FREEPRESS

the DeKalb

FRIDAY, JAN. 27, 2017 • VOL. 19, NO. 43 • FREE

Serving East Atlanta, Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, Chamblee, Clarkston, Decatur, Doraville, Dunwoody, Lithonia, Pine Lake, Stone Mountain, Stonecrest and Tucker • A PUBLICATION OF ACE III COMMUNICATIONS •

Tucker looks to designate areas as a historic district
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Tucker is known as one of
the historic areas in DeKalb.
Before Tucker became
a city 2016, the Tucker area
was established in 1892. The
community played a role in
the Civil War—when Union
soldiers camped at the Browning
Courthouse before fighting in the
Battle of Atlanta.
Now, city and the Tucker
Historical Society are hoping to
preserve the historic Browning
Courthouse, buildings on Main
Street and other areas in the city
by designating these areas as a
historic district.

‘Having a
district is
one part
of a larger
picture of
preservation.’
– Matthew Lee

President of Tucker
Historical Society

The city, the Tucker Historical
Society and Georgia State
University have partnered to
study a potential historic district
in Tucker. During the threemonth project, students from the
Heritage Preservation Master’s
Degree Program will look at
areas in the city to develop
proposed historic preservation
design guidelines for selected
commercial and residential
areas.
Matthew Lee, president of
Tucker Historical Society, said
prior to the city incorporating
in 2016, the society began
discussions about a deeper
look at preservation. Christy
Atkins, chair of our preservation

Tucker hopes to preserve the historic Browning Courthouse (pictured), buildings on Main Street and other areas in the city by
designating these areas as a historic district.

committee, is a graduate of the
Heritage Preservation Master’s
Degree Program at Georgia
State University and worked on
a project with Richard Laub,
director of the master’s program,
to identify historic resources in
Lithonia and develop proposed
design guidelines for that city.
“She contacted Richard
and he felt Tucker would be a
wonderful opportunity for his
students,” Lee said.
Lee said the society has
focused on preservation since
it was founded in 2000. He said
the group gathered an inventory
of the buildings on Main Street
several years ago to identify
their age and original owners.
“We’ve looked at historic
homes in the area from the
1800s, done significant work on
the Browning Courthouse, but
nothing to the level of design
guidelines that this study will
provide. It will be a significant
resource to property owners in
the study area,” Lee said.
If buildings or areas in the
city are designated as a historic

CHAMPIONNEWSPAPER

CHAMPIONNEWS

district, the city could receive
federal tax credits, according to
Lee.
“Currently, only 26 percent of
municipalities in Georgia have
historic preservation ordinances
and just 18 percent qualify for
federal tax credits as certified
local governments,” he said.
“We want Tucker to be added
to the list and bring those
benefits home. Having a district
is one part of a larger picture of
preservation.
“We’ve all seen stretches of
road that are indistinguishable
due to underregulated
development,” Lee said. “We
need development. Changes
must come, but without a plan,
without understanding who we
are, it’s easy to lose identity
as a community. Too many
communities have lost valuable
architecture because people
didn’t know the history.”
Lee said the proposed design
guidelines will give property
owners within the study area a
better understanding of how to
improve their properties without

CHAMPIONNEWSPAPER

inadvertently undermining the
historic value of their buildings.
“For example, if a door
needs to be replaced, masonry
repaired, or a second story
added to a building from the
1940s or ‘50s, there is a way to
do it that meets the functional
need of the business and
maintains the character that
attracts tenants and customers,”
he said, “Design guidelines will
give property owners a better
understanding of the available
options to meet those needs.
“If a production company
wants to film on Main Street,
or in the downtown area, a
historically accurate façade is
of greater value than one that
mixes styles and periods poorly
and destroys the backdrop,” Lee
added.
Once the study is complete,
Lee said he hopes the project
will show how to move forward
with preservation within the city.
“[It] requires further
discussion and this project is
an important gateway to those
conversations,” Lee said.

CHAMPIONNEWS

LOCAL

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017 • Page 2

Boys & Girls Club director honored
DeKalb commissioners commend Brandon Riley for service

by R. Scott Belzer
sbelzer@dekalbchamp.com
Family, friends, coworkers,
community members and the
parents he serves joined East
DeKalb Boys & Girls Club
executive director Brandon
Riley at the Jan. 10 board of
commissioners meeting in
DeKalb County for an official
recognition and honor.
Riley recently finished his
first year as executive director
after five years with the club,
located at 1839 Phillips Road in
Lithonia. County officials and
community members thanked
him for the impact he has made
in the community in a single
year.
“Brandon Riley, or Mr.
Brandon as we know him, has
had a really great impact on our
children,” said parent Tawana
Hutchinson. “I’ve been with
the club a long time, and Mr.
Brandon has had more of an
impact in his one year than
other directors make in many
years.”
According to Hutchinson,
a single mother, Riley and the
East DeKalb Boys & Girls Club
staff made sure she and her
family had a merry Christmas
by purchasing gifts for her and
her three children.
Riley specializes in
developing and implementing
programs for youth
development. Through the
club’s College Bound program,
he is responsible for making
programs that entice children at
the Boys & Girls Club to make

good grades, stay focused on
school and use every academic
opportunity available to them.
Commissioner Gregory
Adams said he wished to thank
and honor Riley for returning
to his hometown and making
a difference in the lives of
children.
“Riley is a student of DeKalb
County schools, grew up in
Lithonia, and went back to
serve his community at the
Boys & Girls Club,” Adams
said. “We hope he continues
his great work and remains a
beacon of light for the Lithonia
community for many years to
come.”
Commissioner Mereda
Johnson said the Lithonia
community commended Riley
at a recent town hall meeting.
“All of the parents at the
meeting had nothing but
great things to say about Mr.
Brandon, his commitment to
youth, dedication to children
and excellence,” Johnson said.
“He’s admired by his coworkers
and the community in which he
serves.”
Riley said he looks forward
to doing more work in DeKalb
County and bettering the
community he grew up in.
“It’s humbling,” Riley said.
“It’s a proud moment, given I
can come into my community
and make an impact on it as
well as the rest of the county.
For the commissioners to
recognize that and support the
cause is very rewarding.”
Riley said he challenged
county leadership to go into
other Boys & Girls Club

DeKalb County’s board of commissioners honored East DeKalb Boys & Girls Club director Brandon
Riley at its meeting on Jan. 10. Photo submitted.

locations and see the work that
is being done.
“It’s not just me doing this
type of work,” Riley said. “I have
great staff, great parents and
great kids. It’s a great support
system in our communities.”
Riley said he will attempt

to achieve more in the coming
year. He said he will offer
defensive driving courses
for high school students
and parents, on-location
health screenings through
a partnership with Emory
University and in-home

tutoring through Emory’s
“Exceeding the Mark” program.
“Our job is to be a support
group for the community,”
Riley said. “Every community’s
kids deserve that, the parents
deserve that and DeKalb
County deserves that.”

IRVIN J. JOHNSON
Tax Commissioner
DeKalb County, GA

ATTENTION ALL DEKALB COUNTY
HOMEOWNERS
The 2017 Property Tax Exemption Deadline is Fast
Approaching!
If you owned and resided in a home in DeKalb County on January 1st, you may
apply for a Basic Homestead Exemption and Property Assessment Freeze with
the County by April 1st of this year. The home must be your primary domicile
and legal residence for all purposes, including the registration of your vehicles
and the filing of your Federal and State income taxes. Applications received
after April 1st will be processed for 2018.
In addition to the basic homestead exemption available to all homeowners, there
are special exemptions available for residents 62 and older, disabled veterans or
their un-remarried spouses, and other disabled residents. Eligibility for special
exemptions is based upon age or disability, total household income, and must
be applied for in person. When applying, please bring your State and Federal
income tax forms, Social Security 1099, and any other forms of income you
may receive, to one of our three offices across the County.

North Office

1358 Dresden Dr., NE
Atlanta, GA 30319

Main Office

4380 Memorial Dr.
Suite 100
Decatur, GA 30032

South Office

2801 Candler Rd. #66
South DeKalb Mall
Decatur, GA 30034

Remember, the deadline for applying for all homesteads is
April 1st!
Apply for the Basic Homestead Exemption, the Property Assessment Freeze, or
renew your tag registration online at: www.dekalbcountyga.gov/taxcommissioner
Questions? Call (404) 298-4000 or email us proptax@dekalbcountyga.gov

4380 Memorial Drive, Suite 100, Decatur, Georgia 30032 (404-298-4000)

LOCAL

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017 • Page 3

AROUNDDEKALB
BROOKHAVEN
City to host daddy and daughter dance
A daddy and daughter dance will be held
Feb. 11, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Lynwood Community
Center in Brookhaven. The event will include
dinner, photo opportunities, giveaways and a
live DJ. Cost is $25 per family. To register, visit
a Brookhaven recreation center or call (404)
637-0152. The Lynwood Community Center is
located at 3360 Osborne Road.

CHAMBLEE
Theater nonprofit announces new artistic
director, resident artist
Chamblee theater nonprofit Onion Man
Productions announced in mid-January its new
artistic director Patrick Young and resident artist Jillian Walzer.
Young will be responsible for developing
seasons, managing the resident artist program
and managing the youth theater program. He
takes over from James Beck, who will now serve
as managing director.
Walzer has been an actress and model since
age 10. She has appeared in film, television and
theater. In Atlanta, she’s performed with Onion
Man, Lionheart Theatre Company, Onstage Atlanta, Stage Door Players, New Origins Theatre
and Working Title Playwrights.
For more information, contact Beck at
james@onionmanproductions.com or call (404)
519-7591.

CLARKSTON
Georgia Piedmont Technical College partners
with Georgia Film Academy and Movie Magic
Georgia Piedmont Technical College—located at 495 N. Indian Creek Road—recently
announced an entertainment-based non-credit
program through the Georgia Film Academy
and Movie Magic.
Three classes offering education in production operations, lift truck operations, occupational safety and health, and other on-set skills
have been established at Georgia Piedmont and
offer enrollees a chance to network, earn certificates and build a resume tailored to the entertainment industry.
For more information, visit www.gptc.edu or
contact Gwendolyn Syphoe at syphoeg@gptc.
edu or (404) 297-9522.

DECATUR

DeKalb County Extension at (404) 298-4080,
mobilemarket@dekalbcountyga.gov or at http://
www.dekalbmobilemarket.com.

Decatur Catholic school to host open house
St. Peter Claver Regional Catholic School—
located at 2560 Tilson Road—will host an open
house on Jan. 29 from 1 to 3 p.m. School administrators, teachers and staff will provide tours
and answer questions about the school’s curriculum.
St. Peter Claver offers education from prekindergarten to eighth grade. Classrooms combine grade levels and combine technology into
the curriculum.
For more information, contact Admissions
Director Joanne Doute-Cooper at jdoute-cooper@spc-school.org or (404) 241-3063.

Parks and cultural affairs to host fatherdaughter dance
The DeKalb County Department of Recreation,
Parks and Cultural Affairs will host its FatherDaughter Dance at Callanwolde Fine Arts Center at
980 Briarcliff Road, Atlanta on Feb. 2 from 6:30 to 9
p.m.
The father-daughter dance is for all ages and costs
$15 per couple and $5 for each additional child. The
event will include music, refreshments and dancing.
Guests are asked to “dress to impress.”
To access online registration, visit www.
dekalbcountyga.gov/parks and click register Online,
or register in person at any DeKalb recreation center.
For more information, contact LaShanda Davis,
public relations specialist, at (404)-371-3643 or
lsdavis@dekalbcountyga.gov.

VFW holding fundraiser
The VFW in Decatur will be holding a Super
Bowl party fundraiser. The party will be held Feb. 5
and admission price is $10. Those in attendance will
receive a free buffet. Doors open at 3 p.m. and will
be located at VFW POST 4706 Covington Highway.
For more information contact Randy Mcfadden
(770) 882-7676.

DeKalb County Extension accepting
applications
DeKalb County Extension is accepting
applications for the DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market
stops for 2017. 
The market visits areas around the county four
days a week for 16 weeks.  Applications for the 2017
season will be accepted online through Feb. 20. 
The DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market is a program
of DeKalb County Extension with support from the
DeKalb County Board of Health.  The program is
made possible with funding from the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention.
For information regarding the application
process or other Extension programs, please contact

TUCKER
Library to host AARP tax assistance session
The 2017 AARP tax assistance session will be
held Feb. 3, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Tucker-Reid H.
Cofer Library. The AARP tax assistance session
is for lower-and middle-income taxpayers, with
special attention to those 60 years of age and
older. Service is on a first-come, first served
basis. Late arrivals may have to wait until the
next day on the schedule for service. The library
is located at 5234 LaVista Road. For more
information, call (770) 270-8234.

LITHONIA
Story time for preschoolers at library
The Lithonia-Davidson Library will have
story time for preschool-age children (12
months to 5 year olds) Feb. 7 from 12 to 12:30
p.m. There will be stories, rhymes, finger plays,
songs and more. The library is located at 6821
Church Street. For more information, call (770)
482-3820.

