspiring sights of selfless sacrifice on Iwo Jima, and finally, fifteen years in overseas ideological warfare, Humphrey observed that universal values exist and, ultimately, control human behavior.

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Humphrey is a graduate of Wisconsin University, Harvard Law School, and the Fletcher School of Diplomacy. At the beginning of the Cold War, he left a teaching position at MIT to help lead in the struggle against Communism. Finding that U.S. education was contributing to, rather than reducing, American overseas problems, he developed a new leadership approach that overcame Ugly Americanism and anti-Americanism among hundreds of thousands in crucial Third World areas. More recently, his methodology won commendations for educating the alleged uneducable: Mexican-American street gang youths in southern California, and Canadian Native teenage dropouts. Until Communism’s fall, Humphrey kept his new methods confidential. Those methods are significant: (1) From his experiences with young infantrymen in heavy combat, and with the peasants in many villages of the world, he perceived humankind’s basic goodness that philosophers have missed or under-rated. (2) In place of compartmentalized, primarily mental education, Humphrey has developed a humannature-guided (moral, physical, artistic, mental) approach. His company offers moneyback guarantees to solve any education or leadership problem where leaders agree to help implement the total program. Those are some of the reasons why we have, enthusiastically, financed this manuscript and chosen its title. Americans seem ready for drastic education reform and leadership upgrading. This work can be of monumental importance. By the publishers, from the back cover. Kleps, Art. The Boo Hoo Bible: The Neo-American Church Catechism. San Cristobal, NM: Toad Books, 1971. Since all competent bullshitters specializing in astrological matters are agreed on the singularly gruesome and wretched nature of the planet Saturn, competence being determined, of course, by agreement with this very definition, since any just or rational judgment is bound to fail, due to the influence of the planet Saturn, it is apparent that the only solution is to below the big fat greasy son-of-a-bitch to smithereens. Ibid., p. 157 The Koran. Lao-Tsu. Tao Te Ching (The Book of the Virtue of the Way of the T’ao). Gia-Fu Feng and Jane English, translators. New York: Vintage Books/Random House, 1972. The Tao Te Ching, the esoteric but infinitely practical book written most probably in the sixth century B.C. by Lao Tsu, has been translated more frequently than any work except the Bible. This fresh translation of the ancient Chinese classic offers the essence of each word and makes La Tsu’s teaching immediate and alive. The philosophy of Lao Tsu is simple: Accept what is in front of you without wanting the situation to be other than it is. Study the natural order of things and work with it rather than against it, for to try to change what is only sets up resistance. Nature provides everything without requiring payment or thanks, and also provides for all without discrimination – therefore let us present the same face to everyone and treat all men as equals, however they may behave. If we watch carefully, we will see that work proceeds more quickly and easily if we stop ‘trying,’ if we stop putting in so much extra effort, if we stop looking for results. In the clarity of a still and open mind, truth will be reflected. We will come to appreciate the original meaning of the word ‘understand,’ which means to stand under.’ We serve whatever or whoever stands before us, without any thought for ourselves. Te – which may be translated as ‘virtue’ or ‘strength’ – lies always in Tao, or ‘natural law.’ In other words: Simply be. – From the back cover

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Macaulay, Lord Thomas Babington. Lord Macaulay’s Essays and Lays of Ancient Rome. New York: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1896. Macrone, Michael. By Jove!: Brush Up Your Mythology. New York: Cader Books, 1992. Mander, Jerry. In the Absence of the Sacred: The Failure of Technology and the Survival of the Indian Nations. San Francisco: Sierra Club Books, 1991. Martin, Malachi. Hostage to the Devil: Possession and Exorcism of Five Living Americans. New York: Reader’s Digest Press/Crowell Distributors, 1976. McGinn, Bernard. Antichrist: Two Thousand Years of the Human Fascination With Evil. New York: HarperSanFrancisco/Harper Collins Publishers, 1994. Medved, Michael. Hollywood vs. America: Popular Culture and the War on Traditional Values. New York: HarperCollinsPublishers, 1992. Why does popular culture seem so consistently hostile to the values that most Americans hold dear? Why does the entertainment industry attack religion, glorify brutality, undermine the family, and deride patriotism? In this explosive book, one of the nation’s best known film critics examines how Hollywood has broken faith with its public, creating movies, television, and popular music that exacerbate every serious social problem we face, from teenage pregnancies to violence in the streets. Michael Medved powerfully argues that the entertainment business follows its own dark obsessions, rather