You are on page 1of 84

2014 ANNUAL

Matt Stock

UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS


ESSENTIAL GEAR FOR OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY
CAPTURING LANDSCAPES WITH LIGHT PAINTING
EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT STUDIO LIGHTING
HOW TO USE ON-CAMERA FLASH FOR NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY
NEED A PHOTO BACKPACK? WE HELP YOU PICK THE RIGHT ONE!

Learn more at mylio.com

CONTENTS
8

EDITORS NOTES
Expert Opinions Matter
by Dan Havlik

Photos Jack Neubart. All rights reserved.

10 BETTER LIGHTING FOR


NATURE CLOSE-UPS
How To Use On-Camera
Bounce Flash
by Jack Neubart

18 HAND, EYE & CAMERA


Darren Pearsons Whimsical
Light Creatures
by Jeff Wignall

24 MATT STOCKS
FLORIDA NIGHTS

10

Lighting Subjects Above


& Below The Sea
by Jeff Wignall

30 CHOOSING A PHOTO
BACKPACK
The Right Stuff For Your
Gear & Journey
by Jack Neubart

36 WHATS IN MY BAG
Essential Gear For
Outdoor Photography
by Stan Trzoniec
All photographs Darren Pearson.

42 A STUDIO LIGHT
SAMPLER
Comments & Characteristics
by Chuck Gloman

46 LANCE KEIMIGS
DARK OBSESSION
A 30-Year Voyage Into The Night
by Jeff Wignall

18

54 USING REFLECTORS
FOR STUDIO
LIGHTING EFFECTS
Portraits With Paul C.
Buffs Omni Reflector
by Joe Farace

60 LARRIE THOMSONS
NORTHERN EXPOSURES
A Canadian Light Painter
Explores The Prairie Past
by Jeff Wignall

76 SCULPT PORTRAITS
WITH LIGHTING
Same Face, Different Aspect
by James Patrick
6

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

46

76

All photos James Patrick

A Modern Light Painting Pioneer


by Jeff Wignall

All photos Lance Keimig

72 TROY PAIVAS LOST


(AND FOUND) AMERICA

The moment when the streets


you walk every day feel new again.
This is the moment we work for.

// PERFECTION
MADE BY ZEISS

The Touit lens family for Fujilm X series cameras.


Featuring our patented T* anti-reective coating for maximum are reduction, nearly circular
diaphragms for surprisingly pleasant out-of-focus highlights, and superior build quality that
stands up to real-world use. ZEISS Touit lenses are designed especially for the art and the
demands of available light photography so that you can rediscover your world in stunning detail.
www.zeiss.com/touitforfuji

GENERAL MANAGER RON LEACH


EDITOR-IN-CHIEF DAN HAVLIK
editorial@shutterbug.com
MANAGING EDITOR CYNTHIA BOYLAN

Photo copyright Dan Havlik.

CONTRIBUTORS
JOE FARACE, CHUCK GLOMAN, JACK NEUBART, JAMES PATRICK, STAN
TRZONIEC, JEFF WIGNALL
EDITOR-AT-LARGE GEORGE SCHAUB
ART DIRECTORS BERNICE GUEVARRA, ALINA AVANESYAN, KIMSON
EKMAN, CHRIS BYWATER
LISTINGS EDITOR CYNTHIA BOYLAN
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/CUSTOMER SERVICE SHERRY SWIM
Sherry.Swim@sorc.com (321) 225-3137
SUBSCRIPTIONS (800) 829-3340, (386) 447-6318
shutterbug@emailcustomerservice.com
SHUTTERBUG, PO BOX 420235, PALM COAST, FL 32142-0235
PLEASE INCLUDE NAME, ADDRESS, AND PHONE NUMBER ON INQUIRY.

EDITORS NOTES
EXPERT OPINIONS MATTER

BY DAN HAVLIK

HERE ARE A LOT of so-called experts on the Internet these days offering

you a variety of tips & tricks on everything from how to properly caulk a
bathtub to how to buy the right laptop computer. While some of this expert
advice can be helpful, much of it is the same basic stuff that has been
rehashed over and over again on the web for many years. (If you want an example,
Google How to Photograph Fireworks and youll see virtually the same tips story
repeated on the first three pages of your search results.)
For our special Expert Photo Techniques issue, we like to think we offer
something distinctly different from all that Internet noise. For starters, our
photo experts are real experts and include everyone from working professional
photographers to college professors to workshop leaders and authors. Theyre all
accomplished writers, as well, and offer a deeper, more informed alternative to
those annoying, featherweight listicles that flood your Facebook feed every day.
In terms of subject matter, weve tried to cover a broad range of photography
topics with this issue. (Those folks looking for How to Photograph Fireworks,
should look elsewhere. Perhaps the Internet?) Proper lighting techniques are
something readers are always asking about so weve stocked this issue with some
articles on that subject. Chuck Gloman gives you a broad overview with his studio
lighting sampler story, touching on everything from strobes to tungsten to LEDs
which are all the rage these days. Meanwhile, Joe Farace offers a handy lighting
story in these pages on how to create cool studio lighting effects with reflectors.
James Patrick discusses how to sculpt photo portraits by using the same subjects
face but different lighting to change mood and expression.
But theres more to this issue than just lighting tips. We also give you some
buying advice on how to choose the right photo backpack; we comb through a
photographers camera bag to reveal the essential gear for outdoor photography;
and we interview photographer Lance Keimig on his 30-year voyage into how he
captures the night sky to create his gorgeous images.
While not everything in this issue might fit your educational needs, weve put
together a pretty diverse mix of imaging articles that will both inspire and inform
you on how to take your photography to the next level. In addition to what youll
find in this print issue, we have a vast, 14-year archive of photography tips and
how-to stories on our website (www.shutterbug.com). Along with reviews of recent
cameras and the latest imaging news, youll find tips on outdoor photography,
travel photography, sports photography, family photography and traditional
and digital darkroom techniques. In short, theres something for every type of
photographer on Shuterbug.com. (And you might even find a tip or two on how to
photograph fireworks!)

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES


GENNY BRESLIN (321) 225-3127
Genny.Breslin@sorc.com
JOANNE GEORGE (321) 225-3130
Joanne.George@sorc.com
ADVERTISING ASSISTANT
ROBIN BEECHERL (321) 225-3144
Robin.Beecherl@sorc.com
FAX (321) 225-3146 sales@shutterbug.com
MANUFACTURING & PRODUCTION OPERATIONS
VP, MANUFACTURING & AD OPERATIONS GREG PARNELL
SENIOR DIRECTOR, AD OPERATIONS PAULINE ATWOOD
DIRECTOR, PUBLISHING TECHNOLOGIES DALE BRYSON
PRODUCTION MANAGER CHRISTINA PONC
ARCHIVIST THOMAS VOEHRINGER
ENTERTAINMENT GROUP
MANAGEMENT
DIGITAL GROUP
PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
DIGITAL DIRECTOR,
KASEY KELLEY
ENGINEERING
JEFF KIMMEL
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR,
DIGITAL
SENIOR PRODUCT
CHRIS MAURO
MANAGER
RISHI KUMAR
FINANCE DIRECTOR
ADAM MINER
SENIOR PRODUCT
MANAGER
MARC BARTELL
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
PETER TRACY
SOURCE INTERLINK MEDIA, LLC
CHAIRMAN
EVP, CHIEF CONTENT
VP, EDITORIAL
PETER ENGLEHART
OFFICER
OPERATIONS
ANGUS MACKENZIE
AMY DIAMOND
CHIEF EXECUTIVE
OFFICER
EVP, OPERATIONS
EVP, AFTERMARKET
SCOTT P. DICKEY
KEVIN MULLAN
AUTOMOTIVE
DOUG EVANS
PRESIDENT,
SVP, ENTERPRISES
AUTOMOTIVE
TYLER SCHULZE
SVP, CONTENT
CHRIS ARGENTIERI
STRATEGY,
EVP, SALES &
AUTOMOTIVE
EVP, CHIEF
MARKETING
DAVID FREIBURGER
FINANCIAL
ERIC SCHWAB
OFFICER
SVP, DIGITAL,
SVP, DIGITIAL
BILL SUTMAN
SPORTS &
OPERATIONS
ENTERTAINMENT
EVP, AFTERMARKET
DAN BEDNAR
GREG
MORROW
AUTOMOTIVE
VP, SALES
DAVID ALGIRE
VP, DIGITAL
OPERATIONS
MONETIZATION
EVP, CHIEF CREATIVE
MATT BOICE
ELISABETH MURRAY
OFFICER
SVP, FINANCIAL
ALAN ALPANIAN
SVP,
MARKETING
PLANNING
RYAN PAYNE
EVP, SPORTS &
MIKE CUMMINGS
ENTERTAINMENT
EVP, MIND OVER EYE
SVP, AUTOMOTIVE
NORB GARRETT
BILL WADSWORTH
DIGITAL
GEOFF DEFRANCE
CONSUMER MARKETING, ENTHUSIAST MEDIA
SUBSCRIPTION COMPANY, INC.
SVP, CIRCULATION TOM SLATER
VP, RETENTION & OPERATIONS FULFILLMENT DONALD T. ROBINSON I I I
OCCASIONALLY, OUR SUBSCRIBER LIST IS MADE AVAILABLE TO REPUTABLE
FIRMS OFFERING GOODS AND SERVICES THAT WE BELIEVE WOULD BE OF
INTEREST TO OUR READERS. IF YOU PREFER TO BE EXCLUDED, PLEASE SEND
YOUR CURRENT ADDRESS LABEL AND NOTE REQUESTING TO BE EXCLUDED
FROM THESE PROMOTIONS TO SOURCE INTERLINK MEDIA, LLC, 831 S.
DOUGLAS ST., EL SEGUNDO, CA 90245, ATTN.: PRIVACY COORDINATOR.
ANY SUBMISSIONS OR CONTRIBUTIONS FROM READERS SHALL BE SUBJECT
TO AND GOVERNED BY SOURCE INTERLINK MEDIAS USER CONTENT
SUBMISSION TERMS AND CONDITIONS, WHICH ARE POSTED AT HTTP://
PRIVACY.SOURCEINTERLINKMEDIA.COM/SUBMISSIONS.HTML.
REPRINTS: CONTACT WRIGHTS MEDIA AT 877-652-5295
(281-419-5725 OUTSIDE THE U.S. AND CANADA) TO
PURCHASE QUALITY CUSTOM REPRINTS OR E-PRINTS OF
ARTICLES APPEARING IN THIS PUBLICATION.
COPYRIGHT 2014 BY SOURCE INTERLINK MAGAZINES,
LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE USA.
CANADA POST: RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADIAN
ADDRESSES TO IMEX GLOBAL SOLUTIONS, P.O. BOX 25542,
LONDON, ON N6C 6B2.

Framed or Unframed
Your Work Belongs on Canvas
Get $10 o a 16x20 Canvas Gallery Wrap on your rst order.
Use Code: EXPERTPHOTO | Expires: Dec 31, 2015

See our full product line at

.com

Accessories: Along with your shoe-mount flash here


are my recommended accessories. Shown here are
the Rogue FlashBender panels (large & small,
unfurled, note the Velcro attaching strips); a Marumi
+3 doublet lens for my Tamron 70-300mm zoom; the
Canon 1.4X converter and the EF25 extension tube.

BETTER LIGHTING FOR


NATURE CLOSE-UPS

HOW TO USE ON-CAMERA BOUNCE FLASH

BY JACK NEUBART

HEN CAPTURING INTIMATE nature portraits, it always helps to add


breathing room between the camera and your subject. This buffer zone
makes skittish subjects less prone to take flight and avoids casting
shadows with the lens. To add bright color and detail in almost any
lighting situation and reduce any motion blur, I always turn to electronic flash.
I might use a macro ring flash when shooting with a 90 or 100mm macro lens.
The ring flash is mounted around the lens (as the name implies) and can bathe the
subject in an even wash of light. But the ring light has its limitations. The low power
output on most units restricts its use to very close subjects, and the shape of the
flash itself often restricts the field of view. Although I love using a ring flash, I also
recognize that it can only be used in certain situations.

CLOSE-UP BOUNCE FLASH


I make use of the tools that came with
each flash so that I can begin with an
even light spread. I keep the included
diffusion dome attached to my Nikon
SB-900 flash. The dome protects the
flash tube assembly and projects a
softer light. On my Canon 580EX, I use
the built-in wide panel. Units made by
other manufacturers and third parties
often come with these light modifiers.
The most important accessory for this
technique follows.
The key player is an optional bounce
panel thats added to the flash. There
are many such devices available, but my
choice is the Rogue FlashBender (www.
expoimaging.com)see my review at
www.shutterbug.com. FlashBenders
feature bendable metal stays that allow
you to shape the panelhence control
the throw of light. I favor the smaller
panel (10x7). However, I also carry
the larger one (10x11), which I reserve
for more sizeable subjects and wider
coverage.
I attach the bounce panel to the flash
head first, then the flash to camera. I
then tilt the flash head upward. With
the small panel, I raise the flash head
to a position that is 2 notches down (at
60) from the maximum elevation. This
does a better job of directing the light
at nearby subjects while still bypassing
Revealing Light: I focused on the wing of a Paper Kite
(Rice Paper) butterfly at life-size. While a butterflys
wings may appear flat, this lighting reveals the ripples,
folds and ridges (wing veins) while also highlighting
the texture of the wing. Note that the flash fully and
evenly covers the area. A Nikon D600 with a 90mm
macro at 1:1; a SB-900 bounce flash; a dome diffuser
and a small FlashBender; ISO 800; f/22; 1/125.

10

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

Photos Jack Neubart. All rights reserved.

To broaden my options, and hopefully


yours as well, Ill explore the use of TTLdedicated shoe-mount flash for nature
close-ups. The main technique I use is
bounce flash, with the aid of one key
accessory. With that in mind I headed to
the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museums
butterfly house (www.naturemuseum.
org), the Lincoln Park Zoo (www.lpzoo.
org), and the Lincoln Park Conservatory
in Chicago (www.chicagoparkdistrict.
com). I worked in areas illuminated
by skylights, just as you might find in
outdoor settings as well.

Different Rigs: These 2 images of a Paper Kite butterfly were shot with 2 different set-ups. This image (A) was
shot with a 70-300mm lens at 300mm, the closest focus setting, with a +3 diopter. The other image (B) was taken
with a 90mm macro lens at life-size. Both were illuminated with my bounce flash rig with the Nikon SB-900.

Accessorized Flash Head: This is my Nikon SB-900 in


the typical bounce position, with a dome diffuser and
a small Rogue FlashBender. Note that the panel is
bent into a parabolic shape for a better throw of light.

the lens shadewhich I always keep


attached to prevent leaves and branches
from coming in to contact with the
front element of the lens. This angular
position also minimizes the chance that
the flash head will precipitously drop
under the added weight of the panel
when you make sudden movements.
With the large panel, I recommend
keeping the head at the maximum
elevation because (on most flashes) that
locks the head in place.
Next, I shape the FlashBender. I
give the small panel a parabolic shape
by pinching in the sides, and I render
the large one as a scoop (to scoop the
light) by pinching it in from the top and
the sides. In this way, I make the most
efficient use of the light. Each acts as its
own hybrid soft box/umbrella, if you will.

Moving With The Shot: I preset the magnification on my 90mm macro (attached to the Nikon D600) to life-size
for the shot of the orange-flecked butterfly when suddenly an interloper entered the scene. To accommodate, I
reset the lens to half life-size and continued to shoot. I photographed this duo focusing first on one then the
other, and then swung around to try to capture both on the same plane as much as possible. The lighting: an
SB-900 bounce flash; a diffusion dome and a bounce panel.

A CHOICE OF OPTICS
This more powerful light gives me the
opportunity to not only use the macro
lens but to go one step furtheror
take a few steps back and shoot from a
greater distance, making better use of
my telephoto zoom. So, with my Nikon
D600 in addition to the Tamron 90mm
f/2.8 macro I can also work with my
Tamron 70-300mm f/4-5.6. With my
Canon EOS 5D, I shoot with the Canon
70-200mm f/4L.
One thing Ive run into that can
frustrate getting really close is the
minimum focusing distance on the lens:
2014

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

11

Aquarium Shooting: I preset the zoom for one


traffic lane, if you will, then waited for one of these
Lake Malawi cichlids to settle down momentarily (as
if stopping at a traffic light) within a couple of feet of
the display glass. I took that opportunity to home in
on it, then used the focusing ring to track its
movements for this exposure. Obviously, all of the
focusing would have to be done with the lens, since
to-and-fro movements were impossible while keeping
the lens flush against the glass to eliminate
reflections and minimize distortion. Youll note that
some of the backscatter from the flash is hitting
floating debris (some of which I retouched out). The
bounce lighting from my rig simulated overhead
sunlight, resulting in shadows on the lower part of
the fish. A Canon 5D; a 70-200mm lens; an EF25
extension tube; ISO 400; f/16 (to restrict the throw of
the light); 1/200.

A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE
1. Set the flash firing mode to
TTL Auto.
2. Set the camera-shooting mode to
Manual (or Aperture Priority on
cameras where a fast flash sync
is automatically setbe sure to
check your instruction book).
3. Set the ISO to 400 (or 800) and
f/stops in the range of f/8 to f/16
for starters, together with a
1/125 to 1/250 flash sync
shutter speed.
4. Attach a bounce panel to the
flash head (add the wide panel or
the dome diffuser, if available).
Any bounce panel will do,
provided that you can shape it to
scoop the light.
5. Securely seat the flash in the
cameras hot shoe and raise the
head to a 60-bounce position
(usually 2 notches below the
maximum). Use a lockable bounce
position for heavy panels.
6. Set the focus to Manual. With
zoom lenses you may find it
easier to focus using the zoom
ring, although certain situations
require you to be adaptable. Finetune the focus by moving to and
fro with the camera.

Lighting Angle & Distance: With the Canon 70-200mm zoom and an extension tube (A), I can achieve a tighter
close-up of this butterfly at 70mm (with the focus pre-set at the closest setting) than at 200mm. However,
moving back for the 200mm shot resulted in shooting from a slightly lower angle than at 70mm (B). Note how
this change in the lighting angle affects the color in the scales, with more purple resulting from a more overhead
light. Also note the change in the background shadows with a change in the distance and the lighting angle.
12

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

7. Watch that leaves or branches


and the lens (or lens shade)
doesnt block the light from the
bounce panel and that the panel
and lens (or lens shade) doesnt
bump into leaves and branches.

Intelligent Image Correction

on the Tamron zoom lens its nearly 5


feet and practically 4 feet on the Canon
glass. Neither distance will deliver the
dramatic close-ups I am aiming for
unaided, that is.
The simple solution: fitted to the
Tamron lens I have a +3 Marumi DHG
Achromat Macro lens (www.marumiinternational.com). What I like about
this plus diopter is that its a highly
corrected doublet, in contrast to singleelement plus lensesand, like any
front-mounted filterit attaches and
detaches quickly and easily. It acts as a
kind of magnifying glass, but with much
improved sharpness. You can also use
extension tubes that fit between the
back of the lens and the lens mount on
the camerawhich I did when using the
Canon set-up.
My arsenal of Canon accessories
includes a Canon EF25 extension tube
and a Canon matched (to minimize
aberrations) 1.4X teleconverter. You
have to decide whats more important:
shooting only close-ups with the
extension tube or capturing a broader
range of subjects near and far with the
converter, which maintains the nearest
focusing distance with its extended focal
length. In the end, the converter proved

Bird At Feeder: To capture this tiny bird at a feeder, I had my 70-200mm lens racked out to the max (280mm with
the 1.4X converter), lighting it with my bounce flash rig. I didnt want to frighten the bird by approaching too
closely, I later cropped in around the bird a bit in Lightroom.

to be a less practical choice, although it


did play a role in many shots.
CLOSE-UPS THAT SPARKLE
Bounce flash with a shoe-mount
provides a quantum leap in utility
compared with a ring flash. It offers
the ability to capture an ever-widening
range of subjects with a sense of the
surroundings for a more natural,
more informative nature portrait.

My on-camera bounce flash rig


(whether with a macro lens or a closeup-enhanced tele-zoom) delivered
a beautiful light that brings out all
of the detail, tonal nuances and rich
color tapestry in my nature subjects.
Yes, there are shadows but they lend
depth to the shot. And this approach
minimizes intrusive catchlights and hot
spots in highly reflective surfaces when
compared with using a ring flash. Q

 
    



   




   


 
! "#$$

  ##



%  
"

&' 

 


 
        

 ! 
"# ! $
%%%&'( )*

Austin Graffyard: Pearson shot this skeleton band rocking out in a graffiti yard in Austin, Texas. The image was made with a Canon EOS 7D with a Zeiss Distagon T* 3.5/18
ZE lens. The total exposure for the image was 361 sec at f/13 at ISO 100.

HAND, EYE & CAMERA


DARREN PEARSONS WHIMSICAL LIGHT CREATURES

BY JEFF WIGNALL

desert skies, skeleton


bands jamming in the back
alleys of Austin and angels hovering
in ballet poses over city lights. These
are not exactly common camera fare
even in the fanciful world of night
photographybut they are exactly
the kinds of beings that populate the
very fun and inventive world of light
painting artist Darren Pearson (www.
dariustwin.com). Using a combination
of long shutter speeds, an assortment of
small flashlights and supremely good
drawing skills, Pearson breathes light
and life into a world of his own very
fertile imagination.
A n illustrator, designer and co-owner
of a clothing company (Danger Brand)
by day, Pearson wanders the night
flashlights in handdrawing his bright
fantasies on a canvas of blackness.
Unlike a lot of light painters whose
light is aimed almost exclusively at the
background, most of Pearsons work
is done with the light aimed into the
18

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

Tijuana Lights: This light angel looks down on the city lights of Tijuana, Mexico. Pearson created the apparition
using a 174 sec exposure, a Canon EOS 7D with a 50mm lens.

All photographs Darren Pearson.

OOLY MAMMOTHS
ROAMING under star-filled

lens. Most of his drawings are done


in a single continuous burst of light
sketchingthough some of his very
wide images are stitched together from
several exposures.
INSPIRATION
Pearson first began shooting his night
creatures in 2007 and was initially
inspired by a portrait of Pablo Picasso
shot in 1949 by Gjon Mili called Picasso
Draws a Centaur. I was flipping
through a LIFE magazine photo book
on our coffee table and that image
immediately stoked my curiosity.
Picasso was drawing in mid-air, with
a light. It made me think about the
photographic medium in a whole new
way, he says. It was like the world
could suddenly be turned into a giant
sketch-book at night, and all I needed
was a tripod, camera and a light.
A lot of his initial education in night
shooting, he says, came from studying
other night photographers works on
Flickr. He says that he also learned a lot
about technique from watching friends
work. I had two friends in San Diego,
Jeff Morris and Michael Brown, that
let me tag along on a few adventures
shooting in the most random locations
and through them I learned about long
exposure photography. They were more
into surface-painting long exposures
like Troy Paivas Lost America style of
photos. I learned a lot from them about
location scouting, exposure settings,
getting focused in the dark and gelling
flashes, he says.

