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DMU Navigator

Preface
What's New?
Getting Started
Basic Tasks
Advanced Tasks
Workbench
Description
Customizing
Glossary
Index

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Preface
DMU Navigator Version 5 addresses Digital Mock-Up (DMU) process centric design and review
requirements of the extended enterprise. It offers a scalable solution capable of handling digital
mock-ups of all sizes, ranging from consumer goods to very large automotive, aerospace,
plant, ship and heavy machinery mock-ups.
Available on both UNIX and Windows environments, DMU Navigator is built to be totally
compliant with Windows presentation standards.
DMU Navigator Version 5 comprises the following main applications:
Kinematics Simulator
Fitting Simulator
Space Analysis
DMU Optimizer
The above applications are delivered as totally interoperable workbenches. From a user
interface standpoint, switching from one to another is completely transparent and done in a
context-sensitive fashion. In addition, to these workbenches, DMU Navigator is an open
solution which offers:
Support of native CATIA Version 4 and Version 5 data
Interface with the VRML industry standard for data exchange
Native OLE (Object Linking and Embedding) compliance. This facilitates the system
integration within the office environment and across the digital enterprise.
DMU Kinematics Simulator
Offers motion simulation capabilities. Kinematics Simulator can be cooperatively used
with other current or future companion products of the DMU Navigator next generation
such as DMU Fitting Simulator and DMU Space Analysis.
DMU Fitting Simulator
Allows the user to define and simulate assembly and disassembly procedures thereby
validating product assembly and maintenance at the design stage. Fitting Simulator can
be cooperatively used with other current or future companion products of the DMU
Navigator next generation such as Kinematics Simulator and Space Analysis.
DMU Space Analysis
Offers advanced interference analysis, sectioning and measurement capabilities. Space
Analysis can be cooperatively used with other current or future companion products of
the DMU Navigator next generation such as DMU Kinematics Simulator and Fitting
Simulator.

DMU Optimizer
Improves user's productivity by computing an optimized representation of data for
mockup verification in the context of the immersive and collaborative design review
environment of the full digital mockup.

Using This Guide


More Information

Using This Guide


This guide is the DMU Navigator Version 5 User's Guide.
To get the most out of DMU Navigator, use the following user guide wizard. It will help you
better locate information relevant to you as well as to the way you work.
User Guide Wizard
Go to:
I am a first time user

The getting started tutorial. Once you have finished, you should
move on to the user task section of this guide. This steps you
through basic procedures.

I have used DMU


Navigator before

Your DMU Navigator Version 5 session and start reviewing your


own documents. If you need some help in understanding tools
and commands, use the on-line help. You can also take a look at
the basic tasks or the advanced tasks in this guide to locate
information with which you are not already familiar. You will use
the samples contained in C:\Program Files\Dassault
Systemes\B05doc\online\dmnug\samples folder.

Where to Find More Information


Prior to reading this book, we recommend that you read the Infrastructure User's Guide.
Note: You can start a DMU Navigator session by entering the command dmu (Windows) or
DMU (UNIX). This starts the default DMU Navigator Version 5 environment.
You may also like to read the following complementary product guides, for which the
appropriate license is required.
DMU Fitting Simulator User's Guide
DMU Kinematics Simulator User's Guide
DMU Space Analysis User's Guide
DMU Optimizer User's Guide

Click to find out more about Conventions used in this guide.

What's New?
BASIC TASKS
Setting Up Your Session
New: You can now position components
Enhanced: Using the Search Command
Navigating
Minor enhancements in Navigating in Fly Mode
Annotating
New: Creating Annotated Views
Enhanced: you can define annotation text font size and font name
New: Managing Annotated Views
New: You can add information to annotated views in Editing Annotated Views Properties
Enhanced: You can now edit the hyperlink URL.
Using Camera Capabilities
Enhanced: About Cameras
Enhanced: You now create Cameras via the View->Named Views...
New: Editing Camera Properties
Enhanced: You can now move Cameras using the Edit->Properties...
Using Generic Animation
New: Detecting Interferences Automatically
Creating Scenes
New: About Persistency in Scenes
Enhanced: Exploding an Assembly
Publishing
New: you can publish objects in HTML format using the P icon
Additional Tools
New: Measuring Between
New: Measuring Item
New: Measuring Inertia
ADVANCED TASKS
Interoperability with CATIA V4
New: Sending Models from VPM to CATIA V4

New: Importing N4D Scenes in a DMU Navigator Session


Conferencing
Enhanced: Initializing the Backbone Driver
Enhanced: you can now move, show/hide products in conference
New: Running CATDMUUtility Batch Process
About Macros
New: Writing A Group Macro
New: Writing An Annotated View Macro
About Automation Objects
New: About WorkbenchNavigator Object
New: About Groups and Related Objects
New: About AnnotatedViews and Related Objects

Getting Started
This tutorial will guide you step-by-step through your first DMU Navigator session,
allowing you to get acquainted with the product.
You will need a DMU Navigator V5 session and should be familiar with basic concepts
such as document windows, standard and view toolbars.
You should be able to complete this tutorial in about 15 minutes.

Entering the Workbench


Inserting Components
Examine Mode
Managing Views
Beginner's Fly Mode
Looking At Objects
Managing URLs
Creating Scenes

Entering the DMU Navigator Workbench


This task shows you how to enter the DMU Navigator workbench and create a new document.
1. Select Digital Mockup -> DMU Navigator from the Start menu.
The DMU Navigator workbench is displayed and a document like this will appear:

Note that more toolbars may appear next to the Standard toolbar when you create a document.

Inserting Components
This task shows you how to insert components into a DMU Navigator document.
1. Select the Insert -> Existing Component... command.

If the menu item cannot be selected, right-click product1 in the specification tree and
select Existing Component... from the contextual menu.
2. In the Insert an Existing Component dialog box, specify the file location for the model of
interest:
the platform.model document from the samples folder
The sample document is installed in the user guide-specific sample folder. For more
information on where sample documents are installed by default, see Accessing Sample
Documents in the Infrastructure User's Guide.
3. Click the Files of type drop-down list and select the model type.
4. Double-click the platform.model to insert it into your DMU Navigator document.
The DMU Navigator document now looks like this:

Navigating in Examine Mode


Navigating in Examine Mode is the default mode. You can examine your document as
you would from the outside by moving around the document's perimeter, or as you would
from within, turning your head to view or moving closer (zoom in, zoom out) to different
objects.
This task shows you how to rotate, zoom and move your document.
1. Press and hold down the middle mouse button, then the left mouse button, and drag
(still holding both buttons down) to rotate.

2. Press and hold down the middle mouse button, then click the left mouse button and
drag (still holding the middle mouse button down) to zoom:
Dragging towards 12 o'clock zooms in on your document; dragging towards 6 o'clock
zooms out of your document.

3. Drag using the middle mouse button to a new location.

Managing Views
This task shows you how to create and annotate a user-defined view.
1.
Click the Create an Annotated View
from the DMU Navigator Tools Toolbar.
2. The 2D view is defined and identified in the specification tree.
You can now customize this view.
3. Adjust the different view parameters (zoom, rotation, etc.) until you are happy with the
result.

The 2D Marker toolbar is active


and you can now annotate your
view.
4. To add text, click the Text
icon then click where you want
to place the text.
The Annotation Text dialog box
appears.

5. Enter the desired text in the 2D text box and click OK.
The text is added at the desired position.
6. Click the Rectangle
icon to create a text box around the text.
7. Drag across the text you added to create a text box.
8. Annotate your document further as desired.

Navigating in Beginner's Fly Mode


This task shows you how to navigate through a document in beginner's fly mode. In beginner's fly
mode you can move upward or downward on any horizontal view plane as you move forward.
Beginner's fly mode commands are single-action commands. Releasing the mouse button means
you exit the command.
Before using the Fly navigation mode, you must be in a perspective view (View ->Render Style
->Perspective).
1. Click the Fly
icon in the View toolbar:
The icons used in the beginner's fly mode appear in the View toolbar.

2. Click the Turn Head

icon then drag (left mouse button) to define your starting position (the

direction in which you look at the object).


3. Release at desired location.
4. Click the Fly
icon, then click the left mouse button to begin to flying:
You begin to fly forward in the chosen direction.
A green arrow appears along with a circular target located at the center of the view
The figure below the arrow
specifies the speed at which you
are flying.

5. Still holding the left button down, drag to the left or right, or up or down, to change direction:
You fly in the direction in which you drag. The further you drag away from the center of the view

(represented by the circular


As you drag, the shape of the
arrow changes to reflect the
direction in which you are flying.

symbol), the greater the change in direction.

6. Drag the cursor back towards the center of the view to continue flying forward in the new
direction.

7. To modify your speed, click the Accelerate or Decelerate icon one or more times, then click the
Fly icon again followed by the left mouse button to pursue your fly.
8. Click the Examine mode
icon in the View toolbar to return to the default navigation mode.

Looking At Objects
During the course of your inspection, you may want to concentrate on a particular object
and view it closer up. Changing the target lets you dynamically redefine your target and
viewing distance.
This task explains how to look at the document in a specific direction by targeting through
a user-defined viewport.
1.
icon in the DMU Viewing toolbar.
Click the Look At
2.
3.

Click (left mouse button) on an object in the document to select it.


Drag (still holding left mouse button down) slowly to display the viewport.

4.

As you begin to drag, a rectangle with two diagonals appears and continues to
grow as long as you continue to drag. This rectangle represents the viewing
window of the future view.
Continue dragging to move around, resize and reposition the viewport.
The viewport is then shaped like a pyramid: your eyepoint is located at the vertex of
the pyramid. You can resize the viewport by dragging the middle mouse button.

5.

Release the button.


You now see what is targeted inside the viewport.

Managing URLs
You can add hyperlinks to your document and then use them to jump to a variety of
locations, for example to a marketing presentation, a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet or a
HTML page on the intranet.
This task explains how to add hyperlinks.
You should prepare a document that you want to see displayed via a hyperlink.
1.

Select the object you want to represent the hyperlink.

2.

Select the Insert-> Add Hyperlinks command.


The Manage Hyperlink dialog box appears.

3.

Enter a name identifying your hyperlink.

4.

Click Browse... and select the file in the Link to File dialog box then click Open.

5.

Click OK in the Manage Hyperlink dialog box.


You can now test the link you added.

6.

Select the object to which you just added the hyperlink.

7.

Click the Go to Hyperlinks


The linked file is displayed.

icon in the DMU Data Navigation toolbar.

Creating Scenes
This task shows you how to create a scene.
1. Click the Create Scene icon

The Edit Scene dialog box and a scene representation in the


document window are displayed.

2. Click OK to create a scene.


You are now in a scene window:
The background color turns to green.
Scene 1 is identified in the specification tree.
3. Perform the required modifications. For instance modify the viewpoint.

4.
Click the Save Viewpoints icon
5. Click the Exit From Scene icon

from the DMU Select toolbar.


to swap to the initial window.

The scene is updated to reflect changes made in the scene window.

This concludes the step-by-step getting started scenario.


You should now go to the user task section of this guide. This steps you through basic
procedures, letting you get the most out of this product.

Basic Tasks
The basic tasks you will perform in the DMU Navigator workbench introduce the powerful
design review environment capabilities offered. The table below lists the information you will
find.
Setting Up Your Session
Navigating
Annotating
Using Camera Capabilities
Using Generic Animation
Creating Scenes
Proximity Query
Comparing Drawings
Publishing
Additional Tools

Setting Up Your DMU Navigator Session


Enter the workbench: Select Digital Mockup ->DMU Navigator from the Start menu.
Insert components: Select Insert ->Existing Component..., then select desired
component(s) via the Insert an Existing Component dialog box.
Import a CAD part: Select Insert ->Existing Component..., then select .prt or .asm type
files via the Insert an Existing Component dialog box.
Define groups: Select one or more products in the geometry area or specification tree,
click the Group icon then OK in the Edit Group dialog box.
View the selection: Select one or more products then click the Current Selection icon.
View the cache: Select Tools ->Cache Content.
Search for named objects: Click the Search icon, enter search criteria in the Search dialog
box and click Search.
Translate components: Click the Translate or Rotate icon, select a component and enter
an offset value in the Move dialog box.
Rotate components: Click the Translate or Rotate icon, then the Rotation tab in the Move
dialog box. Select a component then the rotation axis and specify an angle.
Position Components
Snap components: Click the Snap icon, then select two geometric elements.

Entering the DMU Navigator Workbench


This task shows you how to enter the DMU Navigator workbench and open a new document.
1. Select Digital Mockup->DMU Navigator from the Start menu.
The DMU Navigator workbench is loaded and a DMU Navigator document opens:

The DMU Navigator workbench comprises:


A specification tree and a geometry area
Specific toolbars
A number of contextual commands available in the both the specification tree and the
geometry area.
Clicking off View -> Specifications visible in the menu bar removes the specification tree and lets
you use the entire screen for the geometry.

Inserting Components
This task shows you how to insert components into a DMU Navigator document.
1. Select the Insert -> Existing Component... command.

If the menu item cannot be selected, right-click product1 in the specification tree and select Existing Component...
from the contextual menu.
2. In the Insert an Existing Component dialog box, select the file location.
3. Click the Files of type: list.
4. Select the desired type from the following:
cgr (*.cgr)
V4 model (*.model)
CATpart (*.CATpart)
CATproduct (*.CATproduct)
V4 session (*.session)
VRML 2.0.
obj (*.obj)
byu (*.byu)
iges
pdb (*.pdb)
stl (ASCII and binary) (*.stl)
STRIM and STYLER models (*.tdg)
Models, parts and products are loaded in visualization mode, i.e. without associated technological data (only
visualization data is loaded). To access technological data, you must switch to design mode. This is done by
selecting components inserted in the specification tree and then Edit ->Representations ->Design Mode from the
menu bar.
5. Click Open in the dialog box.
The DMU Navigator document now looks like this:

Note: You can load the product structure only and then specify which 3D representations to insert. For more
information, see Loading the Product Structure Only.
Adding CDM Products: For more information, see Adding a CDM Product to a Product on UNIX as well as
Customizing CDMA Data in Catia Version 5 on UNIX in the V4 Integration User's Guide.
Reading Parts and Assemblies from VPM-1: For information on reading parts and assemblies in VPM-1, please
refer to Building a V5 product from a VPM1-PSN Window in the V4 Integration User's Guide.
Open to MultiCAD:
If you want to import a CAD part which is not directly supported by DMU Navigator, you can run a background
converter that will output one of the following formats: cgr, pdb (Deneb part), vrml or stl.
The CAD part files you want to import must have the .prt extension.
The DMUNAV_CONVCOMMAND environment variable must be given the name of the conversion command as
value. This command can be a .bat script on Windows or a shell script on UNIX. It has the following arguments:
Input file
Full path of the cgr, pdb, vrml or stl file to be created in the data cache, depending on the format chosen.
The command must return 0 if it completes successfully and 1 if an error occurs.
Once the DMUNAV_CONVCOMMAND environment variable is defined, the .prt extension is proposed in the Insert
Existing Component command. If you select a file with this extension, the command defined by the
DMUNAV_CONVCOMMAND environment variable is run.

Each time a CATProduct containing a reference to such a part is re-read, the data cache is searched for the
up-to-date file. If no up-to-date file is found, the command defined by the DMUNAV_CONVCOMMAND environment
variable is re-run.
Using File ->Open, you can now open 2D documents in the following formats:
cgm
V4 model (ENOVIA-DMU Navigator only)
tiff, jpeg, bmp, picture
AutoCAD files (*.dxf, *.dwg)
CATIA V4 drawings (*.model)
CATIA V4 image files (*.picture)
Note: You can also compare 2D documents to highlight differences.
Inserting Sample Documents
Sample documents (installed along with the online help library) are provided in many (but not all) cases, to support
the topic scenario explaining how a specific command works.
The sample documents are installed in user guide-specific sample folders. In the online documentation filetree,
there is one samples folder for each users guide. For more information on where sample documents are installed
by default, see Accessing Sample Documents in the Infrastructure User's Guide.

Importing CAD Parts into a CATProduct


Document
The DMU Navigator Solution is an open system capable of importing data from the most
widely used data standards and CAD systems. You can easily preserve your CAD
investment while still benefiting from the DMU Navigator Solution.
How Does it Work?
Two translation modes are supported:
Batch mode
Associativity mode.
What About the Elements you Import?
As the data contained in the parts you import are loaded in DMU Navigator, they are
inserted as additional representations within the DMU product structure, along with any
other representation previously inserted from any supported source.
Once imported, the data can be handled just as if it were created in the session.