than giving the public what it wants: In fact, the audience for feature films and network television has demonstrated its profound disillusionment in recent years, with disastrous consequences for many entertainment companies. Meanwhile, overwhelming numbers of our fellow citizens complain about the wretched quality of our popular culture – describing the offerings of the mass media as the worst ever. Medved asserts that Hollywood ignores – and assaults – the values of ordinary American families, pursuing a self-destructive and alienated ideological agenda that is harmful to the nation at large and to the industry’s own interests. In hard-hitting chapters on ‘The Attack on Religion,’ ‘The Addiction to Violence,’ ‘Promoting Promiscuity,’ ‘The Infatuation with Foul Language,’ ‘Kids Know Best,’ ‘Motivations for Madness,’ and other subjects, Medved outlines the underlying themes that turn up again and again in our popular culture. He also offers conclusive evidence of the frightening real-world impact of these messages on our society and our children. Finally Medved shows where and how Hollywood took a disastrous wrong turn toward its current crisis, and he outlines promising efforts both in and outside the industry to restore a measure of sanity and restraint to our media of mass entertainment. Sure to elicit strong response, whether it takes the form of cheers of support or howls of outraged dissent, Hollywood in America confronts head-on one of the most significant issues of our times. From the jacket blurb As the blurb proclaims, Michael Medved is one of today’s best-known film critics. Co-author of The Golden Turkey Awards, The Hollywood Hall of Shame, and Son of Golden Turkey Awards (with Harry Medved), and author of The Shadow Presidents and other widely acclaimed works, Medved has a deep and detailed acquaintance with his subject. There’s little more than I can add either to the quotation above or to the book itself beyond – I heartily agree, and urge everyone in this country with even the rudiments of intelligence and concern for the future to read this book and take a good look at the current ugly state of affairs in the American film industry and our country as a whole. Messadié, Gerald. A History of the Devil. Translated from the French by Marc Romano. New York: Kodansha International, 1996. A History of the Devil is a provocative exploration of the personifications of evil through the ages and across cultures. Messadié reveals that the Satan of Judeo-Christian mythology – the antithesis of God and good – was a concept unknown to the Greeks,

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Romans, Egyptians, Hindus, and Chinese. In fact, the devil was probably invented six centuries before the Common Era by Persian clergy eager to demonize their political adversaries. And the image of absolute evil has been a useful tool of the powerful – both religious and secular – ever since, from the Grand Inquisitor Torquemada to Ronald Reagan. From the jacket blurb. Mookerjee, Ajit. Kali: The Feminine Force. New York: Destiny Books, 1988. Kali, a Lunar Goddess, was the Great Mother Goddess of the original inhabitants of India, the Draviddians. So powerful was she that the later Aryan invaders of India were not able to banish Her worship, though eventually they did conquer the Draviddians and drove out the ones that refused to submit to the conqueror’s yoke. Finally, the Aryans assumed Kali into their pantheon as a battleaspect of Durga, their own Great Mother Goddess. Those Draviddian sub-populations that managed to flee India rather than stay and become the Outcastes of India, now known as Europe’s and Russia’s Gypsies, carried Kali with them as they roamed throughout the world, leaving Her icons everywhere across Europe in the form of figurines dubbed “Black Madonnas” by resident Christian populations. Indeed, as the Gypsies themselves converted to Christianity, they kept Kali as an aspect of Mary, much as the Aryans had taken Kali to be a battle- or Crone aspect of Durga. Kali has roughly the same relationship to Durga that the Medusa does to Pallas Athena of the Greeks, or Black Isis does to Isis. She is the Demon-Slayer who defends the Throne of Heaven, much as the Archangel Mikhail of Western cultures does. She is also a Goddess of Tantra, the source of the great floods of Kundalini Energy that are evoked by means of sexual Magick. And with Her husband, Shiva, the Destroyer, another Lunar deity, She destroys and creates whole worlds. The story of Kali is the story of the Left Hand of God, the dark side of deity, All-Devourer and All-Begetter, and no religious education is complete without study of Kali and the other Crone Goddesses. Mookerjee’s work is an excellent introduction to the subject. Peck, N. Scott. The People of the Lie: The Hope for Healing Human Evil. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1983. Ruether, Rosemary Radford. Gaia and God: An Ecofeminist Theology of Earth Healing. San Francisco: Harper Collins, 1992. Russell, Jeffrey Burton. A History of Heaven: The Singing Silence. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1997. Well known for his historical accounts of Satan and hell, Jeffrey Burton Russell here explores the brighter side of eternity: heaven. Dispensing with the cliché images of goodness that can make even heaven seem unendurable, the author stimulates our imagination with a history of how the joy of paradise has been conceived by writers, philosophers, and artists for whom heaven was an imminent reality. Russell not only explores concepts found among the ancient Jews, Greeks, and Romans, as well as early and medieval Christians, but also addresses the intellectual problems heaven poses: how does time ‘pass’ in eternity? is heaven a place or a state? who is in and who is not? what happens to the body and soul between death and Judgment Day? Russell stresses that the best way to approach the logic-defying concept of a place occupying neither space nor time is through poetry and paradox, and through the visions of such mystics as Bernard, Julian of Norwich, and Eckhart. After the Revelation of Saint John the divine, the most sublime and encompassing portrait of heaven to date has come not from a theologian but from a poet – Dante Alighieri in his Divine Comedy. Russell’s history of heaven culminates in a lively analysis of how Dante describes the glories of the indescribable. The unsurpassed images of light, movement, and community that Dante uses so skillfully to convey the presence of God are rooted in the Jewish picture of heaven as a garden or court and in the Greek picture of the Elysian Fields. Using current scholarly insights together with a vast store of knowledge gathered from the past, Russell takes the idea of heaven as valid and important in itself –

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something to be understood from the point of view of those believing in it. His very use of language immerses us in the thoughts of those who have sought heaven and provides rich material for contemplation. From the inside jacket blurb Shattuck, Roger. Forbidden Knowledge: From Prometheus to Pornography. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1996. An outstanding analysis of the Qlippoth of Liberty, the demonic shadow of Key 11, Aleph, and the sociocultural consequences of inhabiting that shadow just a little too long. In both the sweep of its subject and the vigor of its learning, Forbidden Knowledge follows in the tradition of such works as James G. Frazer’s The Golden Bough, Joseph Campbell’s and Bill Moyer’s The Power of Myth, and Harold Bloom’s the Western Canon. In this impassioned work, the eminent critic Roger Shattuck not only examines the meaning of moral responsibility in literature and in our everyday lives, but also suggests that we live in a violent world that dismisses taboos and fails to heed the wisdom of that which is sacred. Forbidden Knowledge boldly traces the tragic arc of Western literature and culture as it explores the notion of ‘forbidden knowledge,’ from the sexual innocence of Adam and Eve to the awe-inspiring discoveries of modern scientists who have created the atomic bomb and recombinant DNA. The result is a dire portrait of human presumption and of a culture that has abandoned all limits in the quest for knowledge and experience. The harrowing imagery that Shattuck presents is matched only by his faith that we can understand our grievous loss of innocence by reexamining our greatest myths and stories of the last two thousand years. In lively, lucid prose Shattuck explores our uncertain fate through such myths as that of Prometheus and a wide range of literary works, including Milton’s Paradise Lost, the writings of the Marquis de Sade, Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein, Melville’s Billy Budd, and the poetry of Emily Dickinson. Parents and teachers should be aware that Chapter VII does not make appropriate reading for children and minors. In this seminal work, Shattuck breaks new ground in opening up a crucial subject never before accorded this full-scale treatment. Forbidden Knowledge impels us to a renewed effort to think judiciously about morality and the sacred during a decade of radical skepticism. Forbidden Knowledge represents the capstone of Roger Shattuck’s career as one of American’s most original and gifted thinkers. Spinoza, Benedictus de. Ethics. New York: Oxford University Press, 1927. Stone, Merlin. When God was a Woman. New York: Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich, 1978. The SubGenius Foundation. The Book of the SubGenius: The Sacred Teachings of J. R. “Bob” Dobbs. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1987. Van Dusen, Wilson. The Presence of Other Worlds: The Psychological/Spiritual Findings of Emanuel Swedenborg. New York: Swedenborg Foundation, Inc., 1974, 1985. Verman, Mark. The History and Varieties of Jewish Meditation. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson Inc., 1996. The History and Varieties of Jewish Meditation is a user-friendly guide designed to familiarize the reader with the vast expanse and incredible diversity of traditional Jewish meditation. The material included in this volume is drawn from the great treasure chest of Jewish spiritual heritage, namely, the Hebrew Scriptures. Accordingly, special attention is paid to specific biblical figures and seminal passages, while much of the discussion concentrates on standard kabbalistic and hasidic sources such as the Zohar and the writings of Rabbi Nachman of Bratslav.