Corythosaurus: Dinosaurs that often roamed the beaches of California are a major theme in Darren Pearsons
light drawings. He brought this one back to life at the Natural Bridges area in Santa Cruz. I like how life-like
these light-fossils are looking. Years ago, I was lucky to get the illustrated bones to line up correctly, and often
times it took me 30 or more tries in a night just to get one light painting! Now they come with ease and are even
starting to have a little personality. This fellow looks like hes just spotted something in the distance. Shot with
a Canon EOS 6D Zeiss Distagon T* 2/28 ZE and exposed for 273 sec at f/6.3 at ISO 100.

DE-EVOLUTIONARY DRAWINGS
Pearsons images tend to center around
three main themes: dinosaurs, human
skeletons and angelsthough they also
include a fanciful assortment of animals,
sea creatures and even smiling space
aliens. Another recent project is a series
of postcards from cities around the world
where he scrawls the names of the cities
in front of famous landmarks.
When it comes to the dinosaurs,
Pearson says they are all pretty much

Sun Worshippers: (Collaboration with Erik Smith.) This image was created using a 324.7 sec exposure at f/7.1
(ISO 100). Shot with a Canon 6D with a Zeiss Distagon T* 3.5/18 ZE lens.

reality based. Most of the prehistoric


creatures I draw are fairly accurate in
terms of where the bones are aligned,
they are based on real dinosaurs and
ice-age animals. I have a dinosaur
encyclopedia at home that I often flip
through first and once I find a good idea
I take to the Internet and try to gather
more image references if its available,
then I sketch, and often email these
clippings to my phone for reference on
the road.
His first attempts at light drawing
human figures were extremely basic
nothing more than stick figures drawn
with a small flash light. The first light
paintings I did were indoors, basic
sketches and generalized human light
forms. Then I moved on to stick figures,
and eventually to more complicated
skeletal drawings, angels and animals,
he says. After drawing the stick figures
for years, I wanted to see if I could
draw a human skeleton. Once I got
those, it was like reverse evolution. I
drew a horse skeleton, a mammoth, a
saber tooth, then a T-Rex. By the time
I started illustrating the dinosaurs, I
began to think anything was possible.
SKETCHING IN THE DARK
The idea of illustrating freehand in
3D presents several challenges, he
says. The main obstacle is simply just
lining up two points precisely in space.
Its nearly impossible, you have to
generalize to a certain degree. Another
2014

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

19

of the big difficulties he faces, of course,


is that unlike drawing on a sketchpad,
you cant see what youve already drawn.
Its more about dividing space into
different quadrants surrounding my
body. So if I have my body as a frame
of reference, then I have a constant to
refer to in space. The only other point of
reference is the camera lens, and maybe
the environment if I can see it, he says.
Ive had a lot of practice doing this,
which is the best explanation for my
accuracy. In the beginning I wasnt very
accurate at all.
Theres a steep learning curve that
happens every time I look at the image
after the drawing. I learn what works,
what doesnt, how to pay attention
to the environmental markings and
make educated guesses on where the
illustration needs to be changed.
DRAWING TOOLS
One of the most interesting differences
that separates Pearsons night work
from most light painters is that,
backgrounds aside, he works with his
lights aimed at the camera lens and
not the background. The actual light
he uses for his drawings depends on a
few factors. I use different lights for
different lines. Similar to a painter using
different brushes, he says.
His favorite tool is a DIY light pen
that his friend Dana Maltby (Twin
Cities Brightest) gave him years ago.
After using it more than I thought
I would, it became a fixture of my
illustration style. It was so simple,
raw, weighted perfectly, he says. Ive
done nearly all of my light paintings
with different versions of this pen. Im
happy to mention that were working
on perfecting the design and making it
available to the market soon. Theres
nothing else quite like it.
He also regularly employs three
other light sources, depending on the
situation. The first is the Coleman/
MAX (a high-powered hand light) great
for thicker bright flaring lines. The
second is a brand called Rayovac, they
make a very tough waterproof light. I
use it when working in wet or under
water conditions. Lastly, Dorcy makes
an insanely powerful spotlight that I
use for gelling the backgrounds of many
shots. That light will literally illuminate
an entire mountain, he says.
Most of his exposures are made in
a single continuous ballet of motion
and light drawing. I like to shoot
everything in one single shot, I feel
like that is the most authentic way
20

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

Saber-toothed Cat: It seems only fitting that Pearson rekindles prehistoric life in the areas where the
creatures once roamedincluding this Sabre-toothed cat he captured in Utahs Zion National Park. One of my
favorite light paintings from the trip. The color blends and texture on this saber-toothed cat make it stand out.
he says. Shot with a Canon EOS 6D EF24-70mm f/2.8L USM and exposed for 184 sec at f/5.6 (ISO 100).

Bag-o-Bones and a Natural Bridge: Pearson stitched together five separate vertical images to create this
scene of skeletons on the beach in Santa Cruz. Each of the images was shot at F5.6, ISO 100, for approximately
82 sec. Light painting panoramas are quickly becoming my new favorite, he says. Shot with a Canon 6D with a
Zeiss Distagon T* 2/28 ZE lens.

Mammoth: A wooly mammoth roams beneath a star filled sky. Photographed with a Canon EOS 6D with a 28mm
Canon lens and exposed 238 sec at f/7.1. Photographed in Anza-Borrego Desert State Park.

Focal length: 28mm Exposure: F/10 15.0 sec ISO100 Ian Plant

16mm

35mm

50mm

300mm

100mm

Inspiration knows no distance.

16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD MACRO


The 16mm wide-angle revolution.
Setting a new standard in high-power zoom lenses.
;OPZL_[YHVYKPUHY`^VYSKZYZ[1 18.8x zoom comes with Vibration Compensation
and high-speed Piezo Drive autofocusing, making the Tamron 16-300mm
Di II VC PZD Macro a lens you can rely on for crisp, detailed wide-angle to
long-telephoto shots.
Model B016
For Canon, Nikon and Sony* mounts
*Sony mount without VC
1
As of March 2014 Source: Tamron

www.tamron-usa.com

1:2.9 Macro

Breaking Bones: This series of a break-dancing


skeleton (and you didnt think they could get down!)
was shot in Venice, California. The exposure for each
frame was 120 sec. Photographed with a Canon EOS 6D
with a Zeiss Distagon T* 2/28 ZE lens.

to light paint. However, this is not


always possible under conditions with
a lack of moonlight, so I do composites
under those conditions (one shot
for the foreground one shot for the
background)blend them together and
you have an evenly lit image.
WHATS NEXT?
So where will Pearson take his
creatures in the future? Id like to
do more collaborations with other
photographers. Bigger productions,
more story elements, perhaps some
more animation, he says. Id also love
to collaborate with an app or game
developer in the future. I think the style
of LED art lends itself very well toward
mobile gaming. Q

PrinTao 8
developed for Mac OS X

Effortless Professional Printing


Never has it been easier to achieve beautiful, accurate, color
prints right from your own printer. LaserSoft Imagings new
PrinTao 8 greatly simplifies printing and color management
so photographers, from beginners to professionals, will be
amazed at what they can achieve. No more wasted paper and
ink as prints are right the first time, every time.
To my amazement, I was making great looking prints immediately on my Epson 7900. The power and ease of use is tremendous.
This will be our only printing software from now on.
Tony Sweet, Nikon legend behind the lens visual workshop
leader, seminar speaker and author.

for more information please visit

www.SilverFast.com
www.PrinTao8.com

Dark And Stormy: Matt Stock photographed this old shipwreck in the Bahamas and began gathering the exposures at around sunset and continued lighting it and
shooting well into darknessa fairly common practice for him. The photo was made with a Nikon D800E and a Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8. The shutter speeds and apertures for
the different exposures vary (all were made at ISO 400) and various dive lights were used to illuminate the wreckage.

MATT STOCKS FLORIDA NIGHTS

IKE MOST NIGHT shooters and light painters, photographer Matt Stock has
little fear when it comes to pushing the boundaries of his art and technique.
Hes willing to put in whatever effort it takes to make his shots happenno
matter how ambitious or daunting the challenge. And hes prone to being
cautious in the environments hes working in because, like most night shooters, hes
run into his share of unusual nocturnal dangerstake sharks, for example. And
sharp-edged ship wrecks, snakes and the occasional alligator.

Based in Miami, Stock says unusual


dangers of all sizes come with the
territorythe territory usually being
south Florida. As a Florida native,
Im very comfortable hiking in the
Everglades and in the mangrove
swamps, he says. But lets be honest,
mangrove swamps are not the most
pleasant places to be. On one shoot he
says it was a danger on a smaller scale
swarms of mosquitosthat nearly
scuttled his shots. There was so many
mosquitos that I didnt think the image
would turn out because clouds of them
were being lit as I exposed my images.
24

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

One reason for the added layers of


difficulty that Stock faces in creating
his images is that many of his subjects
are either at the waters edge, on the
water or partially submerged in the
water. To add to the challenge, in most
shots he is not just lighting the parts of
his subjects that are visible above the
water, but the portions that are below
the surface as well. In fact, much of the
lighting gear that he uses to paint his
subjects was designed not for terrestrial
photographers at all, but rather for
SCUBA divers (he is also an avid diver
himself).

BY JEFF WIGNALL

Stock began night shooting when


he was a student of architectural
photography. I have long been
fascinated with subjects that are slightly
out of the mainstream and when I was
a student I became very interested
in the series of lifeguard towers that
dot the landscape at South Beach in
Miami, he says. They were designed
by well known architects and are quite
beautiful in their own right. So as my
graduate project I decided to document
these lifeguard towers at night when the
beach was abandoned and the towers
would take on a life of their own free of
distractions.
This was my first foray into night
photography for a cohesive project
and really started my love affair with
shooting after dark.
DAY & NIGHT
Interestingly, Stock often begins his

All photos Matt Stock

LIGHTING SUBJECTS ABOVE & BELOW THE SEA

Hicks House: This shot from the Stiltsville project was made with a Nikon D700 and a Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8.
Shutter speeds and apertures varied at ISO 200. A pair of Nikon SB-600 flashes (and various dive lights) was
used by his crew to illuminate the structure.

Miami Springs Powerboat House: The length of time it takes to plan, light and record his shots depends on the
complexity of the location: It really depends on a lot of different factors including weather, the moon, tides,
the scale of the subject and the amount of time we have to shoot to begin with. When I first started shooting it
would take up to 4 hours to shoot a relatively simple set-up. Now many years later with dozens of large scale
images under my belt, I am comfortable creating more elaborate images with less set-up as I have the
experience to pre-visualize how all manner of ambient light will interact with the artificial lighting I use on
location. With less set up time now I can accomplish most shoots in an hour to an hour and a half. He made the
shot with a Nikon D700 mounted with a Nikkor 28-70mm f/2.8. The shutter speeds and apertures (at ISO 200)
varied and he used various dive lights and handheld flashlights to paint the scene.

night shoots during the daycapturing


a sunset sky for exampleto add into
the final mix later. A lot of my night
work is not so much about a strict
adherence to capturing the subject after
dark, but more about using the night as
a way to enhance a particular type of
atmosphere, he says.
Even though my images may look
like they were originally captured in
daylight there are little tells to indicate
that it was shot with a long shutter speed
or at night. For instance, the clouds will
usually reveal significant motion to
them, which is obviously impossible to
achieve at noon. I am trying to capture
the essence of a place and capture it in
an idealized form he says.
Unlike a lot of light painting shots
that are done in either a single long
exposure (or a handful of exposures)
its not unusual for Stock to combine
dozens of exposures in editing (using
both Photoshop and Lightroom) to create
a single final image. I am shooting and
exposing sequentially sometimes 75 shots
in a row. But it is not time-lapse style.
Each exposure is being triggered by
me and it might take my crew minutes
to get into position from one shot to the
next so the overall shooting process can
take hours, he says. So I will start with
either a dark frame and build exposures
and light onto that or sometimes
Ill start with a sunset shot and add
exposures to that. Time is a transient
component to my work.
But while the assembly is done in
postproduction, all technical image
decisions and manipulations are made
at the time of shooting. All of my work
is done in-camera and by manipulating
white balance, exposure time and filter
usage. I am able to capture colors and
objects that would not otherwise be
possible in such low light, he says.
In terms of lighting and light painting
above the water, Stock says he employs
a lot of different gearincluding studio
lighting. I first started working with
small handheld camping lights and
have since moved on to studio strobes
and battery packs as well as continuous
lights powered by generators and hand
held lights capable of producing over
1000 lumens each, he says.
For subjects or parts of subjects that
are below the water, he uses specialized
gear designed for underwater use. I
use specially designed lights normally
used by SCUBA divers to illuminate
my subjects. I will also use surface
lights aimed into the water if we are not
lighting something too deep, he says.
2014

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

25

Marine Stadium Panorama: This shot of an abandoned stadium in Miami took a crew of 4 helpers to light using a pair of White Lightning 1600 strobes (paulcbuff.com) softened
with umbrellas, as well as various handheld flashlights. The shot was made with a Nikon D800E, Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8the shutter speeds and apertures vary at ISO 400.

A LIGHT-PAINTING PERFORMANCE
Because of the scope of a lot of his
images like the Stiltsville shots, Stock
often relies on large crews of assistants
and volunteers to help with the light
painting. The size of the crews depends,
he says, on the complexity and scope
of the project. If hes lighting a single
mango tree he can often handle it with
a single assistant with one light, but in
situations where he may be lighting an
entire abandoned stadium, as he did in
shot of the Miami Marine Stadium, he
often uses 4 or more helpers. The most
complex project to date has been my
work with the Bahamian shipwrecks
The Gallant Lady and the Sapona, he
says. For those images I needed a crew
of 10 and we were contending with
large hungry sharks, 5 seas and stormy
conditions the entire time.
Stock directs his crew from the
camera position, much like a motionpicture director calling out action shots.
When I am working with a new crew
one of the first things ask them is if they
have ever painted a wall before. If so,
then I tell them they will be great at light
painting. The only difference being that
we are using light rather than paint, but
the gestures are the same.
When I am lighting or directing my
crew I will stand off to the side of my
camera and direct them the same way
a composer might. I say more light on
the right! Up! Right! Down! Hold! he
says. As I direct my crew, they will
literally be painting that area with
26

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

A-Frame House: Another shot from the Stiltsville project. As with all of his multiple-image night shots the
shutter speeds and apertures varied from frame to frame and were all shot at ISO 400. A variety of dive lights
and handheld flashlights were used to paint the scene. Look carefully in the sky and you can see star trails
caused by the long exposures. Stock made this shot with a Nikon D700 equipped with a Nikkor 28-70mm f/2.8.

light and we expose a subject piece


by piece and I weave those exposures
together like a digital tapestry. By
manipulating my lights I can pick and
chose which elements to highlight and
which elements I want to fade into the
background, he says.
THE STILTSVILLE PROJECT
One of Stocks more ambitious projects
to date involved creating a series of
night shots in an area of Miami called

Stiltsvillean historic group of homes


built on pilings in Miami bay. Stiltsville
is a magical place well known to those
in the Miami waterfront community,
says Stock. The seeds of these images
were first planted several years ago
by a good friend of mine who is a boat
captain. When I started telling him
about the technique I was developing he
said, Have you thought about lighting
Stiltsville? and I replied, Whats a
Stiltsville?

Mother And Child: Stock captured this shot of the Milky Way and 2 mangrove trees using a Nikon D800E and a
Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8. Multiple frames were exposed using a variety of shutter speeds and apertures at ISO 1600.
Handheld flashlights were used to light the terrestrial portions of the scene.

His friend took him to see the


unusual cluster of homes and he fell
in love with it. I approached the
National Parks and began the project
I titled Stiltsville Illuminated which
culminated with an exhibition at
Stiltsville with a portion of the proceeds
going to help preserve the houses.
Once he had permission to do the
project he began to study the homes
and the potential complications of
photographing and lighting such large
and somewhat inaccessible subjects. As
I became more familiar with Stiltsville
itself, I knew which houses I wanted
to have appear to be solitary figures,
which houses I wanted to have a softer
feel and incorporate sunset or even light
pollution to pull pastels into the frame,
says Stock. But it took many scouting
visits through the area to select my final
shots and then I would sketch out the
concept and describe it to the crew so we
could plan accordingly. There are only
7 houses still left standing out of the
peak of 27 in the heyday of Stiltsville,
he says. It took Stock approximately 2
years from conception to conclusion to
capture all of the images in the series.
Tides, weather, boat availability and
scheduling a crew coupled with the
inherent complexities of each shot led
to an exceedingly complex shooting
schedule, he says.
Because the houses are built over
water, and because he and his crew
were in the water during shoots, one
problem that they had to confront
were the native inhabitants of the area.
The area around Stiltsville is known
for its healthy shark population so I
would wear a shark repellant during
my shoots, he says. It is called a shark
shield and is an electronic cord worn on
the ankle that supposedly deters shark
attacks.
The combination of shining lights
Timekeeper: This is one of the many shots that Stock
lit from both above and below the water. About the
shot he says: Timekeeper was a shot that I had in
mind for quite some time before I attempted to
capture it. As an avid SCUBA diver I know that
mangrove roots can make wonderful subjects. They
have bright colors, are covered in barnacles and, to
me, they truly represent strength. I wanted to show
the world how intricate the entire mangrove plant can
be and had the vision of an over/under before I knew
which tree I would use to capture it. So I scouted
some islands, selected my tree and came back with a
dedicated underwater housing several weeks later
and captured Timekeeper on a very, very, mosquito
laden night. Captured with a Nikon D800E and a
Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8, in an AquaTech underwater
housing (http://aquatech.net). Exposures at ISO 400
were made using a number of different shutter
speeds and apertures and the shot was lit with
various dive lights.
2014

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

27

Viscaya Bridge: Shot with a Nikon D800E and a Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 at ISO 100. The bridge was lit with a pair of Nikon SB-910 flashes and other handheld lights.

around in the darkness and having


several assistants splashing around
in the water only added to the sharks
interest in the project. Fortunately,
we only ran into one shark that was any
cause of concern while shooting and
that was a 6 lemon shark who came in to
investigate one night, he says.
And you know what they say, any
underwater night photo shoot with
sharks that you can swim away from is a
good one! Q
For more of Matt Stocks work visit:
www.mattstockphoto.com.

The Watchers: The toughest part of this shot, says


Stock, was getting all of the pelicans in just the right
positionand then getting rid of them so that he could
light the rest of the scene. This image was the last
one of the evening and I needed to wait until the sea
birds were comfortable with our presence before I
was able to shoot. So I set up my tripod with a
camera, then walked away and waited. When they
were comfortable, I approached my tripod and
captured them all facing into the wind. Then, to make
things easier, I actually shooed them away and began
lighting the dock and the surrounding water, he
recalls. Captured with a Nikon D700 using a Nikkor
14-24mm f/2.8 at ISO 400. A variety of handheld lights
were used to create the circle of light on the water
and to light the dock.

Photo courtesy MindShift Gear.

This is one spot where you wouldnt want to put a pack down to grab your camera for a shot. MindShift Gears rotation180 Professional gets around this dilemma with its
rotating hip pack, which gives you fast access while the backpack remains on your back. Location: Zion National Park Narrows, Virgin River.

CHOOSING A PHOTO BACKPACK

THE RIGHT STUFF FOR YOUR GEAR & JOURNEY

BY JACK NEUBART

TYPES & FEATURES


For starters, pick a backpack to match
what you plan to photograph, which
will determine what you carry. The
30

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

MindShift Gears rotation180 Professional Deluxe edition comes with the camera insert (far right), which is
optional on the standard rotation180. Pictured is the kit one photographer carries in this pack: the hip pack
holds a Nikon D800 with an attached 24-70mm lens, plus a 14-24mm; in the insert, a Nikon D3S with a 70-200mm
f/2.8, 105mm macro and a 24mm tilt shift. When he heads out without the insert he stuffs the pack with a rain
jacket, rain pants, a cook pot, a small cook stove, maps, a compass, a Swiss army knife and energy bars. On the
outside he carries trekking poles (shown in the mid-foreground) and a 3-liter hydration reservoir plus a tripod.

Photo courtesy MindShift Gear.

S PHOTOGRAPHERS, we
have a unique way of looking
at backpacks. Ordinarily the
backpack harness and a proper
fit would be the first things a backpacker
would look at for a wilderness trek
lasting days or weeks. Weeven when on
an overnight outingare usually on foot
for only a few hours at a stretch, stopping
often to shoot. Not all of us are headed
into the backcountry and may simply
be hiking a day trail. Either way, were
concerned as much with our photo gear
as with our own comfortgetting the
gear safely to our destination and getting
around without hindrance or hassles and
always being at the ready so we can start
shooting the moment inspiration strikes.

sample products listed at the end of each


category description are those photo
backpacks Im familiar with, in one
version or another. I have added some
considerations to each type description,
including airline friendliness, capacity
and typical applications. The sample
products listed can be cross-referenced
with the website contacts listed at the
end of this article.

Photo courtesy f-stop.

TECHNICAL PHOTO PACKS


These bags are largely made of durable,
lightweight nylon and feature a
technical harness (padded, contoured
shoulder straps with load-lifter straps,
a padded hip belt, a sternum strap), an
airflow padded back panel and often an
internal frameall designed for stability
and comfort. Theyre aimed at serious
wilderness trekking (and even skiing),
not driving around from one location to
the next.
These packs may require an optional
camera insert (module) or they come
with an integrated photo pouch and/or a
sleeve or even a removable waist or chest
packeach are padded to some degree
and user-configured.
Airline Friendly: It may be a tight fit
in the overhead bin.
Capacity: The provision for camera
gear varies widely. Most packs will carry
a D-SLR with various short and long
lenses, flash and some accessories. Some
packs work best with a compact D-SLR

or a mirrorless camera system, but Ive


also seen others configured for a large
format camera. Many offer a hydration
bladder/reservoir (in an allotted sleeve)
or a water bottle in a mesh pocket and
use the pockets (or unfilled space) for
trail essentials.
Applications: Landscape or wildlife
photography (provided that you dont
need 300mm f/2.8 or longer lenses) or
close-up photography.
Sample Products: MindShift Gear
rotation180 Professional Deluxe, F-Stop
Loka with the optional camera insert,
Naneu Adventure K4L v2, Clik Elite
Obscura, Lowepro Photo Sport Pro 30L,
Boblbee Megalopolis Aero with the
optional camera insert, TrekPak/Deuter
Freerider Pro with the optional camera
insert (specify mens or womens).
DUAL-TIER PHOTO BACKPACKS
These backpacks may be made of nylon
or polyester (rarely other materials) and
feature a padded, customizable camera
section that will hold a modest amount
of photo gear plus a separate (often
unpadded) upper tier usually reserved
for personal items. Many such packs are
equipped with a technical harness and
an airflow back panel (or padding).
Airline Friendly: The size varies
widely but most will easily fit in the
overhead bin, provided that you dont
overstuff the exterior pockets or add
a tripod.

This shot features the Mountainsmith Parallax and the


removable chest pack that comes with it and attaches
to the front of the main bag. While it also improves
balance, a chest pack makes the camera immediately
available without having to put the main pack down to
get at it in less than ideal surroundings.
Photo courtesy Mountainsmith/Keith Ladzinski.

Technical backpacks from f-stop, like this Tilopa BC, accept various-sized camera inserts and MOLLE-compatible modular pouches so you can carry the gear you need
(hike or climb comfortably) and be ready to shoot at a moments notice.
2014

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

31

n
lica
y Pe
rtes

r.

Gea

Pro

STANDARD & ROLLER PHOTO


BACKPACKS
These packs are fully padded and
fully customizable with a nylon or
polyester shell (rarely other fabrics).