LOCAL

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017 • Page 4

‘A discourse on brotherly love’

Local author discusses Resurrecting
Abel, his latest book discussing lack
of ‘fraternal love’
by R. Scott Belzer
sbelzer@dekalbchamp.com
According to local author
Marcus Johnson Jr., one of
the first steps in addressing
problems in the AfricanAmerican community is
addressing a lack of respect.
Johnson released his second
book, Resurrecting Abel: A
Discourse on Brotherly Love,
on Jan. 6. The 45-page book
addresses what Johnson sees as
a lack of fraternal love in the
Black community, its causes
and residual effects.
Johnson’s previous book,
Concentrated Blackness, looked
at ways in which the Black
community can come together.
He said Resurrecting Abel
suggests a step that should
be taken first—loving thy
neighbor.
“The book looks at probably
the biggest cause of disharmony
within the Black community,
which is a lack of love,” Johnson
said.
Resurrecting Abel is
divided into three sections:
“Death,” “Resurrection,” and
“Possibility,” which examine
such topics as mythology, slang,
church and literature.
In “Death,” Johnson
examines well-known instances
of fratricide—the killing of one’s
brother or sister—around the
world. By using examples such
as Cain and Abel, Romulus
and Remus, Osiris and Set,
Johnson writes that fratricide

can be linked to military events
(friendly fire) as well as violence
in the Black community.
Johnson said he titled the
book Resurrecting Abel after
seeing many examples of
fratricide in the Bible. He said
Cain and Abel can be used as a
parallel to the Black community
due to instances of jealousy,
differences and a failure to
appreciate differences.
“Even non-Christians know
that Cain killed Abel,” Johnson
said. “One couldn’t appreciate
the other—the Bible says God
favored Abel’s offering—but
instead of Cain figuring out
how to make his offering
more favorable to God, he just
destroyed his brother. We need
to resurrect Abel, we need to
love him back to life.”
“Resurrection” discusses
obstacles in developing Black
fraternal love, which includes
unhealthy competition,
homophobia and self-hatred.
“When you explore
those areas, you can see how
competition can be both helpful
and harmful,” Johnson said.
“When you look at examples of
fratricide like Cain and Abel,
the twins who found Rome or
the twins who found Egypt, you
can see it’s because of unhealthy
competition.”
According to Johnson,
cures to such issues include
acknowledgment, validation,
encouragement and the
demonstration or articulation
of love.
Citing Joy DeGruy’s Post

Local author Marcus Johnson Jr. hopes to end disharmony in the Black community by promoting fraternal fellowship.
Photo by R. Scott Belzer

Traumatic Slave Disorder,
Johnson explains a dichotomy
in the Black community where
even greeting one another can
have disastrous consequences.
“In a lot of places in
Africa, they have a greeting in
various languages that means
‘I see you,’” Johnson said.
“Viewing each other here,
even looking at each other,
can cause discomfort as well
as other problems. When I
walk past you in the street, I
should be speaking to you and
acknowledging your existence.
When you see or pass by your
family members at home, you
speak to your family members.”
“Resurrection,” according to
Johnson, also asks a reader to
perform exercises. The reader
will note how many Black men
are spoken to as well as how

many are validated, encouraged
and appreciated.
“Validation is about more
than acknowledging an
existence, it’s saying ‘Hey, I
appreciate you and you belong
here,’” Johnson said. “Me
asking how you’re doing is
just as important as me seeing
you. When one of us is doing
something right or trying to do
something right, we don’t need
to tear each other down—we
need to encourage one another.”
Johnson said articulating
value between males is often the
result of something negative,
such as imbibing too much
alcohol or an unforeseen death.
“Why do you have to
be intoxicated to tell your
homeboy or your friend that
you love them?” Johnson said.
“Why do we have to be at

someone’s deathbed in order
to talk about how much we
appreciate them? Or at funerals
to hug each other?”
Johnson said he was
inspired to write Resurrecting
Abel as a retort to those believe
police brutality is warranted in
the Black community.
“Saying, ‘Black-on-Black
violence is a problem so we
shouldn’t pay attention to
Blue-on-Black violence,’ is
inappropriate,” Johnson said.
“The fact that Black-on-Black
violence is there to be used
in that way anyway is the
responsibility of the Black
community. Black-on-Black
violence and how we treat each
other is an issue.”
Resurrecting Abel is available
at Amazon.com as well as
BarnesandNobel.com.

DeKalb officer allegedly leaks nude photos
by Horace Holloman
horace@dekalbchamp.com
A DeKalb County
Police officer is accused of
releasing nude photos of an
acquaintance on social media
platforms.
Audrey Francisquini
reportedly hacked into an
acquaintance’s social media
account and posted nude
photos of the accuser and
was charged by police in
connection with the incident.
On Dec. 30 last year, the

accuser said she
media accounts you
began receiving
are able to upload
phone calls and
any picture from
text messages from
the account holder’s
friends saying they
phone as long as they
saw nude pictures of
are connected to that
her that were posted
social media account
to her Instagram and
and she believes this is
Snapchat accounts.
how the pictures were
Francisquini
According to a
posted,” the police
police report, the
report said.
accuser checked her email
According to the report,
and found that the passwords
Francisquini began texting the
to her social media accounts
accuser before the incident
had been changed and she was stating “you ain’t shit” and
unable to access them.
“you’re going to learn.” The
“She advised on social
report describes the two as

coworkers and acquaintances.
DeKalb County Public
Information Officer Stephen
Fore said the accuser and
Francisquini do not work
together at the DeKalb County
Police Department.
“[The accuser] is unaware
of where this behavior came
from and says she talked to this
coworker several days prior
and everything was okay,” the
report says.
According to Fore, “the
accused is currently on
administrative leave pending
the outcome of an internal

investigation.  She was hired
on April 11, 2016.”
Fore said he is unaware of
whether the photos have been
removed from social media.
The accused said she’s
unaware of any other
individuals who could be
involved in incident and
that she’s been receiving
text messages from a phone
number that may be connected
to a Whatsapp account
belonging to Francisquini.

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017

LOCAL

Page 5

Constellations takes theatergoers
through worlds of possibilities
by Kathy Mitchell
Horizon Theatre on Jan. 17
offered an audience what it calls
a “sneak peek” at the its season
opening play, Constellations.
Lisa Adler, who fills many
roles at Horizon, including
producing director, introduced
Constellations saying, “When
I read there was an awardwinning play with just two actors,
I thought, ‘I’ve got to check this
out.’”
Constellations was not
performed in full for the sneak
peek. Instead, sample scenes
were staged with commentary
from the actors and other key
production figures.
The play, which at its heart
is the time-honored boy-meetsgirl story, plays out through
the complex lens of theoretical
physics. It is a major departure
from what theatergoers may
typically see. Applying what
physicists call string theory—
which suggests that every
moment has infinite possibilities
depending on decisions or
circumstances—the play
imagines a vast number of
directions a relationship might
take.
Instead of a universe, there
is a “multi-verse” in which the
possibilities of a single moment
are infinite. The characters
remain true to who they are, but
their lives change dramatically
as sometimes seemingly
insignificant occurrences change
their trajectory. Although physics
is a driver of the story, no
knowledge of relativity, quantum
mechanics or string theory is
required to follow the play.
“It’s like playing 50 roles
in one play. It can get pretty
demanding,” said Enoch King,
who plays Roland, a beekeeper
who by chance meets Marianne,
a Cambridge physics professor
played by Bethany Irby.
On the sneak peek evening,
the play was in the fourth
week of a five-week rehearsal
schedule, with opening night set
for Jan. 27. Final decisions were

Bethany Irby (Marianne) and Enoch King (Roland) star in Constellations . Photo by Britt Else

being made on some aspects of
production. The audience was
brought into a discussion of such
backstage elements as music
choices, lighting and set design,
details of which the author left to
producers. Sketches and a set
model were passed through of
audience so members could see
what these look like and a play is
developing.
The unconventional concept
of the play requires simple
staging because scenes change
often and quickly; elaborate set
changes would probably be both
impractical and a distraction.
The set is largely platforms and
boxes that sometimes double
as seats with a backdrop of
discs suspended on strings to
suggest the cosmos. In other
productions, set designers have
used balloons and other objects.
Platform tiles in hexagons
suggest a honeycomb while

a chandelier of strings above
the performers suggests the
multiverse. Subtle changes clue
audience members, who are left
to feel like eavesdroppers on a s
ometimes romantic, sometimes
sexy, sometimes turbulent
relationship, that the scene
has shifted form one reality to
another.
While a two-actor play with
a simple set is easier and less
expensive to stage than one with
a larger cast and a detailed set,
the producers of Constellations
took great care with even
small facets of the production.
“We really want to get it right,”
explained Adler.
Getting it right meant gaining
new skills and knowledge for
the actors. With help from the
Atlanta Beekeepers Association,
for example, the staff visited a
hive to study the habits of bees.
“There was one bee—just one,”

King insisted, “that was out to
get me.”
Written by British playwright
Nick Payne, the play is set in
London so both actors were
coached through British accents.
Additionally, a scene calls for
both to use sign language—
British Sign Language, which
apparently is different from
American Sign Language. The
producers started a worldwide
search for a person who could
teach the language of the mute
as it’s spoken in the United
Kingdom. The person they found
was caring for her dying father
and communicated by Skype
from the father’s bedroom.
Constellations will be at
the Horizon Theatre Jan. 27Feb. 26. The theater is located
at 1083 Austin Ave., Atlanta.
For more information, call
(404) 584-7450 or visit info@
horizontheatre.com.

OPINION

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017

Page 6

MLK Jr. marching band deserves an ovation
If I had the ability to make
others do as I wish, I would
make everyone in DeKalb
County watch the portion of the
Tournament of Roses parade
that was televised on Jan. 2
showing the Martin Luther King
Jr. marching band performing.
During the parade–held in
Pasadena, Calif.–200 musicians
from MLK High School in
Lithonia who had traveled to the
West Coast performed. They
were among a select group–just
one of 21 marching bands–and
one of 12 high school marching
bands invited to participate.
However, it’s not merely their
performance that should be
noted but the determination and
perseverance that it took to get

Gale Horton Gay
gale@dekalbchamp.com

them there. For more than two
years these young people have
known about this momentous
event and have worked to make
what had to have seemed like a
far-off dream become a reality.
Of course, these students
had to practice, practice,
practice the music and
rehearse, rehearse, rehearse
the coordinated movements
for which they are known. At

Letter
Sheriff Jeff Mann’s
response to Nov. –
Dec. 2016 Grand
Jury Presentments
As DeKalb County Sheriff,
I am outraged by the way the
former DeKalb County District
Attorney’s administration has
blatantly misrepresented this
agency to the Grand Jury.
The allegations and
insinuations made in the
November-December Term
2016 Grand Jury Presentments
regarding the DeKalb County
Sheriff’s Office are intentionally
false and misleading. It is
clear that the former DA’s
administration had an agenda
in providing the Grand Jury with
misinformation about this agency
and its leadership. I believe the
former DA’s administration set
out to discredit the outstanding
service of the Sheriff’s Office

the same time there was also
school work, jobs, community
involvement, family life and
more. And plenty of money
had to be to raised–$400,000–
approximately $2,000 per
student to pay for the trip. But
they did it and when the band
and the drum majors were in
the spotlight during the parade
they didn’t disappoint. More
than 1.5 million people watched
and TV hosts gushed over their
performance.
At a time when an exorbitant
amount of attention is paid to
those young people who are
engaged in bad behavior, class
acts such as these students
too often are not celebrated. At
a time, when too many of our

to the

Jeffrey L. Mann
DeKalb County Sheriff

and to impugn our reputation to
the public.
I do not fault members of the
Grand Jury but I need to set the
record straight.
The Grand Jury report
refers to two cases involving
the Sheriff’s Office employees
and alleges that the employees
“seemed to have received
special treatment by the Sheriff
and the agency.”
In State v. Dozier, an officer
violated the Use of Force Policy
during a jail incident and was
demoted to a position where he
had no contact with inmates.
Allegations that the video
documenting the incident was
“lost” are completely untrue
and well-documented. In State

students are discredited due to
controversies over test scores
and how schools should operate,
these students are making
outstanding achievements. At
a time when many doubt that
the younger generation is up to
the task of being responsible
members of society, these
students demonstrate that the
future will be in good hands.
These teens represent
the vast majority of our future
leaders and community
members. They have goals and
vision, they know how to work
hard and they understand that
success isn’t instantaneous.
Congrats to the MLK Kings
of Halftime, you sure made us
proud!