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In the History and Varieties of Jewish meditation, Mark Verman examines a wide variety of meditative practices, spanning many centuries, by translating primary kabbalistic sources and providing the reader with intelligible readings of the different techniques found in the Jewish meditative tradition. As the reader will discover, there is no one dominant form of traditional Jewish meditation. Rather, there are dozens, if not hundreds, of disparate techniques, ranging from visualizations of Divine names to candle gazing and chanting. Verman also offers an historical overview of ancient Jewish meditation, starting with the biblical period and continuing to early rabbinic times. Pertinent later commentaries are also cited to elucidate these sources. This background discussion provides the reader with a basic orientation to the tradition of Jewish meditation. This works seeks to combine the academic virtue of methodical study with the creativity and spontaneity of Divine discovery. . . . The richness of the Jewish meditative tradition is highly adaptable to promoting widespread spirituality. . . . From the inside jacket blurb Wilson, James Q. The Moral Sense. New York: The Free Press, 1993. Wright, Lawrence. Saints & Sinners: Walker Railey, Jimmy Swaggart, Madalyn Murray O’Hair, Anton LaVey, Will Campbell, Matthew Fox. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1993. Wright, Robert. The Moral Animal: The New Science of Evolutionary Psychology. New York: Pantheon Books, 1994. 2.3.8: Education and Pedagogy Rickover, Hyman George. American Education – a National Failure: The Problem of Our Schools and What we can Learn From England. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc., 1963. In 1959 E. P. Dutton published Education and Freedom, Admiral Rickover’s first explosive book on the current deplorable state of our system of public education [for more on which, see below]. In this new and vitally important book Admiral Rickover presents even more persuasive arguments – impressively documented throughout – for a thorough reform of our education system. He shows clearly how our education standards are quantitatively and qualitatively inferior to European systems and are thus totally out of step with the needs of modern society. After giving an analysis of the English system of education, the author shows how American may profit by emulating many of the best features of the English system. He advocates the following program: 1) elimination of “ability to pay” from public education and retention of “ability to learn”; 2) procuring of highly qualified teachers to whom much freedom is given in their work and the elimination of nonteaching school principals and administrators; 3) use of Government grants as a means of raising national standards in education; 4) the setting of national standards through national examinations leading to national diplomas. . . . From the jacket blurb. Since 1963, when this book was published, the state of America’s publication “education” has become inconceivably worse than it was then. The solutions for the mess in which our public education system was already in proposed by Admiral Rickover at the time would have helped immeasurably – but they were never implemented. As a consequence, the state of our public educational systems has become so bad that a whole new private industry has grown up to take advantage of the crying need for damagecontrol, e.g., “Hooked on Phonics” and other systems of tutoring in basic skills such as reading for which those who need such services pay out of pocket (or for which their parents or guardians pay). For a good overview of just how things got this bad, Admiral Rickover’s books on the subject together with Robert A. Heinlein’s essay, “The Happy Days Ahead” (in Expanded Universe [Ace Books,

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1980], pp. 515-582). As I’ve said elsewhere (Chapter 3, “Gemini” of Part 2 of Volume 2 of this work), In his essay “The Happy Days Ahead” (in Expanded Universe [Ace Books, 1980], pp. 515-582), Robert A. Heinlein describes the deterioration of American education from his grandfather’s time (ca. 1860) through the 1960s. What he describes is appalling, at least to anyone who gives a damn about the future of this country. It is, unfortunately, accurate – if anything, it understates the case. The reality is a pedagogical and historical horror-story that puts anything by Stephen King in the shade, a fast slide into Hell of the American spirit and soul via what has passed for public “education” in this country since the 1930s on. As a result, American public elementary schools have become little better than