This task shows you how to import data contained in CAD Parts or Assemblies into a
CATProduct document. The main purpose of such an import is to be able to read data
which remain synchronized with the most current level available.
DMU Navigator software P2.
1.

Select the Insert -> Existing Component... command.

2.
3.
4.

5.

If the menu item cannot be selected, right-click product 1 in the specification tree and
select Existing Component... from the contextual menu.
In the Insert an Existing Component dialog box, select the file location.
Click the Files of type: list.
Select the desired type from the following:
.prt
.asm
Models, parts and products are loaded in visualization mode, i.e. without associated
technological data (only visualization data is loaded). To access technological data,
you must switch to design mode. This is done by selecting components inserted in
the specification tree and then Edit ->Representations ->Design Mode from the menu
bar.
To set external format import settings, see Customizing External Formats Import.
Click Open in the dialog box.

Defining Groups of Products


This task explains how to define groups of products.
A group is a set of products defined explicitly by selecting products individually. Groups
are persistent and can be stored in the document.
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder.
1. Select a product in the geometry area or in the specification tree.
2. Ctrl-click other products to add them to the initial selection.

3. Select Insert -> Group... from the menu bar or click the Group
Navigator Tools toolbar to create a group:

icon in the DMU

The Edit Group


dialog box and the
Preview window
appear.

4. The Preview window


shows selected
products.
To change the
default display
setting for this
window, see
Customizing DMU
Navigator Settings.
(Optional) Select
products in the
specification tree or
the geometry area to
remove them from
the group.

5. (Optional) Enter a meaningful name for the group you want to create.
6. Click OK to create the group.

The group is
identified in the
specification tree.
Groups created in this manner are persistent and can be stored in the document. They
are listed as a separate entity in the specification tree and can be selected at any time
and modified.
7. In the specification tree, double-click the group you just defined to modify it
Or,
Right-click the group
you just defined and
select Group 1
object -> Definition
from the contextual
menu.
The Edit Group
dialog box appears
and displays the
contents of the
group you just
created. Parts in the
group are
highlighted in the
specification tree
and in the geometry
area.
8. Modify group contents as desired.
9. Click OK to confirm.
You can change the properties (color, line type and weight) of groups as well as hide
(transfer them to the No Show space) them.

Viewing the Current Selection


The object or objects selected make up the current selection. The list of objects selected can be viewed using the Current
Selection icon in the DMU Data Navigation toolbar. Making a new selection changes the current selection.
For a description of the various selection techniques, please refer to the Infrastructure User's Guide.
This task illustrates current selection capabilities.
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder.
In the geometry area or in the specification tree:
1. Select one or more objects.
2. Click the Current Selection Panel

icon in the DMU Data Navigation toolbar.

The Current Selection dialog box identifies all objects selected.

The Current Selection dialog box contains two tabs, letting you visualize the specification tree or 3D view of your current
selection.

3. Click the Freeze checkbox to freeze the contents of the dialog box on the current selection.
The dialog box will no longer be updated.
4. Select an object in the Current Selection dialog box.
The object is highlighted in the geometry area and in the specification tree.
5. Click the Reframe on selection checkbox to fit the selection into the available space in the geometry area.
6. Select other objects in the Current Selection dialog box in turn and notice the geometry area reframe on the selections.

7. De-select the Freeze checkbox.


The dialog box is updated and now shows the last object selected only.
8. Click the View related objects checkbox to navigate through objects linked to the current selection.
Note: View related objects is only available if there is one object selected.

Relationships identified are parents, any children or connected objects and relationships between objects. Products, groups,
simulation, shuttles and AEC objects are all taken into account.
Note: Contextual menu commands are available in the Current Selection dialog box.

Viewing the Cache Content


Working with a Cache System:
Two different modes are available when a component (V4 model, V5 CATPart, V5 CATProduct, etc.) is inserted into a DMU
Navigator CATProduct document:
Design mode: in this mode, the exact geometry is available and the document is inserted as is.
Visualization mode: in this mode, a representation of the geometry only is available and the corresponding cgr file, if it
exists, is inserted from the cache system.
Using a cache system considerably reduces the time required to load your data.
The cache system is organized into two parts:
Local cache: a read/write directory located locally on your machine and used to store cgr files.
The first time a component is inserted, it is tessellated. This means that the corresponding cgr file is computed and
saved in the local cache as well as displayed in the document window. The next time this component is required, the
cgr file which already exists (and not the original document) is automatically loaded from the local cache. The user is
normally responsible for the local cache.
Released cache: a read-only cache which is not necessarily located locally on your machine.
Several directories can be defined for the released cache. If the cgr file cannot be found in the local cache, the DMU
Navigator browses released directories in the order listed to check whether it is located in one of them. If it is still not
found, the component is tessellated and saved in the local cache. The site administrator is normally responsible for the
released cache.
Reading Components from a Database: The cache system works in exactly the same way when components inserted into a
CATProduct document come from a database. An additional check is run: if the cgr file is not found in the local or released
caches, the DMU Navigator requests that, if the cgr file exists in the database, it be downloaded.
The cache system is managed via the Cache Management tab in the Options dialog box. For more information, see
Customizing Cache Settings.
This task shows you how to view the contents of the cache.
A DMU Navigator document open
1. Select the Tools -> Cache Content command
The Cache Content dialog box appears listing the contents of the local cache.

Other information including whether or not the cache system is turned on, the current cache used and the maximum cache
size is also given in the dialog box.
2. In the Cache directory drop-down list box, select the cache directory whose contents you want to review
By default, the contents of the local cache are shown.
3. Click Close when done

Using the Search... Command


(General Mode)
This task explains how to perform a quick search for and select a named object.
You can search for:
objects with a specific name, or of a specific type or color
product properties
objects created using a specific workbench, in the current document or throughout the whole
product structure.
For more information on searching using a combination of search criteria, see the Infrastructure
User's Guide.
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder.
1. Select the Edit->Search... command or click the Search
toolbar.
You can also run the command using the Ctrl+F shortcut.
The Search dialog box appears:
2. Click the General tab:

icon in the DMU Data Navigation

If the Select command was active before you selected the Search... command, it remains active.
The Search...command does not prevent you from running other commands on the search results
(once selected). so you can also work with other commands while the Search dialog box remains
open. This means that you can:
run commands using the menus and icons
and also apply commands in contextual menus to selected search results using the power
input field: for example, you can manipulate selected specification tree elements using the
"c:center on", "c:center graph", "c:cut" commands.
If you select the Search button now, all items in the specification tree will be found.
2. Enter the name body* in the Name field:
...then click the Search button.
The two body items are highlighted in the list in the Search dialog box, a query is also generated
in the Generated queries field:

...and the body items are preselected in the geometry area:

3. Click the Select button to select the items.


The body items are selected:

4. Click OK to exit search mode.


Note that clicking OK has the same effect as clicking both the Select and Close buttons.
You can sort the results alphabetically by Name and Path in the Search dialog box by clicking the
corresponding column header.
For more detailed information, please refer to Selecting Using the Search... Command
(Favorites and Advanced Modes) in the Infrastructure User's Guide.

Translating Components
This task will show you two ways of translating a component:
by entering translation values
by selecting geometrical elements to define a translation direction.
The component to be translated must belong to the active component.
Open the document MovingComponents01.CATProduct then select Digital
Mockup->DMU Navigator from the Start menu.

1. Click the Translate or Rotation icon

The Move dialog box is displayed.


Either you specify an offset value between the element and the x, y or z axis, or you
select a geometric element to define the direction you need.

2. Select the component to be translated, i.e.


CRIC_BRANCH_3.

3. Enter 50 mm as the offset value, in the Offset X field.


4. Click Apply.
The selected component is translated
accordingly.

5. Click the Invert button to reverse the previous operation and translate the component
in the opposite direction.
The translation is reversed.
You can click Apply as many times as you wish to translate the component onto the
desired position.

6. Click OK to close the dialog box.

7. Repeat steps 1 and 2.


8. Click the Selection button to define a new translation with respect to a geometrical
element.

The Translation tab contents is grayed out.


If you select a line or a plane you need to enter a distance value. The translation is
then done along the selected line or normal to the selected plane. Selecting two faces
or planes assumes these elements are parallel.

9. Select the red and blue faces as shown.


These faces are parallel.

The distance between these faces is computed. The Offset field then displays this
distance value:
Offset X: 20mm
Offset Y: 0mm
Offset Z: 0mm
Please note the result depends on the unit parameters you can customize via
Tools->Options->General->Parameters->Units...
The default values are the following:

10. Click Apply to translate the blue component.


You can apply this translation to any other
components. You just need to select it and
click the Apply button.

11. Click OK to exit.


You can translate constrained components using the Shift key and the compass.

Rotating Components
This task will show you the two ways of rotating a component:
by entering the rotation angle and specifying the rotation axis
by selecting a geometric element as the rotation axis and entering the angle value.
The component to be rotated must belong to the active component.

Open the document MovingComponents01.CATProduct then select Digital Mockup->DMU Navigator from the
Start menu.
1.

Click the Translate or Rotation icon

2.

The Move dialog box is displayed. Translation options are


available. To find out how to translate components, refer
to Translating a Component.
Click the Rotation tab.

3.

Select the component to be rotated, that is


CRIC_BRANCH_1.

4.

Check the Axis Y option.

5.

Enter 90 as the angle value in the Angle field.

6.

Click Apply.
The selected component is rotated accordingly.

7.

Click OK to close the dialog box.

8.

Repeat steps 1 thru' 3.

9.

Click the Selection button to define a new rotation with respect to a geometrical element.

10.

Select the edge as shown to specify the new rotation


axis.

11 Enter 90deg in the Angle field.

12. Click Apply to rotate the red component.


You can apply this rotation to any other components. You
just need to select it and click the Apply button.

13. Click OK to exit.


You can rotate constrained components by means of the Shift key and the compass.

Positioning Components
This task will show you how to position a component
Open the document MovingComponents01.CATProduct then select Digital
Mockup->DMU Navigator from the Start menu.
1. Click the Translate or Rotation icon

2. The Move dialog box is displayed.


Translation and Rotation options are
available. To find out how to
translate components, refer to
Translating a Component.
Click the Position tab.

3. Select the component to be


positioned, that is
CRIC_BRANCH_1.

4. Enter values in the X, Y and Z fields to define the position. For instance, enter 0

5. Enter the required values in the Phi, Theta, and Psi fields.
Phi, Theta and Psi define the euler angle according to the ZXZ convention
6. Click Apply.
The selected component is
positioned accordingly.

Snapping Components
The Snap command allows you to project the geometric element of a component onto another geometric element
belonging to the same or a different component.
The element to be snapped must belong to the active component.
Open the document MovingComponents01.CATProduct then select Digital Mockup->DMU Navigator from the Start
menu.
You will obtain different results depending on the elements selected. The table below indicates what you can do:

First Element Selected

Last Element Selected

Point

Point

Identical points.

Point

Line

The point is projected onto the line.

Point

Plane

The point is projected onto the plane.

Line
Line
Line

Point
Line
Plane

The line passes through the point.


Both lines become collinear.
The line is projected onto the plane.

Plane

Point

The plane passes through the point.

Plane

Line

The plane passes through the line.

Plane

Plane

1. Click the Snap icon

Result

Both planes become parallel.

2. Select the red face as shown.


The element selected first is always the element that will move.

3. Select the blue face as shown.

The red face is projected onto the plane defined by the blue face.

Navigating
Navigate in Examine mode: See Activating Viewing Tools Using the Mouse in the
Infrastructure User's Guide.
Navigate in Walk mode: Select View ->Navigation Mode ->Walk, press and hold down
middle mouse button to define horizontal plane, drag to left or right to determine direction
then click left mouse button to begin. Drag to left or right to change direction then bring
cursor back towards center of view to continue walk forward in the new direction.
Navigate in Fly mode: Click the Fly Mode icon, press and hold down middle mouse button
to define initial horizontal plane, drag to left or right to determine direction then click left
mouse button to begin. Drag to left or right, up or down, to change direction then bring
cursor back towards center of view to continue fly forward in the new direction.
Use the viewpoint palette: Select View ->Viewpoint Palette... to access standard document
views as well as pan, zoom, rotate and turn head commands.
Change views: Click
to display previous view or
to display next view.
View against ground: Click the Horizontal Ground icon to display the ground plane. If
necessary, drag ground up or down to position it.
Magnify: Click the Magnifier icon and adjust magnifier viewport in your document window
to display magnified section in the Magnifier window.
Look at objects: Click the Look At icon, click an object to select it and drag slowly to
display and adjust viewport then release the button.
Set lighting effects: Click the Lighting icon and vary ambient lighting effects using light
source options and the brightness slider in the Light Source dialog box. Drag the handle(s)
to set the lighting direction.
Set depth effects: Click the Depth Effects icon, then desired checkboxes in the Depth
Effect dialog box to set depth effects, for example, the Foggy option to create fog effects.

Navigating in Examine Mode


Navigating in Examine Mode is the default mode. You can examine your document as
you would from the outside by moving around the document's perimeter, or as you would
from within, turning your head to view or moving closer (zoom in, zoom out) to different
objects.
Note: When in beginner's fly mode, click the Examine mode
to return to the default navigation mode.

icon in the View toolbar

For more information, see Activating Viewing Tools Using the Mouse in the Infrastructure
User's Guide.

Navigating in Walk Mode


In Walk mode, you can walk forward and backward (backward in advanced mode only) as well as
turn right or left as you walk along the horizontal plane.
Two walk modes are available:
Beginner's mode
Advanced mode for experienced users.
Before using the Walk navigation mode, you must be in a perspective view (View->Render
Style->Perspective). If you attempt to activate Walk mode, you will be prompted to switch to a
perspective view.

Beginners Walk Mode


This task shows you how to navigate through a document in beginner's walk mode.

Beginner's walk mode commands are single-action commands. Releasing the mouse button
means you exit the command. You can only move forward in beginner's walk mode.
Insert the platform.model document from the samples folder.
1.

Select View->Navigation Mode->Walk.


The icons used in the
beginner's walk mode
appear in the View
toolbar:
These commands are also available via View->Modify in the menu bar.

2.

Click the Turn Head

icon in the View toolbar then drag (left mouse button) to define

your starting position (the direction in which you look at the object).
3.

Release at desired location.

4.

Click the Walk

icon, then click the left mouse button to begin to walking:

You begin to walk straight forward in the chosen direction.


A green arrow appears along with a circular target located at the center of the view.

The figure below the


arrow specifies the
speed at which you are
walking.

The speed at which you first approach the object depends on the initial distance from the
object, and is calculated automatically. The speed is optimized so that you reach the point
you target in approximately 10 seconds.
5.

Still holding the left button down, drag to the right or left to change direction.
You walk in the direction in which you drag. The further you drag away from the center of

the view (represented by the circular

symbol), the greater the change in direction.

Dragging to the left lets you view the object as if you had turned your head to the left;
dragging to the right produces the same effect in the opposite direction.
As you drag, the shape
of the arrow changes to
reflect the direction in
which you are walking.
6.

Drag the cursor back towards the center of the view to continue walking forward in the new
direction.

7.

To modify your speed, click the Accelerate

or Decelerate

icon one or more

times, then click the Walk icon again followed by the left mouse button to pursue your walk.
8.

To return to the default navigation mode, click the Examine mode

icon in the View

toolbar.
You can also set mouse sensitivity and collision detection using the appropriate options in
the Visualization tab, accessed via the Tools->Options command. For more information,
see the Infrastructure User's Guide.

Advanced Walk Mode


This task shows you how to navigate through a document in Walk mode.
Before using the Walk navigation mode, you must be in a perspective view (View -> Render Style
-> Perspective).
It is easier to walk through documents in contexts where you would find a virtual ground, i.e. in
buildings, planes or ships for example.

Insert the platform.model document from the samples folder


1. Select View ->Navigation Mode ->Walk.
2. Press and hold down the middle mouse button to define the horizontal view plane
3. Still holding the button down, drag to the left or to the right to determine the direction in which
you wish to walk.
In the Walk mode, press and hold down the middle mouse button until you've finished
navigating.
4. When in the direction in which you wish to walk, click the left mouse button to begin walking.
You begin to walk forward in the chosen direction.
A green arrow appears along with a circular target located at the center of the view, like when
using beginner's walk mode.

An arrow indicating the direction in which you are walking appears.


5. Still holding the middle button down, drag left or right to change direction:
Dragging to the left lets you view the object as if you had turned your head to the left; dragging
to the right produces the same effect in the opposite direction.
6. Drag the cursor back towards the center of the view to continue your walk forward in the new
direction.