Editor

v. Brown, an officer violated
an administrative rule of the
Georgia Crime Information
Center (GCIC), along with
our agency policy and was
counseled and re-trained
regarding the offense.
The Sheriff’s Office can and
does police itself effectively. We
have a disciplinary action policy
and a schedule of penalties
that we follow. The process
allows appeals by employees
as well as opportunities to
grieve a disciplinary action.
The processes are in place
to ensure equity and fairness
to our employees. The report
acknowledges that our Office
of Professional Standards
conducted investigations and
confirmed the policy violations.
Disciplinary actions followed
in each instance. Yet, this
information was not provided to
the Grand Jury.
The former DA’s
administration misrepresented to
the Grand Jury that the agency
failed to provide information to

their office. Untrue. Our regular
and timely cooperation with
the DA’s administration is welldocumented.
I sincerely hope that
reason will prevail regarding
the recommendation for an
investigation of the DeKalb
County Sheriff’s Office. And, it
is my intention to share these
facts presented here with the
incoming Grand Jury.
The DeKalb County Sheriff’s
Office aspires to transparency,
accountability and integrity in all
that we do for the public safety
of the communities we serve.
As I enter my first full term
as Sheriff of DeKalb County,
I will not settle for less than
operational excellence and
professionalism. Fortunately, I
believe these goals are shared
by our team of dedicated sworn
officers and civilians.
Jeffrey L. Mann, Esq.
Sheriff
January 13, 2017

Subscribe to The Champion Newspaper
To subscribe, visit TheChampionNewspaper.com or call 404.373.7779

OPINION

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017

Page 7

It’s time–a mandatory minimum salary
for law enforcement
“During 2016 there were
140 law enforcement officers
who lost lives in the line of duty
across the country.  Of those
deaths,106 were men and women
in local city/county police and
deputy sheriffs, 19 were state
officers, six were federal officers
and the remaining nine were
college, territory or transit system
officers,” Putnam County Sheriff
Howard Sills, former president
and currently 2nd vice president,
Georgia Sheriffs’ Association.
 
Despite leaving home and
placing their lives potentially
on the line every day, a POSTcertified law enforcement officer
in Georgia has no statewide
mandatory minimum salary, as
our school teachers and most
state government employees
do by job classification. Thanks
though to the leadership of Gov.
Nathan Deal and the Georgia
General Assembly, all of Georgia’s
State Patrol, GBI, crime lab,
corrections officers and other state
law enforcement officers recently
received a raise of 20 percent. A
starting Georgia State Patrol
trooper, after completing basic
training, will earn $46,422 per
year.
 Contrast that with your local
deputy sheriff or police officer,
on the front lines of public safety,
where there is no set minimum
salary. Average starting pay for
a deputy sheriff in Georgia is
$29,900, and average starting
jailer pay is $25,300. When
it comes to law enforcement
comparisons, our average pay
is lower than that it Alabama,
both Carolinas, Florida and
Tennessee. Our current overall
law enforcement average
compensation is 36 percent
below the national average.
Even the much-touted $15 an

‘One Man’s
Opinion’
Bill Crane

bill.csicrane@gmail.com

hour minimum wage for fast food
restaurant workers produces an
annual minimum full-time salary of
$31,200.
It is long past time to better
support and thank our men and
women in brown and blue, and
though resources and tax dollars
are not unlimited, here are some
ways to increase their pay:
Mandate minimum salary—
Minimum annual compensation
should be set by statute. As with
our branches of military service,
there should be pay grade parity
by office and seniority. With
the recent raise for state law
enforcement, it may take several
years to close the gap, but in time
an entry-level salary for a local
police officer or deputy sheriff
should match the starting pay of a
state trooper, and a trained and
certified county jailer should make
as much as a Georgia state prison
corrections officer.
 
An L-SPLOST for funding
local law enforcement—There
are E-SPLOST for local education,
T-SPLOST for transportation
funding and a variety of other
projects such as parks, libraries
and government buildings are
funded by Special Purpose Local
Option Sale Tax. Statewide
penny, or fraction of same, can be
framed as an L-SPLOST for voter
approval, with all proceeds funding
law enforcement salaries and/or
benefits for local law enforcement
personnel.
 

FREEPRESS

State income tax credit—A
state income tax credit of $2,500
for jailers, corrections officers,
juvenile detention officers and
others earning less than $40,000
per year from their primary
agency. 
Minimum salary for
Georgia’s sheriffs—Sheriffs
are constitutional officers and
the chief law enforcement
officer in each of Georgia’s 159
counties. Their salaries are set
by statute and a funding formula
based on population, but it has
been many years since the last
compensation adjustment and
recent criminal justice reform
did significantly increase the
compensation of all Georgia
judges on State Court, Superior
Court, the Court of Appeals and
State Supreme Court.
The budget for each sheriff’s
office is determined by respective
county commission. In metro
and rural areas alike, Georgia
sheriffs are hard-pressed to find
new recruits to train and swear
into office, as the costs of being a
deputy, sheriff or wearing a badge

the DeKalb

Let Us Know What You Think!
SEND LETTERS TO EDITOR,
The DeKalb Free Press,
P. O. Box 1347, Decatur, GA 30031-1347;
Send email to Johnh@dekalbchamp.com
FAX To: (404) 370-3903; Phone: (404) 373-7779.
Deadline for news releases and advertising:
Thursday, one week prior to publication date.

THE CHAMPION FREE PRESS encourages opinions
from its readers. Please write to us and express your
views. Letters should be brief, typewritten and contain
the writer’s name, address and telephone number for
verification. All letters will be considered for publication.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The opinions written by columnists and contributing editors do not necessarily reflect the opinions
of the editor or publishers. The Publisher reserves the right to reject or cancel any advertisement at any time. The
Publisher is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts.

Publisher:
John Hewitt

Photographer:
Travis Hudgons

Chief Financial Officer:
Dr. Earl D. Glenn

Staff Reporters:
Carla Parker
R. Scott Belzer
Horace Holloman

Production Manager:
Kemesha Wadley

The DeKalb Free Press is published each Friday
by ACE III Communications, Inc.,
114 New Street, Suite E, Decatur, GA. 30030
Phone (404) 373-7779.
www.championnewspaper.com
DISPLAY ADVERTISING (404) 373-7779 x 110

just keep getting higher by the day.
 Of the 140 officers killed
during 2016, 65 died as a result
of gunfire. This is an increase
of 69 percent over 2015. Just
during November and December
of 2016, nine officers were shot in
Georgia, most not in major metro
areas. Five of those died. 
Georgia ended 2016
ranking fourth in line of duty
deaths. This isn’t one of those top
10 lists we want to be on. Law
enforcement recruiting is at a
critical stage. Finding and keeping
good talent at existing wages
becomes more difficult every day.
Let’s change the metrics or watch
those statistics head in a much
scarier direction in no time.
Bill Crane also serves as a
political analyst and commentator
for Channel 2’s Action News, WSBAM News/Talk 750 and now 95.5
FM, as well as a columnist for The
Champion, Champion Free Press
and Georgia Trend. Crane is a
DeKalb native and business owner,
living in Scottdale. You can reach
him or comment on a column at
bill.csicrane@gmail.com.

STATEMENT FROM THE
PUBLISHER
We sincerely appreciate the
discussion surrounding this and any
issue of interest to DeKalb County.
The Champion was founded in 1991
expressly to provide a forum for
discourse for all community residents
on all sides of an issue. We have no
desire to make the news only to
report news and opinions to effect
a more educated citizenry that will
ultimately move our community
forward. We are happy to present
ideas for discussion; however,
we make every effort to avoid
printing information submitted to
us that is known to be false and/or
assumptions penned as fact.

LOCAL

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017 • Page 8

County officials, residents
ready for ‘new day in DeKalb’
by Horace Holloman
horace@dekalbchamp.com
When his schedule
allows, newly elected DeKalb
County Commissioner Steve
Bradshaw, representing
District 4, heads to the gym
promptly at 5 a.m. four times
a week.
However, his gym schedule
has been a little sporadic
lately. Bradshaw, who defeated
former DeKalb County
Commissioner Sharon Barnes
Sutton, said he’s still getting
adjusted to taking office.
Bradshaw, along with
Commissioner Gregory
Adams and CEO Michael
Thurmond, are a few of
the new faces in county
government.
Bradshaw said DeKalb
County residents seem
“cautiously optimistic” about
having new faces in the county
government.
In an interview with The
Champion Jan. 12, Bradshaw
said the county has a long way
to go to restore trust in their
government.  
“I’m going to work on
the things that I ran on and
the first thing we have to
do is restore the public’s
trust in DeKalb County,”
Bradshaw said. “That’s not a
one event thing. That’s going
to take place over time. Little
decisions day in and day out
and showing people that we’re
working on their behalf. That’s
first and foremost.”
Restoring trust with
residents will be an uphill
battle, Bradshaw said.
“When you mess up, fess
up,” he said. “It’s when you
mess up and try to hide things,
that’s when you get in trouble
and people start to get uneasy.”
During the Board of
Commissioners first regular
meeting of the year, several
residents expressed the
cautious optimism Bradshaw
spoke of. With the addition
of Adams, the board of
commissioners have all seven
districts represented.
The Champion was unable
to schedule an interview with
Adams, after repeatead calls
were made to his office.
“I’m so proud today that
we have seven commissioners
at one time,” said John Evans,
a longtime civil rights activist
in DeKalb County. “We have
four Blacks and three Whites.
It’s a new agenda. Now you’re

Avondale Estates has decided to move forward with its
annexation proposal.

Avondale Estates to move
forward with annexation plans
New names are pictured on the DeKalb County Government building in
downtown Decatur. Among the new names are CEO Michael Thurmond, Commissioner Gregory Adams and Commissioner Steve Bradshaw. Photo by Travis
Hudgons

going to have to decide how
you’re going to operate it...It’s
a new day. The whole thing
starts today.”
One issue that seems to be
at the top of the agenda for
the county government is the
water billing crisis.
Some DeKalb County
residents are still frustrated
over what some call “a
systemic issue” with the
county’s water billing system.
Thurmond said the issue
is one of his top priorities
and offered an apology to
taxpayers.
“I offer my apologies to
customers that have been
negatively impacted...it’s
unacceptable,” Thurmond said.
Bradshaw said he will defer
to Thurmond in water billing
matters, but said the issue is at
the top of his agenda as well.
“The water billing, I know,
is at the very top of the CEO’s
agenda. He’s been in meeting
after meeting and I’ve passed
by him in the last several
weeks or so and I know [water
billing] is at the top of my
agenda,” Bradshaw said.
DeKalb County resident
Joel Edwards said he was
hopeful that the new year
would be about change in
DeKalb County government.
“We hope, we the people

hope and voted for a change
in DeKalb County,” Edwards
said. “We voted for one
DeKalb County and we’re
hoping you make the right
decision moving this county
forward.”
Commissioners may also
look at an increase in pay for
firefighters and police in 2017.
Adams, a former DeKalb
County police officer, ran on
a platform of increasing pay
for the county’s firefighter and
police personnel.
Adams said he’s worked
with Commissioner Larry
Johnson on the issue.
Bradshaw called DeKalb
County’s inability to retain
police officers and firefighters
a “crisis” and said he plans to
work on a pay increase for
those workers. Bradshaw said
he and Public Safety Director
Cedric Alexander have had
a long discussion regarding
retaining officers in the
county.
“We need to make sure
we address what I regard as a
borderline crisis in our public
safety departments around
turnover. We need to keep our
officers here,” Bradshaw said.
“[Alexander] has put together
a comprehensive plan...at the
end of the day it’s about setting
that as a priority.”

by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
The Avondale Estates
Board of Mayor and
Commissioners will move
forward with its annexation
proposal.
During the board’s Jan.
18 work session, Dr. Kris
Sikes, public service associate
at the University of Georgia
Carl Vinson Institute of
Government, presented the
feasibility study for the city’s
proposed annexation. The
city wants to annex the Forest
Hills and Decatur Terrace
neighborhoods, commercial
property along E. Ponce de
Leon Ave. and Rio Circle,
property along Rockbridge
Road and the American
Legion.
Sikes did the annexation
study for the city last year
when the city was considering
annexation.
“The methodology is the
same; we just updated it with
new information,” Sikes said.
Sikes and her staff studied
whether the estimated
municipal revenues derived in
the proposed annexed areas
will be greater or less than the
cost to provide services in the
areas compared to the city
residents and businesses.
According to the study,
to estimate the revenues that
would have been generated

from the proposed areas,
actual numbers were collected
for revenue categories in
which data was available and
estimated other revenues using
information on the proposed
area’s population, number
of households, number of
businesses and property tax
information.
The institute estimated
that if the proposed areas had
been part of the city in fiscal
year 2015, the areas would
have produced approximately
$1,487,542 in gross new
revenues or $939.70 per capita,
according to the study. The
city would receive $1,173,382
in general fund revenues if
the city were to annex the
proposed areas.
Mayor Jonathan Elmore
said the city will move forward
with the annexation and will
begin having meetings with
homeowners and business
owners in the proposed areas.
“The next step is to talk
to those groups, arrange
meetings, share what the
feasibility study has shown us,
answer any questions they may
have and make our pitch as to
why we feel like they would be
better off joining Avondale,”
Elmore said. “But we had to
get the feasibility study first to
do that so that we’ll have good
numbers.
“Obviously, we’ll have
to reach out to our [DeKalb

See Avondale on Page 14A

LOCAL

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017 • Page 9

Water billing woes
continue to flow
The city of Gaochun in the Nanjing Province of China was officially named
Doraville’s sister city on Jan. 17, after representatives from a Chinese developer
contacted city officials. Photos submitted.

Gaochun is known throughout China for its lakes and freshwater crab and holds an annual crab festival. Photos
submitted.