glorified day-care centers; high schools have devolved into what are at best accelerated elementary schools, as measured against the last century’s educational systems and achievements; colleges have become little more than pumpedup high schools (again, by the measure of another, better century); while our great universities have become repositories of academic cannon-fodder – the students – who are there for the convenience and use of their professors and, later, what Dwight David Eisenhower called “the military-industrial complex.” Therefore while Jupiter may still rule the colleges and universities in this country (if those), clearly today Mercury (or maybe his Qlippoth) rules all forms of American public, “free” education from high school on down. (Though a good argument can be made for the dominion of Luna – Who rules young children – over our public elementary schools, given their devolution into what are at best glorified collective baby-sitters and pedagogical factories for the infantilization and spiritual crippling of our children from age 6 through adolescence.) For a scathing indictment of American public education by someone who had to battle its results every step of the way in order to make any headway on one of the most important military projects of all time, the design and production of the nuclear submarine, see Hyman George Rickover’s Education and Freedom (1962?). As Rickover makes abundantly clear, no matter how bad you think our educational system is – it’s unimaginably worse. It’s all true, too . . . (“– And it’s your fault!!”) _____. Education and Freedom. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc., 1959. Foreword by Edward R. Murrow. Preface by Charles van Doren. Admiral Rickover is no theoretical pedagogue. His attitude toward American education was the result of practical experience, and it is worth all the more for that very reason. He found the inadequacy of our schools when he recruited his staff. With the opening of the atomic era he himself went in for an intensive education in nuclear physics and engineering and inspired his closest associates to join him. Then, when he was assigned to build the first nuclear power plant for naval use, he had to create a working force of highly educated specialists. They had to be like himself, know what the nuclear age meant, be willing to make sacrifices to equip themselves for it, and understand that utterly new engineering standards were called for. He discovered that such men were hard to come by. American education was not supplying them tailor-made for the exacting new duties. Since his initial discovery he has devoted every available moment to education, and has now become our foremost advocate of an educational system that meets the challenge of the atomic era. He has spoken forcefully and frequently on this theme, and this book, largely based on these speeches, is in my opinion the most stimulating and searching analysis of the perils of inadequate preparation for the nuclear age that I have encountered . . . Here is a remarkable book, packed with salient facts, dictated from experience and inspired by wisdom. Admiral Rickover is more than a naval officer who pushed through

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a crash program of building nuclear power plants. He is greater than that. He is a prophet and a leader. He says that we must train better scientists and technicians, but also more responsible men. He has no specialist’s contempt for the humanities. Basically what he wants is to see intelligence and the disciplined mind become respectable. He knows that only if they do will we have a chance to hold our own in the demanding years before us. From the foreword by Edward R. Murrow, ibid., pp. 6-7 _____. Swiss Schools and Ours: Why Theirs are Better. New York: Atlantic Monthly Press Books/Little, Brown, and Company, 1962. Admiral H. G. Rickover requires no introduction. His crusading efforts for the improvement of American education are as vigorous and forthright as his dedication to the development of our atomic navy. This book is a trenchant, no-holds-barred study of education in a European democratic country, Switzerland, and of how the lessons learned there can be applied in the American system. The Admiral describes how Switzerland has achieved an integration of mass and academic education which gives each student the best of what is most suitable for him, and he shows that because of a longer day and a longer school year (240 days compared with 180 in the United States), the Swiss youngsters spend one third more time in the classroom than their American counterparts. All Swiss pupils spend four to six years in elementary school together and then go