Photo courtesy Think Tank Photo .

The newest Pelican ProGear packs (such as


this S115) feature a combination soft + hard
shell body. The attached hard case is fully
waterprooffor a laptop case. The bright
interior camera section lets you easily see
what youre carrying for quicker access.

Photo courtesy Boblbee.

Jack Neubart. All rights reserved.

While not a technical pack, the Mountainsmith


Borealis shares many traits andin some respects
improves upon those found in a wilderness backpack
for short hikes. It features airflow channels and
mesh-covered padding on the back panel, as well as
on the contoured shoulder straps and padded hip
belt, for better air circulation. Also, note the load
lifter straps on the shoulder straps (at the top) and
(much lower down) the adjustable sternum
straps. Two pairs of side compression
straps serve double duty to keep the
pack snug and hold a tripod or
other accessories. The pockets on
the hip belt can be used to store
small items.

The Boblbee line of packslike this Megalopolis Aero


are designed for an active lifestyle that goes beyond
simply hiking. Uniquely incorporating a hard shell and
aerodynamic/ergonomic design. Targeted at bikers
and skiers, they provide protection for your back in
case of a fall.

Capacity: The camera section often


has added depth, letting you store more
lenses on end. It can hold a D-SLR
with an attached 70-200mm f/4 or a
70-300mm zoom and various other
lenses, but dont expect to carry superlong optics or extra-fast zooms.
Applications: Landscape
photography, people candids or wildlife
photography macro. (Note: Because
these packs concentrate the weight at
the bottom, theyre not ideally suited to
steep climbs or long treks on foot.)
Sample Products: Mountainsmith
Borealis, Pelican ProGear S130 or a
Domke F-2 backpack.

The Think Tank Glass Limo was


designed for large glassas much
as a 600mm f/4 or an 800mm f/5.6
unattached or a 500mm f/4 with
the body attachedor it can be
further subdivided to carry a
standard outfit.

This Tenba Shootout LE medium backpack


is representative of packs entirely
dedicated to carrying camera gear. Note
that it holds 2 D-SLRs with the lenses
attached. Having access to the entire kit
lets you work more quickly from inside a
vehicle or a photo blind.
Photo courtesy Tenba/MAC Group.

32

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

Photo courtesy Kelly Moore.

ou

to c
Pho

This Kelly Moore Chapel


backpack was designed for
women. A shoulder strap is
also provided, should you
decide to use it as a
handbag with the camera
insert removed.

shoots, location portraiture, landscape


photography, African safari or shooting
from a photo blind.
Sample Products: Tenba Shootout
LE medium backpack, Gura Gear
Bataflae 26L, Manfrotto Professional
backpack 30, Vanguard Heralder 51T
rolling backpack.
EXTRA-LONG LENS PACK
The purpose of these soft-sided bags is
to carry big glass. However, the harness
system makes them best suited for treks
over easy terrain (usually short hops) or
working from a fixed position.
Airline Friendly: Fitting in the
overhead bin may be a stretch for some
bags, but not a problem for others.
Capacity: These packs come
in various sizes and are optimally
designed for a specific range of lenses
(up to 600mm f/4 or 800mm f/5.6 alone

Photo courtesy Lowepro/DayMen.

They are great to work out of on the


fly because they open fully, letting you
see and access all of your gear. Many
are equipped with a harness system
and a back panel largely identical to
those found on a technical pack. Roller
backpacks, however, are best suited
for more sedate surroundings and for
carrying a laptop.
Airline Friendly: The wheels may be
a problem but most conventional packs
should easily fit in the overhead bin,
provided that you dont add a tripod.
Capacity: These packs can
potentially carry everything youd
conceivably need, including 2 bodies
with attached lenses and most should
easily hold up to a 300mm f/4 lens. Some
can be configured for a medium or a
large format outfit. The spacious pockets
may let you stow a jacket or a poncho.
Applications: Commercial photo

This Lowepro Photo Sport Pro 30L AW is a technical pack with 2


distinctive features. First, it has a side panel for quick access to
the camera. More importantly, you can adjust the backpack
harness for torso length to improve stability and comforta
feature that is rare in photo packs. Camera gear is limited to a pro
D-SLR with a grip and an attached 70-200mm f/2.8 lens, although
you can probably nestle a flash elsewhere in the pack.

or attached to a D-SLR, possibly an


entire kit).
Applications: Large game and
bird photography, African safari,
shooting from a photo blind or sports
photography.
Sample Products: Think Tank
Photo Glass Limo, Tamrac Super
Telephoto Lens Pack model 5793,
Moose Peterson MP-3 Photopack,
Kinesis Long Lens case (with the
optional backpack harness).
FASHIONABLE & COMPACT
BACKPACKS
These bags are often less obvious as
photo bags and travel more easily in
crowds. Many of these specifically target
women, although others are unisex. The
harness system tends to be minimal so,
for utmost comfort, keep it light (even
if the bag has a greater capacity). Any

PACKING, WEARING & USING A


PHOTO BACKPACK
Here are some tips to improve
stability and comfort.
In a technical backpack, pack the
gear to maintain your center of
gravity and to stabilize the load. A
technical harness must be used
properly to provide the utmost
comfort and support. Before hitting
the trails loosen all of the straps,
then fasten the buckles and tighten
the straps in this order: padded hip
belt, shoulder straps, load lifter
straps (at the top rear of the
shoulder strapsleave room for air to
circulate) and the sternum strap.
Cradle the camera with the lens
attached, preferably where you can
reach it without fully unzipping the
backpack and exposing the entire
contents to the elements.

Photo courtesy Manfrotto.

To speed up access without putting


the pack down on the wet ground or
fragile vegetation, use a backpack
with a side access panel.
The nice thing about this
Manfrotto Professional
backpack 30 is that you dont
have to fully unzip the bag to
grab (or return) the camera,
which is cradled at the top
with the attached lens.

Prioritize the pockets and the


sleeves so that often used
accessories are within easy reach.
Avoid burying stuff beneath
other stuff!
Consider a backpack with a lighttoned or brightly colored interior, so
everything is clearly visible.

2014

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

33

Zippers, one might say, are the corner stone of every photo backpack. They should open and
close easily so you can get in and out quickly. But zippers have a weakness; they provide an
entry point for water and dust. Some zippers use a coated water-resistant tape. Others use
storm flaps, but these can bunch up and interfere with the zippers movement. And then there
are zippers designed more for city use, hence the interlocking sliders that accept a TSAcompliant lock (use the rain cover in an emergency). Some packs may use a mix of these and
other zippers for different parts of the bag.

Photo courtesy (respectively) Tamrac and Lowepro/DayMen.

Jack Neubart. All rights reserved.

Backpacks this size may fit on airlines as


personal items (under the seat in front). The dualtier Tamrac Mirage 6 has a side portal for quick access
to the camera. The shallower Lowepro Format will even fit
inside some technical packs in place of the standard camera
insert, giving you the option of carrying a smaller backpack
for more leisurely outings.

waist belt is often flimsy and excessive


its best to go without it.
Airline Friendly: Most should qualify
as a personal item, leaving room for
your clothing in your carry-on luggage.
Capacity: A minimum amount of D-SLR
gearperhaps nothing more than a
body with an attached zoom, a flash
and 1 or 2 extra lenses or a well-rounded
mirrorless system.
Applications: Sightseeing (landscapes
or people), leisure nature outings and
daily activities.
Sample Products: Ona Bolton Street,
Booq Python Slimpack, National
Geographic Africa collection medium
Rucksack, Elite Brands Isaac Mizrahi
Kathryn backpack for women, Kelly
Moore Chapel convertible backpack for
women, Epiphanie Sydney for women,
Jill-e Jack collection Hemingway with
the optional camera insert for men. Q

RESEARCH & MORE


Here is a listing of manufacturers of photo backpacks to aid you in your search for the
perfect bag. Cross-reference these companies to the Sample Products list at the end
of each category or check their websites for their other products. Of course, you really
have to try one on before you buy it, so inquire about the retail outlets near you.
Ape Case:
www.apecase.com
Boblbee (HP Marketing Corp.):
www.hpmarketingcorp.com
Booq:
www.booqbags.com
Chrome Industries:
www.chromeindustries.com
Clik Elite:
www.clikelite.com
Crumpler:
www.crumpler.com
Denny Manufacturing Company, Inc.:
www.dennymfg.com
Domke (Tiffen):
www.tiffen.com
Elite Brands Inc.:
www.elitebrands.com
Epiphanie by Maile Wilson:
www.epiphaniebags.com
f-stop:
www.fstopgear.com

34

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

Gura Gear:
www.guragear.com
Jill-e Designs:
www.jill-e.com
Kata Bags:
www.kata-bags.us
Kelly Moore:
www.kellymoorebag.com
Kinesis Photo Gear:
www.kgear.com
Lightware Inc.:
www.lightwareinc.com
Lowepro:
www.lowepro.com
Manfrotto:
www.manfrotto.com
MindShift Gear:
www.mindshiftgear.com
Moose Peterson:
www.moosepeterson.com
Mountainsmith:
www.mountainsmith.com

Naneu:
www.naneubags.com
National Geographic:
www.geographicbags.us
Ona Designs LLC:
www.onabags.com
Pelican ProGear:
www.pelicanprogear.com
Slinger (Adorama):
www.adorama.com
Tamrac Inc.:
www.tamrac.com
Tenba:
www.tenba.com
Think Tank Photo:
www.thinktankphoto.com
Timbuk2:
www.timbuk2.com
TrekPak:
www.trekpak.com
Vanguard USA, Inc.:
www.vanguardworld.com

02

WHATS IN MY BAG

ESSENTIAL GEAR FOR OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY


BY STAN TRZONIEC

OU PACK YOUR CAMERA, favorite lenses and all of the stuff that makes
for a good photo outing. Once you get on the road you remember that stuck
filter you could never remove, the way you struggled through the dark to get
that pre-dawn shot, the rarely used filter that would have made a difference
in the one great shot of the day or the lens that you really wish you packedyou get
the drift. On offer here are some of the items years of outdoor shooting have taught
me to bring along, to the point where I now keep many of them permanently in
my go bag. While Im not suggesting you always carry all of the items Ive listed,
consider this a friendly reminder of some of the items you might not have thought
about as you pack your bags for the next excursion.

HANDY ITEMS
There are 3 items I never forget: an
extra Allen wrench for my camera
adapters, a utility tool for light
maintenance and gardening around
close-up photos and the trusted rubber
cap remover for stuck filters (#1). I
cannot count the number of times
Ive used this item to clear my lens of
a stubborn filter or to help another
photographer out of the same jam. It
works every time. I purchased mine at
a local flea market for pennies but they
give them out by the score a local home
shows for the asking.
If you are any good at being a
photographer, you know the rules for
great photos. Up at dawn, in bed after
the moon is out! For this you need the
L.L. Bean Pathfinder hat (www.llbean.
com) complete with built-in LEDs that
shine on your camera or light your way
down the path to a great sunrise (#2).
The battery life seems to last forever
and 1 click under the brim lights your
36

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

way in the dark. Along with this, a


top quality LED compact flashlight
completes the set.
Now here is a great piece of
equipment that fits right into a
compartment of your backpack (#3).
From Wimberley, their Model PP-100
Plamp (www.tripodhead.com) is just
what the doctor ordered for in-field use
to hold plants steady during a slight
wind or even position a reflector for
additional light while making minute
adjustments before the exposure. One
end clamps to your tripod, while the
redesigned clamp holds your subject
in just the right position in front of the
lens. It is great for moving the subject to
a more favorable position in relation to
the background. The Plamp works with
any lens simply because of its flexibility
and additional extensions can be
purchased at a very reasonable price.
Along the same lines as the Plamp,
the GorrillaPod Focus from Joby (www.
joby.com) is another helpful item (#4).

This remarkable little tripod will


support a good-sized D-SLR camera (or
anything up to 11 pounds) and can be
manipulated into all kinds of positions in
the field. Weighing in at 20 ounces, there
is no excuse for not having it along on
your next hike. An optional ball head is
available as well as a variety of models.
Most outdoor photographers agree
that a gimbal mount is a versatile
accessory to their tripod-mounted
shots. Always looking for something
better, smaller and lighter to do the job,

03

04

All photos Stan Trzoniec

01

I found this Mongoose M-3.6 gimbal


mount from 4th Generation Designs
(stores.4gdphoto.com) ideal for when
I trek extra distances for the perfect
wildlife photo (#5). Weighing less than
2 pounds, this precision-made product
has a unique quick release lever, Arca
type side mounting, a bubble level and
various adjustments to make a secure
mounting system for any camera or lens
combination. For those who like a lower
horizontal mount (versus a side mount)
they make a full line of custom body
plates for various cameras as well as
specialized arms that allow mounting a
flash unit a full 8 above the camera. (In
Texaswith the birds flying around hot
and heavya gimbal mount under my
telephoto lens helped me to catch this
Kiskadee flipping his food right into his
mouth (#6). Nikon D2X, a Nikkor 200400mm f/4 lens, f/5.6 at 1/2500 sec and
ISO 320.)
Like many folks with expensive super
telephoto lenses, I am always concerned
about front element protection. The item
offered by some lens makers is sometimes
tough to take off and get back on. When
we went to Africa on a photo safari, I
equipped my Nikon 200-400mm lens
with a LensCoat Hoodie (www.lenscoat.
com). It kept the dust out, was easy to
install and it comes in 8 sizes to fit any
lens in your bag (#7).
If youre like me, you can spend a lot of
time waiting for something to happen in
front of your camera. I do a lot of railroad
photography and documenting the short
lines in my native New England takes a
lot of patience. Since they dont run at a
specific time or day, waiting a few hours
for a train up the line to appear is not
unusual, so I carry a portable stool to
make the wait more comfortable. This

05

06

07

08

2014

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

37

09

10

11

12

Walkstool (www.walkstool.com) fits the


bill perfectly; it is moderately priced and
is light enough to carry complete with
a generous shoulder strap (#8). They
have 6 models to fit all requirements;
my choice is the 55XL, which is 22 high
when set up. (This train took over 2 hours
to drop off a loaded car in South Barre,
Massachusetts. I caught it on the return
on a beautiful day heading south (#9).
In addition, I did not even break a sweat
waiting for it!)
LENSES, FILTERS & VIEWERS
Who says that you shouldnt use on-lens
filters when shooting digital? I recently
acquired a Singh-Ray Soft-Ray (www.
singh-ray.com) diffusion filter that is
38

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

great for making dream-like images of


outdoor subject matter (#10). According
to the folks at Singh-Ray, this filter is
capable of optically accentuating the
softness in the scene without losing too
much detail or contrast. (Heres a shot
made with the diffusion filter of a stream
in Arlington, Vermont (#11). In the
popular 77mm size, it is easy to install on
any lensand if you want to dive deeper,
add a polarizer or a graduated filter to
further accent your photograph.)
Although they can be pricey, a PC
(Perspective Control) lens, available
from a host of manufacturers, is an
exciting piece of glass that can come
in handy (#12). As a commercial
photographer, Ive used a view camera

for a long time, so graduating into one of


these lenses was easy for mebut first
time users should not shy away either.
While many use it for architectural
studies, out in the field PC lenses can
shift planes of focus or (as in this shot)
make for great panoramic images with
just 3 movements of the lens from left
to right (#13). First level the camera and
the tripod, take a photo at the extreme
left, then move it to the middle (neutral)
position and take another shot, then
shoot again on the far right. Combine all
3 of the images in a stitching software
program and youre all set.
While most outdoor photographers
carry a macro lens, there are times
when a good set of extension tubes come

13

in handy as well. Available in various


widths, they are quite versatile to use
alone or in combination for very close
work. I still can use the Nikon tubes
shown (#14) with some of my older
non-G type lenses, but more modern
extension tubesfrom manufacturers
like Nikon and third party suppliers
like Kenkoare equipped with all of
the contacts to communicate with the
camera body. Reasonably priced, they
are small enough to find a permanent
place in your kit.
Another option to extension tubes
are 2 element close-up lenses. These
are (in essence) magnifying lenses
that screw right onto the front of your
lens, and are offered by manufacturers
and third-party suppliers (#15). My
suggestion is to match them to the lens
diameter of your favorite lens or lenses
sinceunlike extension tubes that
mount between the back of the lens and
the bodythese supplemental lenses
have a fixed filter thread diameter.
Using close-up lenses with my Nikon
70-200mm lens, I have a working
distance of 20 and the benefit of the
zoom. That enabled me to capture
this floral close-up with the great
background soft focus effects (#16).

14

15

16

2014

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

39

17

18

19
20

If your D-SLR lacks a vari-angle


LCD finder then one of the most useful
accessories you can have in your kit
is a right angle finder (#17). Available
from most camera manufacturers,
others come to mind from sources like
Hoodman (www.hoodmanusa.com).
It allows you to lower the camera and
view your subject without lying on the
ground. This one from Nikon can be
rotated in a 360 circle, allowing the use
of your camera in either a vertical or a
horizontal position.
AND TWO MORE
Like lens filters, you might not think
theres any need to carry a handheld light
meter. There are many excellent meters
available, but I still rely on my trusty
Sekonic Studio Deluxe III (www.sekonic.
com) incident meter (#18), which Ive had
since my commercial photography days.
It does not need batteries to work and
you can take off the dome to measure
very low light, with this model going up
to ISO 12500. (If you get a modern meter
40

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

it can do double-duty to measure studio


flash exposures.)
Since an incident meter measures
the light fallingas opposed to being
reflectedfrom the subject, perfect
exposures are easy especially on all
snow-lit scenes. Like this image I made
in Yellowstone National Park (#19).
Walking around with my Nikon in
Manual Exposure mode, I just set the
camera for what my handheld meter
said, and it was done in 1 capture. The
head swivels for directional light, and
there are no batteries to wear down.
(Exposure at ISO 200 was f/11 at 1/400
sec using my Nikon D3s and a Nikkor
24-70mm f/2.8 lens.)
The strap that comes with most
cameras is sufficient for many needs
but lets face it, having an extracomfortable strap for long hauls in the
field (especially on long hikes) cant

hurt. Although you probably have a


backpack to haul your gear, by the time
you swing the pack around and get the
camera out you might miss the action.
Wide, soft, flexible and even harnessed
camera carriers are available from
many manufacturers and there are even
some that might match your fashion
sense (#20)!
About The Author
Stan Trzoniec is a full time writer and
photographer who specializes in the
outdoors, photography, birding, railroads
and wildlife. Aside from his magazine
articles, he has a brand new and
upgraded book titled Digital Outdoor
Photography which is available and
autographed from his website at
www.outdoorphotographics.com.
He may be reached for brief questions
at fotoclass@aol.com.

A STUDIO
LIGHT
SAMPLER
COMMENTS &
CHARACTERISTICS

BY CHUCK GLOMAN

SET UP THIS TEST TO ILLUSTRATE A


WIDE VARIETY OF LIGHT SOURCES
FOR THE STUDIO PHOTOGRAPHER

STROBES
Used quite often in portraiture, the
strobe used here was shot into a white
42

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

01
umbrella (#1). Strobes emit daylight
balanced bursts of light. Here, a strobe
was placed both on the left and right
sides 8 feet away from Amanda with
each raised to a height of 7 feet. Both
strobes were set at 3/4 strength.
While the output is nominally
daylight balanced, in truth the output
is cooler (more blue) on the color
temperature scale. It has a distinctive
look that only a strobe can provide.

Most often, cameras are set to the


Flash color balance, which adds the
slightest touch of warmth (with Cloudy
and Shade being warmer, respectively).
Note: If shooting in Raw, which I did
for all of these tests, the bluish color of
the strobes can easily be changed if you
desire a warmer look. In these tests I
shot in Raw but did not change the color
temperature from the cameras setting
in processing.

All photos Chuck Gloman

or for anyone who wants to use


artificial light in their portrait work. I
wanted to show the differences not only
in the quality but also in the character
of the light source itself, ranging from
warm to cool and hard to soft. For this
article I lit the same subject with each of
these different types of lights as a kind
of catalog to help you discover the type
of lighting that might work best for the
look you are after.
Heres how I set it up: Amandas
backlighta 1000-watt tungsten
balanced Mole Richardson Fresnel
(www.mole.com)was mounted on the
grid 12 feet above her and dimmed to
75 percent, providing a warm glow to
her hair. This light was used through
all of the set-ups. The backdrop, her
clothing and the pose remained the
same so you could compare apples with
apples. Sometimes, slight variations in
these parameters might change the way
you view the subject (such as a smile or
tilt of the head) but use this catalog
to get a sense of the lighting types and
their effects. Depending on the subject
and the look you want to achieve, I
encourage you to experiment with these
other types of lighting and to not just
stick with what you use now. No matter
which one you chose, it would add a
unique quality to your images.

HMI LIGHTING
Halogen Mercury Iodide (HMI)
lighting is a daylight balanced light
and although quite expensive they
consume a quarter of the power of
tungsten light and still offer 4 to 5 times
the output. For this photo (#2) I used
a K 5600 Joker Bug 400-watt source
(www.k5600.com), which has the
output of a 2000-watt tungsten lamp
(of course, tungsten has a different
color temperature). HMIs arent always
used in portraits, but Hollywood still
uses HMIs on their sets and the still

02

03
photographers who shoot on set utilize
the same lighting that the director of
photography choose for the particular
scene. In this instance, the Joker Bug
Fresnel was placed camera right at a
height of 7 feet and at a distance of 15
feet from Amanda. A white piece of
foam core acted as fill and was placed
opposite the HMI camera right.
This is a very bright light. The glass
from the Fresnel lens helped lessen the
lights output and the distance allowed
the subject to feel less of the units
intense heat. As you can see, the shadows
on Amandas hair are much more
distinct even through the glass lens.
Shooting through a white diffusion
panel with the same HMI light source
softened the shadows while also
lessening the punch of the light (#3).
White diffusion material always
adds a bluer cast and has the effect of
lightening the skin tone while raising

the color temperature 100 degrees. It


did soften the shadows considerably,
and made for an almost shadow-free
image. Because of Amandas paler skin,
I would not normally choose white
diffusion but with darker skin the cooler
color temperature gives the illusion of
lightening of the skin tone (but it doesnt
actually).
Putting a black netting in front of
the HMI does exactly the opposite of
a white diffusion panelit warms the
color temperature by lowering it almost
2000 degrees making it look more like
a tungsten light source (#4). The photo
has a soft quality of light with shadows
of less intensity. Again, the color
temperature has not been adjusted but
the skin tone is considerably warmer.
Ideally, I would dial back the color
temperature slightly for a more perfect
image. As you can see, using modifiers
makes this a very versatile light source.

04
2014

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

43

FLUORESCENT LIGHTING
Studio fluorescent lighting is
certainly dissimilar to those
found in offices (#5). The Ikan
tungsten balanced units in
our studio offers soft, color
corrected lighting. With the 4
tube bank unit on camera left
at a distance of 6 feet, and our
2 bank unit camera right at the
same distance, we achieved
even illumination without the
heat associated with other
lights. The florescent lights
have a sharp falloff so they
must be placed closer to the
subject. The end result is a
warm and flattering light.
TUNGSTEN LIGHT
The old standby and the
probably the oldest form of
studio illumination is the
tungsten light (#6). Color
balanced at 3200 K, the
warm cast that tungsten
delivers makes any subject
even more appealing. In this
shot, I utilized a 750-watt Mole
Richardson Tweenie camera
right and a 200-watt Mole
Richardson Inky on the left.
Both lights were placed 6 feet
from the subject and also raised
to a height of 6 feet. Since both
units are Fresnels, the quality
of the light is pleasing in that
the concentric rings of the glass
lens break the lights beam and
slightly soften the shadows.
The warmth of the light makes
Amandas skin tones pop. This
is one of my personal favorite
types of lighting because of its
timeless quality.