Pressing the PageUp and PageDown keys modifies your speed. Speed is indicated in the
status bar.
7. Click the left mouse button again to reverse direction:
You begin to walk backward, away from the target.
Note: The left and right are now defined as if you were walking away from the target with the
your back towards it.
You can also set mouse sensitivity and collision detection using the appropriate options in the
Visualization tab, accessed via the Tools->Options command. For more information, see the
Infrastructure User's Guide.

Navigating in Fly Mode


In Fly mode you can move upward or downward on any horizontal view plane as you move forward or
backward (backward in advanced mode only).
Two fly modes are available:
Beginner's mode
Advanced mode for experienced users.
Before using the Fly navigation mode, you must be in a perspective view (View->Render
Style->Perspective). If you attempt to activate Fly mode, you will be prompted to switch to a
perspective view.

Beginner's Fly Mode


This task shows you how to navigate through a document in beginner's fly mode.
Note: Beginner's fly mode commands are single-action commands. Releasing the mouse button
means you exit the command. You can only move forward in beginner's fly mode.
Insert the platform.model document from the samples folder.
1.

Click the Fly Mode

icon in the View toolbar or select View->Navigation Mode->Fly.

The icons used in the beginner's fly mode appear in the View toolbar.

2.
3.
4.

These commands are also available via View -> Modify in the menu bar.
Click the Turn Head
icon in the View toolbar then drag (left mouse button) to define your
starting position (the direction in which you look at the object).
Release at desired location.
Click the Fly

icon, then click the left mouse button to begin to flying:

You begin to fly forward in the chosen direction.


A green arrow appears along with a circular target located at the center of the view
The figure below the arrow specifies the
speed at which you are flying.

5.

The speed at which you first approach the object depends on the initial distance from the
object, and is calculated automatically. The speed is optimized so that you reach the point
you target in approximately 10 seconds.
Still holding the left button down, drag to the right or left, or up or down, to change direction.

You fly in the direction in which you drag. The further you drag away from the center of the

symbol), the greater the change in direction.


view (represented by the circular
As you drag, the shape of the arrow
changes to reflect the direction in which you
are flying.

6.
7.

Drag the cursor back towards the center of the view to continue flying forward in the new
direction.
or Decelerate
icon one or more times,
To modify your speed, click the Accelerate
then click the Fly icon again followed by the left mouse button to pursue your fly.
Each click on the icon increases or decreases the speed by approximately 40%.
When you collide with a solid object when flying, you will slide along the object's surface and
not fly through the object, providing a realistic effect. This feature is also available in
Advanced Fly mode.

8.

Pressing the Shift key and dragging lets you bank left or right.
You can use the option "Gravitational effects when navigating" in the Visualization tab,
accessed via the Tools->Options command, to fix the X, Y or Z axis during navigation.While
turning in Fly mode, this creates the impression that the user viewpoint tilts or banks with
respect to the fixed axis, as in a real plane.
You can also set mouse sensitivity and collision detection using the appropriate options in
the Visualization tab, accessed via the Tools->Options command. For more information, see
the Infrastructure User's Guide.
icon in the View
To return to the default navigation mode, click the Examine mode
toolbar.

Advanced Fly Mode


This task shows you how to navigate through a document in advanced fly mode.
Insert the platform.model document from the samples folder.
In advanced fly mode, you can move upward or downward on any horizontal view plane as you
move forward or backward.
1. Click the Fly Mode
icon in the View toolbar or select View ->Navigation Mode ->Fly
2. Press and hold down the middle mouse button to define the initial horizontal view plane.
3. Still holding the button down, drag to the left or to the right to determine the direction in which
you wish to fly
In the Fly mode, press and hold down the middle mouse button until you've finished navigating.

4. When in the direction in which you wish to fly, click the left mouse button to begin flying:
You begin to fly forward in the chosen direction.
A green arrow appears along with a circular target located at the center of the view, like when
using the beginner's fly mode.
The speed at which you first approach the object depends on the initial distance from the object,
and is calculated automatically. The speed is optimized so that you reach the point you target in
approximately 10 seconds.

5. Still holding the middle button down, drag left or right, or up or down, to change direction:
You fly in the direction in which you drag. The further you drag away from the center of the
view, the greater the change in direction.
6. Drag the cursor towards the center of the view to continue flying forward in the new direction.

Pressing the PageUp and PageDown keys modifies your speed. Speed is indicated in the
status bar.
Each press of the key increases or decreases the speed by approximately 40%.
7. Click the left mouse button again to reverse direction:
You begin to fly backwards, away from the target. When flying backwards, the up and down are
reversed.
You can use the option "Gravitational effects when navigating" in the Visualization tab,
accessed via the Tools->Options command, to fix the X, Y or Z axis during navigation. While
turning in Fly mode, this creates the impression that the user viewpoint tilts or banks with
respect to the fixed axis, as in a real plane.
You can also set mouse sensitivity and collision detection using the appropriate options in the
Visualization tab, accessed via the Tools->Options command. For more information, see the
Infrastructure User's Guide.

Using the Viewpoint Palette


The Viewpoint Palette provides an easy and precise way to define your document views.
It gives you access to a certain number of viewing tools that will let you fine-tune
viewpoints.
You can pan and rotate as well as turn your head to view or move closer (zoom in, zoom
out)
to different objects in your document by predetermined increments.
You can start from scratch or fine-tune a standard view.
Views can then be stored and called up from a list of viewpoints, as well as combined to
produce an animation.
To access the Viewpoint Palette, select View -> Viewpoint Palette...
The Viewpoint Palette dialog box appears.

Select standard views : Select View ->Viewpoint Palette..., click


in the Viewpoint
Palette dialog box then select the desired view.
Pan, zoom, rotate & turn your head: Select View ->Viewpoint Palette..., and experiment
with pan and zoom (Translate box default position), rotation (Rotate box default position)
and turn head commands.

Changing Views
Individual views are created as you navigate through your design in examine, walk and fly
modes. Views are stored and can be reviewed using previous and next icons in the DMU
Viewing toolbar.
In walk and fly modes, views are created each time you pause during your walkabout or
fly around.
Insert the platform.model document from the samples folder.
This task shows you how to change views.
1.
2.

Navigate in Examine mode (zoom, pan, etc.) to create and save several different
views
icon in the DMU Viewing toolbar or select View -> Modify ->
Click the Previous
Previous View:

3.

The previous view is displayed in the geometry area.


Click the Previous icon again.

4.

Click the Next

icon, or select View -> Modify -> Next View:

The next saved view is displayed in the geometry area.

Viewing Objects against the Ground


Ground lets you visually insert a plane at the ground level of your document, thus
enabling you to recognize when your document is viewed the right way up.
By default, when you first access a document, the plane parallel or tangent to the bottom
point of your document is considered to be the ground. You can, however, change the
plane used to identify the ground. For more information, see Customizing the Ground.
This task shows you how to show and hide the ground.
Insert the platform.model document from the samples folder.
1.

Select View->Ground, or click the Horizontal Ground

icon in the DMU Viewing

toolbar.
The ground plane is displayed in the geometry area.
2.

To hide the ground, simply repeat the same step.


Drag (left mouse button) the ground up or down to a new location, then release the
mouse button.
The ground is repositioned as defined.

Magnifying
This tasks explains how to obtain a magnified view of your document in a separate window.
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder.
1. Select the View->Magnifier... command or click the Magnifier icon in the DMU Viewing toolbar.
The Magnifier window opens containing a magnified section of your document:

The section magnified is defined by the magnifier viewport


which appears over the object in your document:

Note that the magnifier viewport has handles:


the "+" symbol lets you move the viewport
the arrows in the corners let you resize the viewport.
2. Point to the + symbol and drag it to move the viewport and magnify another area of the document:

3. Point to one of the arrows and drag it to size the magnified area up and down:
While you drag, the

symbol appears.

All the viewing and manipulations performed in the document window are also reflected in the Magnifier
window. For example, rotate the object to see how the object is also rotated in the Magnifier window:

Looking At Objects
This task explains how to look at the document in a specific direction by targeting through a
user-defined viewport.
Insert the platform.model document from the samples folder.
1. Select the View->Modify->Look At command, or click the Look At

icon.

2. Drag (left mouse button down) slowly to display the viewport.


As you begin to drag, a rectangle with two diagonals appears and continues to grow as long as
you continue to drag. This rectangle represents the viewing window of the future view.
3. Continue dragging to move around, resize and reposition the viewport.
The viewport is then shaped like a pyramid: your eyepoint is located at the vertex of the
pyramid. You can resize the viewport by dragging the middle mouse button.

4. Release the button.


You now see what is targeted inside the viewport.

You can also press and hold down both Shift then the middle mouse button for a quicker result.

Setting Lighting Effects


This tasks explains how to vary ambient lighting effects.
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder.
1. Select the View->Lighting... command or the Lighting icon in the DMU Viewing toolbar
to display the Light Sources dialog box.
The default light source settings look like this...

... and produce a lighting effect, for example, like this:

Note that the One Light Source icon


is activated by default. The sphere indicates
the current lighting direction. The handle on the sphere indicates the direction from
which the light is being projected: by default, the light is coming from the top left.
You can drag the handle around (using the left mouse button) to change the lighting
direction. The new lighting effect is created instantaneously as you drag the handle.
The first slider at the bottom of the dialog box lets you adjust light source brightness.
2. Drag the handle down and towards the bottom right: the light is now coming from the
bottom right:

3. Click the Two Light Source icon

to add another light source.

In our example, using two light sources means that the lighting is now too bright.
4. Drag the brightness slider (the first slider in the list) to the left to reduce the brightness.

5. Now drag the lower handle up towards the top left to change the direction of the
corresponding light source.

6. Click the Neon Light icon

to produce a neon light effect.

7. Click the No Light Source icon

to switch off all light sources.

The bottom two sliders control contrast and specular intensity of light sources
respectively.

Setting Depth Effects


This tasks explains how to achieve 3D depth effects, namely, clipping geometry between
clipping planes and creating fog effects.
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder.
1. Select the View->Depth Effect... command or the Depth Effects icon in the DMU
Viewing toolbar to display the Depth Effect dialog box.
The orange sphere completely encompasses the objects in your document. The white
cross represents the center of the objects in the geometry area.
The color of the area behind the orange sphere is the background color of your
document.
The vertical lines represent the front (near) and back (far) clipping planes.

By default, depth effects are deactivated: if you zoom in and out, you will see that for
the moment the geometry is not clipped.
You can keep the Depth Effect dialog box open and continue working with other
commands. You will be able to understand the results obtained by setting depth effects
by zooming in and out.
2. Set the Near Limit and Far Limit by checking the Fixed checkbox for each option,
entering values and pressing Enter in each case.
Note that location of the vertical lines representing the clipping planes has changed.

3. Zoom in progressively to see how the geometry is clipped by the near clipping plane:
The back (far) section of the geometry is clipped. You now only see what is located
between the near and far clipping planes.

4. Zoom out to see all the geometry.


5. Click the Foggy option.
The foggy option introduces a foggy effect.

6. Zoom out again.


As you zoom out, the fog effect is increased. The fog gets thicker as you continue to
zoom out beyond the back clipping plane.

Annotating
Add 3D annotations: Click the 3D Annotation icon, click where you want to place the text,
enter the text in the Annotation Text dialog box then click OK.
Create hyperlinks: Select an object then click the Add Hyperlinks icon. Identify your
hyperlink and select the destination file in the dialog box then click OK.
Jump to hyperlinks: Double-click the hyperlink cue in the geometry area or the specification
tree.
Create Annotated Views: Annotate the active view using commands in the DMU 2D Marker
toolbar.
Manage Annotated Views: You can recover 2D views using the Managing Annotated
Views icon. Double-click the required view in the Annotated Views dialog box.
Edit Annotated Views Properties: Right click the view you need to edit in the specification
tree.
Add comments, change the view name... in the Properties dialog box displayed.
Use temporary markers: Select Analyze ->Graphic Messages ->Name or Coordinate and
move the cursor over objects in your document.

Adding 3D Annotations
You can annotate your 3D document. Annotations are attached to the point selected to
place the text.
This task explains how to add 3D text.
Insert the platform.model document from the samples folder.
1.

Select Insert -> 3D Annotation from the menu bar or,

2.

icon in the DMU Navigator Tools toolbar.


click the 3D Annotation
Click an object at the point you want to place the text.
Note: You can select the object first.
The Annotation
Text dialog box
appears.

3.
4.

Enter the desired text in the 3D Text field.


Click OK.
The text is added at the desired position. Annotations are attached to the point
selected. You can move your document: annotations remain attached to the point
at which you place them.
Note: Text annotations are identified in the specification tree.

A text's drawing properties include its color. You can change the color of text that
you've already added.

5.

Right-click a text you've already added and select Properties from the contextual
menu, or click the text and select Edit -> Properties from the menu bar.
Note: Dynamic highlighting as you move your cursor over objects helps you locate
them.

6.
7.

The Properties dialog box appears.


Make desired changes.
Click OK when done.

Double-click the annotation to modify the text.


Checking the Set as default checkbox in the Properties dialog box sets the
selected properties as default properties and changes how new annotations
will look when you create them.
To delete annotation text, right-click the object and then select Delete from
the contextual menu.

Creating Hyperlinks
You can add hyperlinks to your document and then use them to jump to a variety of
locations, for example to a marketing presentation, a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet or
a HTML page on the intranet.
You can add hyperlinks to models, products and parts as well as to any constituent
elements.
Visualization Mode does not permit selection of individual model elements. To select
these elements, switch to Design Mode (Edit ->Representations ->Design Mode)
This task explains how to add hyperlinks.
Prepare a document that you want to see displayed via a hyperlink.
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder.
1. Select the Insert->Add Hyperlinks command, or click the Add Hyperlinks icon in
the DMU Navigator Tools toolbar.
2. Select the object you want to represent the hyperlink.
Or,
1. Select the object you want to represent the hyperlink.
2. Select the Insert-> Add Hyperlinks command, or click the Add Hyperlinks icon in
the DMU Navigator Tools toolbar.
The Manage Hyperlink dialog box appears.

3. Enter a name for your hyperlink.


Note: This is the name that will appear as a textual cue if the Name checkbox is
set in the Options dialog box. For more information, see Customizing DMU
Navigator Settings.
4. Enter the path to the destination file in the URL field then press Enter.
Or,
Click Browse... and select the destination file in the Link to File dialog box.
Note: You can add more than one link. Simply enter another path or click
Browse... and select another file. All links created are listed in the Link to file or
URL box.
Select a link then click Go to to follow the link to the destination file.
Select a link then click Remove to remove existing links.
5. Click OK in the Manage Hyperlink dialog box when satisfied.
The hyperlink is created and is
identified in the specification tree.

The hyperlink cue is displayed on the object in the geometry area. By default,
hyperlink cues are graphical.
Note: You can change the color of the hyperlink cue. To do so, right-click the cue
then select Properties from the contextual menu, or select the cue then Edit ->
Properties from the menu bar.
You can now edit the Hyperlink URL, simply right-click the hyperlink cue and
select URL object ->Add Hyperlinks from the contextual menu to edit the link.
For example:

Jumping to Hyperlinks
This task explains how to jump to hyperlinks.
You have already added a hyperlink to your document.

1.

There are several ways to jump to hyperlinks:


Double click the hyperlink cue, or the desired hyperlink in the specification tree.
Or,
Click the Go to Hyperlinks

icon in the DMU Data Navigation toolbar, then

select the object with the desired hyperlink, the hyperlink cue or the desired
hyperlink in the specification tree.
Or,
Select the object with the desired hyperlink, the hyperlink cue or the desired
hyperlink in the specification tree, then click the Go to Hyperlinks icon in the DMU
Data Navigation toolbar.
Or,
Right-click the hyperlink cue and select URL object->Definition... from the
contextual menu.
Note: If more than one link has been created, the Open Hyperlink dialog box
appears.
2.

Select the link of interest, then click OK.


The file linked is displayed.

Note: Objects with hyperlinks are identified by textual and/or graphical cues.

Creating Annotated Views


You can draw straight lines, freehand lines, circles, arrows and rectangles. You can
create complex annotations by combining several objects as well as include text in
document views.
This task explains how to annotate your documents.
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder.
To annotate documents, you must be in an active view. Objects drawn are
associated with the active view and will no longer be visible if the view is changed.
You can also add 2D annotations in active views in the Section viewer for example.
Annotations are no longer visible if you change viewer.

1.

2.

3.

Click the Create an Annotated View


from the DMU Navigator Tools
Toolbar
The 2D view is created and identified in
the specification tree

The DMU 2D Marker toolbar becomes


active. You can now annotate your
view.
Click the appropriate icon in the DMU 2D Marker toolbar to draw straight lines,
freehand lines, circles, arrows or rectangles.