A tale of two cities

City of Gaochun in Nanjing Province named Doraville’s sister city
by R. Scott Belzer
sbelzer@dekalbchamp.com
Doraville’s current events,
city government and way of life
have not gone unnoticed on
the opposite side of the world,
according to city officials.
On Jan. 17, Doraville
officially became the sister
city of Gaochun, a city in the
Nanjing Province of China.
“This is a great opportunity
for us to build community
relationships and show that
we are a city that welcomes
everyone,” said Doraville
Mayor Donna Pittman. “This
is a great opportunity to come
together as one. It’s an honor
that they approached us.”
According to the city’s
official resolution, Gaochun
officials contacted Doraville
for the purpose of fostering
goodwill, establishing a
deeper friendship and mutual
understanding through
educational, cultural, sporting
and commercial exchanges.
Gaochun is the
southernmost of 11 districts in
the Nanjing Province of China
and home to approximately
430,000 residents. According

to its website, it is known
throughout China for its
freshwater crab and holds an
annual crab festival. It is also
known for its ecological strides
in development as well as its
traditional bazaar shopping
district.
Doraville Police Chief
John King said representatives
from a Gaochun development
company approached Doraville
officials approximately one
year ago about becoming sister
cities.
“They said they
would really like to have
representatives from Doraville
go to Nanjing,” King said.
“They are very interested
in having a sister city
relationship.”
King said the Chinese
company regularly keeps
up with Doraville events,
government and cultural
climate through the city’s
website and DeKalb
County media. Gaochun
representatives were impressed
with the number of Asian
residents, who make up
approximately 20 percent of
the city population.
“They’re very
knowledgeable about this

PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF MUNICIPAL OFFICE
QUALIFYING FEES
DECATUR CITY COMMISSION AND
DECATUR BOARD OF EDUCATION
NOVEMBER 7, 2017 ELECTION
Pursuant to O.C.G.A. 21-2-131 the City of Decatur
City Commission has fixed the qualifying fee for City
Commission at $ 144.00 and fixed the qualifying
fee for Board of Education member at $ 35.00.
Additional information may be obtained by calling
the City Clerk’s Office at 404-370-4100 ext. 6503
between 8:30 A.M. until 4:30 P.M. Monday through
Friday.

community and know we have
a very large Asian community,”
King said. “They’re very
impressed with the diversity
of our community. They are
focused on the west coast, but
not on the east coast, especially
the southeast. Doraville
seemed like a natural place for
them to start a relationship.”
Like Doraville, King
said, Gaochun is trying to
modernize its community
while maintaining its
traditional construction.
According to Sister Cities
International, sister cities,
counties or states are longterm partnerships between two
communities in two countries.
The partnerships typically
involve back-and-forth
volunteers, nonprofits and
other civic organizations.
Benefits between sister
cities range from cultural to
commercial and participants
often form strategic
international business links.

by Horace Holloman
horace@dekalbchamp.com
For years, DeKalb County
residents have urged county
officials to take action with
ongoing water billing issues,
according to a DeKalb County
resident.
County officials have
attempted to address water
billing issues with town
hall meetings and issuing a
moratorium on water billing
disconnections, but some say
it’s not enough.
Molly Badgett said she
was fed up with the county’s
response to water billing issues
over the years and hoped the
new administration would take
action.
In a recent board of
commissioners meeting she
addressed CEO Michael
Thurmond.
“I just want to say, nothing
can win the hearts and minds
of the people of DeKalb
County in your favor as [much
as] resolving this issue of
water billing,” Badgett said,
directing her comments to
Thurmond in a Jan. 10 Board
of Commissioners meeting.
“People were overbilled...paid
too much for water and they
need to be reimbursed and
given credit. Water should not
cost this much.”
Badgett, a member of the
Facebook group Unbelievable
DeKalb Water Bills, said she
wants the administration to
take action necessary to help its
residents.
“People want answers,

they deserve answers. This
kind of crap has got to stop.
[Commissioner] Nancy Jester
is the only one handling this
issue. Where are the other
commissioners in handling this
problem?” Badgett said.
Badgett also said she was
upset with the county’s lack of
updates on its official website.
“I have... been bugging
Burke Brennan [DeKalb press
secretary] to death. Residents
need communication. This has
been going on for two years or
longer. The only thing on the
website now is a reference to a
moratorium, which has already
ended,” Badgett said. “No one’s
posting information about this
problem.”
Jester said she would
continue to address the matter
of water billing issues. Jester,
who co-hosted a town hall with
other commissioners in 2016,
said she’s hopeful the issues
will be resolved with the new
administration.
“I look forward to working
with our new presiding officer
[Kathie Gannon]. We have a
lot to address this year. I want
to fix the water billing issues
and we need to communicate
with the public more robustly,”
Jester said.
Thurmond said the county’s
water billing issues may be
systematic. Before leaving
office, former DeKalb County
CEO Burrell Ellis wrote an
open letter late last year to the
public diagnosing the problem.
He wrote that DeKalb County
has inaccurate data in its billing
software due to switching from
outdated to new meters.

PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF BROOKHAVEN
FIXING OF QUALIFYING FEES
The date of the Municipal Election for the seats of Council Districts 2 (two) and 4 (four) is Tuesday, November 7, 2017. The qualifying fee for each council seat is $360.00, which is 3% of the total gross salary
of the preceding year (Georgia Election Code 21-2-131 (a) (1) (A). Each candidate shall file a notice of
candidacy in the office of the City Clerk of Brookhaven, 4362 Peachtree Road, Georgia between Wednesday, August 23, 2017 and Friday, August 25, 2017, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m., and
1:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. (Georgia Election Code 21-2-132 (d) (3). Each candidate must meet the qualifications of the Charter and Code of the City of Brookhaven, as well as applicable State laws.
Susan D. Hiott
City Clerk

CITY OF CHAMBLEE, GA
PUBLIC NOTICE
Qualifying fees were set by the City of Chamblee Mayor and Council in
accordance to O.C.G.A. 21-2-131 (a)(1), during the regularly scheduled Council
Meeting held on December 20, 2016 for the City of Chamblee General Election
to be held on November 7, 2017 as follows: for the office of Mayor - $540.00;
for the office of Councilmember District One and Councilmember At-Large $360.00.
Emmie Niethammer
City Clerk/Election Superintendent

LOCAL

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017 • Page 10

Sex in the suburbs

More than 50 arrests take place in prostitution
rings in Dunwoody, Atlanta apartment complexes
by R. Scott Belzer
sbelzer@dekalbchamp.com

An alleged “high-end”
sex trafficking ring made up
of more than 50 people was
broken up in late December
and early January by the
Dunwoody Police Department.
On Jan. 18, officials said
they arrested three individuals
believed to be the leaders
of the operation—Samuel
and Darliene Crenshaw of
Kennesaw as well as George
Moore of Sandy Springs—
who all face sex trafficking,
racketeering, prostitution and
pimping charges.
Police say the trio headed
two prostitution organizations
known as Gold Club Atlanta
Escorts and Lipstick & Shoes
Escorts.
As of Jan. 19, Gold Club
Atlanta has a Facebook page
and message board advertising
“models” with blurred out faces.
Both websites date back to 2011
and posts indicate it is based
out of Dunwoody. The websites
list a phone number to call for
service.
“Ladies available today
and tomorrow!!” reads one
Facebook post.
“Check out Sloane’s
reviews!” reads another,
complete with a link to the
website The Erotic Review.
The website’s message
board shows the latest activity
was in July 2014, with a user
by the name of “acaryu”
soliciting services for “Casey”
and suggesting they meet for
a drink at Oasis Goodtime
Emportium, located at 6363
Peachtree Industrial Blvd.
Lipstick & Shoes also has a
website with a phone number
and lists Dunwoody as its
headquarters.
Dunwoody Police also
announced the arrest of 29
females on prostitution charges
with ages ranging from 18 to
42 years of age. The police said
24 clients or “buyers” were also
arrested in connection to the
operations with Christopher
Quinn, a Gwinnett County
assistant district attorney,
named among them.
“More arrests are expected
as the identities of the buyers
are confirmed,” states a release
from the Dunwoody Police
Department.

According to Dunwoody
Police Chief Billy Grogan,
the Crenshaws and Moore ran
two prostitution rings in four
separate locations in apartment
complexes in Dunwoody and
Atlanta. One apartment, located
in the Savannah at Park Place
complex, is across the street
from the Dunwoody Police
Department at 41 Perimeter
Center East.
“There is no dispute that
this was a criminal enterprise
for commercial sex operating
here in Dunwoody,” Grogan
said. “It was a prolonged
investigation but the detectives
did a good job… Whether it
was happening in [a nearby]
apartment complex or three
miles down the road, it was still
happening. It concerns us and
it concerns the quality of life in
Dunwoody.”
Grogan said police received
an anonymous tip about
the operations in the fall of
2016. Following months of
surveillance and investigation,
as well as corroboration with
the Atlanta Police Department,
Cobb County Police
Department, Clayton County
Police Department and Sandy
Springs Police Department,
seven arrests took place Dec.
29 through Jan. 2—including
Moore and Samuel Crenshaw.
“Our message to anyone
that would be interested in
becoming a buyer and soliciting
sex is ‘Don’t do it,’” Grogan
said. “The people that you
deal with, you don’t know
their circumstances and you’re
furthering a criminal enterprise
when you do so. It damages
families.”
Grogan speculated the
escort services took root in
Dunwoody due to its proximity
to interstates, Atlanta, as well as
its reputation for affluence.
“Crime is no respecter of
any geographic boundaries,”
Grogan said. “Even affluent
areas are not immune to crime.
But thanks to a concerned
citizen, we found out about it.”
Grogan also said an
unidentified woman
disappeared soon after the sting
and remains missing.
DeKalb County District
Attorney Sherry Boston called
the bust an important first
step in addressing a serious
problem.
“Though this initiative was

Samuel Crenshaw, Darliene Crenshaw and George Moore are being charged
by Dunwoody police as the heads of two escort services known as Gold Club
Atlanta and Lipstick & Shoes. Photos submitted.

Dunwoody Police Chief Billy Grogan
said one unidentified woman remains
missing following the arrests and
police fear for her safety. Anyone who
recognizes her is encouraged to call
the Dunwoody Police Department.
Photo by R. Scott Belzer

centered in Dunwoody, it is
my hope that these arrests will
send a strong message beyond
this jurisdiction that these
crimes will not be tolerated in
DeKalb County,” Boston said.
“Both supply and demand
must be targeted if we are to
eradicate this problem.”
Boston said she would
conduct an additional external
investigation once Dunwoody
detectives submit an official
report.

Dunwoody Police Chief Billy Grogan and DeKalb County District Attorney Sherry
Boston revealed 56 people have been arrested in connection with two escort
services in Dunwoody. Photo by R. Scott Belzer

FREE Family Reunion Planning
Wo r k s h o p & S h o w c a s e

Discover DeKalb’s Reunion
Specialist will teach you
everything you need to know
to plan the perfect
Family Reunion in
DeKalb County!
Workshop - 10 a.m. to Noon
Showcase - Noon to 2 p.m.

Saturday, February 18, 2017
Hilton Garden Inn Atlanta
Perimeter Center
1501 Lake Hearn Drive
Atlanta, GA 30319

Pre-registration is required

Call 770-492-5018

Family Reunion Capital of the South

Register online at AtlantasDeKalb.com/Reunions

LOCAL

WEEKinPICTURES

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017 • Page 11

Officers with the Dunwoody Police Department take part in a night shift
parking lot roll call before a 12-hour shift on Jan. 16. Photo submitted.

A dog at the Oakhurst Dog Park in Decatur leaps into action. By Horace
Holloman

The DeKalb County Choir, made up of county employees, sings during the 33rd annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration. By Horace Holloman

Volunteers at the Dunwoody Nature Center dedicate their Martin Luther King Jr. Day to service. Photos submitted.

Clarkston Community Center submitted entries into the International Crafts and
Traditions exhibition on Jan. 21 at the Colquitt County Arts Center in Moultrie,
Ga. Photo submitted.

Have you created programming you’d like to air on TV?
Do you have an interest in Public Access TV in DeKalb County?
Submit your show to DeKalb County’s Public Access channel, DeKalb 25.
Drop off DVD or USB copies to the Manuel J. Maloof Center at
1300 Commerce Drive, Decatur, GA 30030, or upload your content via the internet.
(404) 371-2325

DeKalb25@outlook.com

DeKalb25.com

LOCAL

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017 • Page 12
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Total Revenue

The DeKalb County Board of Commissioners will hold Public Hearings on the 2017 Proposed Budget at the times and
places listed below:
Tuesday
Tuesday

February 14, 2017
February 28, 2017

10:00AM
10:00AM

Maloof Center Auditorium
1300 Commerce Drive, Decatur
Maloof Center Auditorium
1300 Commerce Drive, Decatur

All interested citizens are invited to attend these hearings and have the right to present comments pertaining to the
proposed budget.
The recommended budget is available for public inspection in the Office of Management & Budget, 6th Floor, Maloof
Center, at all DeKalb County Libraries during normal business hours, and electronically at www.dekalbcountyga.gov.