05

06

07

08

SOFTLIGHT
As the name implies, a softlight
is a unit whose lamps face
rearward, bouncing their
illumination off of a white
backing (#7). The soft illumination gives
shadow-free light on your subject. In my
case, I use a Colortran softlight with 2
500-watt lamps (each facing the white
back of the unit). This is a very appealing
type of illumination and in this case, the
Colortran softlight was daylight balanced.
LED
Light Emitting Diodes are the newest
form of portrait lighting and offer
a great deal of promise (#8). Once
you get past the initial expense of
44

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

the units, LEDs last longer than any


other type of light, give off no heat,
consume very little power and often
may be dimmed without altering the
lamps color temperature. Litepanels
fixtures (www.litepanels.com) have
both daylight and tungsten lamps so
in addition to dimming you can mix
color temperaturessomething that
was considered taboo in the past. Also
casting a soft shadow, the LEDs only
drawback is the rapid falloff of light. The
unit was placed camera left at a distance

of 6 feet with both the daylight and the


tungsten lamps ongiving us a mixed
color temperature. It does add quite
a different look than all of the other
examples and it may be exactly what you
are after. Q

Chuck Gloman is Chair and Associate


Professor of the TV/Film Department at
DeSales University. He may be reached
chuck.gloman@desales.edu.

A 30-YEAR VOYAGE INTO THE NIGHT

BY JEFF WIGNALL

OME PEOPLE KNOW right away when theyve found their lifes path, others
spend a lifetime searching for it. Photographer Lance Keimig
(www.thenightskye.com) is one of the lucky ones: he knew from the first
exposures that night photography was going to become one of his passions
though surely he had no idea where that infatuation would take him creatively. The
first roll of film I ever shot was in my bedroom with the lights turned off and the
camera on a tripod. My girlfriend and I waved a flashlight around experimenting
with lighting each other, and pointing the light back at the camera, he says in
describing his first pilgrimage into night photography. The pictures sucked, but
I was thrilled at the time, and it obviously inspired me to continue down that dark
alley. I loved the idea of capturing or creating something that didnt exist in real
time and couldnt be seen with the eyes. Playing with time, compressing minutes
into a single image wasand still isexciting.

For the past 30 years Keimig has


devoted most of his professional life
to night shooting, light painting and
to teaching others what he knows. In
1997 he co-founded the Nocturnes
Night Photography Workshops (with
then partner Tim Baskerville) in San
Francisco, and has been teaching
workshops and classes on the subject
46

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

ever since. He has taught night shooting


as an adjunct professor at the New
England School of Photography and at
the School of the Museum of Fine Arts,
in Boston. His book Night Photography:
Finding Your Way in the Dark (Focal
Press) has been translated in to 5
languages and (along and with his
teaching partner Scott Martin), Keimig

runs a very popular series of night photo


workshops. He also leads international
photo tours aimed at both daytime and
nighttime shooting.
He has, in short, turned a playful
experiment into a very creative and
prosperous career.
THE LURE OF THE NIGHT
Like most night shooters Keimig (who
splits his time between Santa Cruz,
California and Duxbury, Massachusetts)
readily admits to being a born night owl
but says it was the mixing of darkness
with different sources of light that
drew him into night shooting. In the
daytime, were working with a single
light source, either the point source of
the sun on a clear day or the diffused
sky on an overcast day. At night, in the
manmade environment, the light comes
from many different sources, from
every direction and in almost every
color, he says. Out in nature, of course,
its different. In the darker natural
landscape, time becomes the dominant
factor.

All photos Lance Keimig

LANCE KEIMIGS
DARK OBSESSION

Birsay, Orkney, Scotland, 2013, 2:45 am. Simmer Dim


the name of the everlasting twilight of Scottish
summer as the sun skirts just below the horizon for a
few hours. Keimig exposes the scene for 30 seconds
at f/8 (ISO 160) with a Canon 5D MKII and an Olympus
24mm f/3.5 PC lens.

Lerwick, Shetland, Scotland, 2013. Keimig stitched 2 shots together to form this panorama of this incredibly picturesque little harbor. I spent the whole night
photographing in this one area, he recalls. The exposure was for 30 seconds at f/5.6 (ISO 100). Shot with a Canon 5D MKII with an Olympus 24mm f/3.5 PC lens.

The passage of time and the


interaction with the night also play a
major role in many of Keimigs night
shots. The extended exposures
required by lower light levels mean
that there is plenty of opportunity for
transformation and that can be in the
form of time compressed into a single
image, recorded and expressed in a
photo in a way that we cannot directly
perceive or the long exposure time
may simply afford the opportunity to
be an active participant in the process
of making the image, by adding light.
Some light painters go so far as to say
that what they do is performance art. I
wouldnt go that far, but it is a ritual and
a source of both relaxation and energy
for me, he says.
Keimig says he is also fascinated
with the changes that occur in the
environment during the length of an
exposure. I like that over the course of
a long exposure, the world goes on its
merry way and time does not stop for
my photoswhatever else is going to
happen, will. If Im lucky, those changes
that occur during my exposure make
something interesting happen. The most
boring night photographs are static, not
much has happened, and the resulting
image looks like a slightly weird daytime
shot with the faint lines of star trails in
the sky.
A WORLD OF SUBJECTS
Keimigs subjects range from the deserts
of the American Southwest to the

Callanish Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis, Scotland. A car pulled into the parking area for the standing stones
just as I was setting up this shot and the low fog was emphasized by the backlighting from the car headlights,
Keimig says of this foggy Scottish landscape. The exposure was for 60 seconds at f/11 (ISO 100). Shot with a
Canon 5D MKII and a Nikkor 28mm f/3.5 PC lens.

Aurora Borealis in Iceland to foggy night


street scenes of Scotland and, he says,
much of his work is inspired by travel.
One of my favorite photographers,
Michael Kenna, once said something
like, Im not sure if I travel because I
photograph, or the other way around,
but thats very much how I feel, says
Keimig. The two are inter-connected,
and I always find inspiration in new
environments. Some may say that its
easier to photograph in unfamiliar
surroundings, since everything is new.
That may well be, but I try to get below
the surface, and photograph more than
just the obvious things that jump out at
you. Photographing at night goes a long

way toward that end as it forces me to


slow down, spend quality time and get a
better understanding of a place. Theres
a huge difference between pulling over
along the side of the road and taking
a few shots, and spending 3 or 4 hours
photographing in the same location.
I like the treasure hunting aspect of
travel photography too, and that is also
amplified at night because you have to
look that much harder.
He is particularly fond of the desert.
Most people experience the desert as
a barren and empty wasteland from
the comfort of their air-conditioned
cars. Cruising along at 75 mph, its easy
to miss the subtlety and beauty of the
2014

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

47

Owens Dry Lake, near Keeler, California. Keimig stitched 4 vertical shots together with Photomerge in PSCS6 to create this star-filled panoramic. Only a fraction of those
stars were visible to the naked eye, he says. The exposures had to be kept to 20 seconds to prevent trailing. Each exposure was 20 seconds at f/2 (ISO 6400). Shot with a
Canon 6D, Rokinon 24mm f/1.4 lens.

quiet landscapes between the national


parks of the American West. Im drawn
to the desert by the fierceness of the
landscape, and the unique culture of
the sturdy people who live there, says
Keimig. The evidence of humanitys
tenuous existence there is slowly
absorbed back into the Earth, and Ive
long been compelled to photograph it
while it lasts. The night provides cover
for my photographic explorations, cover
from the blistering heat, and the hard
light of the midday sun. Like the many
desert creatures that inhabit the night,
Im most at ease after the sun has set,
free to explore the solitary wonder of
this hidden world.
In what seems kind of like a journey
to a polar opposite, hes also done
extensive shooting in Icelandin winter.
While in Iceland he got the chance to
photograph the Aurora Borealis and
says seeing that unexpectedly flare up
was a huge bonus visually. What an
experience. Its surprising that they are
so much brighter in camera than what
we see with our eyes, he says. That
said, we see in real time, but the camera
accumulates light over time, and does
not lose sensitivity in low light the way
our eyes do. People are always amazed
at the color in their first night images
because all they could see was blue when
they were out photographing.
Stones of Steness, Orkney, Scotland. Backlighting with a warm LED flashlight, plus side lighting on the front
stone made this dynamic shot even more dramatic. I needed to get some exercise, so challenged myself to get
the lighting done in 30 seconds, says the photographer. He made the shot with an exposure of 30 seconds at
f/8 (ISO 800). Shot with a Canon 5D MKII mounted with an Olympus 24mm f/3.5 PC lens.
48

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

LIGHTING DECISIONS
One of the issues that Keimig has to
address is deciding how a particular

Shack, Rhyolite, Nevada. Stars filled the western sky about an hour after sunset on a moonless night when
Keimig shot this desert shack. A dim LED light was placed in the shack (on the floor) and a dim warm LED light
was used to light the bushes. The exposure was a relatively brief 30 seconds at f/2.8 (ISO 12800). Its very
difficult to light paint at high ISO with short exposures, as it is hard to have much control when you are moving
so quicklybut I enjoy the challenge of getting it all in one shot, he says. Shot with a Canon 6D and a Sigma
35mm f/1.4 lens.

Chicken Coops, Rhyolite, Nevada. This shot, says Keimig, represents another super fast lighting job. This was
the most difficult shot Ive ever tried to pull off in 30 seconds, as it involved lighting the interior of both coops,
as will as running all the way around the structure lighting the landscape. It took about 7 or 8 tries before I got
this one, he recalls. The exposure was 30 seconds at f/2 (ISO 6400). Shot with a Canon 6D with a Rokinon 24mm
f/1.4 lens.

Aurora Borealis, Iceland. Exposures for photos of the


Aurora Borealis need to be kept short and the Aurora
often moves quickly in the sky, says Keimig. First
quarter moonlight provided illumination for the
landscape, but also reduced the visibility of the
Aurora. The exposure was 20 seconds at f/4 (ISO
3200). Shot with a Canon 5D MKII with an Olympus
24mm f/2.8 lens.

location should be litand what the


balance should be between the ambient
light and whatever light he chooses to
introduce. It depends on the location.
For urban locations I generally rely
on existing light for the most part, I
spend my time looking for light rather
than making it. I mostly look for mixed
lighting, often where light sources do
not necessarily overlap, but where one
wall is lit with sodium vapor, another
with metal halide, for example, he says.
In a departure from his early nightshooting experiments, Keimig says he
depends less on painting and more on
the atmosphere of the ambient lighting
and says that when he adds lighting
its often to contrast with the existing
lighting colors. I have always been
interested in how we humans alter the
landscape, and my images are usually
about manmade objects in nature. I
consider light to be a manmade object
too, he says. If I am photographing
in an urban environment, usually the
lighting is sodium vapor, which is pretty
warm. In those instances, if I add light, I
usually pick a complimentary cool LED
light. In nature, where the natural light
is cooler, I use warm incandescent.
Ice Monster, Iceland. Retreating tides carved this
limousine sized ice sculpture, which took 3 people an
hour to figure out how to light. The varying density of
the ice and small footprint made it both difficult to
light evenly and difficult to avoid being seen behind,
says the photographer. Exposed for 30 seconds at f/4
(ISO 400). Shot with a Canon 5D MKII equipped with a
Nikkor 28mm f/3.5 PC lens.

50

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

Jupiter Rising, Terlingua, Texas. A short exposure was


used in this shot to freeze the movement of the stars
and Jupiter combined with moonlight, and ambient
artificial light. The planet Jupiter is a key part of the
composition, and the challenge was composing the
shots so that all of the elements worked together and
the distractions were minimized, says Keimig. He
exposed the scene for 20 seconds at f/5.6 (ISO 6400).
Shot with a Canon 5D MKII and a Nikkor 28mm f/3.5 PC
lens.

Aurora Borealis, Iceland. Keimig says he loves mixing natural and man made lights and enjoyed combining the
glow of distant sodium vapor lights in Reykjavik with the Aurora Borealis and light painting on the house in the
foreground to create this very unusual image. Most people try to avoid any artificial light with Aurora images,
he says. He shot the photos with an exposure of 20 seconds at f/4 (ISO 3200). Shot with a Canon 5D MKII with an
Olympus 24mm f/2.8 lens.

Thermal Conduit, Myvatn, Iceland. Im particularly proud of this image because it has so much going on, says
Keimig. An unusually static Aurora allowed for a long exposure and star trails, plus a long steam plume from a
nearby thermal energy plant and a key bit of red light added to the foreground pipe, that was also keeping me
warm during this frigid night. The icing on the cake was the unexpected iridium flare in just the right part of the
sky. Iridium communication satellites create distinctive streaks of light in the sky as the satellite rotates and
reflects sunlight. I didnt notice the flare until I loaded the image into Lightroom. The exposure was 11 minutes
at f/5.6 (ISO 640). Shot with a Canon 5D MKII with a Nikkor 28mm f/3.5 PC lens.
52

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

The lighting design is largely a


process that is dictated by the subject,
and what he wants to say about it. Its
an evolutionary process that unfolds
as I start photographing. I usually
have a pretty good idea after a few
exposures, then try to nail it down and
refine the lighting, he says. I light to
draw attention to something, and do it
thoughtfully so that I can create a mood,
atmosphere or feeling. I think of my
photographs as suggestive rather than
literal.
GETTING STARTED
What are Keimigs best tips for finding
success in night shooting? Take time
to work through a shot from concept
to completion, dont give up because it
doesnt look the way you expected after
1 or 2 exposures. Look at the work of
others, figure out how they do what they
do, and then improve upon it and make
it your own, he says. And take a class
or a workshop if you can, the experience
of learning with a group of others who
are similarly curious and inspired is
exhilarating.
Lastly he says, while youre out there,
dont forget to stop and look up at the
stars, or the moon. Leave your phone in
the car. Q

For your shots that beg to be


measured in feet rather than pixels.

Mountain Path Bathed in Morning Light


by Mike Wease, avid birder and nature
photographer. Sony DSC-H50, handheld,
ISO100, 1/60th sec, f/2.8.

TM

92.

99

Sizes up to 48 inches are shipped


flat and have a variety of mounting
options available. Sizes longer than 48
inches are shipped loosely rolled and
include a protective laminate backing
at no additional charge.

E-surface Prints
SIZE

PRICE

5 x 15
6 x 18
8 x 24
10 x 30
12 x 36
16 x 48
20 x 60
30 x 90

2.99
4.99
12.99
16.89
19.95
49.99
69.99
92.99

E-surface Prints
SIZE

5 x 20
6 x 24
8 x 32
10 x 40
12 x 48
16 x 64
20 x 80
30 x 120

PRICE

4.99
9.99
14.99
19.99
25.95
69.99
79.99
104.99

Wease

30x90 size, shown here,

Printed on Kodak Endura Professional


E-Surface or Metallic Paper.
Your choice of Lab Corrected Color
or No Correction for the same price.

by Mik
e

True photographic prints, not inkjet,


on Kodak Endura professional paper.

Images

Panoramix

PROFESSIONAL PRINTS

8x10 $1.69

for
only
Your choice of LAB CORRECTED COLOR
or NOCORRECTION for the same price.
The highest quality photographic prints in
over 80 sizes. We also offer a wide variety
of other products, including: cards, books,
albums, iPhone covers, mugs, metal prints,
and much more.

No application process to wait for. Visit


our website, sign-up, download our free
ordering software, begin ordering today.

www.meridianpro.com
800-544-1370

A beauty dish has a center section that blocks the flash tube to prevent direct light from hitting the subject.
Instead the light is kicked around inside the reflectors surface and is then directed at the subject to create the
kind of catchlight seen at left. At right, is the catchlight produced by a Paul C. Buff Omni reflector that does not
have the same flashtube shield, producing more specular direct light.

USING REFLECTORS
FOR STUDIO
LIGHTING EFFECTS
PORTRAITS WITH PAUL C. BUFFS
OMNI REFLECTOR

BY JOE FARACE

NEW TOOLS
One of the problems facing beginning
portrait photographers is having the
budget to afford different kinds of
lighting gear and thats where light
modifiers like Paul C. Buffs Omni
reflector comes in (www.paulcbuff.com).
It splits the difference between a multipurpose reflector and a beauty dish and
its compact sizebeauty dishes can be
largegives it versatility for storage and
travel. The Omnis relatively compact
design allows light to strike the surface
of the reflector evenly, from the center to
the edges, creating smooth light across
its face with good catchlights and a
pleasant rendering of reflective objects
54

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

(for product photography).


The Omni reflectors 18 diameter
reflector produces a 30 spread
and can be used directly for even
coverage and the smooth feathering
characteristic of a beauty dish. For
location photographers, the bright silver
interior maximizes the output making
the Omni useful outdoors for shooting
sports or applications that require long
light-to-subject distances. Paul C. Buff
offers 2 different 22 beauty dishes (but
does not call their Omni 18 reflector a
beauty dish).
At $79.95 the Omni reflector
includes a triple-layer diffusion sock
that, when attached, turns it into a hard

shell lightbank thats a lot easier and


faster to put together than a traditional
soft box, thanks (in part) to Buffs use
of the quick-to-set-up Balcar mount
that works with their AlienBees,
Einstein and White Lightning
monolights. Paul C. Buff is planning
to offer a honeycomb grid that snaps
into the reflectors recessed outer lip to
eliminate spill light and provide soft,
yet selective lighting.
Attaching a grid to the Omni should
be simply a matter of snapping a few
clips to its edgeultimately mounting
flush with the front of the reflector
and it can be used with or without the
diffusion sock.

Photos Joe Farace / Product shots: Photographs courtesy of Paul C. Buff, Inc.

LIKE TO THINK THAT PORTRAIT LIGHTING HAS 4 MAJOR CHARACTERISTICS:

color, direction, quantity and quality. Attaching lighting modifiers (like a beauty
dish reflector) to a light source (such as a monolight or a power pack and head
systems) lets you control most of these factors.
A beauty dish is a large metal reflector that uses its parabolic shape to distribute
light toward a focal point and, when used for portraiture, generates a concentrated
pool of light producing a round catch light in the subjects eyes. Beauty dishes are
available in different sizes with most having a metal shield in the center blocking
direct light from the flashtube and filling the reflector dish with soft indirect light.
A beauty dish wraps light around a subject producing an effect somewhere between
a direct flash and a softbox. You can modify the look it produces with accessories
such as a grid or a diffusion sock that can add softness when used with a white-lined
dish or to cut the contrast from the silver-lined models.

This photograph of Sarah Dean was made using a B800


monolight with a standard reflector placed at camera
right and was kept at the same location and same power
setting for the next shot. A 32 circular reflector is
placed at camera left. What is immediately noticeable
(to me) is the slightly harder, higher contrast light falling
on the subject. Pay particular attention to the
background (a Savage Infinity Photo Grey Vinyl) and the
harshness of the shadows. Shot with a Panasonic Lumix
GH4 with an Olympus 45mm f/1.8 lens attached and an
exposure of 1/125 sec at f/11 and ISO 200.

IN THE STUDIO
Unlike a beauty dish, the Omni does not
have a center section covering the flash
tube preventing direct light from hitting
the subject. Instead, light is kicked
around inside the reflector and then
directed at the subject. The downside
of using the Omni is that you lose the
beauty dishs soft yet direct lightthe
upside is that you keep all of the power
allowing you to maximize the amount
of output from even lower powered
lighting systems. When shooting with
Paul C. Buffs Omi reflector, I attached
it to an AlienBees B800 Purple Haze
edition monolight. The B800 has a
built-in slave to allow wireless firing
from another unit and includes a sync
cord but I used a PocketWizard PlusX
(www.pocketwizard.com) for all of the
illustrations seen here.
When I did side-by-side comparison
tests of the effect of switching from the
B800s standard reflector to the Omni
I was frankly amazed at the results and
(depending on how large the images
appear on this page) you should see a
difference in the quality (softness) and
quantity of the light as well. In fact I was
surprised by how much using the Omni
increased the B800s output. Read the
captions to see the actual difference
in exposure, without changing either
the distance of the light to the subject
or the power setting on the AlienBees
monolight.

Simply attaching Paul C Buffs Omni reflector to the


B800 monolight increases the amount of light
produced. The new exposure is 1/125 sec at f/14 and
ISO 200 but more importantly the quality of the light
is improved. The light is broader (no surprise) theres
more light is on the subject than the Photo Grey
background (surprise) and the shadows on it are so
soft they barely register. Bottom lineto me, this is a
more salable portrait.
2014

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

55

Before: Here is a shot of Sarah Dean channeling Rosie


the Riveter made with a B800 monolight with the Omni
reflector mounted. Shot with a Panasonic Lumix GH4 with
an Olympus 45mm f/1.8 lens and an exposure of 1/125 sec
at f/14 and ISO 200. The background is Silverlake Photo
Accessories Blush Colorsmack (www.silverlakephoto.com).

After: Here is a shot of Sarah Dean taken with a B800 monolight with an Omni reflector mounted and her sister,
Abbie, holding a large honeycomb grid in front of the monolight. Shot with a Panasonic Lumix GH4 with an
Olympus 45mm f/1.8 lens attached and an exposure of 1/125 sec at f/9 and ISO 200.

I was unable to get Paul C. Buffs new honeycomb grid


for the Omni reflector in time for testing so I
improvised using a grid from a larger beauty dish and
had Abbie Dean hold it in front of an Omni reflector
mounted on the B800 monolight.
56

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

A grid provides a wider beam than


a snoot so its useful for focusing light
on a particular part of a subject and
lets you produce multiple looks from a
single light source. Since a grid blocks
some of the light, your light source is
going to produce less output so youll
need to either crank up your lights
power or increase your cameras ISO
setting to maintain the same aperture
as an un-gridded shot. How much less?
In my less than perfect (see illustration)
grid test its approximately 1 and 1/3
stops but it may vary slightly depending
on the finished style of Paul C. Buffs
grid as delivered.
Adding the triple-layer diffusion
sock widens the Omnis coverage to 120
and softens the output for manageable

exposure levels but it does more than


that as can be seen in the before and
after (or sock vs. no sock) examples.
The sockits surprisingly thick and
soft, just like a good sockalso warms
up the image a bit. Not too much but a
combination of a softer, broader, warmer
light source is always a good thing for
portraits. Then theres the question
of light loss caused by using the sock.
In my tests I saw about 1 and 1/2 stops
light loss by attaching the sock but, the
AlienBees B800 at around 1/4 power
produced a (with the sock) aperture of
f/9 at ISO 200, that some photographer
might prefer be closer to f/5.6 but theres
always 1/16 power (and less) available
from the B800. Needless to say, I loved
using the sock.

This photograph of Sarah Dean was made using a B800 monolight with an Omni reflector attached at camera
right and was kept at the same place and same power setting for the next shot. A 32 circular reflector was
placed at camera left. The background was a Rough Diamond Colorsmack from Silverlake Photo Accessories.
Shot with a Panasonic Lumix GH4 with an Olympus 45mm f/1.8 lens attached and an exposure of 1/125 sec at f/16
and ISO 200.