4.

Put the cursor where you want to start the object, then click and drag to draw the
object:
To draw a straight line, click at the start of the line and drag from the beginning
to the end of the line.
To draw a freehand line, click at the start of the line and drag the cursor along
the path of the line.
To draw a circle or a rectangle, click at the start of the object and drag diagonally
across the area in which you want the object to appear.
To draw an arrow, click at the start of the arrow and drag from the beginning to
the end of the arrow.
You can move and resize 2D markers
easily. All you need to do is drag the
green manipulators attached to the
marker selected.

5.

Click the Text

6.

In the view, click where you want to


place the text.

icon to annotate your view with text.

The Annotation Text dialog box


appears.

7.

8.

Enter the desired text in the 2D text box and click Apply.
change the size and style of annotation text if needed
and click Apply.
You can add more than one line of annotation text. To edit existing text, simply
double-click.
The text is added at the desired position.
An object's drawing properties include color, line type and weight. You can
change drawing properties of objects that you've already drawn.
icon to enter the selection mode.
Select the Select

9.

Right-click an object you've already drawn and select Properties from the
contextual menu, or click the object then select Edit -> Properties from the menu
bar.
Note: Dynamic highlighting as you move your cursor over objects helps you
locate them.

The Properties dialog box appears.


10. Click the Graphic tab to display the graphic properties of the current object.
11. Make desired changes:
You can change the color, line type and line weight of the selected object.
12. Click OK when done.

Checking the Set as default checkbox in the Properties dialog box sets
the selected properties as default properties and changes how new
annotations will look when you create them.
To delete all annotations in the current view, select the Delete All
icon.
Annotations
You can also delete individual markers by right-clicking the object and
then selecting Delete from the contextual menu.

Managing Annotated Views


This task explains how to recover your 2D views using the Manage Annotated
Views icon.
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder. Create
at least two views.
These 2D views are identified in the specification tree

1.
2.

Click the Manage Annotated Views


icon.
The Annotated Views dialog box is displayed

3.

Double-click View.1in the dialog box to recover your view.

4.

Now double-click View.2.

5.

Click Cancel to exit the Annotated Views dialog box or OK to enter the view
selected.
You can edit the annotated view.

Editing Annotated Views Properties


This task explains how to edit annotated views properties. This new capability eases
the collaborative work as you can add information such as user name, creation or
modification dates...)
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder. Create an Annotated View.
Please refer to Creating Annotated Views
1.

Right click the view you need to edit in the specification tree.

2.

Select the Properties item from the contextual menu displayed

3.

The Properties dialog appears

4.

Enter the required information ( creator name, comments...)

5.

Click Apply and click OK to exit the dialog box.


The next views you are going to create will be assigned the creator name you
entered.

Using Temporary Markers


You can visualize the names of objects as well as coordinates of points defined on objects
in your document as you move your cursor over objects. Clicking turns the temporary
marker into a 3D annotation.
This task explains how to visualize object names and point coordinates.
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder.
1. Select Analyze -> Graphic Messages -> Name from the menu bar to view object names.
2. Move your cursor over objects in your document.
The name of the object is displayed.

3. Re-select Analyze -> Graphic Messages -> Name to de-activate the command.
4. Select Analyze -> Graphic Messages -> Coordinate from the menu bar to view point
coordinates.
5. Move your cursor over objects in your document:
The coordinates of the point under the cursor are displayed. Dynamic highlighting helps
you identify points of interest.

6. Re-select Analyze -> Graphic Messages -> Coordinate to de-activate the command.
Clicking turns the temporary marker into a 3D annotation.

Using Camera Capabilities


About Cameras: Gives background information on cameras.
Create and Display Cameras: Adjust view parameters (zoom, rotation, etc.) of the document
and click the Create Camera icon then OK in the Edit Camera dialog box.
Edit Cameras Properties: right-click the camera to be edited. Perform changes, when
satisfied, click Apply and OK.
Move Cameras: Select a camera, attach the 3D compass to the 3D camera representation,
then drag parts (axis, arc, etc.) of the compass to move the camera to a new position.
Select Standard Views: Select View ->Named Views... then double-click the desired view.
User-defined Views: Customize the selected standard view then click Add. Use other options
in the Named Views dialog box to manage views.

6. Zoom out and rotate the model to see the 3D representation.

7. Click anywhere in the geometry area to de-select the camera and see the camera symbol.

You can create several cameras at different locations. The DMU Navigator offers you the possibility of visualizing the
viewpoint of each camera in different windows.
8. Select Window -> Camera Window from the menu bar.
All cameras created are listed.
9. Select the cameras of interest from the list.
A new window showing the camera viewpoint is opened for each camera selected.
If you want to organize the opened windows horizontally:
10. Select Window -> Tile Horizontally from the menu bar.

If you want to organize the opened windows vertically:


11. Select Window -> Tile Vertically from the menu bar.

If you want to organize the opened windows in a cascading arrangement in which they overlap each other:
12. Select Window -> Cascade from the menu bar.

About Cameras
Cameras let you take stills of views or viewpoints in your document. A series of
views showing different viewpoints in succession can be combined to create an
animation.
Cameras are identified by name in the specification tree and by a symbol
in the geometry area.

A 3D representation helps you locate the viewpoint of interest by showing what the
camera sees through a viewport:

Cameras are moved using the 3D compass or directly using the green manipulators.
Note that you can use cameras in two different modes: Perspective or parallel.
Please refer to Editing Camera Properties

Perspective mode

Parallel mode

Editing Cameras Properties


This task shows how to display and edit camera properties.
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder.
You create a camera
1. Right-click the camera in the specification tree. Select the Properties item form the contextual menu displayed.
You can also select the camera and use the Edit->Properties command
The Properties dialog box is displayed:
The Lens tab is active

The Lens tab lets you edit the following:


Type
Perspective

Focal length (click and drag or use the spin box)

Parallel

The Preview window lets you see the actions (zoom, new type...) you perform and these actions are updated in
the geometry area
For more detailed information, please refer to Moving Cameras
2. Click the Position tab.

3. Select values for the Origin and Target distances


4. When satisfied, click Apply.
5. Click OK.

Using Standard Views


This task explains how to use standard views.
Insert the platform.model document from the samples folder.
1. Select the View->Named Views... command:
The Named Views dialog box appears.
The list provides a number of standard views you can
use to display the document:
*front
*back
*left
*right
*top
*bottom
*iso.

2. Double-click the desired view.


For example, double-clicking *front obtains the front
view:

The other views are:

Creating, Modifying and Deleting User-Defined


Views
This task explains how to create, modify and delete user-defined views. Note that user-defined views are stored
with the document.
Insert the platform.model document from the samples folder.
1. Select the View->Named Views... command and double-click the desired
view.
You are now ready to customize the view.

2. Adjust the different view parameters (zoom, rotation, etc.) until you are
happy with the result.

3. Click the Add button to add the view to the list.


The default name of the view is Camera 1.

4. Rename the view as required and press Enter.

You now see a 3D viewpoint representation in the geometry area. The 3D representation is a viewport that
helps you to define what you want to see in the view. What you see inside the viewport can then be stored in
your view. You can manipulate the 3D representation to define exactly what you want to see:
zooming, rotating and panning the geometry using the standard tools also affects the 3D representation
dragging the corners rotates it
dragging any of its sides or any of the corner markers inside the representation moves it (the triangular
marker always represents the bottom left corner)
dragging the point in the center (the eye position) defines the direction in which you look at the
document.

6. Manipulate the 3D representation to define your view parameters.


7. Click the Properties button to access the Camera Properties dialog box.

8. Double-click anywhere on the 3D representation to apply the view parameters, and click Apply to apply the
changes to your view.
9. If you want to modify any customized view you have already saved, select it, modify the view parameters
again, then click the Modify button.
You can also delete views by selecting the view from the list and clicking the Delete button.
The Reverse button lets you view the object from the reverse angle.

Moving Cameras
This task shows how to move the camera you have just created to the desired position.
You can move cameras in three different ways, using
Pan, rotate and zoom commands directly in the camera window
Or,
The 3D compass.
For information on the 3D compass, see the Infrastructure User's Guide.
The Edit-> Properties... on Cameras

You defined a Camera.


1. Select Window -> Camera Window and select the camera from the list to open a
separate window showing the camera viewpoint.
2. Select Window -> Tile Vertically to organize opened windows vertically.

3. Pan, rotate and/or zoom the camera in the camera window until satisfied with the
camera position.
The camera position in the document window is updated.

1. Select the camera to be moved in the specification tree:


The 3D representation is shown in the geometry area.
To move the camera, you will attach the 3D compass to the 3D camera representation.
If you cannot see the 3D representation, click the camera in the specification tree and
select Camera object -> Definition from the contextual menu, then click the Show
Graphic Representation checkbox in the Edit Camera dialog box.
2. Attach the 3D compass to the 3D camera representation:
Press and hold down the left mouse button on the red square of the 3D
compass
Drag the 3D compass to attach it to the camera representation:
Notice that the compass changes appearance as you drag it.

Pointing to a line coming from the eye automatically snaps the compass to the eye and
pointing to one of the sides of the viewport snaps the compass to the target.
You can attach the 3D compass to two different positions of the camera representation
as shown below: the eye and the target.

3. Select Window -> Camera Window and select the camera from the list to open a
separate window showing the camera viewpoint.
4. Select Window -> Tile Vertically to organize opened windows vertically.

5. Click one of the translation axes of the 3D compass and drag to translate to the
desired position.
As you move the camera in the document window, the camera viewpoint in the camera
window is updated.

6. Click one of the rotation axes of the 3D compass and drag to rotate to the desired
position.
7. Continue experimenting until satisfied with the camera position.
The camera viewpoint is automatically stored.

1. Right-click the Camera in the specification tree


2. Select the Properties item from the contextual menu displayed
3. The Properties dialog box is displayed.

The Lens tab is active


4. If you zoom, pan, rotate the camera within the Preview window, the camera position is
updated accordingly in the geometry area.

5. Continue experimenting until satisfied with the camera position.


Click Apply and click Ok.
This is the new camera position you obtain :

Using Generic Animation


Record animations: Select a camera then click the Simulation icon. Move the camera
using the 3D compass, clicking Insert in the Edit Simulation dialog box to record shots and
OK to save the simulation. Select the simulation object and click the Compile Simulation
icon. Set options in Compile Simulation dialog box then click OK to create a film.
Replay animations: Select a replay object and click the Replay icon. Replay the recorded
animation using buttons and options in the Replay dialog box.
Generate an animation file: Select a simulation object and click the Compile Simulation
icon. In the Compile Simulation dialog box, click the Generate an animation file checkbox
and set other options. Click File name... and specify the animation file name and location
before clicking Save in the Save As dialog box.
Record viewpoint animations: Click red start command in the Viewpoint Animation toolbar
and move the geometry as desired to record viewpoints. Click stop command when
satisfied.
Detect interferences automatically: Double-click the simulation object in the specification
tree and click Clash Detection (On). Set options in the Edit Simulation dialog box and run
your simulation.

Recording Animations
This task shows how to create an animation using one camera. This is done in two steps:
Define a simulation.
For this, you will use the 3D compass. For more information on the 3D compass,
see the Infrastructure User's Guide.
Create a film from your simulation.
You defined a Camera.
1.
2.

Click the camera in the


specification tree.
Click the Simulation icon
or select
Insert->Simulation from
the menu bar.
The Edit Simulation
dialog box and the
Preview window showing
the object manipulated
(in our case, the camera)
appear.

3.

To change the default


display setting for the
Preview window, see
Customizing DMU
Navigator Settings.
Close the Preview
window.
The camera viewpoint is stored in the Simulation object each time you click Insert.
You can, in this way, record a series of viewpoints which when combined and
compiled create your animation.

4.

Remember the initial position is automatically recorded.


Using the 3D compass, move the camera to a new location.

5.
6.

By default, the 3D compass snaps to the eye when you clicked the Simulation icon
if it wasn't attached before.
Click Insert and record the desired shot.
Move the camera as often as necessary, clicking Insert to record shots.

7.
8.

You may find it useful to open the camera window (Window->Camera Window) and
tile the two windows. This will allow you to see the camera viewpoint better as you
move the camera.
Use the VCR buttons to position the camera in its original location and replay the
recorded camera positions.
Click OK to save the simulation.
Note: No track is displayed when defining a simulation recording camera
viewpoints.

9.
10.

You are now ready to create a film. This is done by compiling your simulation.
Select the Simulation object in the specification tree.
Click the Compile Simulation icon
.
The Compile Simulation dialog box appears.

11.
12.
13.

Enter a meaningful name for your film if desired.


Activate the Time step drop-down list box and select the Time step you want to
break down each shot into.
Click OK to compile the simulation and create a film:
You can see the results in the geometry area as the simulation is being compiled.
For more information on Simulation and Compile Simulation capabilities, see the
Fitting Simulator User's Guide.
Use Simulation capabilities in this way to produce an animated inspection of your
design.

Replaying Animations
This task shows you how to replay a recorded animation.
You must have already recorded an animation. See Recording Animations.
1.

Select the Replay object in the specification tree.

2.

Click the
Replay icon
.
The Replay
dialog box is
displayed.

3.
4.

5.

Open the camera window (Window->Camera Window) and tile the two windows to
see the animation better.
Click:
the Play Forward button to run a continuous replay of the recorded
viewpoints
or the Step Forward button to run a step-by-step of the recorded viewpoints.
Adjust the sampling step:
Leaving the value at x1 replays the film in the number of steps defined when
compiling the simulation. Increasing the value speeds up the animation, for
example, setting the sampling step to x2 will replay the film at every second step.
You can choose one of the loop modes to re-run the animation in a continuous way
(either in one direction only or in one direction then the other).
For more information on Replay capabilities, see the Fitting Simulator User's Guide.

Generating an Animation File


This task shows you how to generate an animation file in standard movie format.
You must have already recorded an animation. See Recording Animations.
1. Click the Compile Simulation icon

The Compile Simulation dialog box appears:

2.
3.
4.
5.

Make sure the Generate an animation file option is activated.


Enter a meaningful name for the animation file you want to create.
Activate the Time step drop-down list box and select the time step.
Click File name to store your animation.

The Save As dialog box displays.


6. Click Setup to display the Choose Compressor dialog box
Enter the required parameters and click OK.
7. Specify the file location and name, then click Save.
The animation file is created and saved In AVI Microsoft format.
For more information on Compile Simulation capabilities, see the Fitting Simulator
User's Guide.

Recording Viewpoint Animations


This task will show you how to record viewpoint animations either using the fly command or manipulating
directly the geometry. A replay is automatically created for each new viewpoint recording.
Open the the cgr files from the samples folder.

Use the Fit All In icon


to position the model geometry on the screen.
1. Click the Record Viewpoint Animations icon
from the DMU Generic Animation toolbar.
The Viewpoint animation toolbar appears:

2. Click the red button to start recording viewpoints.


The Resulting Replay dialog box is displayed

3. Enter a meaningful name and click Ok.


The replay object is identified in the specification tree

You are in recording mode:

the Viewpoint animation toolbar lets you stop


or pause
whenever you need it.
The third icon gives you the status (record).
You are ready to start recording viewpoints.
4. Move the geometry as desired, for instance:

the recording

5. When you are satisfied, click the

button and close the Viewpoint Animation toolbar.

6. Double-click Replay.1 in the specification tree.

The Replay dialog box is displayed:

7. Use the VCR buttons to run Replay.1

Detecting Interferences Automatically


This task shows you how to use the Interference Detection functionality while replaying a simulation.
The Automatic Clash Detection is now available while moving an object with the 3D compass.
Open the document AUTO_CLASH_DETECTION.CATProduct, then select Digital Mockup -> DMU Navigator from the Start menu.
1. Double-click Simulation.1 in the specification tree

The Kinematic Simulation and Edit simulation dialog boxes appear.


2. Click the arrow within the clash detection icon from the DMU Generic Animation toolbar.
Undock the toolbar if necessary.

3. Set the Clash detection to on


4. Select 0.04 as interpolation step in the Edit Simulation dialog box.

5. Run your simulation using the VCR buttons.


The products in clash are highlighted in the geometry area.

Now select the Stop mode clash detection

6. Run your simulation. This time, the simulation stops at the first clash detected.

If you need to obtain a finer clash analysis, you need to define a interference, please refer to Space Analysis User's Guide.