Tax Funds

DeKalb County, Georgia FY17 Proposed Budget Resolution
FY16 Current

FY17 Proposed

General Fund (100)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

Taxes
HOST Sales Taxes
Licenses & Permits
Intergovernmental
Charges for Services
Fines & Forfeitures
Investment Income
Miscellaneous
Other Financing Sources
Total Revenue

192,394,503
61,363,714
500
1,374,942
51,608,150
9,384,668
150,621
3,679,819
4,932,539
$ 324,889,456

187,489,744
52,504,504
0
1,307,432
50,080,545
9,582,853
0
5,709,528
4,262,107
$ 310,936,713

Animal Services
Board of Commissioners
Budget, Office of Mgt and
CEO/Exec Asst/Communications
Child Advocate
Citizen Help Center a.k.a. 311
Clerk of Superior Court
Community Service Board
Cooperative Extension
Debt
DEMA - Dekalb Emerg Mgt Agy
DFACS
District Attorney
Economic Dev (See Unincorp.)
Elections
Ethics Board
Facilities
Finance
Fire (General Fund)
Geographic Information Systems
Health, Board of
HOST Contributions
Human Resources
Human Services
Internal Audit
IT
Juvenile Court
Law
Library
Magistrate Court
Medical Examiner
Non-Departmental
Planning & Sustainability
Police (General Fund)
Probate Court
Property Appraisal
Public Defender
Public Works Director
Purchasing
Sheriff
Solicitor
State Court
Superior Court
Tax Commissioner
Total Expenses

3,982,740
3,465,890
1,159,431
3,754,088
2,565,239
358,416
7,599,511
1,984,057
921,939
5,337,319
295,445
1,278,220
15,088,485
1,637,500
4,342,902
300,000
17,381,090
8,717,756
8,728,585
2,595,280
4,155,634
4,891,824
3,961,254
5,224,320
1,000,000
24,442,521
7,021,701
4,561,293
16,090,421
3,480,018
2,571,654
23,685,058
1,820,199
8,744,507
1,786,053
5,411,049
9,263,672
740,650
3,079,252
82,524,100
7,605,409
15,659,020
9,605,748
8,079,976
$ 346,899,226

4,085,813
3,569,501
1,139,679
3,886,254
2,731,404
387,737
7,623,033
2,084,057
912,285
7,784,098
421,010
1,278,220
14,923,706
0
2,465,520
504,029
14,965,369
7,201,414
141,249
2,617,794
4,255,634
1,393,050
3,838,234
5,271,548
1,368,191
22,063,438
7,303,973
4,914,186
17,212,244
3,598,339
2,550,392
19,680,657
1,777,010
8,221,668
1,952,642
5,541,818
9,413,214
738,798
3,312,643
83,558,935
7,544,871
15,816,726
9,778,146
8,225,751
$ 328,054,280

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

$

Fire Fund (270)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

54,308,822

32,299,052

$

1,023,507

$

44,393,542
13,226,461
674,833
0
15,550
58,310,386

Debt
Fire
Non-Departmental
Total Expenses
Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

Taxes
HOST Sales Taxes
Charges for Services
Transfer from General Fund-Fire
Miscellaneous
Total Revenue

Designated Fund (271)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

40,191,087

23,073,520

$

2,777,937

$

53,408,316
11,571,716
674,833
141,249
13,800
65,809,914

$

0
51,174,313
5,791,146
56,965,459

$

280,941
60,441,288
5,757,213
66,479,442

$

2,368,434

$

2,108,409

$

404,643

$

23,622,391
4,513,481
706,781
172,096
2,189,359
14,030,040
45,234,148

$

6,676,198

$

25,023,028
6,372,171
762,900
173,995
2,500,000
4,496,531
39,328,625

Debt
Non-Departmental
Parks
Roads and Drainage
Transportation
Total Expenses

$

0
11,199,019
12,949,495
17,247,586
2,903,364
44,299,464

$

31,534
11,860,972
12,582,650
16,561,401
2,866,174
43,902,731

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

1,339,327

$

2,102,092

Unincorporated Fund (272)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

2,366,367

$

(476,800)

Taxes
Licenses & Permits
Fines & Forfeitures
Investment Income
Miscellaneous
Other Financing Sources
Trf to Designated Fund (271)
Trf to Police Fund (274)
Total Revenue

33,077,257
19,278,881
8,814,762
814
304,284
2,004,237
(14,765,289)
(36,366,599)
$ 12,348,347

$

4,835,983
17,162,039
8,202,876
0
47,208
3,271,101
(4,496,531)
(9,555,127)
19,467,549

Beautification
Economic Development
Plan & Sustain (Business Lic)
Traffic Court
Non-Departmental
Total Expenses

$

0
0
5,542,398
4,565,812
4,259,290
14,367,500

$

8,888,134
1,000,000
1,752,673
4,486,474
2,133,054
18,260,335

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

347,214

$

730,414

Hospital Fund (273)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

1,179,954

Taxes
HOST Sales Tax
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Other Financing Sources
Trf from Unincorp Fund (272)
Total Revenue

Taxes
Transfer from General
HOST Sales Taxes

14,283,289
0
5,082,572

$

(1,582,296)
13,957,750
4,310,520
3,972,380

$

19,365,861

Subsidy to Grady Hospital
Grady Bond Payments
Other Professional Services
Total Expenses

$

12,934,952
7,476,750
0
20,411,702

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

134,113

$

22,240,650

$

12,934,952
7,466,188
250,000
20,651,140
$

7,214

Police Fund (274)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

Taxes
HOST Sales Tax
Licenses & Permits
Anticipated Tucker Revenue
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Other Financing Sources
Tfr from Unincorp Fund (272)
Total Revenue

60,405,346
13,932,919
428,000
0
504,367
354,631
0
37,105,388
$ 112,730,651

76,404,869
16,480,379
428,000
0
450,000
270,000
159,080
9,555,127
$ 103,747,455

Debt (was in Non-Departmental)
Non-Departmental
Police
Total Expenses

0
8,653,500
98,457,396
$ 107,110,896

474,532
9,835,898
98,500,436
$ 108,810,866

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

2,643,209

$

Countywide Bond Fund (410)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

(2,976,546)

$

9,404,938

4,341,527

$

1,685,582

$

1,293,103

Taxes
Total Revenue

$

11,375,424
11,375,424

$

11,209,155
11,209,155

Debt Service
Total Expenses

$

11,625,700
11,625,700

$

11,939,200
11,939,200

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

1,435,306

$

563,058

Unincorporated Debt Svc (411)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

3,070,962

$

(136,956)

Taxes
Miscellaneous
Total Revenue

$

1,032,133
0
1,032,133

$

7,160,142
0
7,160,142

Debt Service
Total Expenses

$

4,114,870
4,114,870

$

6,829,788
6,829,788

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

(11,775)

$

193,398

61,063,291
585,286,406
605,794,817
$ 40,554,880

$

Tax Funds Summary
Starting Fund Balance
Revenues
Expenses
Ending Fund Balance

$

58,147,211
579,900,203
604,927,782
$ 33,119,632

Non-Tax Funds
Airport Fund (551)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

7,266,486

$

5,242,902

Miscellaneous (Airport)
Total Revenue

$

5,021,000
5,021,000

$

5,021,000
5,021,000

Airport
Transfer to Capital Improvements
Total Expenses

$

2,835,135
4,500,000
7,335,135

$

2,768,170
4,000,000
6,768,170

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

4,952,351

$

3,495,732

Bldg Auth Debt Svc Fund (412)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

1,344,190

$

53,721

$

2,382,504
2,382,504

$

3,728,754
3,728,754

$

3,726,694
3,726,694

$

3,728,754
3,728,754

0

$

53,721

Misc: Rental of Real Estate
Total Revenue
Debt Service
Total Expenses
Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)
County Jail Fund (204)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

$

337,579

$

434,988

Intergovernmental
Fines & Forfeitures
Total Revenue

$

120,000
1,175,000
1,295,000

$

118,000
1,151,500
1,269,500

County Jail
Total Expenses

$

1,632,579
1,632,579

$

1,704,488
1,704,488

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)
DCTV (PEG) Fund (203)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

0

$

0

$

1,632,106

$

744,439

Investment Income
Miscellaneous (PEG Fund)
Total Revenue

$

1,500
90,000
91,500

$

0
90,000
90,000

PEG Fund (Less Reserve)
Total Expenses

$

1,048,932
1,048,932

$

628,657
628,657

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

674,674

$

205,782

Development Fund (201)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

4,855,885

$

5,773,683

Licenses & Permits
Charges for Services
Investment Income
Miscellaneous (Development Fund)
Total Revenue

$

7,317,000
220,000
2,500
(4,000)
7,535,500

$

7,548,250
250,000
0
(6,500)
7,791,750

Plan. & Sustain. (less Reserves)
Total Expenses

$

8,026,958
8,026,958

$

7,421,514
7,421,514

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

4,364,427

$

6,143,919

Drug Abuse Tre/Ed Fund (209)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

197,224

$

181,412

Fines & Forfeitures
Investment Income
Total Revenue

$

225,625
150
225,775

$

215,000
0
215,000

Drug Abuse Treatment & Education
Total Expenses

$

422,999
422,999

$

396,412
396,412

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)
E911 Fund (215)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)
Investment Income
Miscellaneous (911 fees)

$

$

0

5,487,830
5,500
9,800,000

$

$

0

4,986,329
0
10,460,000

LOCAL
Total Revenue
E911
Total Expenses

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017 • Page 13
$

9,805,500

$

10,460,000

$

15,293,330
15,293,330

$

15,441,701
15,441,701

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

Foreclosure Reg. Fund (205)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)
Charges for Services
Total Revenue

0

$

473,016
$
$

160,000
160,000

Beautification
Planning
Total Expenses

4,628

141,419
$
$

130,000
130,000

$

0
511,336
511,336

$

257,914
0
257,914

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

121,680

$

13,505

Hotel/Motel Fund (275)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

2,159,559

$

2,789,603

$

5,645,000
5,645,000

$

5,400,000
5,400,000

$

3,414,489
1,463,350
2,926,720
7,804,559

$

3,582,951
1,535,551
3,071,101
8,189,603

Taxes
Total Revenue
DeKalb Convention & Visitors Bur
Tourism Product Development
Transfer to Unincorporated Fund
Total Expenses
Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)
Juvenile Services Fund (208)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)
Charges for Services
Investment Income
Total Revenue
Juvenile Court (Juvenile Services)
Total Expenses

$

0

$

30,384

$

25,999
150
26,149

$

56,533
56,533

$

0

$

45,332

$

49,000
0
49,000

$

94,332
94,332

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

0

$

0

Law Enf. Conf. Mon. Fund (210)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

0

$

0

Intergovernmental
Total Revenue
Police - Federal Drug Funds
Police - State Drug Funds
Police - Treasury
District Attorney - State Drug Funds
Sheriff- Federal Drug Funds
Sheriff- State Drug Funds
Total Expenses

$

8,543,790
8,543,790

$

4,675,984
1,424,453
621,132
300,789
1,521,235
197
8,543,790

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)
Pub Saf Jud Ath Debt Fund (413)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

$

Transfer from Police
Transfer from Fire
Transfer from E911
Transfer from Transportation
Total Revenue

$

$

14,068,000
6,000
14,074,000

$

14,964,346
10,000
14,974,346

Stormwater (Operations)
Stormwater (Capital)
Total Expenses

$

20,265,282
2,000,000
22,265,282

$

24,902,947
0
24,902,947

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

6,903,054

$

5,035,291

Street Light Fund (211)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

1,406,674

$

1,374,544

$

4,350,000
300
4,350,300

$

4,795,700
300
4,796,000

Charges for Services
Investment Income
Total Revenue
Street Lights (Less Reserves & Transfers)
Total Expenses

59,032

$

31,411

Urban Redev. Agency (414)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

73,578

$

248,586

Transfer from General Fund Debt
Total Revenue

$

749,552
749,552

$

479,122
479,122

Debt Service
Total Expenses

$

737,744
737,744

$

726,709
726,709

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

85,386

Vehicle Maintenance Fund (611)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

119,031

$

1,008,254

$

165,000
31,293,331
50,000
31,508,331

$

200,000
31,170,000
0
31,370,000

$

31,627,362
31,627,362

$

31,370,000
31,370,000

0

$

1,008,254

$

31,502,053

$

32,302,062

Intergovernmental
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Total Revenue
Fleet Management
Total Expenses
Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)
Vehicle Replace. Fund (621)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)
Charges for Services
Investment Income
Other Financing Sources
Total Revenue

$

709,636
1,143,248
203,054
267,848
1,115,845
197
3,439,828
0

6,139,133
6,139,133

$

3,439,828
3,439,828

$

5,697,942
5,697,942

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

0

2,265,683

Charges for Services
Investment Income
Total Revenue

$

$

999

$

24,128,000
20,000
900,000
25,048,000

$

27,032,878
0
900,000
27,932,878

Vehicle Replacement
Total Expenses

$

48,431,500
48,431,500

$

48,383,478
48,383,478

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

8,118,553

$

11,851,462

Victim Assistance Fund (206)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

283,347

$

83,565

$

500,000
400,000
900,000

$

500,000
420,000
920,000

$

1,183,347
1,183,347

$

1,003,565
1,003,565

$

656,699

0
0
0
0
0

$

474,532
280,941
169,138
31,534
956,145

$

1,612,844
1,612,844

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

0

Water & Sewer Op Fund (511)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Transfer from Gen & San Fund
Other Financing Sources
Total Revenue

263,036,332
373,082
429,196
126,668
$ 263,965,278

264,649,630
487,925
429,196
63,063
$ 265,629,814

Finance
Transfer to R&E
Transfer to Sinking Fund
Watershed (less Resv/Tran)
Total Expenses