ALIENBEES
AlienBees are inexpensive
monolights available from Paul C.
Buff in 3 output levels and colors
including the limited edition Jimi
Hendrix Purple Haze model I used.
With housings in colorful Lexan
polycarbonate, they are also available
in white, black, hot pink and a Navajo
Turquoise limited edition model.
The AlienBees B800 ($279.95) has
an adjustable output from full power
(320Ws) down to 1/32nd and can
be set in whole f-stop increments
using a slider on the rear panel. To
ensure accurate output, the unit
automatically dumps the excess
power when adjusting from a higher
to a lower setting. Buff says the B800
has true what-you-see-is-whatyou-get 150-Watt modeling lamp
accuracy (and it seems that it is) and
can be set to full, off or track power
changes. AlienBees have a 1-second
recycle time and I never outshoot it
once. The unit has a built-in cooling
fan and is quiet enough for someone
(like me) who prefers a quiet set.

This photograph of Sarah Dean was made using a B800 monolight with an Omni reflector at camera right,
Attaching the sock not only broadens the lightlook at the effect on the backgroundbut is noticeably warmer
and softer. All of which makes the background more noticeable in this portrait of Sarah and contributes to an
overall feeling of warmth. Shot with a Panasonic Lumix GH4 with an Olympus 45mm f/1.8 lens attached and an
exposure of 1/125 sec at f/16 and ISO 200.
2014

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

57

Here a B800 monolight is


placed at camera right.
The Omni reflector is
mounted and the bundled
diffusion sock is stretched
over the reflector. A
second (non-Paul C. Buff)
150Ws monolight, set at
full power, is at camera
left and behind the model
pointing at the wall in my
11x15 home studio.

In the studio, the Omni is handy


for high-key shooting from a modestly
large light source such as the AlienBees
B800 used for this test. I was unable to
produce a perfect high-key portrait
because the model isnt wearing the
all white clothing required by purists
but I tried to minimize the effect by
converting the captured Raw file into
black and white using Nik Silver Efex
Pro (www.google.com/nikcollection/).
With only 1 AlienBees available, I
resurrected an old monolight and
pointed it at a white wall to give an
approximation of high-key lighting using
only 2 lights. (See the illustration for the
exact lighting set-up.) Since the Omni
reflector worked so well with high-key,
I decided to try it with a low-key image
by simply setting up a black background
and pointing the background light at
the subjectnot at the wall. I liked that
effect proving that the AlienBees/Omni
reflector was flexible for whatever kind
of portrait you want to make.
This exercise proved that a reflector
is more than just a hunk of metal that
you stick in front of a light head and
hope everything comes out right on
the other end. The way a reflector is
designed can have an impact both in the
quality and quantity that a lightsuch
as the inexpensive AlienBeescan
produce and when used selectively with
accessories (such as a diffusion sick or
a grid) the number of variations on a
lighting theme are more diverse than
a single hunk of metal could otherwise
hope to produce. Lighting may be 20
percent technique and 80 percent art
but that doesnt mean using the right
tools isnt a big help. Q
58

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

This pseudo high-key shot was made using the


lighting set-up that I illustrated and shot with a
Panasonic Lumix GH4 with Lumix G Vario 14-42mm
f/3.5-5.6 lens (at 29mm) and an exposure of 1/125 sec
at f/8 and ISO 200. Originally captured as a Raw file,
developed in SilkyPix Developer (www.isl.co.jp/
silkypix/english/) and converted to monochrome with
Nik Silver Efex Pro.

The lighting diagram for this low-key shot is similar to


the high-key portrait with just a few changes. A
Savage Infinity black vinyl background (www.
savageuniversal.com) was set up and the background
light was directed at Sarah, instead of the white wall
producing a completely different look. Shot with a
Panasonic Lumix GH4 with a Lumix G Vario 14-42mm
f/3.5-5.6 lens (at 42mm) and an exposure of 1/125 sec
at f/8 and ISO 200. Originally captured as a Raw file
and developed in SilkyPix Developer.

SIRUI P-S Multi-Function


Photo/Video Monopods
Where Support Meets Flexibility
Photo Monopod, Video Monopod
and Table-Top Tripod
All In One Compact System
360
Panning Grip
(patented)

Swivels 20
in any direction
or locks vertically
(patented)
Feet
convert to
low angle/table top
tripod (patented)

SIRUI...

Support feet for


increased stability

All The Support You Need!


For more information visit Argraph.com
or call us at 1.888.ARGRAPH (1.888.274.7274)
Distributed Exclusively in the U.S. by Argraph Corporation
Sirui is a registered trademark of SIRUI Photographic Equipment Industry Co. Ltd
argraph.com/SiruiMonopods.html

Converts to
standard
monopod
(patented)

Big Valley Roundhouse #1: Thomson photographed


these Stonehenge-like remains of a roundhouse used
to service locomotives just outside the town of Big
Valley, Alberta. The shot was taken with a Tamron SP
17mm f/3.5 prime lens and exposed for 5 minutes at
f/5.6 at ISO 160. The sky was overcast, the full moon
was low in the sky and the light of dawn was just
visable on the horizon behind the structure. The
lighting came from a single strobe flash through an
orange gel onto the concrete gear assembly at a low
angle to the right of the camera. A second strobe
flash from the left side of the frame (with a blue gel)
was used to define the concrete gears and to
illuminate the shadowed vertical areas in the
foreground.

A CANADIAN LIGHT PAINTER EXPLORES


THE PRAIRIE PAST
BY JEFF WIGNALL

N THE QUIET and stillness of the moonlight theres an atmosphere that I


thrive upon. This is when I feel most alive, says Alberta, Canada-based
night shooter and light painter Larrie Thomson (http://nightphotographer.
com). I want to capture that in photos and share it with people who will
never experience these places at night. Without the noise, light and distraction of
daytime, the ghosts begin to tell their stories.
60

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

FINDING NIGHT-WORTHY
SUBJECTS
These days Thomson devotes himself
exclusively to night shooting and he
says that searching out and choosing
his subjects is really just a matter of
what he finds interesting. Ive never
intentionally tried to restrict my
photography to a specific theme or
subject, he says. Ill drive for days at
a time and anything interesting that I
come across is fair game. My work does,
however, naturally seem to gravitate
toward two general themes: abandoned

All photos Larrie Thomson

LARRIE THOMSONS
NORTHERN EXPOSURES

For Thomson, there is also a certain


level of control that he can exercise
at night that he says is impossible
to achieve during the day. Real life
is never perfect and sometimes the
imperfections make it challenging or
impossible to photograph, he explains.
Working at night with my bag of
lighting tricks, I can hide undesirable
parts of a scene in shadow, draw
attention to a subject with a subtle
glimmer of light, create mystery with
just the right amount of darkness or
completely change the mood of an image
using color.
Thomson, who has been exploring
and visually preserving the forgotten
towns, farms, mines and fading
industrial complexes of Alberta and
Saskatchewan for 15 years, says he
clearly remembers his first experiments
with light painting. It was a hot night
in 1999 and I couldnt sleep so I packed
up my camera gear and headed for
the county dump, he says. That was
back in film days and I had no idea how
anything I shot that evening would turn
out. My very first subject was a large
set of pipes protruding from a massive
block of concrete, he says. I set up
my tripod and opened the shutter on
it for 5 minutes under the moonlight.
I advanced the film and opened the
shutter again for 5 minutes, this time
splashing some light from a red-gelled
flash onto it from both sides of the shot.

Absorption PlantTurner Valley Gas Plant, Southern Alberta: The Turner Valley Gas Plant is the oldest remaining example of gas production in Canada. Thomson shot
the picture with a Tamron SP 17mm f/3.5 prime lens. The exposure was 6.5 minutes at f/5.6 at ISO 160 under a clear sky and a full moon. He painted the scene for 2 minutes
with light from a 6-volt halogen flashlight (on the towers) using a green gel and for 1 minute onto the foreground pipes through a red gel, 3 strobe flashes through a
purple gel added light from outside of the left and right sides of the frame.

Big Valley Roundhouse #2: This shot of the Big Valley Roundhouse was exposed for 5 minutes at f/5.6 at ISO
160 under a light haze and a full moon. Additional lighting included 2 strobe flashes through purple gels onto
the foreground concrete wall at a shallow angle, 1 flash from each side of the shot. Light was also painted on the
curved exterior wall with 6-volt halogen lantern through a green gel for a total of 2 minutes. A total of 6 strobe
flashes were made through an orange gel from inside of the curved wall at a low angle.

places and unusual natural landscapes.


The depopulated rural areas and dying
towns of southern Saskatchewan and
Alberta are so rich in subject matter.
While his subjects represent a mix
of both common manmade and natural
locations, he often chooses locales that
have an inherently surreal quality and
his colorful light-painting techniques
combined with long moonlit exposures
tend to exaggerate that mystical
atmosphere. Many of the subjects he
finds are close to home, while other
interesting areas are within a day or two
of home, though hes been known to go
rambling the countryside in his van for
weeks. Being on the road for days at a
time, rarely speaking with anyone and
spending most of your days and nights
exploring solitary, abandoned places
puts you in a different state of mind. Its
more visual and emotional, with less
mental noise and chatter. Its the perfect
clear, uncluttered state of mind for
photography, he says.
Thomson says he prefers to scout
locations carefully during the day. I
find that if I come upon a location after
2014

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

61

Oliver Tractor, Side View: Thomson found this vintage steel-wheeled Oliver tractor sitting forgotten in the corner of a field about an hour south of Edmonton, Alberta.
He made the shot with a Tamron SP 17mm f/3.5 prime lens and the exposure was 4 minutes at f/5.6 at ISO 160 under a full moon and a clear sky. He did 2 minutes of light
painting using a Mini Maglite aimed onto the engine and the wheels, 3 strobe flashes were made through purple gels from the right side of the camera.

dark I usually end up missing something


that would have been a great subject or
made a photo that I did get even better,
he says. Experience has taught me
what to look for that could make night
photography challenging or impossible
and I still tend to spot most of these
things in daylight. Having a good look at
things before dark can also make a night
shoot much safer, he says. Holes in a
floor and other hazards can be noted
and safely avoided later while working in
darkness.
LIGHTING TOOLS
Because many of his shooting locations
are remoterequiring a lot of walking
Thomson says he likes to travel light
and only brings a minimal amount of
lighting gear. He says that virtually
any type of light can be used to paint.
His essentials include 3 flashlights of
various sizes and a basic camera flash
unit. When choosing a flashlight, beam
pattern is more important than buying
the brightest one you can find, he says.
I prefer a nice even beam without a
bright spot in the middle, with extra
points given for flashlights with an
adjustable beam width.
62

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

The strobes he uses are just basic


accessory units. Any common flash unit
will do. The brighter the better though,
since it is usually fired through colored
lighting gels, he says.
Most of the added color in his shots
comes from theatrical lighting gels
placed over white light sources such as
a flashlight or a strobe. And since you
can blend the colors from many gels
over the duration of a long exposure, you
can create a limitless variety of color,
gradient and shading from surprisingly
few gels.
One fun and powerful tool thats
become available in recent years,
he says, is the ProtoMachines LED
Flashlight (www.protomachines.com),
he owns the LED1 model. This device is
fully HSL (Hue, Saturation, Luminance)
configurable to deliver any flavor and
intensity of light you require. No gels
needed, he says. It will set you back at
least $500 though, including batteries
and a charger.
EXPOSURE TIMES
The duration of most of his exposures
depends largely on the phase of the
moon, the amount of cloud cover and

how much lighting hes bringing to a


scene. My exposures under moonlight
typically range between about 5 to 8
minutes but it can be whatever you
want, he says. If the sky is overcast,
exposing by moonlight could take half
an hour or more.
On a moonless night he might use
exposures as long as an hour or more
to capture movement in the night sky
to add a pinwheel of star trails to a
composition. There are finite limits
on the length of an exposure in digital
photography where accumulated digital
noise will make an image unusable he
says. The noise issue varies greatly from
one camera to the next and typically
newer cameras vastly outperform
technology from even a few years ago.
The improvements in light
sensitivity and long exposure noise
characteristics have been dramatic,
he says. I now rarely worry about
exceeding reasonable noise limits in a
long exposure. The extreme high ISO
settingswhile unsuitable for long
exposure photographyare great for
doing a quick test shot to check my
composition or to look for unwanted
sources of light on the horizon. He

Fort Chiniki Gas Station: Thomson spent an entire evening shooting this abandoned gas station and go-cart track along the Trans-Canada Highway between Banff and
Calgary. The shot was made using a Canon EF17-40mm f/4L USM lens and an exposure of 3 minutes at f/5.6 at ISO 100. The scene was lit using a single strobe flash through
a light yellow-gold gel onto the left side wall from right of the shot. Thomson also painted the shadowed areas of the shot with a Mini Maglite through a blue gel from 3
locations for a total of 25 seconds.

1959 Cadillac, Hay Lakes, Alberta: This shot is from a series made at a farm in central Alberta thatat the timecontained the largest private collection of old Cadillacs
in the world. The owner, says Thomson, was planning to sell off the collection and he agreed to let the photographer spend a night shooting. The exposure was 71 seconds
at f/6.3 at ISO 100 using a Canon EF17-40mm f/4L USM lens. One flash burst was made onto the trunk from the left of the shot through an amber gel, and 2 additional
flashes were made on the side of the car from aqua gels.
2014

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

63

Abandoned ChurchDorothy, Alberta: This church is in the ghost town of Dorothy in southern Alberta. The photo was exposed for 8 minutes at f/5.6 at ISO 160 under a
full moon (outside of the frame to the left). He painted the interior of the church intermittently with light from a 6-volt halogen lantern through an amber gel for 1 minute
to illuminate the windows. A single strobe flash through an amber gel out of the open door from the inside was used to illuminate the ground in the entrance area. He
illuminated the cross on top using a red laser pointer.

currently uses a Canon 5D Mark III as


his primary body.
Interestingly, because some of his
exposures are so long, often his moonlit
exposures have a daylight quality to
them. If you think about it, moonlight
is really just reflected daylight. If you
expose a photograph long enough on a
64

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

clear, moonlit night it will eventually


look like high noon, he says. The cool,
bluish cast we see at night, he says, is
an optical illusion resulting from the
human eyes response to low light and he
often shoots digitally using a tungsten
white balance settings to maintain
that illusion. Has all of this shooting all

night turned Thomson into a daylightwary vampire? Im completely, 100


percent nocturnal. The wee hours of the
morning out alone under the moonlight
or driving down a deserted highway is
when I feel most alive, he says. But
dont get me wrong, I love morningsI
stay up for them all the time! Q

New, Used, Refurbished, Preowned Collectables At Discounted Prices

Pro Performance Lens

14mm F2.8 ED AS
IF UMC
FULL FRAME Ultra
Wide Angle

$299.00
Available for Canon EOS EF, Nikon with AE Chip,
Sony A, Sony E, Pentax K, Olympus/Panasonic Micro
4/3, Fuji X, Canon M, Samsung NX

Pro Performance Lens

24mm F3.5 TiltShift ED AS UMC


Full Frame Perspective
Control Lens

$799.00
Available for Canon EOS EF, Nikon, Sony A,
Pentax K, Olympus/Panasonic Micro 4/3

Pro Performance Lens

10mm F2.8 ED AS NCS


Ultra Wide Angle with
Anti-Reflection Nano
Coating System

$479.00
Available for Sony E, Olympus/Panasonic
Micro 4/3, Fuji X, Canon M, Samsung NX

Pro Performance Lens

500mm/ 1000mm
Telephoto Lens Kit
with 2x
Teleconverter

$129.00
Available for almost any Current or OLD Digital or
Film Interchangeable Lens DSLR, SLR or Mirrorless
Cameras (Please specify your camera)

More Than 50 Years Of Experience

Pro Performance Lens

Pro Performance Lens

35mm F1.4 ED AS
IF UMC

24mm F1.4 ED AS
IF UMC

Full Frame Wide Angle


With AE Chip

Full Frame Wide Angle

$499.00

$499.00
Available for Canon EOS EF, Nikon AE w and w/o
chip for: Sony A, Sony E, Pentax K, Olympus 4/3,
Samsung NX

Available for Canon EOS EF, Nikon with AE Chip,


Sony A, Sony E, Pentax K, Olympus 4/3, Olympus/
Panasonic Micro 4/3

ROKINON CINE LENSES


Pro Performance Lenses

De-Clicked Aperture Control


Geared Aperture and Focus Rings
Calibrated in T-Stops
Side Mounted Aperture and Focusing Scales

Buy all 3 Cine Rokinon lenses for $1299.00


24mm T1.5 ED AS IF UMC Cine $679.00
35mm T1.5 AS UMC Cine $479.00
85mm T1.5 AS IF UMC Cine $299.00
Available for Canon EOS EF, Nikon, Sony A, Sony E, Olympus/Panasonic Micro 4/3

Pro Performance Lens

Pro Performance Lens

12mm F2.0 NCS


8mm F2.8 UMC

Ultra Wide Angle with


Anti-Reflection Nano
Coating System

Fisheye Lens - Series II

$349.00

$299.00

Available for Sony E, Olympus/Panasonic


Micro 4/3, Fuji X, Canon M, Samsung NX,
Canon EOS EF/S, Nikon

Available for Sony E, Fuji X,


Canon M, Samsung NX

Pro Performance Lens

Pro Performance Lens

650-1300mm/ 1300mm-2600mm
Super Zoom Lens Kit
with 2x Teleconverter

$279.00

Available for almost any Current or OLD Digital or


Film Interchangeable Lens DSLR, SLR or Mirrorless
Cameras (Please specify your camera)

800mm/ 1600mm
Mirror Lens Kit
with 2x
Teleconverter

$199.00
Available for almost any Current or OLD Digital or
Film Interchangeable Lens DSLR, SLR or Mirrorless
Cameras (Please specify your camera)

60-18 FRESH POND ROAD, MASPETH/QUEENS, NEW YORK 11378


1-800-221-2253 1-718-858-5002 1-212-675-8600 email: Sales@CambridgeWorld.com

New, Used, Refurbished, Preowned Collectables At Discounted Prices


We Buy, Trade, Export, Import Anything Photographic, Online Sales & Wholesale

WE WILL BEAT AND MEET DISCOUNT PRICES!


CALL OR EMAIL US AND WE WILL SAVE YOU $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

NEW DIGITAL & FILM CAMERAS


LENSES, FLASHES, SCREENS
PAPER AND ACCESSORIES
Canon, Casio, Fuji, Hasselblad, Kodak, Leica, Mamiya, Nikon, Olympus,
Panasonic, Pentax, Polaroid, Samsung, Sanyo, Sigma, Sony, Vivitar, Etc -

Memory Cards

Delkin, Kington, Lexar, SanDisk, Nikon


Fuji, Olympus, Sony, Panasonic, Etc............

CALL

Large selection of BATTERIES available at discount prices....CALL

LARGE SELECTIONS OF NEW AND USED

CLASSIC CAMERAS

LENSES AND ACCESSORIES IN STOCK AT LOW DISCOUNT PRICES!


Agfa, Alpa, Ansco, Arca-Swiss, Bolex, Bronica, Canon, Contax, Contarex, Edixa,
Exa, Exakta, Fuji, Fujica, Gami, Hasselblad, Kodak, Konica, Kowa, Leica, Leitz, Linhof,
Mamiya, Mercury, Minolta, Minox, Miranda, Nikon, Nikonos, Olympus, Pentacon, Pentax,
Petri, Plaubel, Polaroid, Praktica, Praktina, Retina, Revere, Ricoh, Robot, Rollei, Rolleiflex,
Sea & Sea, Stereo Realist, Tessina, Topcon, Toyo, Voigtlander, Wollensak, Yashica, Zeiss, Etc.

High ResolutionTop Quality Lenese


Macro Lens
2X Telephoto Lens
Wide Angle Lens
All for

$229

25mm T2.1 Xenon FF Lens


35mm T2.1 Xenon FF Lens
50mm T2.1 Xenon FF Lens
75mm T2.1 Xenon FF Lens
100mm T2.1 Xenon FF Lens

LENSES

Canon, Cosina, Nikon, Pentax, Olympus, Leica, Sony, Minolta,


Vivitar, Schneider, Mamiya, Hasselblad, Rodenstock, Zeiss, etc.
50mm F1.4..........358.95
50mm F2.8..........234.95
70mm F2.8..........468.95
105mm F2.8........458.95
150mm F2.8.......688.95
180mm F2.8.......1488.95
300mm F2.8.......2998.95
500mm F4.5.......4598.95
10-20mm F4-5.6....478.95
10-20mm F3.5........548.95
10-20mm F4.398.95
17-70mm F2.8-4.5...458.95
18-35mm F1.8.748.95
18-200mm F3.5-5.6..238.95
18-250mm F3.5-5.6.358.95
24-70mm F2.8.....798.95
17-50mm F2.8
DCOS HSM..548.95
8-16mm F4.5-5.6 DC...618.95 EX
28-70mm F2.8.....318.95
28-70mm F2.8-4....88.95 28-300mm F3.5-6.3...234.95
28-200mm F3.5-5.6...174.95 50-150mm F2.8....698.95
35-135mm F4-5.6...99.95
55-200mm F4-5.6...124.95
50-150mm F2.8968.95
50-200mm F4-5.6.148.95 70-300 F4-5.6......138.95
70-300mmDGOS.248.95
50-500mm F4-6.3...948.95
70-200mm F2.8....888.95 100-300mm F4-5.6...99.95
70-300 F4-5.6 APO...188.95 120-300mm F2.8...2698.95
70-200/2.8OS..1148.95 150-500mm F5-6.3...948.95
100-300mm F4....1098.95 120-400 F4.5-5.6...938.95
200-500mm F2.8 APO EX DG...................25998.95
300-800mm F5.6 EX BE HSM.....................7698.95
1.4X APO............218.95 2X APO...............278.95

LENSES FOR MOST MANUAL


& AUTOFOCUS AF CAMERAS

TOP DOLLAR$$$

Large selections of NEW &


USED LEICA cameras, lenses,
filters and accessories at low discount
prices ASK for Joseph

Nothing is too Small or too Large Anything Photographic !!!!!


Estate Sales Welcome!!! You can mail your gear or we can pick your gear up.
NEW P
ID INSTANT You can trade-in your gear or we will pay you with a check or with Paypal.
CALL 1-800-221-2253 and ask for Simon Or Email us at
DIGITAL CAMERA
Print your pictures 148.99 sales@cambridgeworld.com. Send your equipment for a FREE evaluation to:

LARGE SELECTION
OF PROJECTION
BULBS...CALL ALEX

WE DO HAVE MORE THAN


5000 INSTRUCTION BOOKS
IN STOCK CALL US AT
1-800-221-2253 AND ASK
FOR PAUL OR EMAIL US AT

NEW SERIES 1 LENSES

NEW FLASHES
16M19.95 DF 183 AF.44.95
DF 283 AF89.95 285HV...87.00
DF 293 AF89.95 DF 383 AF124.95
385 HV.........149.95 DF 483 AF159.95

JORGE V., CAMBRIDGE, MA

See more testimonials on our website.

WE PAY FOR YOUR RETIRED GEAR!

HEADQUARTERS!!!

7mm F3.5..324.95 13mm F2.8409.95


35mm F1.4499.95 85mm F1.4199.99
500mm F8.99.99 500mm F6.3..124.99

We Offer MORE THAN 1,000 DIFFERENT


LENSES at LOW DISCOUNT PRICES!!!