Defining Scenes
About scenes: Gives background information about scenes.
Create scenes: Click the Create Scene icon then OK in the Edit Scene dialog box. Set
scene properties then click the Exit from Scene icon to return to the initial document
window.
Add a component: In the document window, click Product1, select Insert ->Existing
Component... then the component(s) you want to add.
Reset & Check Component Positioning: Double-click the scene representation then select
Tools ->Checking Positioning... to highlight items moved. Click the Reset Selected
Products icon and exit the scene.
Remove a component: In the document window, delete a component.
Explode an assembly: Create a scene. In the scene window, select the product(s) you
want to explode and click the Explode icon. Set options in the Explode dialog box and click
OK. Exit the scene.
Save viewpoints : Click the Create Scene icon then OK. Modify viewpoints then click the
Save viewpoints icon. Click the Exit from Scene icon to return to the initial document
window.
Editing a Scene Macro : You create a scene through a macro and edit specific
parameters.
About Persistency in Scenes: Deactivate a node in an existing scene. Exit scene the node
in the product is still activated and deactivated in the scene.

About Scenes
The Scene capability lets you control the position and orientation of each component in a
product. You can easily rotate a component and set different positions and orientations in
an instance.
Scenes are identified by name in the specification tree and by a graphical representation
in the geometry area.
The following operations are not allowed in a Scene context:
add
remove
replace
cut
delete
paste

Creating Scenes
This task shows you how to create scenes.
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder.
1.

Click the Create Scene icon

The Edit Scene dialog box and a scene representation in the document window are
displayed.

2.

Click Ok to end the scene creation.


You are now in a scene window:
The background color turns to green.
Scene 1 is identified in the specification tree.

3.

4.

Perform the required modifications. For instance modify:


The viewpoint
Graphical attributes
Show-no show.
Within a scene, click the Reset selected products icon
to reposition the
components as they were in the initial product. Note that color attributes and the
show-no show specification are not taken into account when using the Reset
selected products icon.
to swap to the initial window.
Click the Exit From Scene icon
The scene is updated to reflect any changes made.

5.
6.

Double-click Scene 1 either in the specification tree or in the geometry area to


swap to the scene window.
Create as many scenes as needed.
Deactivating View -> Scene Specification Visible in the menu bar removes the
scene representation and lets you use the entire screen for the product. You can
also use the F4 key to toggle more quickly.

Adding a Component
This task shows you how to add components to a product.
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder, except NOZZLE_1_2.cgr and
NOZZLE_2_2.cgr.
1.
.
Click the Create Scene icon
The Edit Scene dialog box and a scene representation in
the window appear.

2.

Click OK to end the scene creation.


You are now in a scene window:
the background color turns to green.
Scene 1 is identified in the specification tree.

3.

Click the Exit From Scene icon

to swap to the initial window.

The scene is created and its representation appears in the left corner of the main
window.

4.

Now add the NOZZLE, for this:


Select Product1 in the specification tree and select Insert->Existing
Component...
Shift-select NOZZLE_1_2.cgr and NOZZLE_2_2.cgr and then click Open.

5.

The added components (NOZZLE) are identified in the specification tree and added
in the geometry area.

6.

Double-click scene1 to swap to the scene window:


The corresponding components are automatically added and appear in the
specification tree
By default, the shape representation is deactivated therefore the scene
visualization is unchanged.

Clicking the Exit From Scene icon


made.

updates the scene to reflect any changes

Using Reset Selected Products


This task shows you how to use the Reset Selected Products command.
Please refer to Creating Scenes.
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder.
You created Scene.1.
1. Double-click the scene representation to enter the scene.

In this scene you moved certain components.

2. Select Tools->Checking Positioning... from the menu bar to find out


the items you moved.

The moved items are highlighted in the specification tree.

3. Click the Reset Selected Products icon

and exit the scene.

The items are repositioned in the scene as they were in the initial product.

Removing a Component
This task shows you how removing components affect a scene.
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder.
You created a first Scene.
1. Remove the REGULATION_COMMAND for instance.

Scene 1 is updated.
2. Double-click the scene representation to enter the scene.

This scenario is also valid when replacing a component. The scene is automatically
synchronized.

Using Explode in a Scene


The Explode capability can be used in a scene context. You can easily create a scene and
explode a product without changing anything in the original product.
This task shows you how to manage an exploded view in a scene context.
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder.
1. Click the Create Scene icon

The Edit Scene dialog box and a scene representation in the


document window are displayed:

2. Click Ok to end the scene creation.

3. Select Product.1and click the Explode icon

The Explode dialog box appears.


Note the Explode now takes into account assembly constraints
The constrained Explode type is applicable only to specific cases:
when the assembly is assigned coincidence constraints:
axis/axis
plane/plane

4. Click Apply.
This is what you obtain:

5. Click the Exit From Scene icon

to swap to the initial window.

For more details about the explode capacity, please refer to the DMU Fitting Simulator User's
Guide.

Saving Viewpoints in a Scene


This task shows you how to save viewpoints in a scene. It can be very useful to save
specific viewpoints in a scene different from the initial product viewpoint.
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder.
1. Click the Create Scene icon

The Edit Scene dialog box and a scene representation in the


document window are displayed:

2. Click Ok to end the scene creation.


You are now in a scene window:
The background color turns to green.
Scene 1 is identified in the specification tree.
The default viewpoint is the initial product viewpoint.

3. Modify the viewpoint.

4.
Click the Save Viewpoints icon
5. Click the Exit From Scene icon

from the DMU Select toolbar.


to return to the initial document window.

The initial product viewpoint is displayed.

5. Double-click Scene1 either in the specification tree or in the geometry area to swap to the
scene window.

The viewpoint saved is taken into account in the scene.


If you do not use the save viewpoint command, the viewpoint is the default one.

Editing a Scene Macro

1.

If you perform a task repeatedly, you can take advantage of a macro to automate it.
A macro is a series of functions, written in a scripting language, that you group in a
single command to perform the requested task automatically.
This task will show you how to edit a scene macro created in the DMU Navigator
workbench.
You stored your recorded macros in a text format file. For more details about
recording, running macros please refer to the DMU Navigator Infrastructure User's
Guide.
You can easily modify the macro instructions specific to DMU Navigator (strings of
characters put in bold).
Here is a scene macro example: (you create a scene through the macro process)
SCENE MACRO
Language="VBSCRIPT"
'*********************************************************
' Purpose: This macro can be used interactively to create a scene and
move products within.
'
' Returns: None
'*********************************************************
Sub CATMain()

'Deactivate file alert (to avoid interactive message during write of


files if any)
Dim FileAlertSave As Boolean
FileAlertSave = CATIA.DisplayFileAlerts
CATIA.DisplayFileAlerts = False
'Find the root of the CATProduct
Dim RootProduct As AnyObject
Set RootProduct = CATIA.ActiveDocument.Product
'Create the scene
Dim TheSceneWorkbench As Workbench
Set TheSceneWorkbench = CATIA.ActiveDocument.GetWorkbench (
"SceneWorkbench" )

Dim Ascene As Scene


Set Scene = TheSceneWorkbench.WorkScenes.AddNewScene ("Scene1",
RootProduct)
End Sub

EXPLANATIONS
Create the scene launches the scene creation
"Scene1 corresponds to the to be created scene
RootProduct: corresponds to Product1
Please refer to Creating Scenes.

About Persistency in Scenes


The activation or deactivation of a product is persitent in the scene context.
This task will show you how the activation or deactivation is persistent in Scene context.
For this: you are going to deactivate a node in the product specification tree
Insert all the cgr files from the samples folder.
1. Click the Create Scene icon

The Edit Scene dialog box and a scene representation in the document window are displayed.

2. Right-click REGULATION_COMMAND.1 in the specification tree.


3. Select Representations->Deactivate Node from the contextual menu displayed

4. Click Ok to end the scene creation.


3. Click the Exit From Scene icon

to swap to the initial window.

4. The REGULATION_COMMAND.1 representation is activated in the Product1

The scene is updated:


The node REGULATION_COMMAND.1 is deactivated in the scene.
The deactivation is persistent within the scene context.

Proximity Query
Run a proximity query (DMU Navigator license only): Click the Proximity Query icon, make
your reference selection and set other options in the Proximity Query dialog box then click
Apply. If desired, hide the products found. Note: the query is run on activated shape
representations only.
Run a proximity query (DMU Navigator & Optimizer): Click the Proximity Query icon,
make your reference selection and set other options in the Proximity Query dialog box
then click Apply. Note: the query can be run on products inserted without shape
representations. If desired, activate shape representations of products found.

Proximity Query
Large assemblies can be complex, consisting of many products and subproducts. You can
simplify a complex assembly by displaying only those products you want to work with.
Proximity Query lets you do just that.
How Does it work?:
The proximity query calculation is not based on the representation visualized in session but
on the cubic representation, which corresponds to the accuracy parameter. Because of the
way in which the detection algorithm is designed, the real distance may be greater than the
clearance value.
Thus, three kinds of increase may arise:
Due to the cubic representation itself: :maximum increase= 2*accuracy*sqrt(3)
Due to the clearance value:
maximum increase= accuracy*sqrt(3)
Due to the relative position:
maximum increase= 0.5*accuracy*sqrt(3)
Thus, the combination of the three factors give a maximum increase= 3.5*accuracy*sqrt(3)

Accuracy:
Setting an accuracy determines the size of the cubes used to represent the products in the
calculation. For larger products, a lower setting will result in a slower computation time but
a more precise result.
Clicking ... opposite Accuracy gives you access to the Cache Management and Accuracy
dialog box which tells you how much cache is used, lets you free the cache, and if you
have a DMU Navigator license only, will calculate the cache required for an accuracy
setting you enter.
Clearance:
Setting a clearance defines an area around the reference selection within which all nearby
products or outside of which all far away products are returned by the query depending on
the Products to select option chosen.
This task shows how to perform a proximity query.
You have the DMU Navigator license only, which means the query will take into account the
objects of the activated representation only.
Insert all the GARDENA model documents from the samples folder.
1. Click the Proximity Query icon

The Proximity Query dialog box displays:

2. Select one of the products you want to be the reference for the query, Lock.1 for instance.
3. Set the accuracy by entering a value, 3mm for example.4. Check the Far away products
only option.
4. Click Apply.
The results display in the Result field.

5. Click OK when done.


The products found are highlighted both in the specification tree and geometry area:

6. Hide the products


found.
Now you can work with
a simplified product.

You can combine the Proximity Query command with other DMU commands for example
Comparing Products (DMU Space Analysis toolbar). Note that if you have only the DMU
Navigator license, the query only takes into account the products with an activated
representation.
DMU Optimizer License:
If you have a DMU Optimizer License, you can run a query on the components with the
representation deactivated.

Proximity Query with DMU Optimizer license


Large assemblies can be complex, consisting of many products and subproducts. You can simplify a complex
assembly by displaying only those products you want to work with. Proximity Query lets you do just that.
This task shows how to run a proximity query based on components inserted without associated shape
representations.
You load the product structure only.
Insert all the PLATFORM*.model documents from the samples folder.
Make sure shape representations are deactivated before inserting your model files.
Make sure you work with the cache system on.
1. Deactivate representations.
For this:
Select Tools->Options from the menu bar.
The Options dialog box is displayed.
Expand the Infrastructure category in the left-hand
tree.
Click the Product Structure tab.
In the Representation field, check the Do not activate
default shapes on open option.
Click Ok to confirm your operation.

For more details, refer to Loading the Product Structure Only.


2. Activate the cache system:
For this:
Select Tools->Options from the menu bar.
The Options dialog box is displayed.
Expand the Infrastructure category in the left-hand tree.
Click the Cache Management tab.
In the Cache Activation box, check the Work with the Cache System option.
Click Ok to confirm your operation.
Restart your session to take modifications into account.

For more details, refer to Customizing Cache Settings.

3. Click the Proximity Query icon

The Proximity Query dialog box appears:

4. Select one of the products you want to be the reference for


the query, PLATFORM_10 (PLATFORM_10.1) for
instance.

5. Set the Clearance by entering a value. In our example, we will keep the default value of 0mm.
Clearance:
Setting a clearance defines an area around the reference selection within which all nearby products or outside
of which all far away products are returned by the query depending on the Products to select option chosen.
6. Set the Accuracy by entering,1000mm for example.
Accuracy:
Setting an accuracy determines the size of the cubes used to represent the products in the calculation. For
larger products, a lower setting will result in a slower computation time but a more precise result.
Clicking ... opposite Accuracy gives you access to the Cache Management and Accuracy dialog box which
tells you how much cache is used, lets you free the cache, and if you have a DMU Navigator license only, will
calculate the cache required for an accuracy setting you enter.
7. Check the Nearby products including selection option.
8. Click Apply.
The result displays in the Result field.

9. Click OK when done.


The products found are highlighted in the specification tree.
10. Activate the shape representations of the items. For this:
Right-click the highlighted items in the specification tree
Select Representations
Select Activate Node

This is what you obtain:


Now you can work with a simplified product.

You can combine the Proximity Query command with other DMU commands for example Comparing
Products (DMU Space Analysis toolbar). Note that if you have only the DMU Navigator license, the query only
takes into account the products with an activated representation.

Advanced Tasks
The advanced tasks you will perform in the DMU Navigator workbench introduce conferencing
capabilities and interoperability with the ENOVIA 3d com Navigator.
Interoperability with CATIA V4
Interoperability with ENOVIA 3d com Navigator
Conferencing
Running CATDMU Utility Batch Process
About Macros
More About Automation Objects

Interoperability with CATIA V4


Import N4D Scenes: Declare the required variable
N4D_TO_DMU_DECL= file dlname, select Tools->Import N4D
Scenes... Select the file location and click Open in the Import N4D
Scene File dialog box displayed.
Send Models from VPM to CATIA V4: select Tools ->Send to
CATIA V4->Add Single.

Importing N4D Scenes in a DMU


Navigator Session
This task shows you how to read a N4D scene in a DMU Navigator V5 session.
Have a DMU Navigator session running
1. Under Unix and Windows NT
You need to declare the following variable:
N4D_TO_DMU_DECL = Path_dlname
This is an example of a this file:
# Unix_path alias
#
#
#
x:\db\ CAR MODELS
/u/users/catusr/db/ MODEL REPOSITORY

2. Select Tools ->Import N4D Scene

3. The Import N4D Scene File dialog box is displayed:

4. Select the file location. The file type is wrl by default.


5. Click Open in the dialog box.
The N4D Scene document now looks like this:

Sending Models from VPM to CATIA V4


This functionality is available on ON UNIX ONLY
This task shows you how to send products. Your VPM model is opened into the DMU Navigator V5.

Have a DMU Navigator V5 and an CATIA V4 session running.


You opened a VPM model in a DMU Navigator session:

1. In DMU Navigator V5, select Tools ->Send to CATIA V4

2. Select the required item from the pull-down menu


Add Single: lets you send your VPM model to CATIA V4 session in active mode
Replace Active: lets you replace the current active model in the CATIA V4 session
Add Passive: lets you add VPM models to the CATIA V4 session in passive mode
Synchronize Viewpoint: the CATIA V4 viewpoint will be DMU Navigator V5 one

3. This is what you obtain if you selected Synchronize Viewpoint (very useful to perform clash detection)

Interoperability with ENOVIA 3d com


Navigator
Load products: Right-click product(s) in ENOVIA 3d com Navigator and select DMU_V5 ->
Load from the contextual menu
View and manipulate products: Right-click product(s) in ENOVIA 3d com Navigator and select
the appropriate command from the contextual menu
Save products: Select the File ->Save command in the DMU Navigator

Loading Products into DMU


Navigator
This task shows you how to load products, for example a .model, selected in ENOVIA 3d
com Navigator, into the DMU Navigator.
Have a DMU Navigator and an ENOVIA 3d com Navigator session running.
1. In DMU Navigator, check Tools ->Backbone connection to establish the connection
between DMU Navigator and ENOVIA 3d com Navigator.
2.
icon if not already selected
In ENOVIA 3d com Navigator, click the Search Tree
to access the products of interest via WebInfo.
The Search Tree and default directories are displayed.
3. Expand the Enovia Queries
directory until you can access a
query capability.
4. Right-click and select Activate from
the contextual menu.
The Enovia Access dialog box
appears.

5. Choose a role from the proposed list.


The Query panel can now be accessed and filled to define your query.

6. Define a query, for example use the '%' wildcard, in the Query panel then click
Submit.
The results of the query are displayed.

8. Select one or more entries and click


Add to add a bookmark to selected
objects in a WorkBook and
subsequently have direct access to
them.
The Choose Target WorkBook
dialog box appears.