on to specialized schools, according to their desires and abilities. Admiral Rickover also stresses than in Switzerland the school is not expected to do the whole job, and the family supplements schoolwork with extra reading at home. He emphasizes that moral training is the responsibility of the parents and not of the teachers. Constructively, the Admiral makes some suggestions for America in the light of Swiss experience. We should begin by improving the training of our administrative personnel: a superintendent or principal should first of all be an excellent teacher, rather than someone with limited experience in the classroom who has acquired administrative training, or, even worse, a football coach turned principal. He also feels that there is a great need for a nationally determined standard of course programs, so that there will be greater uniformity of requirements for secondary diplomas and college degrees. (He deplores the expensive, time-consuming College Entrance Examination Board tests, which must be given to all entering students because colleges cannot rely upon the variations in grades and recommendations of high schools across the country.) . . . . From the jacket blurb. 2.3.9: General Biography 2.4: Technology and Engineering 2.4.1: General Reference Hiscox, Gardner D., M. E., editor. Henley’s Formulas for Home and Workshop: Containing 10,000 Scientific Formulas, Trade Secrets, Food and Chemical Recipes, and Money Saving Ideas. A Valuable Reference Book for the Home, the Factory, the Office, and the Workshop. Enlarged edition. New York: Avenel Books, 1979. 2.5: General Works: Reference and Miscellaneous Crystal, David, editor. The Cambridge Factfinder. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1993.

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Hirsch, E. D., Jr.; Kett, Joseph F.; and Trefil, James. The Dictionary of Cultural Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know. Second edition, revised and updated. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1993. The Old Farmer’s Almanac. Robert B. Thomas, editor. Annual publication. Dublin, NH: Yankee, Inc. The Reader’s Digest. Published monthly by The Reader’s Digest Association, Inc., Pleasantville, NY 10570. This GOP (Grand Old Periodical) needs no introduction, I’m sure – except that while its reputation as a vanguard of the bourgeoisie is well-justified, it also carries an astonishing amount of good and useful advice, outstanding humor, and other material well worth reading and considering by even the most radical and politically correct among us. If you have kids to raise and care for and a family to cherish and nurture, there are far worse magazines to have around and read – for either yourselves, your guests, or your children. The World Almanac and Book of Facts, 1976. New York: Newspaper Enterprises Association, 1975. 2.6: Catalogs You Can’t Do Without Archie McPhee: Outfitters of Popular Culture®. Collectors’ edition Color Catalog # 1. $3 from Archie McPhee & Co., PO Box 30852, Seattle, WA 98103. Info & order line: (206) 745-0711. Email: mcphee@mcphee.com. Website: http://www.halcyon.com/mcphee/. The Mother of All Weirdness Catalogs. Hermes’ favorite toy-store. The Ultimate Institution. The Great Seattle Takeover!! Archie McPhee’s has done more to corrupt this country than even Starbuck’s® – and thank God for it! How would we ever have done without such necessities of life than, e.g., Sparkzilla (catalog order # 09865 – “Run! Hide! Evacuate the downtown area! Our 3” tall Sparkzilla windup shoots fiery sparks from his mouth as he trudges toward the miniature metropolis of your choice. . . .”), Monster Women (# 09947 – “Each ferocious yet stylish Monster Woman is made of soft rubber, fabulously detailed right down to her jewelry and lipstick.” 6 assorted for $4.50 or tub of 72 for $34.95), or Martian Popping Thing (# 09500 – “It is a little-known fact that Martians use similar devices known as ‘human popping things’ to relieve stress on their planet, hence the very low crime rate and lack of hypertension on Mars.”)?! If you have never received an Archie McPhee’s catalog, you haven’t lived! U. S. Games Systems, Inc. Tarot and Cartomancy Catalog No. 43. $2 from U. S. Games systems, Inc., 179 Ludlow Street, Stamford, CT 06902 (order desk: (800) 544-2637). U. S. Games Systems, Inc., is the producer and distributor of all commercially produced Tarot packs in this country. Their catalog not only lists the packs, but shows samples from each in gorgeous color. 53 pages of Tarot packs for the connoisseur, the professional card-reader, the artist, the Magus, the historian, the scholar, the collector, or anyone.

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