10,024,154
149,152,056
52,860,297
143,285,385
$ 355,321,892

11,185,131
62,076,967
66,044,649
145,974,124
$ 285,280,871

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

7,539,693

$

Other Professional Services
Lease Purchase of Juv Court Bldg
Total Expenses

$

1,620,297
1,620,297

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

645,386

$

Fines & Forfeitures
Intergovernmental
Total Revenue
Victim Assistance
Total Expenses

$

0

98,896,307

$

$

0

95,654,891

Recreation Fund (207)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

13,365

$

236,937

Charges for Services
Total Revenue

$

890,000
890,000

$

842,300
842,300

Recreation Services
Total Expenses

$

853,871
853,871

$

1,079,237
1,079,237

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

49,494

Rental Motor Vehicle (280)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

598,034

$

561,687

Taxes
Total Revenue

$

504,469
504,469

$

658,163
658,163

W&S Debt Svc Bond Fund (514)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

14,713,635

Rental of Porter Sanford Center
Total Expenses

$

712,625
712,625

$

705,875
705,875

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

389,878

$

513,975

Miscellaneous
Other Financing Sources
Total Revenue

$

30,000
53,080,297
53,110,297

$

0
66,044,649
66,044,649

Risk Management Fund (631)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

5,146,981

$

8,911,529

Debt Service
Total Expenses

$

67,823,932
67,823,932

$

66,044,649
66,044,649

Charges for Services
Payroll Deductions
Transfers in Workers Comp
Total Revenue

9,010,000
93,116,915
820,302
$ 102,947,217

10,080,000
93,000,000
0
$ 103,080,000

Risk Management
Total Expenses

102,142,835
$ 102,142,835

103,676,171
$ 103,676,171

Charges for Services
Total Revenue

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

5,951,363

$

8,315,358

Workers Comp
Total Expenses

Sanitation Fund (541)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

1,968,328

$

4,122,613

$

63,682,000
181,000
1,970,000
2,147,143
67,980,143

$

64,902,066
30,000
0
0
64,932,066

$

223,700
2,350,000
67,374,771
69,948,471

$

0
1,500,000
67,554,679
69,054,679

Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Transfer from Vehicle Fund
Other Financing Sources
Total Revenue
Finance
Transfer to Sanitation CIP
Sanitation (Less Reserves & Tran)
Total Expenses
Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)
Speed Humps Maint Fund (212)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)
Charges for Services
Investment Income
Total Revenue

$

$

0

$

0

0

$

1,522,798

$

1,075,709

$

289,000
1,000
290,000

$

300,000
896
300,896

Speed Humps
Total Expenses

889,901
889,901

328,656
328,656

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

922,897

$

1,047,949

Stormwater Ops Fund (581)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

$

15,094,336

$

14,963,892

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)
Workers Comp Fund (632)
Starting Fund Balance (Jan 1st)

Ending Fund Balance (Dec 31st)

$

76,003,834

$

0

$

0

0

$

2,011,911

$

174,065

$

4,700,000
4,700,000

$

6,000,000
6,000,000

$

6,711,911
6,711,911

$

6,174,065
6,174,065

$

0

$

0

Non-Tax Funds Summary
Starting Fund Balance
Revenues
Expenses
Ending Fund Balance

$ 199,400,320
611,749,305
770,371,757
$ 40,777,868

$ 181,768,861
626,511,211
694,554,252
$ 113,725,820

$ 260,463,611
1,197,035,711
1,376,166,574
$ 81,332,748

$ 239,916,072
1,206,411,414
1,299,482,034
$ 146,845,452

All Operating Funds Summary
Starting Fund Balance
Revenues
Expenses
Ending Fund Balance

LOCAL

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017 • Page 14

Clark Patterson Lee took over community development services for the city of Chamblee for a
steadily increasing fee beginning at $864,000 per year. Photo submitted.

Clark Patterson Lee, an architecture firm based in New York, was
awarded a $124,500 contract for design responsibilities for the
Downtown Doraville Civic Campus. Photo submitted.

Clark Patterson Lee contract details emerge
by R. Scott Belzer
sbelzer@dekalbchamp.com
The Champion has received documents detailing
Doraville and Chamblee’s agreements with Clark
Patterson Lee (CPL), shedding more light on the New
York firm’s presence in DeKalb County.
Doraville renewed and awarded contracts to
CPL and the firm has also taken over community
development services for Chamblee. Dunwoody and
Avondale Estates currently employ the firm while
Brookhaven has used CPL in the past.
Doraville officials renewed the city’s contract with
CPL—an architecture, engineering and municipal
services firm based in Rochester, N.Y., with a
southeastern headquarters in Suwannee—for building
inspection services on Jan. 9.
According to the contract, Doraville pays $57.81
per hour with additional costs on an as needed basis.
Costs include $46.25 per hour for a certified building
inspector, $57.81 for a certified building official, $46.25
per hour for a certified plan reviewer and $57.81 per
hour for a certified code enforcement officer.
According to City Manager Shawn Gillen, it would
cost the city approximately $4.3 million for Doraville to
provide the same services over the next five years.
“[CPL] has served us outstandingly,” said Mayor
Donna Pittman at the Jan. 9 meeting. “They do
outstanding work. I’ve been very pleased and have not
heard any complaints about them—usually the ones
complaining are the people who got citations.”
On Jan. 17, Doraville awarded CPL the contract
for its planned Downtown Doraville Civic Campus
development. CPL will act as prime consultant and
lead the areas of planning, architecture building

AVONDALE Continued From Page 8A
County] commissioners and sell this case to them
because we’re taking land away from the county,”
Elmore added.
Mayor Pro Tem Terry Giager said the city is too
late getting into the annexation process.
“I know six or seven months ago I said we need
to talk to [the people in the proposed areas] now, not
when the legislature starts meeting,” Giager said. “It’s
kind of scary what’s happening. I think we’re too late
now to move forward. We [have] less than a month and
a half to get everything in and done.”

Doraville city council members Dawn O’Connor and
Robert Patrick did not seem convinced about awarding
Clark Patterson Lee a contract for the Downtown
Doraville Civic Campus. Photos submitted.
systems and utility engineering on the project, which
will completely revamp and renovate Doraville’s
downtown core.
“This is a very exciting time for our city,” Pittman
said.
CPL was chosen out of eight respondents to
a request for qualifications (RFQ). Four were
interviewed, including CPL, Perkins Eastman, Cooper
Carry as well as Smallwood, Reynolds, Stewart &
Stewart.
The interview panel was made up of Gillen,
community development director Enrique Bascunana,
economic director Luke Howe and senior planner
Brianna Rindge.
CPL scored the highest on a scoresheet gauging
civic architecture design, innovate design, streetscape
design, transit- and pedestrian-friendly design,

There is an annexation proposal being discussed for
Clarkston, as well as cityhood proposals for the cities
of Greenhaven and Prosperity, that include some of the
areas proposed in Avondale Estates’ maps.
The other commissioners agreed that the city
should move forward with its plan.
“I think originally our thought was if we can have
all the communication done prior to and put in a
bill in 2018 then that would be the best way to make
sure everybody was communicated with, we got all
the feedback and could really reach out and say we’ve
done all of the homework that we needed to do,”
Commissioner Brian Fisher said. “Unfortunately, it
feels like with what’s happening with this legislative
session—there’s a new city of Prosperity that’s been

presentation and project expertise. CPL will work
with Duluth site design firm Keck & Wood, Atlanta
designer Eric Bosman, Atlanta architects TimHaahs &
Associates, Alpharetta-based architects Pieper O’Brien
Herr, New York architecture firm 720 Design and Mack
Cain Landscape Design Studio to complete the project.
Bascunana said CPL’s experience, understanding
of urban design, record of projects and mixed-use
and team readiness set the firm apart from competing
firms.
“We very tediously measured and recorded scores
since August,” said Gillen. “We sat down with Clark
Patterson Lee and negotiated a contract price.”
The overall budget for the project, according to
city officials, is approximately $30 million According
to Doravile councilwoman Pam Fleming, CPL will be
paid $124,500 for its services.
Doraville City Council approved the contract
4-1, with councilwoman Dawn O’Connor casting
the single opposing vote and councilman MD Naser
absent. Councilman Robert Patrick hesitated and
asked to pass before casting his vote of approval.
Documents obtained by The Champion indicate
CPL will receive $840,000 in 2017 from the city of
Chamblee for planning and zoning, the building
department as well as arborist and erosion control.
This fee will increase to $864,000, $888,000 and
$912,000 in 2018, 2019 and 2020 respectively. CPL
originally bid to receive $117,000 per month ($1.4
million) in 2017 with amounts steadily increasing into
2020.
Each year, CPL will also receive 60 percent of
building permit fee revenue which, according to its
procurement letter, is estimated to be around $60,000
per month.

talked about, annexation for Clarkston, some areas
are doing things in DeKalb County that may mean we
need to go ahead and move forward faster than what
we thought and we need to make a decision.”
“I support moving forward, and yes, it’s not going
to be easy and yes, I wish we would’ve done it a lot
earlier,” Commissioner Adela Yelton said. “I think a lot
of the other cities that are pursuing annexation efforts
are in the same exact boat.”
“I’m actually supportive of it and I do hear what
Terry is saying,” Commissioner Randy Beebe said. “I
think we’re going to have some [areas] that don’t want
to be a part of us and that’s OK. But I think we should
move forward.”

EDUCATION

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017 • Page 15

Dyslexia plan revealed
at Decatur schools
First of four progress reports addresses 13 issues,
details first plan of action
by R. Scott Belzer
sbelzer@dekalbchamp.com

Following meetings, listening
sessions and research into
dyslexia, City Schools of Decatur
(CSD) officials revealed training
plans, potential partnerships and
curriculum research to address
students affected by the learning
disability on Jan. 17 during a
board of education meeting.
During the first quarterly
meeting addressing the issue,
staff provided the board with
a 13-point plan of action and
progress report.
The plan—prepared by Joe
Austin, Heidi Whatley, Mary
Mack and Bruce Roaden—details
how CSD can fund addressing
dyslexia, improve community
engagement, create partnerships,
study curriculums, create afterschool programs and develop
intervening tests for students
affected by the issue.
“We did our best to try and
make sure we created a timeline
in addressing all questions asked,”
Mack said. “We have been able to
accommodate additional teachers

and students to provide additional
support. We will start completing
action steps throughout 2017.”
Whatley said groups
such as the Decatur Dyslexia
Network, Special Education
PTA, International Dyslexia
Association, [Down Syndrome]
Association and Autism Society
of America are being consulted to
provide a “world view” of the issue
and suggestions to aid students
with disabilities.
“There’s a lot of work we’ll be
doing in the next few months that
we look forward to sharing with
you,” Whatley said.
Austin told the board that
the team will monitor reading
assessment data to gauge reading
skills and identify potential
problems.
Board member Lewis Jones
said he appreciated the focus on
action in the progress report.
Board chairman Annie Caiola
said she is hopeful and optimistic
about the plan but said it was “a
plan for a plan.”
“It’s just not going to come
to fruition as quickly as people
would like,” Caiola said. “Some of
that may be unavoidable.”

City Schools of Decatur revealed the first of four progress reports regarding dyslexia in schools on Jan. 17 following
public outcry in August 2016. Photo by R. Scott Belzer

The board also approved a
$80,880 contract with Reading
is Essential for All People
(REAP), which provides
instruction on teaching the
dyslexia-specific OrtonGillingham learning program
as well as other instructional
programs.
Eve Wyatt, a CSD parent,
said she was excited to see
the contract approved by the
board.
“After all the conversations
[parents and the board] have
had, after all the comments
[the board] heard, I’m excited
about the possibilities that can
come from the contract and
that relationship,” Wyatt said.
According to medical
experts, dyslexia affects one
in five people. Signs and
symptoms include language

delay, difficulty understanding
words, reversals of letters
and numbers, word omission
while reading and confusion
about directions.
CSD hosted a listening
session about dyslexia on Aug.
2 where parents, students,
teachers and principals shared
thoughts and stories. Though
circumstances differed, one
thing seemed agreed upon the
district was not doing enough
to serve those affected.
On Aug. 9, the CSD board
of education responded to
the concerns and said they
would be “taking a deeper
dive” into the issue, including
28 questions from CSD
superintendent David Dude
that staff were responsible for
answering by October.
Questions included

whether dyslexia is
recognized as a disability
and qualifications for
individualized education
programs. Parents also asked
about the school system’s
various reading programs,
teacher training, tests for
dyslexia, national statistics
with regards to dyslexia, and
how CSD addresses students
with special needs.
In addition, Dude visited
the Schenck School and Swift
School in Roswell, which
serve dyslexic students,
for advice on training and
combating dyslexia in schools.
To view the contract with
REAP and CSD’s 13-point
progress report, visit https://
simbli.eboardsolutions.com/
Meetings/ViewMeetingOrder.
aspx?S=4052&MID=54631.