9. Select the WorkBook of interest


from among those proposed in the
dialog box and click OK.
A bookmark to selected objects has
been created. You can now access
these objects directly via the
WorkBook.

In ENOVIA 3d com Navigator, the products you want to load may already be
bookmarked in a WorkBook. If this is the case, simply select and expand the
appropriate WorkBook to display products of interest.
10. Expand the WorkBook to display the products of interest: right-click and select
Expand on ->All Levels from the contextual menu.

11. Select one or more products, right-click and select DMU_V5 -> Load from the
contextual menu to load products into the DMU Navigator.
Selected products are loaded into the DMU Navigator. A Download dialog box
appears informing you of the progress of the download.

You can, at any time and in the same way, add products to an existing DMU
Navigator session.
The Unload command in the contextual menu lets you remove products from
the DMU Navigator session.
For more information on how to connect to the ENOVIA 3d com Navigator in general,
see the Portal 3d com User's Guide.

Viewing & Manipulating Products


This task shows you how to manipulate products via the ENOVIA 3d com Navigator
contextual menu, seeing the results in your DMU Navigator session.
Have loaded products into the DMU Navigator via ENOVIA 3d com Navigator.
1.

In ENOVIA 3d com Navigator, select one or more products, right-click and select
one of the commands in the DMU_V5 contextual menu:
Highlight: highlights selected products in the specification tree and geometry
area of the DMU Navigator, adding them to the current selection. This can,
for example, be used to place selected products in a group.

Unhighlight: Removes highlighting from products selected via ENOVIA 3d


com Navigator.
Reset Highlight: Removes all highlighted products in the DMU Navigator
from the current selection.
Reframe: Zooms in or out to fit all the geometry into the available space.
Show: Displays hidden selected products.
No Show: Hides the selected products in the No Show space.
Color Highlight: Changes the color of selected products to the color selected
(blue in our example).

Reset Color: Restores the original color of selected products.

Saving Products
This task shows you how to save products loaded into your DMU Navigator session from
ENOVIA 3d com Navigator as CATProduct documents.
Have loaded products into the DMU Navigator via the ENOVIA 3d com Navigator.
1.

In the DMU Navigator, click the Save

icon or select the File ->Save command.

The Save As dialog box opens.

2.
3.

In the Save As dialog box, specify the location of the document to be saved as well
as its name and type.
Click Save.

Conferencing
Initialize the backbone Driver: As Administrator, launch the backbone daemon on node
1"CATSysDemon -dm domain.lst -timeout 3000 Launch the Backbone daemon on both
Node2 and Node3 as follows:"export BBDomainManager=node1 CATSysDemon-timeout
3000". once initialized, the user must select the backbone driver option using
Tools->Options->General -> General...
Initialize the Conference: User 1 must select the Tools->Conferencing->Host from the menu
bar to host a conference. Other users must select the Tools->Conferencing->Guest from the
menu bar to be able to receive invitation calls.
Work in Conference: The host performs modifications (3D & 2D annotations, viewpoints...)
The guest session is automatically updated.

Initializing the Backbone Driver


The backbone needs to be set up on each computer running applications which need
to communicate.
Under UNIX, conferencing is supported by the Backbone process.
On NT, you can select either the Conference driver Microsoft NetMeeting or Backbone.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:


If you use Backbone as conference driver (on UNIX, optional on NT) for the first time,
you need (as administrator) to set up backbone on each computer but also on a
reference server.
For this, you need to define a server as a specific domain manager.

This task shows you how to initialize backbone driver for conferencing purposes. You
have three UNIX machines: Node1-Node2-Node3, follow the described procedure:
1. You need (as administrator) to define a machine (for example Node1) as "Domain
Manager"
2. Launch the Backbone daemon on Node1 as follows:
"CATSysDemon -dm domain.lst -timeout 3000"
domain.lst is a file containing the machine list belonging to the Domain.
A timeout (in seconds) is triggered once the daemon runs without CATIA or another
daemon backbone

In our example domain.lst contains Node2 and Node3.


3. Launch the Backbone daemon on both Node2 and Node3 as follows:
"export BBDomainManager=node1
CATSysDemon -timeout 3000"
4. (Optional) use the -DebugL4 option when launching the daemons to make sure
everything works correctly.

5. Once the Backbone domain is initialized, you need to (as user) to select backbone as
conference driver. For this:
Select Tools->Options from the menu bar.
The Options dialog box is displayed.
Click the General category in the left-hand tree.
Click the General tab.
In the Conferencing field, check the Backbone option.
Click Ok to confirm your operation

Remember that users must select the same conference driver.

Initializing the Conference


More About Conferencing:
Conferencing enables different people from different places to dialog and/or work together as if they
were virtually at a same place.
Audio, video or chat tools enable the conference members to dialog while whiteboard or any other
application sharing capabilities enable them to share documents or even applications.
Usually, one member has a leading role, he is named the host or the master member.
The conferencing functionality is available with ENOVIA DMU V5R4, under Windows NT or 9x and
UNIX platforms

This scenario describes how to start a conference under Windows NT with NetMeeting as conferencing
driver.
If you work on NT and if you selected the NetMeeting option as conference driver, make sure you have
version 3.01 installed.
Have a DMU Navigator session running.
On NT, you can select either the Conference driver Microsoft NetMeeting or backbone.
On UNIX only, you need to select the backbone as conference driver
For more information on the backbone process, please refer to the Infrastructure User's Guide Communications Backbone Files.
Select Tools->Options from the menu bar.
The Options dialog box is displayed.
Expand the General category in the left-hand tree.
Click the General tab.
In the Conferencing field, check the Conferencing driver option you need.
Click Ok to confirm your operation

Both users must select the same conference driver

1. User 1 must select the Tools->Conferencing->Host from the menu bar to host a conference.
2. Other users must select the Tools->Conferencing->Guest from the menu bar to be able to receive
invitation calls.

On NT only, if you chose the NetMeeting option:


The NetMeeting and the Conferencing dialog boxes appear:

There must be one and only one host member in the conference, but as many guest members as
needed.

If the NetMeeting interface is already on the desktop, you can use it to host a conference by selecting
the Call/Host Meeting menu item, and then connect DMU to that conference by selecting
Tools->Conferencing->Host from the menu bar in the DMU window.
Likewise, guests already in a NetMeeting conference can connect DMU to that conference by
selecting the Tools->Conferencing->Guest from the menu bar in the DMU window.
3. Edit your own personal information by selecting the Who I am button. The Business card dialog box
is displayed.

the update on every database option saves information on NetMeeting too.


4. The host member then uses either the NetMeeting or the Conferencing dialog box to call other
members.
Using NetMeeting dialog box:
use Call/New Call or
select the Place Call icon and enter the name or the IP address of the member machine.

Using the Conferencing dialog box:


enter the name or the IP address of the member machine and
click the Call button.

NetMeeting enables users to initialize a conference by placing direct calls without being host. Such a
conference cannot be used for DMU conferencing.
As soon as the conference is active (i.e. at least 2 members connected), the Chalk tab page of the
Conferencing dialog box is displayed.
The host and guest user interfaces are a little different since they cannot perform the same actions.
The host one looks like this:

The guest one like this:

The conference is on hold. Everybody can go on working, opening files or windows, etc.
5. The host member clicks the Start button in the Conferencing dialog box to initialize a conference. The
Start button switches automatically to Suspend.
What about the Chalk function?
When the conference is running, only the member who has the chalk (the host has the chalk by
default) can work. Some specific actions or commands are replicated in other members sessions.
The other members cannot interact in the DMU window, only in the Conferencing dialog box.
Thus, any guest can request the chalk through the Conferencing dialog box by clicking the Request
chalk button. The chalk is given, at any time, by the host member to any member by selecting a
member name in one of the two lists in the Conferencing dialog box. Of course, the host member can
also get the chalk for himself by selecting the Get chalk button.

6. How to suspend the conference?


The host member can suspend the conference at any time. All he needs to do is click the Suspend
button. Performing this action allows everybody to work on their own, open a new part for instance.
Only the host can suspend and start a conference.

7. How to quit the conference?


Any member can leave the conference by selecting the Tools->Conferencing->Stop from the menu
bar or exiting the Conferencing dialog box, hanging up the NetMeeting conference or exiting the
NetMeeting user interface. If the host leaves the conference, the conference is ended for everybody.

Now, let's look at the Conferencing dialog box more carefully.


When the conference has started, this dialog box is the only one the non-chalk users can interact
with.
It comprises of a header, a footer and several tab pages:
The header
The header indicates the host identification (user name and node name and/or IP address) and the
current status of the conference (started or suspended).
The Chalk page
The Chalk page is used to manage the chalk. The host member can give the chalk to anyone
whether requested or not, or get it for himself, while the guest members can only request it. The host
member can also choose to automatically accept incoming requests.
The Options page
The Options page is used to customize options. Application developers can use it to offer user
options. This is the case for telepointers.

ko (now in tools options)


The Chat page
The Chat page allows the members to send messages to the other conference members.

The History page


The History page provides a list of certain actions performed throughout the conference.

The Documents page


The document page is used to indicate which documents are opened in the host member session.

The footer
The footer comprises the button used by the host member to start and suspend the conference.

Working in Conference
This task shows how you can work in a conferencing environment.
Have a DMU Navigator session running. You initialized a conference. For more detailed information
please refer to Initializing the Conference.
Each member of the conference must have access to the data and load them by themselves. In order
to help them, information about which documents are open in the host member session is provided to
any member.
The actions replicated during a conference are the following:
workbench transition
object selection
viewpoint modification (zoom, rotation)
3D annotations (creation, modification and deletion)
2D annotations (linked to cameras) creation, modification and deletion
Conferencing now supports:
move products (free hand or simulation context)
show/hide
specification tree status (if you expand a node as the host it is replicated in the guest session)

1. This is the host session:


The ProductA.CATProduct.1 is the one used in this conference

2. This is the guest session:

User 1 decides to add a 3D annotation (new markup):

The 3D annotation (new markup) creation is automatically taken into account and visible in the guest
session :

Running CATDMUUtility Batch


Process
The CATDMUUtility is a batch process enabling the generation of cgr, 3dmap, wrl and
NCGM format from a CATIA file or MULTICAD files :
It can process files through a path or a list under UNIX operating system through the
EnoviaVPM
This task shows explains how to use the CATDMU Utility batch process
1. Prepare the Input file defining conversion parameters.
A typical computation parameters file looks like this:
Example 1:
CATDMUUtility -f inputfile -cgr outputfile1 [-nolod] [-sag value] [-3dmap outputfile2]
[-vox value2] [-box outputfile3] [-unit value3]
Example 2:
CATDMUUtility -l inputliste -db name -user username -pwd password -server
servername
-cgr -cache
Example 3:
CATDMUUtility -l inputliste

-f -cgr -wrl -cache

Example of input file:


Under WINDOWS NT
"e:\New A\CRIC_BRANCH_1.CATPart"
e:\B05doc\online\dmnug\samples\CRIC_BRANCH_1.CATPart
e:\B05doc\online\dmnug\samples\GARDENAATOMIZER.model
Under UNIX
/usr/B05doc/online/dmnug/samples/CRIC_BRANCH_1.CATPart
Note: Special characters [] identify optional parameters.
Please find below the different options available input, output

Input Options :
-f

: Input file with appropriate extension. A path must follow the option.

-l

: Input list of model with -f, or database identifiers with -db option.

-db

: Input database name for processing a list of Data Base identifiers.


The name of the Data Base { VPM } must follow the option.
Can not be used with -f option and without -l option.
Output Options :

-cgr

: Output file for cgr corresponding to the input file.


A path must be indicated after the option, if no path is specified the output
will be written into
the cache by using -cache option.
-NCGM : Output file for NCGM corresponding to the input file. A path must be
indicated after the option,
if no path is specified the output will be written into the cache by using
-cache option.
-3dmap : Output file for 3dmap corresponding to the input file. A path must be
indicated after the option,
if no path is specified the output will be written into the cache by using
-cache option.
-wrl
: Output file for vrml corresponding to the input file. A path must be indicated
after the option,
if no path is specified the output will be written into the cache by using
-cache option.
-box

: Output file for bounding box corresponding to the input file. Text format.
Computing options :

-vox
: Switch to generate 3map with a specified voxel value. Its use is mandatory
after -3dmap option.
A float value is required.
-sag
: Optional switch to generate cgr with a specified sag value. A float value is
required.
Default value is defined in the settings.
-nolod
-unit

: Optional switch to generate CGR without Level Of Detail (LOD)


: Optional switch to compute in the appropriate unit { mm, cm, m, inch, foot}
Default value is input millimeter : mm

-cache

: Optional switch to generate files directly in the cache directory

-user

: user name identifier for a Data Base connection. Only used with -db option
If no user or a blanc is required, the option must not be used.

-pwd

: password of the user for a Data Base connection. Only used with -db option
If no user or a blank password is required, the option must not be used.

-server : logical name of the Data Base server (Defined in Settings). Only used with
-db option.
Its use is mandatory to establish the connection with the Data Base.
To use this option, make sure you work with the Cache system. For this:
select Tools->Options->Infrastructure->Cache Management
For more detailed information, see Customizing Cache Settings
2. Run the following shell to start the batch process:
Under UNIX:
Place yourself in the following directory:
cd /install_folder/code/command
Run the command:
./catstart -run "CATDMUUtility -f inputfile -cgr outputfile1"
Under Windows:
Write a shell script containing the following lines:
cd \install_folder\code\bin
CATDMUUtility CATDMUUtility -f inputfile -cgr outputfile1
Run the shell.
Note: The "install_folder" is the name of the installation directory or folder. For more
information on installing DMU, see the Infrastructure User's Guide.

About Macros
Write a Group Macro: Open a CATProduct document. Select the Tools->Macro->Macros...
command to display the Macro dialog box. Select External File in the Macro in drop-down list
to run a macro stored in a file. Click Select to select the name of the macro to run. The
Select External File dialog box appears. Select the .CATScript document, then click Open.
Click Run in the Macro dialog box to replay the selected macro.
Write a Annotated View Macro:Open a CATProduct document. Select the
Tools->Macro->Macros... command to display the Macro dialog box.Select External File in
the Macro in drop-down list to run a macro stored in a file. Click Select to select the name of
the macro to run. The Select External File dialog box appears. Select the .CATScript
document, then click Open. Click Run in the Macro dialog box to replay the selected macro.

Writing a Group Macro


If you perform a task repeatedly, you can take advantage of a macro to automate it. A macro
is a series of functions, written in a scripting language, that you group in a single command
to perform the requested task automatically.
You create the Group macro by editing a file (written in a scripting language) to insert the
functions you wish.
For more information on macros, see the Infrastructure.

What does the Group Macro do ?


The Inertia macro computes the inertia data of the selected products in the opened
CATProduct document and displays the results in a dialog box.

How to run the


Macro ?
1. Open a CATProduct
document.
2. Select the
Tools->Macro->Macros...
command to display the
Macro dialog box.
3. Select External File in the
Macro in drop-down list to
run a macro stored in a file.
4. Click Select to select the
name of the macro to run.
The Select External File
dialog box appears.
5. Select the
DocSampleGroup.CATScript,
then click Open.
6. Click Run in the Macro dialog
box to replay the selected
macro.
A dialog box appears
giving you the group
data of the product.

Sample Group CATScript


Language="VBSCRIPT"
'*********************************************************
' Purpose: This macro can be used interactively to invert (DMU Invert) the selection.
'*********************************************************
Sub CATMain()
' Find the workbench
Dim TheNavigatorWorkbench As Workbench
Set TheNavigatorWorkbench = CATIA.ActiveDocument.GetWorkbench (
"NavigatorWorkbench" )
' Retrieve the groups collection
Dim TheGroups As Groups
Set TheGroups = TheNavigatorWorkbench.Groups
' Create a group with selected products
Dim SelGroup As Group
Set SelGroup = TheGroups.AddFromSel
' Fill the selection
SelGroup.FillSelWithInvert
' Delete the group
TheGroups.Remove SelGroup.Name
End Sub

Writing an Annotated Views Macro


If you perform a task repeatedly, you can take advantage of a macro to automate it. A macro is a
series of functions, written in a scripting language, that you group in a single command to perform
the requested task automatically.
You create the Annotated Views macro by editing a file (written in a scripting language) to insert
the functions you wish.
For more information on macros, see the Infrastructure.

What does the Annotated Views Macro do ?


The Annotated View macro computes the inertia data of the selected products in the opened
CATProduct document and displays the results in a dialog box.