4.5mm F2.8..........838.95
8mm F3.5.............828.95
10mm F2.8...........598.95
15mm F2.8...........568.95
19mm F2.8...........178.95
20mm F1.8...........588.95
24mm F1.8...........498.95
28mm F1.8...........308.95
30mm F1.4...........278.95
30 mm F2.8174.95
35mm F1.4.848.95
60mm F2.8...........278.95
400mm F5.6.299.95
85mm F1.4...........848.95
800mm F5.6.......6698.95
12-24mm F4.5-5.6..748.95
18-50mm F2.8-4........188.95
18-50mm F2.8............375.95

1-800-221-2253

INSTRUCTION MANUALS/BOOKS

650-1300mm F8-16
Zoom Lens...239.99
800mm F8...189.00
8mm F3.8....189.00

f
rs o e
Yea rienc
e
Exp

I WAS NERVOUS ABOUT


THIS PURCHASE, BUT THE
ITEM WAS SHIPPED PROMPTLY
AND IT ARRIVED AS
DESCRIBED FOR A GREAT PRICE.

A S K

1-800-221-2253

for the iPhone


& Samsung Galaxy
includes the iPhone
4, 4s, 5 & 5S & Samsung Galaxy S4 as well as the
iPad2, iPad Mini, Mini Retina & iPad Air too.

IF YOU DO NOT SEE


IT, IT DOESNT MEAN
WE DO NOT HAVE IT,

50

TESTIMONIAL OF THE MONTH

SALES@CAMBRIDGEWORLD.COM

SPECIALS
OF THE MONTH
New Latest

85mm F1.8

vivitar series 1 lens


with lens
case and sun shade for $124.99

Rollei & Rolleiflex


Headquaters
* Large selsctions of new

and used Rollei and Rolleiflex


cameras,lenses and accessories
at discount prices!!!!!

CALL William 1-800-221-2253


8mm F3.5.............199.99 14mm F2.8..........349.99
Special Prices on
24mm F2.8.............79.95 135mm F3.5..........29.95
Rollei 6000 Series
28mm F2.8.............49.95 135mm F2.8..........49.95
35mm F2.8.............39.95 200mm F3.5..........79.95
50mm F1.8.............69.95 300mm F5.6..........99.95
Adapters Lenses
Accessories..................
50mm F1.4...........189.95 400mm F6.3..........99.95
85mm F1.4...........308.95 500mm F8.............99.95
100mm F3.5.........119.95 500mm F6.3........124.95
EXPOSURE
LIGHT METERS
800mm F8............219.95 1000mm F11.......799.95
Cambron, Gossen, Kenko, Sekonic, Minolta, Pentax,
500mm 1000mm combination.........................129.95
Polaris,
Shepard,
Soligor,
Spectra, Wein, Etc. - CALL
19-35mm F3.5-4.5....149.95 28-80mm F3.5-5.6...79.95
28-105mm Zoom...99.95 28-210mm F3.5-5.6...99.95 FLASHES Ansmann, BRNO, Canon,
28-300mm F4-6.3..169.95 35-105mm Zoom.....119.95 Cambron, Elinchrome, Gary Fong, Metz, Minolta,
70-210mm Zoom...79.95 75-150mm F3.5.......49.95 Multiblitz, Nikon, Novacon, Norman,Novatron,
75-300mm F4.5 Macro Zoom Lens..................89.95 Olympus, Pentax, Photogenic, Quantum, Sigma,
100-300mm F5.6-6.7....99.95 100-500mm F5.6-8...395.95 Stroboframe,Stratos, Smithvictor,
650-1300mm F8 Long Zoom Lens...................249.95 Sunpak, Sony, Vivitar, Etc.
1000-4000mm zoom.........................................349.95
PROJECTORS & VIEWERS
1.4X Teleconverter..............................................99.95
Braun, Canon, Epson, GEPE, Kodak Carousel &
2X Teleconverter......29.95
3X Converter...69.95
Ektagraphic,Kaiser, Panasonic, Optoma, Sanyo,
1.5X Teleconverter...69.95
1.7X.Converter..99.95
Sharp, Telex, Da-Lite Screens,
0.42X Fisheye Lens............................................39.95
Slide Mounts,Vue-all Etc.
0.45X Wide Angle Lens.....................................39.95

NOVOFLEX

CALL

CALL

CALL

DARKROOM/ENLARGERS

Beseler, Durst, Fujimoto, KAISER, LPL,

Cambridge World 60-18 Fresh Pond Rd, Maspeth, NY 11378


TOP QUALITY EXPERIENCED

REPAIR SERVICE!

AT DISCOUNT PRICES! Send your equipment for a


FREE repair estimate to: Cambridge World
60-18 Fresh Poind Rd., Mespeth, New York 11378

USED DEPARTMENT
We have more than 30,000 Used items. Email us your Wish Listat
sales@cambridgeworld.com or CALL 1-800-221-2253 and we will
assist you and SAVE you $$$$$$. No item is too small or large.
Listing is very partial.

Bronica GSI...............399.50
Canon 24mm F1.4 ........989.00
Bronica SQ camera.....199.99
Canon 50mm F1.4 ..........79.50
Canon 1V....................499.99
Canon 85mm F1.2 .....1,299.00
Canon 1X......................69.99
Canon 300mm F2.8 ...2,199.00
Canon Elan....................69.99
Canon 16-35mm F2.8 ...889.00
Canon VT....................299.99
Canon 24-105mm F4 ....789.00
Canon XTi .................399.99
Canon 28-300mm F3.5 ...1,299
Contax N1...........349.99
Canon 70-200mm F2.8 ...1,199
Exakta RTL................149.99
Canon 100-400mm F4.5 ....1,199
Fuji Digital S3....299.95
Canon 430EX ...............129.00
Exakta VX 1000......129.50
Canon 580EX................269.00
Hasselblad 503CW.....499.95
Retina Reflex ................99.99
Canon 24-70mm F2.8 ...899.95
Leica IIIG....................699.99
50mm F1.4 Zeiss Planar...209.00
Leica M3.....................499.99
80-200mm F4 sonnar.....199.00
Leica R8......................749.99
Hasselblad 150mm F4 ..299.00
Minolta X700................99.99
Leica 35mm F2 Summicron M...899
Mamiya 110mm RZ lens...229.99 Leica 50mm F2 Summicron M...399
Maxxum HTsi...........69.99
Minolta XTi............59.95
Leica 135mm F4.5 Hektor Screw..129
Maxxum
5000...............39.95
Maxxum 7000.........49.95
Leica 50mm F2 Summicron R..349.50
Maxxum 700I.............119.95
Maxxum 9000.........69.95
Mamiya 55mm F2.8 ........99.00
Maxxum 7D................299.99
Maxxum 5D..........199.95
Mamiya 180mm F4.5....149.00
Nikkormat
FT2...........119.94
Nikkormat FTN.......99.95
Minolta 50mm F1.7.........19.00
Nikon F2.....................119.99
Nikon F...................99.99
Minolta 80-200mm F4.5..69.00
Nikon F100.................199.99
Nikon FA..............169.99
Minolta 5400HS...............79.00
Nikon FM10...............129.99
Nikon F3...............129.99
Maxxum 50mm F1.7 .......69.95
Nikon D40..................199.99
Nikon F5...............349.99
Nikon 50mm F1.4............69.00
Nikon N55....................66.99
Nikon D200..........499.99
Nikon 18-200mm F3.5..349.00
Nikon N8008................79.95
Nikon N90..............99.99
Nikonos II.....................79.95
Nikon 80-200mm F2.8 ......399
Nikonos V.............179.99
Olympus OM4............179.99
Nikon SB600 ................269.00
Olympus OM1........99.99
Pentax 80-160mm645zoom.229.99 Nikon SB900 ................349.00
Pentax 120mm 645macro..399.99 Olympus 50mm F1.8 Zuiko...39.00
Pentax K1000..........99.99
Pentax LX...................299.99
Pentax 645.............249.99
Olympus 70-210mm F4.5.......99.00
Rollei 35M..................119.99
Rolleicord V..........149.99
Olympus 50mm F1.4.......99.95
Rolleiflex F3.5............499.99
Topcon super RE249.99
Panasonic 14-50mm F2.8....479.00
Topcon
UNI..................79.95
Voigtlander Bessa...599.99
Pentax 28-80mm F3.5.....39.00
Vitomatic II..................99.95
Voigtlander Bessamatic...129.99
Pentax 35-80mm F4........44.00
Vittesa......................99.95
Yashica FX3............69.99
Sigma 70mm F2.8.........379.00
Yashica FR1..................69.95
Zeiss Contarex.........299.99
Sony 16-80mm F3.5......499.00
Zeiss Icarex................149.99
Canon 5D.....999.00
Sony 55-200mm F4.........99.00
Nikon 35TI.....369.50
Canon 40D.299.00
Nikon FM 3A.399.00
Vivitar 500mm F8 ..........69.00
Contax Aria299.95
Nikon F4.299.00
Vivitar 283 Flash..................29.95
Exakta 66....999.99
Nikon D300........699.00
2X Teleconverter Extended Lens..29.95
Leica M6.....999.99
Nikon D200....499.00
3X Teleconverter Extended Lens..39.95
Minolta SRT 101..69.95
Olympus E-520..249.00
Bronica S2A, EC...... Call
Bronica ETR...........99.95

Canon A2E .............79.99


Canon Elan.....49.99
Canon rebel 2000......89.99
Canon F1...............119.99
Canon rebel XT.....299.99
Contax G2.............699.99
Contax RTS III........699.99
Exakta VX..............99.99
Fuji S5 digital.......599.95
Hasselblad 500C..149.99
Kodak Retina IIIc...99.95
Leica IF.................499.99
Leica IIIF...............299.99
Leica R3................199.99
Mamiya RB67.......199.99

Omega, Etc. Enlarging Lenses & Darkroom


14mm F2.8...........989.99 90mm F2.8..........348.95
Accessories. Large selection of papers available
28mm F2.5.............99.99 180mm F3.5........628.95
(Kodak, Ilford, Fuji, Forte, Etc.)
24mm F2.5.............79.95 500mm F8...........198.95
11-18mm F4.5-5.6...434.95 10-24mm F3.5-4.5...429.95
LARGE
& MEDIUM FORMAT
17-50mm
F2.8.....334.94
18-200mm F3.5-6.3...158.95
Alpa, Arca Swiss, Bronica, Contax, Fuji, Cambron,
18-270mm............398.95 18-250mm F3.5-6.3...414.95 Hasselblad, Linhof, Kiev, Mamiya,
19-35mm
F3.5=4.5...159.95
20-40mm F2.7-3.5...298.95
24-135mm F3.5-5.6...398.95 Pentax 645D Digital Camera, Rollei,
16-28mm F2.8 .....748.00 12-28mm F4598.95
28-105mm F2.8....298.95
28-200mm F3.8-5.6...118.95 Rolleiflex, Toyo, Wista, Yashica, Etc.CALL
300mm F6.3.299.95 17-35mm F4........719.00
24-70mm F3.3-5.6...89.95
TELESCOPES, RIFLESCOPES,
28-75mm F2.8.......348.95
TRIPODS
10-17mm F3.5-4.5...444.95 100mm F2.8.........384.95
24-70mm F2.8......1195.00 28-300mm F3.8-5.6...294.95
RANGEFINDERS
Arca Swiss, Bogen, Cambron, Cullman, Berlebach,
11-16mm F2.8......564.95 28-200mm F3.5-5.6....99.95
We offer one of the Largest selections of BINOCULARS,
28-80mm F3.5-5.6...68.95 70-300mm F4-5.6 329.95
Giottos,
Davis
&
Sanford,
Gitzo,
Impact,
Linhof,
12-24mm F4.........424.95 50-135mm F2.8....674.95
TELESCOPES, RANGEFINDERS AND RIFLESCOPES
28-300mm F3.8-5.6 VC....584.95 200-400mm F5.6......298.95
Manfrotto, Slik, Sunpak, Tiltall,
16-50mm F2.8......594.95 80-400mm F4.5-5.6....638.95
at LOW DISCOUNT PRICES!!! We also offer you more
55-200mm F4-5.6...128.95 75-300mm F4-5.6...128.95
Vanguard, Velbon, Etc. than 500 DIFFERENT BINOCULARS!!!!!!!
KENKO TELECONVERTER
70-200mm F2.8...664.95 200-500mm F5-6.3..758.95
BUSHNELL, BAUSCH&LOMB,
1.4x..99.95 1.5x..84.95 2X..129.95 3X..219.95
CAMBRON, CANON, CARSON,
FILM (ALL SIZES)
60mm F2 Macro........399.95 10-24mm F3.5-4.5....458.99
SAMYANG/ROKINON/BOWER
CELESTRON, DOCTER, FUJI, FUJINON,
7.5mm F3.5...299.00
8mm F3.5299.00 14mm F2.8399.00 1.4X Converter....124.95 2X Tele Converter.....138.95 Kodak, Ilford, Fuji, Polaroid, AGFA, Etc.
JASON, KOWA, LEITZ, LEICA, LEOPOLD, MEOPTA,
35mm F1.4499.00 85mm F1.4299.00 500mm F8...99.99 1.4X SP Converter...178.95 2X SP Converter...208.95
MINOLTA, MINOX, OLYMPUS, PENTAX, SAMSUNG,
500mm mirror..119.99 500mm F6.3..159.99 800mm F8...219.99
CASES
&
GADGET
BAGS
150-600mm F56.3 for $999.99
SPALDING, STEINER, SWIFT, TASCO, VANGUARD,
24mm F1.4...$699.00 24mm F3.5 Tilt and Shift..999.00
Billingham, BobLBee, Domke, Lowepro,
NEW SCHNEIDER PC TS LENSES
650-1300mm f8-16 Zoom Lens....279.99
VIVITAR, VIXEN, VORTEX, WEENS & PLATH, ZEISS,
50/2.8
HM
Super
Angulon.........................................3498.99
CINE LENSES
Pelican, Rimowa, Tamrac,
90/4.0
HM
Makro-Symmar.......................................3198.99
8mm T3.8...329.00 14mm...T3.1...449.00 24mm T1.5 749.00
FOR YOUR SPECIAL PRICE
Tenba, Zero Halliburton
3.5mm T1.5...549.00 85mm...T1.5...349.00
120/5.6 HM Aspheric Apo-Digitar...........................4698.99

CALL

BINOCULARS

CALL
CALL

CALL

CALL

Olympus XA........79.99
Minolta 160.......69.99
Minolta 70........49.99
Canon 120.........79.99
Canon 105.........49.99
Leica minilux.....199.99
Contax T2.........199.99
Yashica T4.........99.99
Nikon lite touch...49.99
Konica 120.........49.99
Nikonos II.........99.99
Olympus 140........49.99
Pentax 115.........59.99
Minox GT...........199.99
Rollei 35..........129.99
Canon rebel X.......49.99
Minota 7000.........39.99
Petri V.............79.99
Exa.................69.99
Praktica TL.........69.99
Ricoh XRP...........99.99
Canon canonet.......49.99
Canon dial..........49.99
Canon P............239.99
Hasselblad x-pan...999.99
Mamiya 500 DTL......79.99
Leica c-lux.........299.99
Leica C1........... 199.99
Mamiya 7............699.99
Mamiya 645E.........199.99
Mamiya C220..........99.99
Yashicamat..........129.99
Minolta 70...........59.99
Minolta 9Xi..........149.99
Kodak C800............49.99
Samsung 170...........69.99
Pentax auto 110.......69.99
Nikon F100............169.99
Olympus IS.............79.99
Miranda FV.............99.99
Pentax PZ1.............109.99
Contax IIa.............139.99
Contarex...............249.99
Nikon 35Ti.............299.50
Nikon 28Ti.............349.95

FILTERS

WE HAVE MORE THAN


IN STOCK. CALL ADAM

10,000 FILTERS
1-800-221-2253

Top Quality screw in optical Glass Filters


19-37mm19.95 67-82mm..19.95
40-49mm..9.95 86-95mm..59.95
52-62mm.14.95 105-122mm129.95
Sun Shade Lens Hoods
19-37mm...9.95 67-82mm..19.95
40-49mm...6.95 86-95mm..69.95
52-62mm...9.95 105-122mm..99.95
3 Lens Close-up Macro Lens Sets
19-37mm..29.95 52-62mm.29.95
40-49mm..19.95 67-82mm.39.95

B+W, HELIOPAN, CANON, CAMBRON, COKIN,


HOYA, KENKO, LECIA, NIKON,
SINGH-RAY,TIFFEN, ZEISS, ETC

CALL

email: Sales@CambridgeWorld.com

MARKETPLACE
STO-FEN
OMNI-BOUNCE
CUSTOM MADE FOR YOUR STROBE
The OMNI All Directional Bounce
It achieves the effect of Umbrella & Soft Bare Bulb illumination. Works well with all lenses from 16 to
200mm, including zooms. Designed for the following strobes: Canon 199A, 300TL, 270EX, 380EX,
420EX, 420EZ, 430EX, 430EZ, 540EZ, 550EX, 580EX,
580EXII & NEW 600EX/RT. Metz MZ-3, 32Z-1, 32Z2, 36AF, 44AF, CT/CL45, CT60, 40MZ2, 40MZ1i & 3i,
40AF4N, 58AF1, 50MZ5, 54MZ3 & MZ70, 70MZ-4&5,
76MZ5. Minolta 3500xi, 3600, 4000AF, 5200I, 5400xi/
hs & 5600HS. Nikon SB16, SB24, SB25, SB26, SB28,
SB28DX, SB50DX & SB80DX, SB400, SB600, SB800,
SB900. Olympus T32, FL36, FL40, FL50 & G40. Pentax
330FTZ, AF360FGZ, AF500FTZ & AF540FGZ. Sunpak
355AF, 383, 422, 433, 444, 30DX, 455, 522, 544, 555
PZ4000AF, PZ5000AF, PZ40X, MZ40AF, RD2000. Sony
HVL-F36, F56, HVL-F58AM, HVL-F32X, HVL-F1000 &
FH1100. Achiever 260 Series. Vivitar 283, 285, 728AF,
730AF, 830AF, 840AF, 850AF, 2500, 3500, 3700, 4600 &
5600. Plus Universal for many other bounce strobe units.
If you do not see your ash listed, please ask, as we can
t many other ashes not listed.
Specify your strobe
when ordering
AVAILABLE AT MANY
DEALERS
Only: $19.95 plus $2.50 shipping
CA & NY residents
add sales tax
To Order, CALL TOLL FREE

800-538-0730
VISA, MASTERCARD, AMEX
Welcomed. Mail Orders
Send Check or Money Order.
Most orders shipped
within 48 hours.

Omni shown on Nikon SB25

STO-FEN PRODUCTS

P.O. Box 7609, Dept. S9, Santa Cruz, CA 95061


)NQUIRIES  s&AX  

www.stofen.com

Protects camera &


lens while in the
field or in storage

1-800-875-3055
&Z
^

%HDU+LOO5G:DOWKDP0$

SOFT POUCH

D-SERIES D-SLR

See the demonstration video on our website!

XXXPQUFDIVTBDPNr

68

| SHUTTERBUG | 2014

Photo 2014 Hernan Rodriguez

C41 and B&W Processing


)LOP6FDQV+3ULQW6FDQV
3ULQWVIURP1HJDWLYHV 6OLGHV
&KURPLUDSULQWVXSWRZLGH
)LQH$UWSULQWVXSWRZLGH
3ULQWVRQ$OXPLQXP
3ULQWVRQ&DQYDV
Since
3ULQWVRQ:RRG
1976
3KRWR:DOO&OLQJV
(800) 207-7927
colorservices.com

Let the FourSquare


Be With You!

STO-FEN OMNI-BOUNCE
CUSTOM MADE FOR YOUR STROBE
The OMNI All Directional Bounce
It achieves the effect of Umbrella & Soft Bare Bulb illumination. Works
well with all lenses from 16 to 200mm, including zooms. Designed
for the following strobes: Canon 199A, 300TL, 270EX, 380EX, 420EX,
420EZ, 430EX, 430EZ, 540EZ, 550EX, 580EX, 580EXII & NEW 600EX/
RT. Metz MZ-3, 32Z-1, 32Z-2, 36AF, 44AF, CT/CL45, CT60, 40MZ2,
40MZ1i & 3i, 40AF4N, 58AF1, 50MZ5, 54MZ3 & MZ70, 70MZ-4&5,
76MZ5. Minolta 3500xi, 3600, 4000AF, 5200I, 5400xi/hs & 5600HS.
Nikon SB16, SB24, SB25, SB26, SB28, SB28DX, SB50DX & SB80DX,
SB400, SB600, SB800, SB900. Olympus T32, FL36, FL40, FL50 & G40.
Pentax 330FTZ, AF360FGZ, AF500FTZ & AF540FGZ. Sunpak 355AF,
383, 422, 433, 444, 30DX, 455, 522, 544, 555 PZ4000AF, PZ5000AF,
PZ40X, MZ40AF, RD2000. Sony HVL-F36, F56, HVL-F58AM, HVL-F32X,
HVL-F1000 & FH1100. Achiever 260 Series. Vivitar 283, 285, 728AF,
730AF, 830AF, 840AF, 850AF, 2500, 3500, 3700, 4600 & 5600. Plus
Universal for many other bounce strobe units. If you do not see your
ash listed, please ask, as we can t many other ashes not listed.

Specify your strobe when ordering


AVAILABLE AT MANY DEALERS
Only: $19.95 plus $2.50 shipping
CA & NY residents add sales tax
To Order, CALL TOLL FREE

800-538-0730
AmEx, VISA & MASTERCARD Welcomed.
Mail Orders Send Check or Money Order.
Most orders shipped within 48 hours.

Onmi shown
on Nikon
SB25

STO-FEN
PRODUCTS
P.O. Box 7609
Dept. S20
Santa Cruz, CA
95061
Inquiries:
831-427-0235
Fax:
831-423-8336
www.stofen.com

Introducing the FourSquare, a


unique and simple
solution to mount one
or multiple speedlights
together. It can be used
with umbrellas, its own
30lightbank or with most any
other lightbank on the market.
Multiple accessories are available.
Learn more at:

ALL OF OUR PHOTOGRAPHY


SOFTWARE AT
LESS THAN HALF PRICE
Visit AlienSkin.com
for beautiful examples
and a free trial.

Successful people
make adjustments.
EVANDER HOLYFIELD
facebook.com/TheRealDealHolyeld

MARKETPLACE

Your Trusted Source for

Photography Backgrounds.

J

J

Get a 16x20
Canvas Gallery
Wrap for only

17

99

+ Shipping

On your first order


Use Code: EXPERTPHOTO
Expires: December 31, 2015

Order Now at CGProPrints.com

J

J

J

J

Seamless Paper
Fire-Retardant Seamless
Muslin Backgrounds
Twistflex Backgrounds
Graduated Backgrounds
Vinyl Backgrounds
Photo Equipment & Accessories

IMAGE BY THERESA THURMAN

Were behind your great images.

TRUE PHOTOGRAPHIC LAB CORRECTED


PRINTS ON KODAK ENDURA PAPER
8 wallets 1.75
11 x 14 4.49
4x6
.29
16 x 20 14.49
5x7
.99
20 x 24 19.99
8 x10 1.69
20 x 30 25.99
10 x10 2.89
30 x 40 53.99
Over 80 sizes, from wallet up to 30" x120"
true photographic prints, not inkjet, on
Kodak Endura Premier Professional Paper
E-Surface and Metallic.