Local schools awarded by governor’s office
Sixteen schools from DeKalb County, Decatur earn Single Statewide Accountability System Awards
by R. Scott Belzer
sbelzer@dekalbchamp.com
Fourteen DeKalb County
School District (DCSD) and
two City Schools of Decatur
(CSD) schools joined others
across the state in earning
Single Statewide Accountability
System (SSAS) awards,
according to results released
Jan. 4.
Each year, the Governor’s
Office of Student Achievement
awards schools with high
academic performance and
high academic growth. This
year, the governor’s office used
three years of data from the
College and Career Readiness
Performance Index (CCRPI) to
award schools in two categories:
Greatest Gains and Highest
Performing.
Austin Elementary in
Dunwoody earned a platinum
award in both categories.
To earn the Greatest Gains

Sixteen schools from DeKalb County School District and City Schools of Decatur
earned Single Statewide Accountability System (SSAS) awards from the Governor’s Office of Student Achievement. Photos submitted.

award, the school averaged a
CCRPI progress score in the
99th percentile in the state for
three years, meaning Austin is
part of the 1 percent of Georgia
schools that have progressed
while still maintaining a high
CCRPI average.
Indian Creek Elementary is
the only other school in DCSD
or CSD to earn a platinum
award for Greatest Gains.
DeKalb Early College Academy

and Laurel Ridge Elementary
earned a gold award in the
category by scoring in the 97th
percentile while Cedar Grove
High School, DeKalb PATH
Academy and DeKalb School of
the Arts earned silver awards by
scoring in the 95th percentile.
Dunwoody High School
earned a bronze award in the
category by scoring in the 93rd
percentile.
To earn awards in the

Highest Performing category,
schools must earn a three-year
CCRPI Achievement Score in
the 93rd percentile as well as a
three-year CCRPI achievement
gap score in the 75th percentile.
Austin Elementary, DeKalb
Early College Academy, DeKalb
School of the Arts, Kittredge
Magnet School and Wadsworth
Magnet School earned platinum
awards by scoring in the 99th
percentile.
Vanderlyn Elementary
School earned gold in the
category by scoring in the
97th percentile while Renfroe
Middle School and Oak Grove
Elementary School earned
silver by scoring in the 95th
percentile.
Montgomery Elementary
and Decatur High School
both earned bronze awards by
scoring in the 93rd percentile.
News of the award was
circulated through social media
by Cedar Grove High School
parents, students and teachers.

“Never mind what you
thought you knew about Cedar
Grove,” said the school’s band
director Cory Bostic. “CGHS
wins another statewide award.
Thanks to our AP teachers,
our teachers, our counseling
staff and to each [community
member] for their support of
our school’s programs.”
“I congratulate all of
the students, teachers and
administrators in Georgia’s
award-winning schools who
worked tirelessly toward these
accomplishments,” said Gov.
Nathan Deal. “The bright
minds of Georgia’s students
are the state’s most precious
resource and I commend the
schools that are exceeding
expectations in preparing their
students for future success.”
For more information,
visit https://gosa.georgia.gov/
single-statewide-accountabilitysystem-ssas-awards-0.

BUSINESS

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017 • Page 16

Architectural firm wins second
residential design award
by Kathy Mitchell
Architects Ed and Shawn
Alshut share a Decatur home,
a business and a professional
philosophy.
“There are buildings
where you go from the
outside to the inside or even
to different spaces inside
and feel like you’ve entered
a different planet. We like
for it all to work together—a
single flowing experience.
The richest solutions result
from a synthesis of landscape,
architecture, interior design,
lighting, art, engineering
and construction” explained
Shawn, who partners with her
husband at the architectural
firm Studio A2.
A large number of people
who appreciate building design
apparently like their approach.
Studio A2 was voted the
Atlanta Home Improvement
Magazine’s “2016 Best
Residential Architect Firm” for
the second year in a row.
The Alshuts have won
numerous other awards
during their firm’s eight-year
existence, but Shawn said they
are especially proud of their
recent award.
“We’re really thrilled by
this because it’s based on a
popular vote. It’s based on what
people like,” she said. “In every
project we undertake we want
to do everything right from a
technical standpoint, but we
also want people to really like
what we’ve done.”
At a home the couple
recently remodeled, they
pointed out how the building
fits into a narrow space on
a densely populated Atlanta
street. Floor-to-ceiling glass
along a downstairs wall brings
the outside patio almost
seamlessly into the sitting area.
“You would never notice that
from the street,” Shawn said.
“And from the inside you don’t
get the sense that you’re on
a busy city street. You see a
beautiful garden area.”

It’s an example of what
Shawn calls “balancing
aesthetic and spatial
considerations with
marketplace realities.” The
couple say that successful
projects stand the test of time,
stylistically, functionally, and
environmentally without
sacrificing design integrity.
“Because I have training
and experience as both an
architect and an interior
designer, I tend to think in
terms of how a space ultimately
comes together. I believe
the exterior and interior of a
building should be conceived
and designed as one holistic
experience,” Shawn said.
The Alshuts moved to
the Atlanta area because of a
career move Ed was making.
After working separately, the
couple decided to form their
own company. “We realized
that our talents and interests
complement each other and
together we can offer clients
more than either of us could
individually,” Shawn said.
The Studio A2 website notes
that Ed “was most significantly
influenced by his time working
with Kallmann, McKinnell
& Wood whose inclusive
architecture is based on a
dedication to modernism that
references historic memory
of compositional devices,
traditional materials and
craftsmanship in building.” 

Shawn is a Leadership in
Energy and Environmental
Design (LEED) accredited
professional who works with
clients who want to build or
renovate with environmental
concerns in the forefront. 
She explained that they
chose the name Studio A2
“because we’re two people
named Alshut.”
The award notwithstanding,
Studio A2 is not limited to
residential projects. It is a
full service architecture and
interior design firm whose
work includes commercial,
institutional, corporate and
residential architecture and
interior design. While the firm
is basically the two of them,
the Alshuts often partner with
others on large projects.
She said she and her
husband grew up with an
appreciation of beauty. “I’ve
always had an artistic eye.
My mother was an artist and
I’ve always enjoyed beautiful
things,” Shawn said.
Ed has a longtime interest
in fine art and photography. In
time, both focused their artistic
interest, on architecture. They
met as students in the master
of architecture program at the
University of Texas at Austin.
“We quickly recognized
that we shared a professional
philosophy and that we liked
each other a lot,” Shawn said.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
The Mayor and City Council of the City
of Chamblee, Georgia will hold a public
hearing on Thursday, February 16, 2017,
at the Chamblee Civic Center, 3540 Broad
Street, Chamblee, GA 30341 at 6:00 p.m.
to receive public comments regarding
the following matters:

•Text amendment to the UDO to
adopt the 2012 International
Property Maintenance Code.

CITY OF AVONDALE ESTATES
2017 GENERAL MUNICIPAL ELECTION QUALIFYING FEES
Pursuant to O.C.G.A. 21-2-131(a)(1)(A) of the Georgia Election Code, The City
of Avondale Estates on January 23, 2017, set the qualifying fee at $3.00 for all
offices in the upcoming November 7, 2017 General Municipal Election. The fee
can be paid with cash, check or money order. Qualifying will take place from
8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. beginning Monday,
August 21, 2017 through Friday, August 25, 2017 at City Hall, 21 North
Avondale Plaza, Avondale Estates, Georgia 30002.

Ed and Shawn Alshut visit an Atlanta home that they recently renovated.

420-39511 1/26,2/2,2/9,2/16,2/23,3/2,3/9,3/16,3/23,3/30jb
STATE OF GEORGIA
COUNTY OF DEKALB
NOTICE OF SALE UNDER POWER
Because of a default under the terms of the Security Deed executed by Robert
M. Scott and Carla Catalon-Scott to Freedom Mortgage Corporation dated
January 21, 1994, and recorded in Deed Book 8090, Page 411, DeKalb County
Records, said Security Deed having been last sold, assigned, transferred and
conveyed to Nationstar Mortgage LLC, securing a Note in the original principal
amount of $80,028.00, the holder thereof pursuant to said Deed and Note
thereby secured has declared the entire amount of said indebtedness due and
payable and, pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Deed, will on the
first Tuesday, April 4, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, before the Courthouse door in said County, sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash,
the property described in said Deed, to-wit:
ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND LYING AND BEING IN LAND LOT
123, 16TH DISTRICT, DEKALB COUNTY. GEORGIA. BEING LOT 42, BLOCK
A, LAUREL POST CLOSE SUBDIVISION, UNIT THREE. AS PER PLAT
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 91, PAGE 47. DEKALB COUNTY RECORDS,
WHICH PLAT IS INCORPORATED HEREIN AND MADE A PART HEREOF BY
REFERENCE_ BEING MORE COMMONLY KNOWN AS 6487 EASTBRIAR
DRIVE, LITHONIA, GA 30058.
Said property is known as 6487 Eastbriar Drive, Lithonia, GA 30058, together with all fixtures and personal property attached to and constituting a part
of said property, if any.
Said property will be sold subject to any outstanding ad valorem taxes (including taxes which are a lien, whether or not now due and payable), the right of
redemption of any taxing authority, any matters which might be disclosed by
an accurate survey and inspection of the property, any assessments, liens, encumbrances, zoning ordinances, restrictions, covenants, and matters of record
superior to the Security Deed first set out above.
The proceeds of said sale will be applied to the payment of said indebtedness
and all expenses of said sale as provided in said Deed, and the balance, if any,
will be distributed as provided by law.
The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit
of the status of the loan with the secured creditor.
The property is or may be in the possession of Robert M. Scott and Carla
CatalonScott, a/k/a Carla Catalon-Scott a/k/a Carla Scott-Catalon a/k/a Carla
Catalon a/k/a Carla Scott a/k/a Carla ScottCatalon, successor in interest or
tenant(s).
Nationstar Mortgage LLC as Attorney-in-Fact for Robert M. Scott and Carla
Catalon-Scott
File no. 17-063499
SHAPIRO PENDERGAST & HASTY, LLP*
Attorneys and Counselors at Law
211 Perimeter Center Parkway, N.E., Suite 300
Atlanta, GA 30346
770-220-2535/SJ
shapiroandhasty.com
*THE LAW FIRM IS ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR. ANY INFORMATION
OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.
01/26, 02/02, 02/09, 02/16, 02/23, 03/02, 03/09, 03/16, 03/23, 03/30, 2017

CLASSIFIED

The

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017 • Page 17

CHAMPION

CLASSIFIEDS

The Champion is not responsible for any damages resulting from advertisements. All sales final.
RATES: $30 for up to 40 words, each
additional word $0.60. All ads are
prepaid. All major credit cards accepted.
AUCTIONS
BANKRUPTCY AUCTION.
1/28/17 @ 10AM, Lindsey’s
Fish Camp, 1051 Eufaula
Hwy, Ft Gaines, GA 39851.
Heritage Realty & Auction,
DFarmer, 800.445.4608,
www.HeritageSales.com
GA#H62481-339652NR00266.
BANK OWNED
EQUIPMENT AUCTION.
Macon, GA Bulldozer,
Chip Vans, Walking Floor
Trailers, Delimbers & More!
Selling Online Only. Auction
Bid Deadline: February
15th. Bullseye Auction &
Appraisal GAL#2643 www.
BullseyeAuctions.com 770544-7479.
ADVERTISE YOUR
AUCTION in over 100
newspapers for only $350.
Your 25-word classified ad
will reach more than1 million readers. Call Bruce
Washington at the Georgia
Newspaper Service, 770454-6776.
DIVORCE SERVICES
DIVORCE WITH OR
WITHOUT children
$125.00. Includes name
change and property settlement agreement. SAVE
hundreds. Fast and easy.
1-888-733-7165, call us
toll FREE 24/7.
HELP WANTED
Hiring qualified individuals
and subcontractors for all
trades and labor for a 79
unit apartment building development. Please contact:
McShane Construction
Company/Mercy Housing
Project/5134 Peachtree
Rd. Atlanta, GA 30341 * **
These are Section 3 covered positions under the
HUD Act of 1968. Section
3 residents and business
concerns are encouraged
to apply * **
K & B Elite Doggie Daycare
and Boarding in the City

Ads due by Friday at noon for next
publication date. For more information
visit www.championclassifieds.com

of Decatur is looking for
dog-friendly help to work
afternoons and weekends.
Experience with handling
dogs is preferred. contact
Kathy Buse if interested
404-371-9135.
Pioneer Apparel Inc
in Doraville, GA seeks
Account Manager who can
secure orders & generate
quotes. BA reqd. Email
resume to pioneerapparelga@gmail.com.
MISCELLANEOUS
New AT&T INTERNET
OFFER. $20 and $30/
mo plans available when
you bundle. 99% Reliable
100% Affordable. HURRY,
OFFER ENDS SOON. New
Customers Only. CALL
NOW 1-800-291-8502.
Have a car? Want to earn
money on your schedule?
Drive with Uber. www.
uber.com Use invite code
JENNIFERL1266UE.
VIAGRA and CIALIS
USERS! Cut your drug
costs! SAVE $$! 50 Pills for
$99.00. FREE Shipping!
100% Guaranteed and
Discreet. CALL 1-800-2651479.
Switch to DIRECTV.
Lock in 2-Year Price
Guarantee ($50/month) w/
AT&T Wireless. Over 145
Channels PLUS Popular
Movie Networks for Three
Months, No Cost! Call
1-800-984-6205.
Lung Cancer? And Age
60+? You and Your
Family May Be Entitled To
Significant Cash Award.
Call 844-499-2074 for
Information. No Money Out
of Pocket.
Protect your home with
fully customizable security
and 24/7 monitoring right
from your smartphone.
Receive up to $1500 in
equipment, free (restrictions apply). Call 1-800781-1708.