How to run the Macro


?
1. Open a CATProduct document.
2. Select the
Tools->Macro->Macros...
command to display the Macro
dialog box.
3. Select External File in the Macro
in drop-down list to run a macro
stored in a file.
4. Click Select to select the name of
the macro to run. The Select
External File dialog box appears.
5. Select the
DocSampleAnnotation.CATScript,
then click Open.
6. Click Run in the Macro dialog box
to replay the selected macro.
A dialog box appears giving
you the macro responsible
name. Change it if needed.

Sample Annotated Views CATScript


Language="VBSCRIPT"
'*********************************************************
' Purpose: This macro can be used interactively to create an approval.
'*********************************************************
Sub CATMain()
'Acquire the name of the Responsible for approval
Dim Name As String
Name = "John SMITH" 'Default value
ComponentName = InputBox("What is your name ?", "Responsible name", Name )
If Name <> "" Then
' Find the Navigator workbench
Dim TheNavigatorWorkbench As Workbench
Set TheNavigatorWorkbench = CATIA.ActiveDocument.GetWorkbench ( "NavigatorWorkbench" )
' Retrieve the AnnotatedViews collection
Dim TheAnnotatedViews As AnnotatedViews
Set TheAnnotatedViews = TheNavigatorWorkbench.AnnotatedViews
' Create positions of the frame
Dim CharHeight
CharHeight = 0.06
Dim CharWidth
CharWidth = 0.05
Dim HalfWidth
HalfWidth = 0.30
Dim HalfHeight
HalfHeight = 2*CharHeight
Dim Center(1)
Center(0) = 1.1
Center(1) = -0.8
Dim Position1(1)

Position1(0) = Center(0)-HalfWidth+CharWidth
Position1(1) = Center(1)+CharHeight
Dim Position2(1)
Position2(0) = Position1(0)
Position2(1) = Center(1)-CharHeight
Dim Position3(1)
Position3(0) = Position1(0)
Position3(1) = Center(1)-2*CharHeight
Dim Position4(3)
Position4(0) = Center(0)-HalfWidth
Position4(1) = Center(1)-HalfHeight-CharHeight
Position4(2) = Center(0)+HalfWidth
Position4(3) = Center(1)+HalfHeight
Dim Position5(3)
Position5(0) = Center(0)-HalfWidth
Position5(1) = Center(1)
Position5(2) = Center(0)+HalfWidth
Position5(3) = Center(1)
' Create the AnnotatedView
Dim AnnotatedView1 As AnnotatedView
Set AnnotatedView1 = TheAnnotatedViews.Add
' Create the Marker2Ds collection
Dim Marker2Ds As Marker2Ds
Set Marker2Ds = AnnotatedView1.Marker2Ds

' Create the texts


Dim Marker2DText As Marker2D
Set Marker2DText = Marker2Ds.Add2DText (Position1, "ACME Approval")
Set Marker2DText = Marker2Ds.Add2DText (Position2, Name)
Set Marker2DText = Marker2Ds.Add2DText (Position3, Cstr(Now))
' Create the frame

Dim Marker2DRectangle As Marker2D


Set Marker2DRectangle = Marker2Ds.Add2DRectangle(Position4, 0)
Dim Marker2DLine As Marker2D
Set Marker2DLine = Marker2Ds.Add2DLine(Position5)
' Update the view
AnnotatedView1.Update
' Apply the view
TheNavigatorWorkbench.View AnnotatedView1
End If
End Sub

More About Automation Objects


About NavigationWorkbench Object:
About Groups and Related Objects:
About AnnotatedViews and Related Objects:

More About NavigatorWorkbench


Objects
Navigator Workbench (Object)
Manages all DMU Navigator entities.
This version allows to manage groups and annotated views.
Properties
o Groups(out CATIAGroups oGroups)
Return the Groups collection.
Example:
This example retrieves the Groups collection of the active document.
Dim TheNavigatorWorkbench As Workbench
Set TheNavigatorWorkbench = CATIA.ActiveDocument.GetWorkbench (
"NavigatorWorkbench" )
Dim TheGroupsList As Groups
Set TheGroupsList = TheNavigatorWorkbench.Groups
o AnnotatedViews(out CATIAAnnotatedViews oAnnotatedViews)
Return the AnnotatedViews collection.
Example:
This example retrieves the AnnotatedViews collection of the active document.
Dim TheNavigatorWorkbench As Workbench
Set TheNavigatorWorkbench = CATIA.ActiveDocument.GetWorkbench (
"NavigatorWorkbench" )
Dim TheAnnotatedViewsList As AnnotatedViews
Set TheAnnotatedViewsList = TheNavigatorWorkbench.AnnotatedViews
Methods
o View(in CATIAAnnotatedView iAnnotatedView)
Apply the AnnotatedView.
Parameters:
iAnnotatedView

The AnnotatedView.
Example:
This example applies the view of the NewAnnotatedView AnnotatedView.
TheNavigatorWorkbench.View(NewAnnotatedView)

About Groups and Related Objects


1. Groups (Object)
A collection of all groups currently managed by the application.

Methods
o Add(out /*IDLRETVAL*/CATIAGroup oGroup)
Create an empty Group.
Returns:
The created Group
Example:
This example creates a new Group in the TheGroups collection.
Dim NewGroup As Group
Set NewGroup = TheGroups.Add

o AddFromSel(out CATIAGroup oGroup)


Create a Group containing all products in the selection.
Example:
This example creates a new Group containing all products in the selection in the
TheGroups collection.
Dim NewGroup As Group
Set NewGroup = TheGroups.AddFromSel

o Item(in CATVariant iIndex,out CATIAGroup oGroup)


Return a Group using its index or its name from the Groups collection.
Parameters:
iIndex

The index or the name of the Group to retrieve from the collection of groups.
As a numerics, this index is the rank of the Group in the collection. The index
of the first Group in the collection is 1, and the index of the last Group is
Count. As a string, it is the name you assigned to the Group.
Example:
This example retrieves in ThisGroup the ninth Group, and in ThatGroup the Group
named Group3 from the TheGroups collection.
Dim ThisGroup As Group
Set ThisGroup = TheGroups.Item(9)
Dim ThatGroup As Group
Set ThatGroup = TheGroups.Item("Group3")

o Remove(in CATVariant iIndex)


Remove a Group from the Groups collection.
Parameters:
iIndex

The index or the name of the Group to retrieve from he collection of groups.
As a numerics, this index is the rank of the Group in the collection. The index
of the first Group in the collection is 1, and the index of the last Group is
Count. As a string, it is the name you assigned to the Group.
Example:
The following example removes the tenth Group and the Group named Group2
from the TheGroups collection.
TheGroups.Remove(10)
TheGroups.Remove("Group2")

2. Group (Object)

Represents a DMU group.


The DMU group is an entity which gathers reference to several products in order to automate
validation and verification of the Digital Mock-Up.
You can build a group using several methods : explicitly point out some products or take all
products by default.
The designated products can be intermediate or terminal node from the product structure.
For instance, a user who has to verify the integration of the engine in engine bay, may define
a group with the engine assembly or with all the parts from the engine in order to detect
clashes.
In the first case he has to add the engine assembly (as a product) in the group and in the
second case, he has to add all the parts to the group.
Obviously, when a modification occurs in the engine assembly he has to change the group
only in the second case. To manage the explicit definition of the group, one may use the
XxxxExplicit methods.
When the system takes the group into account to perform a given task, it may be necessary to
retrieve :
the products designated by the user (ex : section of these products);
the terminal nodes (or leaves) of the product (ex : clash detection takes into account
terminal nodes);
the set of products in the product structure which are not selected (ex : hide all products
which are not in the group);
the set of terminal nodes which are not selected (ex : clash of some products against all
others).
To perform these treatments one may use YyyyExtract or ZzzzInvert methods.

Properties

o get_ExtractMode(inout long oMode)


Return or set the mode for the extraction.
Returns:
The mode
0 : the extraction provides the products from the group (intermediate of terminal nodes).
1 : the extraction provides terminal nodes of the products from the group.
Example:
This example reads the mode of NewGroup Group and sets it.
Dim Mode As Integer
Mode = NewGroup.ExtractMode
NewGroup.ExtractMode = 1

Methods

o Invalid return type 'HRESULT' in CATIA IDL: HRESULT AddExplicit(in CATIAProduct


iProduct)
Add a product to the group.
Parameters:
iProduct

The product to add


Example:
This example adds a product MyProduct to the group NewGroup.
NewGroup.AddExplicit MyProduct
o CountExplicit(out long oNbItems)
Return the number of products in the group.
Example:
This example reads the number of products in the group NewGroup.
Dim number As Integer
number = NewGroup.CountExplicit

o ItemExplicit(in CATVariant iIndex,out CATIAProduct oProduct)


Parameters:
iIndex

The index of the product in the group. The index of the first product is 1, and
the index of the last product is CountExplicit.
Returns:
The retrieved Product
Example:
This example retrieves in ThisProduct the ninth Product from the NewGroup Group.
Dim ThisProduct As Product
Set ThisProduct = NewGroup.ItemExplicit(9)
o RemoveExplicit(in CATVariant iIndex)
Remove a product from the group using its index.
Parameters:
iIndex

The index of the product in the group. The index of the first product is 1, and
the index of the last product is CountExplicit.
Example:
The following example removes the tenth Product from the NewGroup group.
NewGroup.RemoveExplicit(10)
o CountExtract(out long oNbItems)
Return the number of products which can be extracted from the group.
Depending on the extract mode, the extracted products can be:
Mode = 0 : the products from the group (intermediate or terminal nodes).
Mode = 1 : the terminal nodes of the products from the group.
Example:
This example reads the number of products in the group NewGroup.
Dim number As Integer
number = NewGroup.CountExtract

o ItemExtract(in CATVariant iIndex,out CATIAProduct oProduct)


Return a product which can be extracted from the group using its index.
Parameters:
iIndex

The index of the product in the group. The index of the first product is 1, and
the index of the last product is CountExtract.
Example:
This example retrieves in ThisProduct the ninth Product from the NewGroup Group.
Dim ThisProduct As Group
Set ThisProduct = NewGroup.ItemExtract(9)
o FillSelWithExtract()
Fill the selection with all products which can be extracted from the group.
Example:
This example fills the selection with products which can be extracted from the
NewGroup Group.
NewGroup.FillSelWithExtract
o CountInvert(out long oNbItems)
Return the number of (terminal nodes) products which cannot be extracted from the
group.
Example:
This example reads the number of products in the group NewGroup.
Dim number As Integer
number = NewGroup.CountInvert
o ItemInvert(in CATVariant iIndex,out CATIAProduct oProduct)
Return a (terminal node) product which cannot be extracted from the group using its
index.
Parameters:
iIndex

The index of the product in the group. The index of the first product is 1, and
the index of the last product is CountExtract.
Example:
This example retrieves in ThisProduct the ninth Product from the NewGroup Group.
Dim ThisProduct As Group
Set ThisProduct = NewGroup.ItemInvert(9)

o FillSelWithInvert()
Fill the selection with all (terminal nodes) products which cannot be extracted from the
group.
Example:
This example fills the selection with products which can be extracted from the
NewGroup Group.
NewGroup.FillSelWithInvert

About AnnotatedViews and Related Objects


1. AnnotatedViews (Object)
A collection of AnnotatedViews.

Methods
o Add(out CATIAAnnotatedView oAnnotatedView)
Create an AnnotatedView with the current viewpoint.
Example:
This example creates a new AnnotatedView in the TheAnnotatedViews collection.
Dim NewAnnotatedView As AnnotatedView
Set NewAnnotatedView = TheAnnotatedViews.Add

o AddFromViewpoint(in CATIAViewpoint3D iViewpoint,outCATIAAnnotatedView oAnnotatedView)


Create an AnnotatedView with a given viewpoint.
Parameters:
iViewpoint

The viewpoint.
Example:
This example creates a new AnnotatedView in the TheAnnotatedViews collection.
Dim Viewpoint As Viewpoint3D
Dim NewAnnotatedView As AnnotatedView
Set NewAnnotatedView = TheAnnotatedViews.AddFromViewpoint(Viewpoint)
o Item(in CATVariant iIndex,out CATIAAnnotatedView oAnnotatedView)
Return a AnnotatedView using its index or its name from the AnnotatedViews collection.
Parameters:
iIndex

The index or the name of the AnnotatedView to retrieve from the collection of AnnotatedViews. As a numerics, this
index is the rank of the AnnotatedView in the collection. The index of the first AnnotatedView in the collection is 1,
and the index of the last AnnotatedView is Count. As a string, it is the name you assigned to the AnnotatedView.
Example:
This example retrieves in ThisAnnotatedView the ninth AnnotatedView, and in ThatAnnotatedView the AnnotatedView named
AnnotatedView3 from the TheAnnotatedViews collection.
Dim ThisAnnotatedView As AnnotatedView
Set ThisAnnotatedView = TheAnnotatedViews.Item(9)
Dim ThatAnnotatedView As AnnotatedView
Set ThatAnnotatedView = TheAnnotatedViews.Item("AnnotatedView3")

o Remove(in CATVariant iIndex)


Remove a AnnotatedView from the AnnotatedViews collection.
Parameters:
iIndex

The index or the name of the AnnotatedView to retrieve from he collection of AnnotatedViews. As a numerics, this
index is the rank of the AnnotatedView in the collection. The index of the first AnnotatedView in the collection is 1,
and the index of the last AnnotatedView is Count. As a string, it is the name you assigned to the AnnotatedView.
Example:
The following example removes the tenth AnnotatedView and the AnnotatedView named AnnotatedView2 from the
TheAnnotatedViews collection.
TheAnnotatedViews.Remove(10)
TheAnnotatedViews.Remove("AnnotatedView2")

2. AnnotatedView (Object)
Represents an Annotated View.
Properties
o get_ProjectionMode(out CatProjectionMode oProjectionMode)
Returns the projection mode of the AnnotatedView.
Example:
This example gets the projection mode of the NewAnnotatedView AnnotatedView.
Dim Mode
Mode = NewAnnotatedView.ProjectionMode

o get_Zoom(out double oZoom)


Returns the zoom factor associated with the AnnotatedView. This property exists with the parallel (cylindric) projection type
only.
Example:
This example retrieves in ZoomFactor of the NewAnnotatedView AnnotatedView.
Dim ZoomFactor As Double
ZoomFactor = NewAnnotatedView.Zoom
o get_FieldOfView(out double oFieldOfView)
Returns the field of view associated with the AnnotatedView. The field of view is half of the vertical angle of the viewpoint,
expressed in degrees. This property exists with the perspective (conic) projection type only.
Example:
This example retrieves the field of view of the NewAnnotatedView AnnotatedView.
Dim Field As Double
Field = NewAnnotatedView.FieldOfView

o get_Comment(inoutCATBSTR oText)
Returns or sets the comment associated to the AnnotatedView.
Parameters:
iText

The text.
Example:
This example reads the comment of NewAnnotatedView AnnotatedView.
Dim text As String
text = NewAnnotatedView.Comment
o get_Marker2Ds(out CATIAMarker2Ds oMarker2Ds)
Return the Marker2Ds Collection of Marker2D associated to the AnnotatedView.
Example:
This example returns the TheMarker2Ds collection from the NewAnnotatedView AnnotatedView.
Dim TheMarker2Ds As AnnotatedView
Set TheMarker2Ds = NewAnnotatedView.Marker2Ds(9)
Methods
o GetOrigin(inout CATSafeArrayVariant oOrigin)
Gets the coordinates of the origin of the viewpoint of the AnnotatedView.
Example:
This example retrieves the origin of the NewAnnotatedView AnnotatedView.
Dim origin(2)
NewAnnotatedView.GetOrigin origin
o GetSightDirection(inout CATSafeArrayVariant oSight)
Gets the components of the sight direction of the viewpoint of the AnnotatedView. The sight direction is the line passes both by
the origin of the viewpoint and by the target.
Example:
This example gets the sight direction of the NewAnnotatedView AnnotatedView.
Dim sight(2)
NewAnnotatedView.GetSightDirection sight
o GetUpDirection(inout CATSafeArrayVariant oUp)
Gets the components of the up direction of the viewpoint of the AnnotatedView.
Example:
This example gets the up direction of the NewAnnotatedView AnnotatedView.
Dim up(2)
NewAnnotatedView.GetUpDirection up
o Update()
Update the AnnotatedView.
Example:
This example updates the NewAnnotatedView AnnotatedView.
NewAnnotatedView.Update

3. Marker2Ds (Object)
Methods

o Add2DLine(in CATSafeArrayVariant iCoordinates,out CATIAMarker2D oMarker2D)


Create a line Marker2D.
Parameters:
iCoordinates

The coordinates
iCoordinates(0) is the X coordinate of the first point
iCoordinates(1) is the Y coordinate of the first point
iCoordinates(2) is the X coordinate of the second point
iCoordinates(3) is the Y coordinate of the second point
Example:
This example creates a new Marker2D in the TheMarker2Ds collection.
Dim NewMarker2DLine As Marker2D
Set NewMarker2DLine = TheMarker2Ds.Add2DLine(Positions)
o Add2DArrow(in CATSafeArrayVariant iCoordinates,outCATIAMarker2D oMarker2D)
Create an arrow Marker2D.
Parameters:
iCoordinates

The coordinates
iCoordinates(0) is the X coordinate of the head
iCoordinates(1) is the Y coordinate of the head
iCoordinates(2) is the X coordinate of the tail
iCoordinates(3) is the Y coordinate of the tail
Example:
This example creates a new Marker2D in the TheMarker2Ds collection.
Dim NewMarker2DArrow As Marker2D
Set NewMarker2DArrow = TheMarker2Ds.Add2DArrow(Positions)
o Add2DRectangle(in CATSafeArrayVariant iCoordinates,in long iFillStatus,out /CATIAMarker2D oMarker2D)
Create a rectangle Marker2D.
Parameters:
iCoordinates

The coordinates
iCoordinates(0) is the X coordinate of the first point
iCoordinates(1) is the Y coordinate of the first point
iCoordinates(2) is the X coordinate of the second point
iCoordinates(3) is the Y coordinate of the second point
iFillStatus

The status (1 the figure is filled, 0 the figure is not filled).