Superior Specialties
800-666-2545

Call for your free catalog or visit

superspec.com

www.meridianpro.com
800-544-1370

bigprintsusa.com
Canvas Prints
Free Shipping

Get Your

ww.lenseon.com

(on orders over $15.00)


Price Includes: Printing on artist
canvas, Mounting on Stretcher
Frame, Boxed and SHIPPED FREE.
www.bigprintsusa.com

Put Your Photos


on Canvas
24 x 30
11 x 14
24 x 36
11 x 17
30 x 40
12 x 16
36 x 48
16 x 20
38 x 60
18 x 24
20 x 30
Gallery Wrap Available

70

| SHUTTERBUG | 2014

LensCoat makes unique, protective covers for camera


lenses, bodies, and accessories. Made from 100%
closed-cell neoprene, LensCoat products protect your
gear from bumps and scratches, they keep rain and mist
away from sensitive equipment, and they also insulate
your hands from cold equipment. Most products are
available in Camouflage patterns Forest Green, Realtree
AP Snow, Realtree Max4 HD, and Digital Camo all
designed to blend in with different environments as well
as solid colors (black, blue, green, pink or purple).

Lens Covers
t"WBJMBCMFXJUIBDVTUPNGJU
for most popular lenses
t" MTPBWBJMBCMFJOXIJUFGPS
Canon lenses

LensCoat protective covers slide on and off like a sleeve,


leaving no residue. Some covers feature clear, flexible
UV-PVC windows over important controls and displays,
allowing you to use the equipment with the cover on.

LensCoat RainCoat 2 provides protection for your camera and lens


from the elements like rain, snow, salt spray, dirt, sand and dust while
allowing you easy access to the camera and lens controls. It has
all same great features as the original RainCoat but adds an
additional integrated pocket with foldaway arm sleeve on
the left side for easier access to zoom and focus. The
RainCoat 2 comes in two sizes Pro (for DSLRs with lenses
from 300mm f2.8 - 800mm) and Standard (for DSLRs with
Pro
small lenses up to 400mm f5.6). The RainCoat 2 is constructed
from a lightweight waterproof, breathable poly tricot material.
The seams are tape sealed for maximum protection.

t-JHIUXFJHIUXBUFSQSPPG CSFBUIBCMFQPMZUSJDPUNBUFSJBM t.BEFJOUIF64"


t$JODI4USBQTBEKVTUDPWFSMFOHUICZGPMEJOHUIFNBUFSJBMPWFSJUTFMGLFFQDPWFSTOVH
t"EKVTUBCMFSFBSBDDFTTXJUIDPSEMPDL t/0EFEJDBUFEFZFQJFDFSFRVJSFE
ProP[ IPPEFYUFOTJPOGPSNNNNP[

Standard 20.5" 9.4oz


Hoodie Lens Caps
t'JUTTOVHMZBSPVOEZPVSMFOTIPPEPSTIBEF
t'FBUVSFTBSFJOGPSDFESFNPWBCMFGSPOUQSPUFDUJPOEJTD
t"WBJMBCMFJODPMPST TPMJEDBNP

X-Small ............... 2.75" to 3.25"


Small .................. 3.25" to 3.75"
.FEJVN............... 3.75" to 4.25"
Large .................. 4.25" to 4.75"

3X pandable Internal dimensions 8" x 8" x 19.75" or 23.5" or 27.75"


"DDPNNPEBUFTDBNFSBCPEZXJUIMFOTFTTVDIBT$BOPONN NN
G NN%0 NN /JLPONN G NN 4JHNB
500mm, 300-800mm, Sony 500mm
4X pandable Internal dimensions 9" x 9" x 21.5" or 24.5"or 28.75"
"DDPNNPEBUFTDBNFSBCPEZBOE
MFOTTVDIBT$BOPO/JLPO
400mm f/2.8, 500mm,
600mm, 800mm

s
in or
e ol
bl C
la s/
ai r n
Av t t e
Pa

t3FNPWBCMFMJEXJUI
pocket zips on easily
and securely at all
three positions
t.BMFBOEGFNBMFFOETPO
removable shoulder strap
allow for strap to be
used to secure bag
t3FNPWBCMFSFJOGPSDFEJOTFSU
panels allow you to configure
the weight and support
t3FNPWBCMFIBSOFTT TPMETFQBSBUFMZ

t.VMUJQMFDPOOFDUJPOQPJOUTUPTFDVSFUIFCBH
Shown with
optional
t#VJMUUPMBTUXJUIIFBWZEVUZXBUFSSFTJTUBOU$PEVSB
harness
and lightweight, water-resistant nylon lining
t4PGUTJEFEDPOTUSVDUJPOBMMPXUIFCBHUPCFGPMEFEOFBSMZGMBU
t.0--&XFCCJOHTZTUFNUPFBTJMZBEEQPVDIFTBDDFTTPSJFT
t&YQBOEBCMFFYUFSJPSNFTIQPDLFU
t"WBJMBCMFJO#MBDL %JHJUBM$BNP 'PSFTU(SFFO$BNP 
PS3FBMUSFF.BY t.BEFJOUIF64"

RAINCOAT 2

XPANDABLE SERIES LONG LENS BAGS


This is one smart bag. Whether you're in the field
or a safari vehicle its perfect when you want to
be ready to take the shot at a moment's notice.
The Xpandable bag can be ingeniously folded to
three different sizes or folded flat!

Folded Flat

Other Innovations from LensCoat

X-Large ............... 4.75" to 5.25"


XX-Large ............... 5.5" to 6.25"
XXX-Large ................ 6.25" to 7"
XXXX-Large .............. 7" to 7.75"

LegCoat Wraps (set of 3)


t8SBQBSPVOEUIFVQQFSMFHPGZPVSUSJQPE
t5JHIUMZHSJQTUPZPVSUSJQPETPUIFZXJMMOPUTMJEF
LegCoat Tripod Covers
t7FMDSPGBTUOFSTBMMPXGPSFBTZBTTFNCMZ
t1SFTFSWFUIFGJUBOEGJOJTIBOE
resale value of your tripod
t1SPUFDUZPVSTIPVMEFSXIFODBSSZJOHZPVSHFBS

t 5SBWFM$PBU t -FOT1PVDIFT t 'MBTI,FFQFS t *QBETMFFWF


t (JNCBM1PVDI$PWFS t #FUUFS#FBNFSDPWFS t #FBNFS,FFQFS

Late Delivery: One of Paivas workshop students


brought this doll to a junkyard shoot and Paiva says he
fell in love with it and ended up carrying her around
as a prop all night. This was shot just after 2AM with a
Canon 60D and a Tokina 12-14mm zoom (at 12mm). The
exposure (at ISO 200 with the white balance set for
3800K) was 178 sec at f/8. The overall lighting was
from the full moon and the warm white, lime and red
set lighting was from a ProtoMachines flashlight.

TROY PAIVAS LOST


(AND FOUND) AMERICA
A MODERN LIGHT PAINTING PIONEER
BY JEFF WIGNALL

OKING AROUND IN deserted auto junkyards, pet cemeteries orheaven


forbidthe morgue rooms of decommissioned naval hospitals in the dead
of night is probably not where most of us would willingly search out our
photographic inspiration. The spooky quotient alone would be enough to
send us fleeing to more welcoming (not to mention more brightly lit) venues. And
to the uninitiated, the visual possibilities of such places would seem anything
but obvious. But its in these exact locales, and an assortment of similarly creepy
repositories of our common past, where California photographer Troy Paiva feels
most at home.

For the past 25 years, in fact,


Paiva has devoted virtually all of his
photographic energy to unearthing the
beauty of these rarely recorded places
and, like a mad nocturnal alchemist,
uses his creativity to turn industrial
lead into photographic gold. There
is nothing that can compare with the
72

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

feelings you get exploring a pitch dark


abandoned mental hospital in the
middle of the night. Or the epic scale of
a derelict ocean liner or airliner bone
yard, says Paiva. Its a bittersweet
melancholia for all this lost history,
mixed with the thrill of being in places
youre not supposed to be, combined

A CULT OF CULTISTS
Like most innovative artists, Paiva
spent much of his early years laboring
in total obscurity. In the first 10 years or
so of shootingfrom 1989 to 1999he
says, the only people that knew about
his midnight photo rambles were
friends and family (and a boss that let
him out early to take off shooting).
Things changed in 1999, however,
when he launched his Lost America
(www.lostamerica.com) site. Its
that site that is largely credited with
almost singlehandedly birthing a new
generation of vampirish camera-toting
urban explorers. There is, in fact, little
argument in the night-photo world that
Paiva is more or less the Godfather of
modern light paintinga role he seems
to accept with a mix of gratitude and
curiosity.
For about 5 years my Lost America
site was the first hit in any web search
for night photography, he says. I seem
to have popularized a long-lost way of
shooting and a strange new aesthetic.
Today there are thousands of people
(all over the world) essentially trying
to copy what I do, he says. Many
of them now have their own cult
followings, inspiring even more people.
Like the end of Fight Club, this strange
little experiment I started has now
completely spiraled out of my control.
Its all very strange.

All photos Troy Paiva

with the ecstasy of creation.


While the technique of light painting
has been around since the beginnings
of photography, Paiva uses a skillful and
experimental combination of moonlight
(he works exclusively by the light of the
full moon) and handheld lighting tools
to reimagine and expand the parameters
of light painting and night photography.
He has published two books of his work:
Lost America: Night Photography of the
Abandoned Roadside West (Motorbook
International, 2003) and Night Vision:
The Art of Urban Exploration (Chronicle
Books, 2008). His images have been used
to illustrate countless magazine articles
and dozens of book and CD covers
perhaps most notably the iconic images
on the cover of Stephen Kings books
Christine and From a Buick 8.

Boxy But Safe: A Volvo station wagon hangs in the jaws of a massive junkyard-shearing machine. Paiva shot the scene in a California auto graveyard with a Canon 60D
and a Tokina 12-24mm zoom (at 12mm). He exposed the scene for 167 sec at f/8 (at ISO 200, with the white balance set at 3800K). The overall light was provided by the full
moon and color was added using lime and red set lighting from a ProtoMachines flashlight.

Also, while its easy to think of this


kind of urban art as a purely American
obsession, Paiva says the interest
is actually stronger elsewhere. Its
actually bigger outside the United
States. Europeans have always
understood the romance of ruins better
than Americans because their backyard
is full of them, he says. The American
zeitgeist is obsessed with consumerism
and a constant need for shiny new
things, but in the 21st Century, as the
younger generations obsess over postapocalyptic zombies and urbex culture,
this is changing. Today we are living in
a golden age of ruins, worldwide. The
common thread is that these are human
places and objects, now discarded, and
in the process of being consumed by
nature.
BACK TO THE FUTURE
Paiva says his interest in light painting
began as a kind of rebellion against
the technology of faster and faster
film speeds and higher shutter speeds.
By the time I started shooting, the
technique of lighting with hand-held
sources during time exposures was
mostly lost. Since the very beginning of
photography, film, camera and lighting
manufacturers were in a race to make
exposures as short as possibleto freeze
everything in a 250th of a second with

The Blue Space God: The International Car Forest of the Last Church is an art installation on the outskirts of Goldfield,
Nevada that includes a series of partially buried and painted autos. Paiva captured this view using his Canon 60D with a
Tokina 12-24mm (at 12mm). The exposure was for 399 sec at f/11 (at ISO 200). The scene lighting came from the full moon
and the cool white and red set detail lighting was produced using the ProtoMachines flashlight.

a strobe, he says. I looked back the


other way, choosing to make willfully
long exposures, and combined the latest
flashlight technology with this oldfashioned workflow to create an all new
aesthetic.
Much of what he did in pre-digital
days was largely experimental and

the percentage of keepers he shot


was entirely related to how much time
he spent in the field shooting. In the
film era, night photography was much
harder. Without an LCD to review you
had no idea if you were even getting
anything, let alone something good. Add
reciprocity failure and difficult lighting
2014

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

73

Cockpit Heater: Aircraft bone yards are among Paivas favorite late-night haunts. He shot this photo of a 737
nose in storage at a California airplane cemetery. He shot it with a Canon 60D, a Tokina 12-24mm lens, exposed
(at ISO 200 with the white balance at 5000K) for 147 sec at f/8. In addition to the light of the full moon, purple,
lime and red lighting came from a ProtoMachines flashlight.

DC-8 And 880: One of Paivas older aviation graveyard scenes, this one was shot on film (Kodak 160T) in 1990
at the Airplane Graveyard in Mojave, California. Shot in the light of the full moon and colored with a Vivitar 285
strobe and pink gels. It was shot with a Canon FX camera with a 28mm Canon lens. The exposure was for 8
minutes at f/5.6.

Staircase: Paiva used light painting to add an odd and somewhat ironic twist of glamor to the once luxurious
vestibule of the Byron Hot Springs Hotel. He made the shot with a Canon 20D, a Tokina 12-24mm (12mm) exposed
for 261 seconds at f/5.6 (at ISO 200, at 5000K). The lighting is a combination of full moon, total darkness and a
blue and red gelled LED flashlight.
74

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

to the mix and that failure rate explodes.


Shooting 36 8-minute exposures over
the weekend, you were lucky to get 1 or 2
images worth looking at. Few attempted
it and even fewer stuck with it, he
explains.
I think the one thing that improved
my work the most is the same thing that
opened up night work and experimental
lighting to the masses: the LCD on the
back of the camera. Now that you can
chimp the shot, you can keep honing
and refining it until you get exactly what
youre trying for, says Paiva. Theres
really no reason to not get the shot. Just
relax and keep working it until you get
something on the LCD you like.
LIGHT PAINTING TODAY
Paiva says that his lighting methodology
has also evolved with the technology.
In the 90s it was mostly open-strobe,
masked with swatches of theatrical
lighting gels, for color. I also used a
couple of Maglites for soft fills and tight
spaces, he says. By the turn of the
century, the first LED flashlightswith
their uniquely pure, cool white cast
began to hit the market. In the 00s I
switched to working with flashlights
almost exclusively. I used LED and
Xenon lights, taking advantage of their
different color-cast reactions to each gel
color.
A few years ago Paiva began
experimenting with a new generation of
light-painting tool: the ProtoMachines
flashlight (www.protomachines.
com). It was developed by a light
painter, for light painters. Its fully
HSB controllable: it can literally make
millions of colors and the operator
can make any color 1 of 8 presets, he
explains. The brightness is also fully
controllable: dim enough to light a screw
head from 6 away, or bright enough to
light an object 100 yards away. And it fits
in your pocket. Its the only light source
I use now.
SHOOT NOW, ASK LATER
Like a lot of urban explorers, Paiva
often finds himself crossing somewhat
invisible lines to enter interesting sites.
At this point in my career its about
50/50, trespassing versus permission.
For many years I didnt really
understand that I could ask for and
actually be granted permission to shoot
some of these places. Many sites are
wrapped in bureaucratic red tape, yet
easily accessed through Swiss-cheese
fences and unlocked doors, he says. In
those cases its easier to ask forgiveness

Tri-Power Catfish: Paivas late night wanders


through auto junkyards often turn up a kind of
unyielding beauty in Americas automotive past. Here
he added glamour to a 1957 Chevy gasser using a
combination of full moon and ProtoMachines lighting
(cool white, lime and red). The scene was exposed for
108 sec at f/7.1 at ISO 200 and using a 3800K white
balance setting.

than permission, should the need arise.


A lot of his shooting is done in salvage
and junkyards and, he says, those sites
are usually well guarded, so he tries to
get permission from someone during the
day. Youd be surprised how well some
night images look on your phone, or a
few inexpensive 8x10s to pass around
can lubricate the locks, he says. Its all
about human engineering with property
owners and caretakers, striking a
balance between serious professional
and oddball artist, interlaced with an
undercurrent of obviously harmless
friendliness.
Another somewhat less obvious
problem of shooting in the urban
underworld that has gotten worse
since he began shooting is that a lot
of the most interesting locales have a
half-life of only weeks, if not days. The
shootable life of an abandoned site is
usually short. The actual time frame
depends on how far from the rest of
civilization it is. More urbanized sites
may only last a matter of months or even
weeks. Taggers and metal scrappers can
ruin a site in one night, he says.
JUST THE BEGINNING
Today Paiva spends as much time
as possible teaching workshops and
sharing his knowledge via eBooks and
says that his workshops are as much fun
for him as they are a learning experience
for his students. My workshops are
unlike any other. We rent a site, usually
a remote junkyard, and lock ourselves in
there, with 6 to 8 hours of night shooting
time (and some daylight scouting hours)
for 3 nights. No time wasted driving
from site to site, no disturbing the locals
or run ins with the sheriff. More than
half of his workshoppers are repeat
offenders, returning over and over again,
he says.
Does he think the current popularity
of light painting will fade into the
night? Its actually ramping up very
quickly. Night photography and light
painting is the final frontier of amateur
photography, he says. I think its really
only just beginning. Q
To see more of Troy Paivas work,
visit: www.lostamerica.com.

Race Control: While the outdoor portions of the scene of the collapsing press box of the abandoned
Pearsonville Raceway in Pearsonville, California have a daylight quality, that look is entirely produced by the
long exposure under the light of the full moon. Look in the distance and you can see the city lights along the
horizon. The interior colors were painted using a lime and red gelled LED flashlight. The image was made using a
Canon 20D, a Tokina 12-24mm (at 12mm), exposed at ISO 100 (3950K) for 120 sec at f/5.6.

Count Olafs Eyes: This is actually the prop car (a custom-built Chrysler limousine) from the film Lemony
Snickets A Series of Unfortunate Events. The shot was made with a Canon 60D, a Tokina 12-24mm (at 12mm),
exposed for 109 sec at f/8, ISO 200 with the white balance set to 3800K. Heres Paivas diary entry on how the
shot was made: This custom dashboard is utterly unlike anything Ive ever seen in a junkyard before. This was
an intensely complex set up. Because the passenger area is huge in a limo I had plenty of room to set the tripod
up there and point the camera over the seat to get the drivers perspective. A lime gelled LED pointed straight
down on the steering wheel, seat and dash as well as on the ceiling from camera left. Theres also a red LED
from the left and right onto various areas of the interior. From the front of the car I shined an LED flashlight
through the torn and hanging headliner 3 times, careful to space them well and get the right amount of light
through the perforations. I used my 60Ds swivel screen to remain outside of the car during the entire shooting/
previewing process. It took quite a few tries to get everything balanced and placed properly.
2014

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

75

SAME FACE, DIFFERENT ASPECT

BY JAMES PATRICK

PRIMARY PART of my work over the past 12 years has been editorial and
commercial portraiture. Ive worked with athletes, actors, musicians,
business owners, models, doctors, mothers, fathers, brothers and sisters
each with a unique look.

The important thing about lighting


setupsand a principle of studio
shootingis that the bigger the light
source is in relation to the subject, the
softer the light will be. The key words
being in relation to the subject. A light
bulb or even a candle that is right next to
the subject is much softer than a softbox
placed 20 feet away, simply because the
softbox is further away, thus smaller
in relation to your subject. Applying
that concept of lighting, placing a large
light source as close to your subject as
possible creates a softer quality of light.
If you want harder (or more contrasty
light) use smaller light modifiers and/or
move the light away from the subject.
My aim in this article is to show
how a slight movement of the light,
where it is pointed and what you use to
soften or direct the light, can create a
very different mood and vibe in your
portrait images.
MATCH THE LIGHT TO THE
SUBJECT & INTENT
Clearly, there is no such thing as a
76

EXPERT PHOTO TECHNIQUES

2014

perfect lighting setup for every subject.


Every face is going to give you something
unique and different, which is what
makes creating and sculpting with
light so much fun. When considering
lighting setups, always ask yourself
(and sometimes your subject!) what the
intent of the image might be and what
type of lighting will best accomplish
that for you. There are no strict rules
here. Sometimes, harsh and heavily
shadowed light will work for a certain
female subject while soft light will work
for a certain male subject. The goal is
to experiment, observe how the use of
light impacts your subject, and then be
willing to shift gears to add an extra
spark to your work.
In this photo of Heather (#1) we
wanted to create a flawless look. For
this we used what is called Clamshell
lighting. The main light (an Einstein
640 with a large octabox, www.
paulcbuff.com) was placed directly in
front of the model about 2 feet up using a
C-stand, a boom arm and pointing down
at a 45 angle.

All photos James Patrick

SCULPT PORTRAITS
WITH LIGHTING

One light pointing down from this


angle can create unflattering shadows
on her face, making her appear older. To
compensate we put a second light in a
large softbox on a small stand pointing
up at a 45 angle, creating the look of a
clamshell with the 2 lights. The second
light fills in the shadows under her brow
and chin. Alternatively, we could have
used a reflector to bounce up light into
her face from below.
The main light was metered at
f/11 and a secondor lower light (the
fill)at f/8. If the fill were even with
the main light it would erase too many
details from her face. Keeping it at least
a stop under allows for a separation in
her jaw line.
We added 2 lights with strip boxes
and grids, each about 4 feet behind
the model pointing at her shoulders
at a 45 angle for a rim light (a kind of
sharp-edged halo) to separate her from
the background.
The result is smooth light that
creates a fresh and vibrant portrait.
Consider clamshell lighting for subjects
when you want to soften their skin.
You can enhance the drama by simply
turning down the power of the fill light
to increase the shadows to get just the
look you want.
For the next setup (#2) we wanted
more drama while still making sure the
light was flattering. We used a technique
called Feathering The Light.
Feathering is a less directional (softer)
light which wraps around the subject
with a gradual falloff. We started with
the light at a 90 angle to the subject. We
then moved the light forwardtoward
us and away from the model. If you were
to look at the lighting setup from the
side, youd see the light is not even really
pointing at the modelbut stands in
front of her.
Think about how the light passes
through a softbox. The light (which
is in the center of the box) shoots
forward through a few baffles, usually
translucent white material. The interior
is lined with silver that bounces the
light around and then pushes it out of
the enclosure. The light from the center
of the softbox is much stronger and
harsher than the light from the edges.
So we are using the very edges of the
softbox to light the subject.
This light has a richer look, creating
more shadow from the light falling off
while still being soft enough to cover
up any imperfections in the skin. We
added in a silver reflector at camera
left to fill in some of the shadows on

the subjects right side. We set up one


rim light, camera right, to separate her
from the background.
This lighting is a bit moodier, adding
more contrast than the previous image
while still being flattering to skin tones
and texture. This is a great lighting
setup for modeling talent portraits as
well as for editorial portraits.

just as much as highlights. Here we


used the feathering technique, however,
we did not use a reflector to fill in the
shadows and allowed the light verge
into darkness. We added a hair light to
provide dimension and shape to his face.
For this image (#4) we used 3 lights,
each with a 7 reflector and a grid.
A reflector surrounds the light and
strengthens it and (unlike a softbox)
there is no diffusion panel in front of the
source. A grid is a patterned covering for
a light that directs and often shapes it
without affecting its quality or strength.
We placed the main light, with a 10 grid
for a narrow beam of light, directly in
front of the subject on a C-stand with a
boom arm just a few feet away and about
a foot higher than his eye level. The 2
rim lights each had a 30 grid set a few
feet back pointing at his temples. The
rim lights were metered a stop higher
than the main and the background falls
dark, as no light is hitting it.
The directional main light fills in the
texture on his facebut casts a nice hard
shadow below his nose and chin. Notice
how the flattering light makes Percys
face seem a bit wider than in the other
image, where the shadows slimmed out
his face. Q

With a female subject I am careful


about how the light impacts her skin.
However, with a male subject (#3) I
am more apt to allow for more texture,
contrast and shadow. I tend not to use
a clamshell light setup with a male
portrait, but you might approach this in
another way. My aim in this setup with
Percy was to bring in strong shadows



 

 







  

  !"#$#
%
&'()"(##*$)$
+,&'()"(*"#
-& ./0 
/0 

01  2



"#
  

$ 
 &'(( "%
   )*
'  ) +,-./.