SAVE YOUR HOME! Are
you behind paying your
MORTGAGE? Denied
Loan Modification? Is the
bank threatening foreclosure? CALL Home Owner’s
Relief Line now for Help
844-846-6824

DISCLAIMER: We do not knowingly accept advertisements that
discriminate, or intend to discriminate, on any illegal basis. Nor
do we knowingly accept employment advertisements that are not
bona-fide job offers. All real estate advertisements are subject
to the fair housing act and we do not accept advertising that is
in violation of the law. The law prohibits discrimination based on
color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap or familial status.

Burglar. Even if you can’t
reach a phone! FREE
Brochure. CALL 800-3718914.

newspaper readers. Your
25 word classified ad will
appear in over 100 Georgia
newspapers for only $350.
Call Bruce Washington
at Georgia Newspaper
Service, 770-454-6776 or
online at www.gapress.org/
georgianewspaperservice.
html

VACATION RENTALS
ADVERTISE YOUR
VACATION PROPERTY, to
more than 1 million Georgia

DISH SPECIAL! Stop paying for channels you don’t
watch! Starting at $39.99/
mo. FREE Next-Day
Installation + FREE $50
giftcard with signup courtesy of SatelliteDeals Call
855-400-4334
Owe more than 10k to the
IRS? We can Help! Call Tax
Mediation Services to stop
collection and Harassing
Letters. Call for FREE case
review! 888-5517351
Spectrum Triple Play. TV,
Internet & Voice for $29.99
ea. 60 MB per second
speed. No Contract or
commitment. We buy your
existing contract up to
$500! 1-800-616-7798.
Got Knee Pain? Back
Pain? Shoulder Pain? Get
a pain-relieving brace at
little or NO cost to you.
Medicare Patients Call
Health Hotline 1-800-8175077.
A-1 DONATE YOUR
CAR FOR BREAST
CANCER! Help United
Breast Foundation education, prevention &
support programs.
FAST FREE PICKUP-24
HR RESPONSE-TAX
DEDUCTION 844-2890993.
Georgia Press Association
has two cubicles (which
make four work stations)
free to anyone willing to
remove them from GPA’s
third floor office and
haul them away. Contact
Jennifer Labon at 770-4546776 for more details.
Life Alert . 24/7. One
press of a button sends
help FAST! Medical, Fire,

AIRLINE
CAREER
2017

Get FAA approved hands on Aviation training.
Financial aid for qualified students Career placement assistance.
CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance

866-564-9634

Finding Senior Housing can be
complex, but it doesn’t have to be.

(800) 929-3014

The Family Gourmet Feast

2 (5 oz.) Filet Mignons
2 (5 oz.) Top Sirloins
2 (4 oz.) Boneless Pork Chops
4 Boneless Chicken Breasts (1 lb. pkg.)
4 (3 oz.) Kielbasa Sausages
4 (4 oz.) Omaha Steaks Burgers
12 oz. pkg. All-Beef Meatballs
4 (3 oz.) Potatoes au Gratin
4 (4 oz.) Caramel Apple Tartlets
Omaha Steaks Seasoning Packet (.33 oz.)

Plus, 4 more
Kielbasa Sausages

49

$
44240VPT Reg. $215.90 | Now Only

99

FREE

Call 1-800-261-0746 ask for 44240VPT
www.OmahaSteaks.com/savor78
Limit 2. Free gift must ship with #44240. Standard S&H will be added. Expires 1/31/17.
All product, prices and sales are subject to Omaha Steaks, Inc. Terms of Use and Pricing Policy.
Visit omahasteaks.com/terms-of-useOSI ©2016 OCG | 608B120 | Omaha Steaks, Inc.

SPORTS

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017 • Page 18

Lithonia

Tucker

Dunwoody

Lakeside

Photos by Travis Hudgons

Players ready to shine this baseball season
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Some DeKalb County high school
baseball players are going into the
2017 season with high hopes and state
playoffs on their minds.
Seven DeKalb County School
District teams—Chamblee, Druid
Hills, Dunwoody, Lakeside, Redan,
Southwest DeKalb and Tucker—as
well as Decatur, Marist and St. Pius X
all made the playoffs last season. St.
Pius was the only team to go deep in
the playoffs—advancing to the Class
AAAA quarterfinals where they lost to Harris
Eastside.
A few players from non-playoff
several returning starters and Morris
teams are also hoping to advance
is confident his team will do well and
to the playoffs this year, including
fight for a playoff spot.
last year’s county leader in batting
“Our team is really good this year,”
average—Cedar Grove senior Jenard
he said. “I’m feeling really good. We’ll
Morris. Morris, led the county with a
go far this year.”
.540 average, had 29 hits, 26 RBI’s, nine
Miller Grove senior Daniel Harris,
doubles and two triples.
who finished sixth in the county with a
Morris said he had a good offseason, .440 batting average, said his team can
hitting 100 balls a day to prepare for
also make a run to the playoffs.
the season. He said he wants to lead the
“I definitely think we’re going to be
county again in hitting.
over .500 and hopefully we’ll get to the
“I also want to lead in pitching as
playoffs,” Harris said.
well and have the best glove [in the
Miller Grove didn’t reach .500 last
field],” Morris said.
season with a 6-12 record and the
Cedar Grove finished the 2016
Wolverines have not made the state
season with a 9-11 record after
playoffs since 2010, their only playoff
advancing to the playoffs for the first
appearance in program history. Harris
time since 1991 in 2015. The team has
said hitting will be the key for the

Morris

Wolverines if they want to make the
playoffs.
“We definitely have to work on
hitting, so that’s what we’ve been
doing—working on hitting, getting
in the [batting] cages, going opposite
field,” he said. “That’s going to get us to
the playoffs.”
For Stone Mountain junior Joshua
Christian, being successful in basic
baseball fundamentals will be the
key for the Pirates to make a possible
playoff appearance.
“Fundamentals, that’s all what the
game is—fundamentals,” Christian said.
His teammate, Roderick Hudson,
said it’s all about taking one step, one
game at a time.
“[We can’t] look forward on the

schedule,” Hudson said. “We have to
look at what’s in front of us now. That’s
the key.”
“We need to work together as a
team,” their teammate Jimmy Ae
added.
Stone Mountain has not made the
playoffs since 1989 and the Pirates
finished last season with a 3-18 record.
Christian, Hudson and Ae said they
spent the offseason in the weight room
to prepare for the 2017 season.
“I’ve been in the weight room
working on my leg [strength] and
stamina and getting my arm stronger,”
Christian said.
“We had tons of workouts; we really
never took a day off since the season
ended,” Hudson said. “We’re ready to
go.”
Lithonia freshman A’lante
Shepherd is also ready to go this
season. Lithonia coach Samuel Marion
had nothing but glowing remarks about
the young hitter and said Shepherd
is expected to be a playmaker for the
Bulldogs.
“He will be big for us,” Marion said.
Shepherd, who plays for East Cobb
travel baseball team, said he doesn’t
feel any pressure to lead the team to the
promised land.
“I’m just going to do my job with the
team and hope everyone does their job,”
Shepherd said. “We’ve been bonding
and I think we’re going to have a really
good season.”

SPORTS

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017 • Page 19

MILLER GROVE 61, SOUTHWEST DEKALB 52

The Miller Grove Wolverines rallied back from an 11-point deficit in the first half against the
Southwest DeKalb Panthers defeating the Panthers 61-52 to improve to 7-0 in Region 5-5A.
Photos by Travis Hudgons

WEEKEND BASKETBALL SCORES

Jan. 20

Boys
Chamblee 50, Arabia Mountain 45
Decatur 73, Lithia Springs 54
Druid Hills 71, Luella 64
Dunwoody 73, Johns Creek 70
Greenforest 90, Our Lady of Mercy 27
Lithonia 69, Clarkston 44
Marist 56, West Hall 34
Miller Grove 61, Southwest DeKalb 52
Paideia 51, Atlanta International 37
Redan 64, McNair 52
St. Pius X 56, Stephens County 39
Stephenson 103, Forest Park 73
Holy Innocents 72, W.D. Mohammed 58
Lovett 61, Stone Mountain 55
Meadowcreek 60, Lakeside 49
Mundy’s Mill 53, M.L. King 47
Pace Academy 69, Cedar Grove 52
Westminster 55, Towers 42

Girls
Arabia Mountain 50, Chamblee 30
Cedar Grove 47, Pace Academy 44
Greenforest 48, Our Lady of Mercy 40
Lithonia 52, Clarkston 50
Paideia 52, Atlanta International 19
Redan 63, McNair 28
Southwest DeKalb 60, Miller Grove 29
St. Pius X 42, Stephens County 34
Stephenson 53, Forest Park 44
Holy Innocents 81, W.D. Mohammed 23
Johns Creek 60, Dunwoody 40
Lithia Springs 77, Decatur 59
Lovett 47, Stone Mountain 33
Luella 72, Druid Hills 54
Mundy’s Mill 63, M.L. King 27
West Hall 62, Marist 49
Westminster 57, Towers 40
Jan. 21
Boys
Cedar Grove 89, McNair 60

Decatur 51, Woodward Academy 49
Lakeside 59, Chamblee 51
Southwest DeKalb 74, Arabia Mountain 61
St. Pius X 51, St. Joseph’s Catholic 48
Towers 88, Cross Keys 26
DeMatha (Md.) 46, Greenforest 43
Forest Park 52, Tucker 43
Pope 61, Dunwoody 43
Tattnall Square Academy 49, Paideia 32
Winston-Salem Prep Academy 63, Miller Grove 60
Westminster 51, Redan 35
Girls
Chamblee 45, Lakeside 31
Decatur 49, Woodward Academy 44
Druid Hills 42, Clarkston 22
Redan 40, Westminster 33
Southwest DeKalb 63, Arabia Mountain 29
St. Pius X 59, St. Joseph’s Catholic 19
Tucker 62, Forest Park 52
Pope 66, Dunwoody 45
Tattnall Square Academy 43, Paideia 34

LOCAL

DEKALB FREE PRESS Friday, Jan. 27, 2017 • Page 20

Chamblee-Doraville development authority considered
Doraville City Council discusses “abatement transactions” behind closed doors at work session
by R. Scott Belzer
sbelzer@dekalbchamp.com
Doraville City Council discussed a
possible joint development authority
(JDA) with Chamblee at its Jan. 17 work
session, which takes place one hour
before its regular meeting.
A JDA between the two cities would
allow Chamblee and Doraville to
conduct abatement—incentive driven,
often involving taxes—transactions
outside of the two cities’ respective
downtown development authorities’
(DDA) jurisdiction.
According to documents related to
the discussion prepared by Doraville
Economic Director Luke Howe, a
necessity for a JDA between Doraville
and Chamblee stems from the need to
pool resources following annexations of
the cities’ borders.
“The need for the ability to
conduct bonds for title or ‘abatement’
transactions outside of the DDA
jurisdiction has become increasingly
evident since [Doraville’s] 2014
annexation,” states one document.
“[Doraville] needs this tool to address
properties like Friday’s Plaza and the old
Georgia Pacific property. Since annexing

A joint development authority between Doraville and Chamblee would create an additional board
monitoring development in both cities and whose powers would be created by the cities themselves.
Photo submitted.

Century Center, Chamblee has come to
the same realization.”
According to Howe, development
authorities that cover a region rather
than a city or county have the potential
to draw on a combined set of resources
to meet the needs of potential businesses
or construction projects.
Under the Georgia Code, governing
bodies are exempt from paying property
taxes. Development authorities
throughout the state use this loophole
to transfer property into their name and
lease the property back to the “owner”
tax free. Known as a tax abatement or

If I don’t
have the answer,

bond for title, this tactic is often used
by development authorities to attract
developers and business to an area.
Doraville’s DDA, which meets
quarterly, most recently waived 35
percent of property taxes on the
Assembly development slated to occupy
the former GM assembly plant for the
next 30 years. The value of this incentive
is estimated to be around $82 million
if the site reaches its forecasted value of
$1.5 billion.
Chamblee’s DDA granted an
abatement worth $11 million for 18
years to Del American Real Estate for the

Chamblee Atlanta mixed-use apartment
development.
These are property taxes that
normally go toward their respective
cities, DeKalb County and DeKalb
County School District.
The JDA would ultimately take
responsibilities of both DDAs and put
them in the hands of three Chamblee
DDA members and three Doraville
DDA members, with “a rotating elected
official,” according to Howe. Deals
conducted in a particular city would
grant fees to the city in which the deal
took place.
“The fees associated with a deal in
Doraville, for instance, would go to the
Doraville DDA and vice versa,” Howe
states. “This would ensure that fees are
being reinvested in each city’s downtown
and would be accomplished through
[intergovernmental agreements].”
Ultimately, projects would first go
to the JDA and then be sent to either
the Chamblee DDA or Doraville DDA,
depending on the project’s geography.
Howe states Doraville staff have
had preliminary discussions with
Chamblee staff and that the work session
discussion’s purpose was to bring the
conversation to the mayor and council.