Example:
This example creates a new Marker2D in the TheMarker2Ds collection.
Dim NewMarker2DRectangle As Marker2D
Set NewMarker2DRectangle = TheMarker2Ds.Add2DRectangle(Positions, 0)
o Add2DCircle(in CATSafeArrayVariant iCoordinates,in long iFillStatus,out CATIAMarker2D oMarker2D)
Create a circle Marker2D.
Parameters:
iCoordinates

The coordinates
iCoordinates(0) is the X coordinate of the center
iCoordinates(1) is the Y coordinate of the center
iCoordinates(2) is the X coordinate of the a point on the circle
iCoordinates(3) is the Y coordinate of the a point on the circle
iFillStatus

The status (1 the figure is filled, 0 the figure is not filled).


Example:
This example creates a new Marker2D in the TheMarker2Ds collection.
Dim NewMarker2DCircle As Marker2D
Set NewMarker2DCircle = TheMarker2Ds.Add2DCircle(Positions, 0)

o Add2DFreeHand(in CATSafeArrayVariant iCoordinates,out CATIAMarker2D oMarker2D)


Create a free hand drawing Marker2D.
Parameters:
iCoordinates

The coordinates
iCoordinates(0) is the X coordinate of the first point
iCoordinates(1) is the Y coordinate of the first point
iCoordinates(2) is the X coordinate of the second point
iCoordinates(3) is the Y coordinate of the second point
iCoordinates(n*2-2) is the X coordinate of the n-th point
iCoordinates(n*2-1) is the Y coordinate of the n-th point
Example:
This example creates a new Marker2D in the TheMarker2Ds collection.
Dim NewMarker2DFreeHand As Marker2D
Set NewMarker2DFreeHand = TheMarker2Ds.Add2DFreeHand(Positions)
o Add2DText(in CATSafeArrayVariant iCoordinates,in CATBSTR iText,out CATIAMarker2D oMarker2D)
Create a text Marker2D.
Parameters:
iCoordinates

The coordinates
iCoordinates(0) is the X coordinate of the point
iCoordinates(1) is the Y coordinate of the point
iText

The text
Example:
This example creates a new Marker2D in the TheMarker2Ds collection.
Dim NewMarker2DText As Marker2D
Set NewMarker2DText = TheMarker2Ds.Add2DText(Positions, "example")
o Item(in CATVariant iIndex,out CATIAMarker2D oMarker2D)
Return a Marker2D using its index from the Marker2Ds collection.
Parameters:
iIndex

The index of the Marker2D to retrieve from the collection of Marker2Ds. As a numerics, this index is the rank of the
Marker2D in the collection. The index of the first Marker2D in the collection is 1, and the index of the last Marker2D
is Count.
Example:
This example retrieves in ThisMarker2D the ninth Marker2D from the TheMarker2Ds collection.
Dim ThisMarker2D As Marker2D
Set ThisMarker2D = TheMarker2Ds.Item(9)
o Remove(in CATVariant iIndex)
Remove a Marker2D from the Marker2Ds collection.
Parameters:
iIndex

The index of the Marker2D to retrieve from he collection of Marker2Ds. As a numerics, this index is the rank of the
Marker2D in the collection. The index of the first Marker2D in the collection is 1, and the index of the last Marker2D
is Count.
Example:
The following example removes the tenth Marker2D from the TheMarker2Ds collection.
TheMarker2Ds.Remove(10)

4. Marker2D (Object)
Properties
o get_Type(out CatMarker2DType oType)
Return the Marker2D's type.
Example:
This example reads the type of NewMarker2D Marker2D.
Dim type As CatMarker2DType
type = NewMarker2D.Type
o get_Fill(out long oStatus)
Return or set the Marker2D's filling status for rectangle or circle Marker2D.
Parameters:
iStatus

The status (1 the figure is filled, 0 the figure is not filled).


Example:
This example reads the status of NewMarker2D Marker2D.
Dim status As Integer
status = NewMarker2D.Fill
o get_Text(inout CATBSTR oText)
Return or set the text for a text Marker2D.
Parameters:
iText

The text.
Example:
This example reads the text of NewMarker2D Marker2D.
Dim text As String
text = NewMarker2D.Text
o get_TextFont(inout /*IDLRETVAL*/CATBSTR oFont)
Return or set the text's font for a text Marker2D.
Parameters:
iFont

The text's font.


Example:
This example reads the text's font of NewMarker2D Marker2D.
Dim font As String
font = NewMarker2D.TextFont
o get_TextSize(inout double oSize)
Return or set the text's size for a text Marker2D.
Parameters:
iSize

The text's size.


Example:
This example reads the text's size of NewMarker2D Marker2D.
Dim size As Double
size = NewMarker2D.TextSize
Methods

o GetPositions(inout CATSafeArrayVariant oCoordinates)


Get the coordinates of the positions of the Marker2D.
These positions depend on the type of the Marker2D :
Line : 2 positions.
Arrow : 2 positions, the first is the head and the second is the tail.
Rectangle : 2 positions.
Circle : 2 positions, the first is the center and the second is a point on the circle.
FreeHand : n positions of all points of the drawing.
Text : 1 position.
Example:
This example retrieves the coordinates in the NewMarker2D Marker2D.
Dim Coordinates (3)
NewMarker2D.GetPositions Coordinates
o SetPositions(in CATSafeArrayVariant iCoordinates)
Set the coordinates of the positions of the Marker2D.
These positions depend on the type of the Marker2D :
Line : 2 positions.
Arrow : 2 positions, the first is the head and the second is the tail.
Rectangle : 2 positions.
Circle : 2 positions, the first is the center and the second is a point on the circle.
FreeHand : n positions of all points of the drawing.
Text : 1 position.
Parameters:
iCoordinates

The coordinates
iCoordinates(0) is the X coordinate of the first point
iCoordinates(1) is the Y coordinate of the first point
iCoordinates(2) is the X coordinate of the second point
iCoordinates(3) is the Y coordinate of the second point
oCoordinates(n*2-2) is the X coordinate of the n-th point
oCoordinates(n*2-1) is the Y coordinate of the n-th point
Example:
This example retrieves the coordinates in the NewMarker2D Marker2D.
Dim Coordinates (3)
NewMarker2D.SetPositions Coordinates

Workbench Description
The DMU Navigator Version 5 application window looks like this:
Click the hotspots to see related documentation.

DMU Navigator Menu Bar


DMU Navigator Tools Toolbar
DMU Viewing Toolbar
View Toolbar
DMU 2D Marker Toolbar
DMU Data Navigation Toolbar
DMU Move Toolbar
DMU Generic Animation Toolbar
Viewpoint Animation Toolbar
Publishing Tools Toolbar
DMU 2D Tools
DMU Measure Toolbar

DMU Navigator Menu Bar


This section presents the menu bar tools and commands dedicated to the
DMU Navigator workbench
Start

File

Edit

View

Insert

Tools

Analyze Windows

Help

View
For...

See...

Viewpoint Palette...

Using the Viewpoint Palette

Modify -> Previous View Changing Views


Modify -> Next View

Changing Views

Modify -> Look At

Looking At Objects

Named Views...

Using Camera Capabilities


Using Standard Views and
Creating, Modifying and
Deleting User-Defined Views

Navigation Mode ->


Examine

Navigating in Examine Mode

Navigation Mode -> Fly

Navigating in Fly Mode

Lighting...

Setting Lighting Effects

Depth Effect...

Setting Depth Effects

Ground

Viewing Objects against the


Ground

Magnifier...

Magnifying

Insert
For...

See...

Create an Annotated View Annotating


Add Hyperlinks

Creating Hyperlinks

3D Annotation

Using the 3D Marker

Group

Defining Groups of Products

Simulation

Recording Animations

Compile

Recording Animations

New Component

Assembly User's Guide

New CDM Component

Integration User's Guide

New Part...

Assembly User's Guide

Existing Component...

Inserting Components

Tools
For...

See...

Options

Customizing DMU Navigator Settings


Customizing Data Cache Settings
Loading the Product Structure Only
Customizing the Ground

CacheContent

Viewing the Cache Content

Replay

Replaying Animations

Publish

Publishing
Loading Products into DMU Navigator

Backbone Connection
Conferencing
Import

Analyze
For...

See...

Graphic Messages Using Temporary Markers


Measure Between Measuring Between
Measure Item

Measuring Properties

Measure Inertia

Measuring Inertia

DMU Navigator Tools Toolbar

See Creating Annotated Views


See Managing Annotated Views
See Creating Hyperlinks
See Using the 3D Marker
See Defining Groups of Products
See Defining Scenes

DMU Viewing Toolbar

See Looking At Objects


See Changing Views
See Changing Views
See Magnifying
See Setting Depth Effects
See Viewing Objects against the Ground
See Setting Lighting Effects

View Toolbar

See Navigating in Fly Mode


See Navigating in Examine Mode

DMU 2D Marker Toolbar


The DMU 2D Marker toolbar contains the following tools:

For all 2D Marker tools, see Creating Annotated Views

DMU Data Navigation Toolbar

See Using the Search... Command


See Proximity Query
See Viewing the Current Selection
See Jumping to Hyperlinks
See Publishing
See Snapping Components in the Assembly Design User's Guide

DMU Move Toolbar

See Rotating Components


See Positioning Components
See Snapping Components

DMU Generic Animation Toolbar

See Recording Animations


See Recording Animations
See Replaying Animations
See Detecting Clashes Automatically
See Recording Viewpoint Animations

Viewpoint Animation Toolbar

For all viewpoint animation commands, see Recording Viewpoint Animations

Publishing Tools Toolbar

For all Publishing tools, see Publishing.

DMU 2D Tools Toolbar

See Comparing Drawings


See Publishing

DMU Measure Toolbar

See Measuring Minimum Distances & Angles Between Geometrical Entities or Points
See Measuring Properties
See Measuring Inertia

Customizing Settings
Before you start your first working session, you can customize the way you work to suit
your habits. You can, for example, customize how the data cache is managed. This is
done using Tools -> Options from the menu bar.
This type of customization is stored in permanent setting files. Settings will not be lost if
you exit your session.

Customizing DMU Navigator Settings


Customizing Cache Settings
Loading the Product Structure Only
Customizing the Ground
Customizing External Format Import

Glossary
3D

3D
representation

Used to define your document viewpoints when using named views and
camera capabilities.

D
data cache

The area of storage used for the saving of conversions of models to cgr files.

E
examine

eye

The default navigation mode. Let's you view your document from the outside
by moving around the document's perimeter, or from within, turning your head
to view or moving closer (zoom in, zoom out) to different objects.
Defines the observer's position. See 3D representation.

F
fly

A navigation mode that lets you move upward or downward on any horizontal
view plane as you move forward or backward through your document.
Note: In beginner's mode, you cannot move backward.

product

In DMU wokbenches, subset or constituent part of a CATProduct document


that can be of the following type:
cgr (*.cgr)
V4 model (*.model)
CATpart (*.CATpart)
CATproduct (*.CATproduct)
V4 session (*.session)
VRML 1.0.
obj (*.obj)
byu (*.byu)
iges
pdb (*.pdb)
stl (ASCII and binary) (*.stl)

F
fly

target
track

A navigation mode that lets you move upward or downward on any horizontal
view plane as you move forward or backward through your document.
Note: In beginner's mode, you cannot move backward.
Defines the point of the document at which the eye is looking. See 3D
representation.
A visual aid describing the simulation path. No track is displayed for
simulations recording camera viewpoints.

U
URL

Uniform Resource Locator. A text used for identifying and addressing an item
in a computer network.

V
viewing
distance

The distance between the eye and the target.

viewport

Defines what you see in a document view. You can manipulate the 3D
representation to define exactly what you want to see. See 3D representation.

Index
Numerics
2D documents
comparing
opening
2D objects
changing properties
3D Annotation command
3D marker
3D representation
3D text
changing color of

A
Add Hyperlinks command
adding
2D text
3D text
arrows
circles
components to scenes
coordinates
hyperlinks
lines
object names
rectangles
temporary markers
animation
creating
detecting clashes
generating a film
recording viewpoints

replaying
annotating
using graphic messages
using the 2D marker
using the 3D marker

B
back view
beginner's fly mode
bottom view

C
Cache Content command
cameras
creating
moving
using in animations
Clash Detection(On) command
clipping plane ,
commands
3D Annotation
Add Hyperlinks
Cache Content
Clash Detection(On)
Compare Drawing
Compile Simulation
Create Camera
Create Scene
Current Selection
Depth Effect...
Examine
Existing Component...
Fly
Go to Hyperlinks

Graphic Messages
Group...
Horizontal Ground
Lighting...
Look At
Magnifier
Named Views... , ,
Next View
Previous View
Proximity Query
Record Viewpoint Animations
Replay
Search
Simulation
Start Publish
Viewpoint Palette...
Walk
comparing drawings
Compile Simulation command
components
inserting
rotating
snapping
translating
conferencing
Create Camera command
Create Scene command
creating
animations
cameras
groups of products
hypertext links
new documents
scenes
user-defined views
current selection
viewing

Current Selection command

D
data cache
viewing content
defining
groups of products
deleting
components from scenes
user-defined views
Depth Effect... command
depth effects
Far Limit
foggy
Near Limit
DMU 2D Marker toolbar
DMU Data Navigation toolbar
DMU Generic Animation toolbar
DMU Navigator Tools toolbar
DMU Viewing toolbar
documents
creating new
drawings
comparing

E
ENOVIA 3dcom Navigator
examine mode
Existing Component... command
exploding assemblies in scenes

F
Far Limit
Fly command
fly mode
beginner's fly mode
advanced fly mode
front view

G
Go to Hyperlinks command
Graphic Messages command
Group... command
ground
customizing
groups
defining

H
Horizontal Ground command
hyperlinks
creating
jumping to

I
inserting
components
isometric view

L
left view
lighting effects
neon light
one light source
switching off light sources
two light sources
Lighting... command
Look At command
looking at through viewport

M
Magnifier command
manipulator
moving
markers
using temporary markers
using the 2D marker
using the 3D marker
modifying
user-defined views
moving
cameras

N
Named Views... command , ,
navigating
changing views
examine mode
fly mode
magnified views
viewing objects against the ground
walk mode

Near Limit
New... command
Next View command

O
opening 2D documents

P
Previous View command
products
adding to scenes
defining groups of
deleting from scenes
exploding in scenes
properties
2D object
3D text
Proximity Query command
publishing

Q
query
for nearby/far away products
with DMU Optimizer license

R
recording animations
Record Viewpoint Animations command
Replay command
replaying animations
resetting component positions in scenes
right view

rotating components

S
scenes
adding components
creating
deleting components
exploding assemblies
resetting component positions
search
for nearby/far away products
for named objects
setting
depth effects
lighting effects
Simulation command
snapping components
standard views
back
bottom
front
isometric
left
right
top
Start Publish command

T
temporary markers
top view
translating components

U
user-defined views
show representations

V
viewing
changing views
current selection
data cache content
looking at
magnifying
objects against the ground
panning
rotating
standard views
turn head
user-defined views
using camera capabilities
using viewpoint palette
zooming
viewpoint palette
Viewpoint Palette... command

W
Walk command