!




3 $4 )
$ 5" 6 

(37

OM-D E-M1 Mirrorless System Camera

Lumix DMC-GH4 4K Mirrorless System Camera

t5JMUJOH-$%5PVDITDSFFO
t.JDSP'PVS5IJSET4ZTUFN
t4%4%)$4%9$$BSE4MPU
t'VMM)%Q7JEFP
t#VJMU*O8JSFMFTT$POOFDUJWJUZ
t%VTU4QMBTI'SFF[FQSPPG
Magnesium Alloy Body

t%$*,YBUQ
t6)%,YBUQQ
t-$% t-JWF7JFX'JOEFS t'VMM)%
VQUPQ t)JHI4QFFE1PJOU"'
t4VQQPSUGPSQ Q Q Q
t#JUPS#JU)%.*0VUQVU
t.BHOFTJVN"MMPZ 8FBUIFS4FBMFE#PEZ

16

#OLEM1*

The Professionals Source

When in New York,


Visit our SuperStore

420 Ninth Ave.


Corner of 34th Street

New York, N.Y. 10001

Mega
Pixels

Body Only #CAE60D ......................................899.99

18

Mega
Pixels

EOS-70D DSLR

BandH.com/catalog
212-444-6633

Store & Mail Order Hours:

Sunday 10-5 t Mon.-Thurs. 9-7


Friday 9-1 EST/9-2 DST
Saturday Closed

Page 1

Mega
Pixels

20

Mega
Pixels

Body Only #CAE5D3* ...................................3399.00


Kit with 24-105mm L IS #CAE5D324105 ......3999.00

22

Mega
Pixels

18

Mega
Pixels

EOS-1Dx D-SLR

Body Only #CAE7D .......................................1499.00


Kit with 28-135mm IS #CAE7D28135...........1699.00

Convenient free parking


available

20

t$MFBS7JFX)JHI3FTPMVUJPO-$%
t% *(*$ *NBHF1SPDFTTPS t1PJOU
)JHI%FOTJUZ"' t6TFT$BOPO&'-FOTFT
t%VBM$' 4%$BSE4MPUT t6QUP'14
t%VSBCMF.BHOFTJVN"MMPZ$POTUSVDUJPO
t'VMM)%QBOEQ'PSNBUT
t#VJMU*O)%3BOE.VMUJQMF&YQPTVSF.PEFT

EOS-7D D-SLR

Hands-on demos

Body Only #CAE6D ......................................1899.00


Kit with 24-105mm f/4 L #CAE6D24105 ......2499.00

EOS-5D Mark III D-SLR

t%VBM1JYFM$.04"'XJUI-JWF7JFX
t%*(*$ *NBHF1SPDFTTPS
t4%4%)$4%9$$BSE4MPU
t6TFT$BOPO&'&'4-FOTFT
t7BSJ"OHMF5PVDITDSFFO
tGQT$POUJOVPVT4IPPUJOH
t'VMM)%Q7JEFP

t%VBM%*(*$ *NBHF1SPDFTTPST
t.BHOFTJVN"MMPZ#PEZ
t&ZF-FWFM1FOUBQSJTN7JFXGJOEFS
t-$%.POJUPS t6TFT$BOPO&'-FOTFT
t%VBM$'DBSETMPUT
tY)%7JEFP$BQUVSF
t-JWF7JFX4UJMMBOE7JEFP3FDPSEJOH
t1PJOU)JHI%FOTJUZ"VUP'PDVT

t3FDPSE)%7JEFP t.FHBQJYFM4FOTPS
t-$% t7JFXGJOEFS
t6TFT$BOPO&'-FOTFT t$'$BSE4MPU
t%VTU8FBUIFS3FTJTUBOU tGQT#VSTU.PEF
t4 FMFDUBCMF7JEFP&YQPTVSFBOE'SBNF3BUFT
t/FX1PJOU "MM$SPTT5ZQF"'4ZTUFN
t*40 FYQBOEBCMFUP

The most knowledgeable


Sales Professionals

Mega
Pixels

t'VMM'SBNF$.044FOTPS t-$%
t%*(*$ *NBHF1SPDFTTPS
t6TFT$BOPO&'-FOTFT
t4%4%)$4%9$$BSE4MPU
t#VJMU*O8J'JBOE(14$POOFDUJWJUZ
t'VMM)%QXJUI.BOVBM$POUSPMT
t#VJMU*O)%3BOE.VMUJQMF&YQPTVSF.PEFT

Body Only #CAE70D..................................... 1199.00


Kit with 18-55mm STM #CAE70D1855 ........1349.00

Over 70,000 square feet


of the latest gear

16

EOS-6D DSLR

EOS-60D DSLR
tY)%7JEFP$BQUVSF
t%*(*$*NBHF1SPDFTTPS
t4%4%)$4%9$$BSE4MPU
t8PSLTXJUIBMM$BOPO&'&'4-FOTFT
t7BSJ"OHMF$MFBS7JFX'MJQ0VU-$%
tGQT$POUJOVPVT4IPPUJOH
t*40&YQBOEBCMFUP
t)%.*0VUQVUUP)%57

EOS Flash System (USA)


270EX II .... 169.99
430EX II .... 299.99
320EX ..................
600 EX-RT 549.99
MR-14EX Ringlight........................549.99
MT-24EX Twin Flash......................829.99
EF-S Lenses for Digital Only (USA)
(Not compatible with full frame cameras)
60/2.8 USM Macro (52)...............469.99
10-22/3.5-4.5 USM (77) .............649.99
15-85/3.5-5.6 IS USM (72) .........799.99
17-55/2.8 IS USM (67)................879.99
17-85/4-5.6 IS USM (67) ............599.99
18-135/3.5-5.6 IS (67) ...............499.99
18-200/3.5-5.6 IS (72) ...............699.99
55-250/4.0-5.6 IS USM (58) .......249.99
EF Lenses (USA)
20/2.8 USM (72) .........................539.99
24/2.8 IS USM (58) .....................599.99
28/2.8 IS USM (58) .....................549.99
35/2 IS USM (67) ........................599.99
50/1.8 II (52) ..............................125.99
50/1.4 USM (58) .........................399.99
50/2.5 Macro (52).......................299.99
85/1.8 USM (58) ...........................419.99
100/2 USM (58) ..........................499.99
100/2.8 USM Macro (58).............599.99
28-135/3.5-5.6 IS USM (72) .......479.99
70-300/4-5.6 IS USM (58) ..........649.99
70-300/4.5-5.6 DO IS USM (58) ......1399.00
75-300/4.0-5.6 III (58) ................199.99
75-300/4.0-5.6 III USM (58) ........234.99

Body Only............................................ #PADMCGH4*

18

Mega
Pixels

TS-E MF Lenses (USA)


17/4.0 L.. 2249.00
24/3.5 L II . 1999.00
45/2.8 .... 1399.00
90/2.8 .... 1399.00
EF L Lenses (USA)
14/2.8 USM II .............................2249.00
24/1.4 II (77) ............................1649.00
35/1.4 USM (72) .......................1479.00
50/1.2 USM (72) .......................1549.00
85/1.2 USM II (72) ....................2099.00
100/2.8 IS USM Macro (67) .........949.99
135/2.0 USM (72) .....................1049.00
180/3.5 USM Macro (72)...........1499.00
200/2.0 IS USM (52) .................5999.00
300/4.0 IS USM (77) .................1449.00
300/2.8 IS USM II (52 rear)........6599.00
400/5.6 USM (77) .....................1339.00
8-15/4.0 Fish-eye USM...............1349.00
16-35/2.8 USM II (82) ...............1699.00
17-40/4.0 USM (77) ...................839.99
24-70/4.0 IS USM (77)................999.99
24-70/2.8 USM II (82) ...............2099.00
24-105/4 IS USM (77)...............1149.00
28-300/3.5-5.6 IS USM (77) .....2549.00
70-200/4.0 IS USM (77)............1299.00
70-200/2.8 USM (77) ...............1449.00
70-200/2.8 IS II USM (77) .........2299.00
70-300/4.0-5.6 IS USM (67) .....1449.00
100-400/4.5-5.6 IS USM (77) ...1699.00
1.4x III Tele . 449.99
2x III Tele ... 449.99

Body Only #CAE1DX*....................................6799.00

AF Flashes
SB-300 ..... 146.95
SB-700 ..... 326.95
SB-910 ........................................ 546.95
R1 Wireless Twin Flash .............................
R1C1 Wireless Twin Flash System .............
DX ED-IF Lenses for Digital Only
10.5/2.8 Fish-Eye ....................................
35/1.8 G AF-S (52) ..................... 196.95
40/2.8 G AF-S Micro (52) ............ 276.95
85/3.5 G ED VR Micro (52) .......... 526.95
10-24/3.5-4.5 G AF-S (77).....................
12-24/4 G AF-S (77) ..............................
16-85/3.5-5.6 G AF-S VR (67) ................
17-55/2.8 G AF-S (77) ...........................
18-55/3.5-5.6 G AF-S II (52) ..................
18-55/3.5-5.6 G AF-S VR (52) ..... 196.95
18-105/3.5-5.6 G AF-S VR (67) ... 396.95
18-200/3.5-5.6 G AF-S VR II (72) 596.95
18-300/3.5-5.6 G AF-S ED VR (77) ..... 996.95
55-200/4-5.6 G AF-S (52)......................
55-200/4-5.6 G AF-S VR (52) ...... 246.95
55-300/4.5-5.6 G AF-S VR (58) ... 396.95
D-Type AF Lenses
14/2.8 D ED .........
24/2.8 D (52)......
16/2.8 D (39) with Hood .........................
24/3.5 D ED PC-E (77) ...........................
28/1.8 G AF-S (67) ..................... 696.95
28/2.8 D (52)......
35/2.0 D (52)......
45/2.8 D ED PC-E Micro (77) ..................

D-Type AF Lenses
50/1.8 D (52)......
50/1.4 D (52)......
50/1.8 G AF-S (58) ..................... 216.95
50/1.4 G AF-S (58) ................................
60/2.8 D Micro (62) (1:1) .......................
60/2.8 G AF-S ED Micro (62) ..................
85/1.8 G AF-S (67) ..................... 496.95
85/1.4 D IF (77) .....................................
85/1.4 G AF-S (77) ................................
105/2.8 G AF-S ED-IF VR Micro (62) .......
105/2.0 DC D with Hood (72) .................
180/2.8 D ED-IF (72)..............................
200/4 D ED-IF Micro w/Case (62) ...........
200/2 G AF-S ED-IF VR II (52) .................
300/4.0 D AF-S ED-IF (77) .....................
14-24/2.8 G AF-S ED-IF.............. 1996.95
16-35/4.0 G AF-S ED VR (77) .... 1256.95
17-35/2.8 D AF-S ED-IF (77) ..................
18-35/3.5-4.5 G ED (77)............. 746.95
24-70/2.8 G AF-S ED-IF (77) ..... 1886.95
24-85/2.8-4.0 D IF (72) .........................
24-120/4.0 G AF-S ED VR (77) ........ 1296.95
28-300/3.5-5.6 G AF-S ED VR (77) ... 1046.95
70-200/2.8 G AF-S ED-IF VR II (77)..... 2396.95
70-300/4.5-5.6 G-AFS VR (67).... 586.95
80-200/2.8 D with Collar (77).................
80-400/4.5-5.6 D VR (77) ......................
200-400/4 G AF-S ED VR II (52)..............
TC-14E II (1.4x) Teleconverter ...................
TC-17E II (1.7x) ....
TC-20E III (2x).......

10-22/3.5-4.5
EF-S USM Digital Lens

600 EX-RT
Shoe Mount Flash

18-200/3.5-5.6 DX G
AF-S ED-IF VR II Digital Lens

SB-910 Speedlight
i-TTL Shoe Mount Flash

t&YDMVTJWFMZEFTJHOFEGPS%JHJUBM4-3T
tNNFRVJW
16-35mm
tBTQIFSJDBM
lens elements
tG4UPQ3BOHF
t.JOJNVNGPDVT
tNNMUFSEJBNFUFS
t8FJHIUP[

t%VTUBOEXBUFSSFTJTUBODF
t(VJEF/Ph
t8JSFMFTT3BEJP
Multiple Flash System
t#PVODFBOE
Swivel Head
t;PPN)FBE NN

t$VTUPN'VODUJPOT
t8FJHIUP[

t&YDMVTJWFMZEFTJHOFEGPS%JHJUBM4-3T
tNNFRVJW
27-300mm
t73**7JCSBUJPO3FEVDUJPO
t48. 4JMFOU
Wave Motor)
tG4UPQ3BOHF
t'PDVThUP*OOJUZ
t8FJHIUP[

t5VOHTUFO'MVPSFTDFOU'JMUFST*ODMVEFE
t(VJEF/Ph
t4JNQMJFE(SBQIJD
User Interface (GUI)
t#PVODF 4XJWFM
;PPN)FBE
(17-200mm)
t8JSFMFTT$POUSPMMFS
t8FJHIUP[

Prices, specifications, and images are subject to change without notice. Manufacturer rebates are subject to the terms and conditions (including expiration dates) printed on the manufacturers rebate forms. Not responsible for typographical or
illustrative errors. 2000-2013 B & H Foto & Electronics Corp. NYC DCA Electronics Store Lic. #0906712; NYC DCA Electronics & Home Appliance Service Dealer Lic. #0907905; NYC DCA Secondhand Dealer General Lic. #0907906

Alpha A7 %4-3

Alpha A6000 .JSSPSMFTT4ZTUFN$BNFSB

t'VMM'SBNF&YNPS$.044FOTPS
t%JSFDU$PNQBUJCJMJUZXJUI&NPVOU-FOTFT
t5JMUBCMF5'5-$% t.VMUJ*OUFSGBDF4IPF
t4 %4%)$4%9$ .41SP%VP
1SP)(%VP$BSE4MPUT
t'VMMQXJUI6ODPNQSFTTFE0VUQVU
t#VJMU*O8J'JBOE/'$ t%JSFDU"DDFTT*OUFSGBDF
#PEZ0OMZ #SOA7B

t6TFT4POZ&NPVOU-FOTFT
t5JMUJOH-$%t4% 4%)$ 4%9$ 
.41SP%VP .4130)(%VP$BSE4MPU
t'VMM)%JQ"7$)%7JEFPBUGQT
t6 QUPGQT4IPPUJOHBOE*40
t#VJMU*O8J'J$POOFDUJWJUZXJUI/'$
t"WBJMBCMFJO#MBDLPS4JMWFS

24

,JUXJUINN-FOT #SOA7KB

Mega
Pixels

D7100 %4-3

24

Kit with 16-50mm OSS Lens #SOA6000*

D810 %4-3

t.BHOFTJVN"MMPZ#PEZ t.PJTUVSF3FTJTUBOU
t&91&&%*NBHF1SPDFTTPS t-$%
tQ'VMM)%7JEFP$BQUVSF
t"DDFQUT/JLPO"'-FOTFT YGBDUPS

t%VBM4%4%)$4%9$$BSE4MPUT
t#VJMU*O'MBTIXJUI$PNNBOEFS'VODUJPO
t/JLPO*ODMJNJUFEXBSSBOUZJODMVEFE
#PEZ0OMZ #NID7100 ................................................. 1,199.95
,JUXJUINN73 #NID710018105 ....................1,599.95

24

NEW

t'9'PSNBU$.044FOTPS t0QUJDBM-PX1BTT'JMUFS
t& 91&&%*NBHF1SPDFTTPS t$'4%%VBM$BSE
4MPUT t/JLPO'.PVOU-FOT.PVOU t-$%
t'VMM)%Q7JEFPBUGQT
t&YUFSOBM.JDBOE)FBEQIPOF*OQVUT
t$POUJOVPVT4IPPUJOHUPGQTJO'9.PEF
t.VMUJ$".'9"'4FOTPSX1PJOUT
t/JLPO*ODMJNJUFEXBSSBOUZJODMVEFE
Mega
Pixels

Body Only............................ #NID810 ............................3296.95

The Professionals Source

BandH.com
36

Mega
Pixels

16

Mega
Pixels

D4s %4-3

D610 %4-3

t'9GPSNBU GVMMGSBNF
$.044FOTPS
t#JU3"8'JMFT#JU3"84'PSNBU
t&91&&%*NBHF1SPDFTTPSt*40
t'VMM)%Q7JEFPBUGQT t-$%
t$PNQBUJCMFXJUI.PTU/JLLPS0QUJDT
tGQT4IPPUJOHGPS4IPUTXJUI"&"'
t$'5ZQF92%$PNQBUJCMF
t/JLPO*ODMJNJUFEXBSSBOUZJODMVEFE

t'9'PSNBU 'VMM'SBNF
$.044FOTPS t-$%
t6TFT/JLPO"'-FOTFT t4%4%)$4%9$
$BSE4MPU t& 91&&%*NBHF1SPDFTTPS
t&YQBOEBCMF4FOTJUJWJUZUP*40
t'VMM)%Q7JEFP3FDPSEJOHBUGQT
t.VMUJ$"."'4FOTPSXJUI1PJOUT
t/JLPO*ODMJNJUFEXBSSBOUZJODMVEFE
#PEZ0OMZ #NID610....................................................1996.95
,JUXJUINN73-FOT #NID6102485 .................2596.95

24

Mega
Pixels

Body Only...................... #NID4S .................6496.95

Muse
4FMFDUJWF'PDVT4-3$BNFSB-FOT

17-50mm f/2.8
XR LD-IF Di II %JHJUBM-FOT

11-16mm
f/2.8 AT-X Pro DX-II %JHJUBM-FOT

58 AF-2 TTL
Shoe Mount Flash

'BTUBOE-PPTF
*EFBMGPSUBCMFUPQBOE
NBDSPQIPUPHSBQIZ
4RVFF[FUIF.VTFUP
GPDVT BOECFOEZPVS
4XFFU4QPUBSPVOE
UIFQIPUP

t&YDMVTJWFMZEFTJHOFEGPSVTFXJUI
EJHJUBM4-3DBNFSBT
t.BHOJDBUJPO
SBUJPPG
t.JO'PDVT
t8FJHIUP[

t&YDMVTJWFMZEFTJHOFEGPSVTFXJUI
EJHJUBM4-3DBNFSBT
t'PDVT$MVUDI.FDIBOJTN
t.JO'PDVT
tBOHMFPGWJFX
tNNMUFSEJBNFUFS
t8FJHIUMC

t(VJEF/Ph
t'VMM55-.PEF
t;PPN)FBE 

t#PVODF4XJWFM)FBE
t6QEBUFWJB64#1PSU
t8FJHIUP[

for Canon, Nikon, Sony


501 ** $525.00

for Canon, Leica, Nikon,


Olympus, Panasonic, Pentax,
Samsung, Sony  .&"' $399.99

18-200mm f/3.5-6.3
II OS HSM DC %JHJUBM-FOT

EM-140 DG TTL
3JOHMJHIU'MBTI

285HV Professional
Auto Shoe Mount Flash

t&YDMVTJWFMZEFTJHOFE
GPSVTFXJUIEJHJUBM
4-3DBNFSBT
t.JOJNVN'PDVTh
t.BHSBUJPPG

t8JSFMFTT55-BTIDPOUSPM
t)JHI4QFFE4ZODISP
t*EFBMGPSQIPUPHSBQIJOH
TVCKFDUTJOOFEFUBJM

t(VJEF/Ph
t"VUPNBUJDFYQPTVSF
SBOHFUPh
tBVUPGTUPQTFUUJOHT
t3FNPWBCMFTFOTPS
t#PVODF)FBE

for Canon, Leica, Nikon, Olympus,


Pentax, Sony -&.6  $149.95

for Canon, Nikon,


Pentax, Sony
5"  $499.00

10-20mm f/4-5.6
EX HSM DC %JHJUBM-FOT
t&YDMVTJWFMZEFTJHOFE
GPSVTFXJUIEJHJUBM
4-3DBNFSBT
t'PDVThUP*OOJUZ
for Canon, Nikon,
Olympus, Pentax,
Sigma, Sony 4*%  $479.00

Mega
Pixels

for Canon, Nikon,


Sigma, Sony 4*  $499.00

for Canon, Nikon,


Pentax, Sigma, Sony
4*&.%(  $379.00

800-947-9965
212-444-6645
Fax:

212-239-7770

We Buy, Sell, and Trade

7*)7 $85.00

Advertisers Index
42nd Street Photography ........................................................................79
Alien Skin Software.............................................................................69, C4
Argraph Corporation .................................................................................59
Athentech Imaging....................................................................................13
Automated Photo Technology ..............................................................68
B&H Photo .............................................................................................. 80-81
Bay Photo Lab ...................................................................................C2-3, 68
Big Prints USA ..............................................................................................70
Cambridgeworld.Com .......................................................................66, 67
Carl Zeiss Optical Co .................................................................................... 7
Circle Graphics Inc................................................................................. 9, 70
Color Services ..............................................................................................69
Eizo Nanao Technologies .........................................................................41
EP Levine .......................................................................................................68
Expoimaging Inc ..................................................................................29, 70
Hoodman Corp............................................................................................35
Lasersoft ........................................................................................................22
Lenscoat.........................................................................................................71
Lense On ........................................................................................................70

Lightware Inc ...............................................................................................69


Manfrotto ...............................................................................................C3, 82
Meridian Professional Imaging.......................................................53, 70
Midwest Photographic Resource..........................................................65
Mylo Development LLC ..........................................................................4, 5
Naneu .............................................................................................................69
Omegabrandness ................................................................................45, 77
Op Tech ..........................................................................................................68
Paul C Buff Inc ....................................................................................... 16-17
Photoflex .......................................................................................................23
Plasticase Inc ................................................................................................15
Promediagear ..............................................................................................51
Protek..............................................................................................................14
Skytop Trading ............................................................................................68
Sto Fen.....................................................................................................68, 69
Superior Specialties Inc ............................................................................70
Tamron USA ..................................................................................................21
Tiltall ................................................................................................................78
Vanguard USA..............................................................................................49

I am connected
to the feeling and
personality of analog
imagery that digital
fails to render.
Exposure gives me
back that feeling
and personality.
Parker J. Pster

PHOTO 2014 PARKER J. PFISTER.

Now featuring all the artistic lens simulation effects of our best-selling
creative focus software, Bokeh, Exposure 6 brings even more of the organic
warmth and artistry of the darkroom to the world of digital.
With Exposure, your photo will look handcrafted rather than computer-generated. Offering over 450 presets right
out of the box, Exposure provides a wide range of starting points for developing your look. Exposure 6 ts into any
workow. It integrates seamlessly with Photoshop, Lightroom and Aperture and, with its updated UI and super fast
processing, delivers excellent results as a standalone application.

Visit alienskin.com to try Exposure for free.