You are on page 1of 18

 

Evaluation   of   Reston   Association’s   Purchase   and 
Management   of   the   Tetra   Property 
  
A   Failure   in   Board   Oversight   and   Staff   Management 
  
Prepared   for   the   Reston   Association’s   Board   of   Directors   and   Chief   Executive   Officer 
  
January   25,   2017 
  
Prepared   by   Reston   Recall 
Ed   Abbott 
Alison   Kamat 
Terry   Maynard 
 

 
 
 

 

 

 

Because   the   Board   of   Directors   of   the   Reston   Association,   together   with   RA   staff   and 
legal   counsel,   have   failed   to   negotiate   a  contract   to   investigate   the   circumstances   that 
led   up   to   the   purchase   of   the   Tetra   property   at   an   inflated   price,   as   well   as   the   cost 
overruns   associated   with   that   purchase,   we   have   taken   it   upon   ourselves   to   examine   the 
public   record   and   present   the   known   facts.   Here   is   our   report   of   those   findings.  
 
 
The   story   in   brief,   Op­Ed   by   Terry   Maynard

Historical   Background

Reston   Land   Corporation

1980   rezoning

Development   of   Lake   Newport

Purchase   by   Tetra   Properties

2010   appraisal

Reston   Association   purchase
2015   appraisal
Problems   with   building   a  restaurant   on   the   site



10 

Fairfax   County   Chesapeake   Bay   Resource   Protection   Area

10 

Floodplain

10 

Reston   Association   easements

11 

Neighborhood   opposition

11 

Asking   price

11 

Purchase   proposed   at   the   Reston   Association   Board   meeting

12 

Resolution   to   buy   the   Tetra   Property

13 

Referendum

13 

Referendum   passes

13 

Financial   projections

14 

Rent­back   agreement   and   Bill   Lauer's   death

14 

Renovation   budget   and   cost   overruns

15 

Independent   review   of   the   Lake   House   purchase

16 

Mediaworld   bids   on   project
17­page   contract
Conclusion

16 
16 
17 

 

 
 

 

The   story   in   brief,   Op­Ed   by   Terry   Maynard 
This is an op-ed by Terry Maynard, co-chair of the Reston 20/20 committee, originally published 
in RestonNow, January 11, 2017.  

 
Two   years   ago,   former   RA   Board   President   Ken   Kneuven,   Reston’s   homeowner   association 
announced   its   deal   with   a  local   developer   to   purchase   his   property,   the   Tetra   office   building,   for 
over   twice   its   county­appraised   value   of   $1.2   million.    This   started   the   long   slide   of   Reston 
Association   into   bad   governance   and   mismanagement. 
 
 
How   did   this   happen?   No   one   knows   for   sure.    However,   Mr.   Kneuven   and   Rick   Beyer,   who   lives 
on   the   shore   of   Lake   Newport   opposite   the   Tetra   property,   have   been   friends   for   some   time.   Mr. 
Beyer   was   active   in   supporting   the   RA   Tetra   purchase.    He   was   likely   concerned   about   his   view 
and,   as   a  result,   his   property   value.   It   is   not   known   whether   Beyer   asked   a  favor   from   Kneuven 
in   eliminating   this   risk   by   having   RA   pursue   the   purchase   of   the   Tetra   property.   It   is   clear   is   that 
after   Mr.   Kneuven   left   his   RA   post,   he   obtained   employment   as   a  Senior   Consultant   at   AGB 
Institutional   Strategies.   Mr.   Beyer   is   a  Managing   Principal   at   the   same   company. 
 
 
As   for   the   rest   of   us,   RA   and   its   Board   justified   paying   $2.65   million   in   part   by   assuming   that   a 
costly   restaurant   there   twice   the   size   of   the   Tetra   building   might   be   built.   RA   didn’t   bother   to 
note,   however,   that   the   restaurant   was   never   approved,   and   there   are   numerous   environmental 
restrictions   and   easements   preventing   construction.    Moreover,   RA’s   appraiser   put   the 
property’s   “as   is”   value   at   just   $1.1   million.   In   fact,   the   property   had   been   on   and   off   the   market 
with   little   interest   for   most   of   a  decade. 
 
 
Nonetheless,   to   sell   the   deal   in   a  community   referendum,   RA   “projected”   that   renovations,   inside 
and   out,   would   cost   RA   members   just   $259,000.   To   date,   interior   repairs   alone   have   cost 
Restonians   $692,000   —  not   counting   $925,000   in   seller   contributions   and   a  Comstock   proffer   to 
RA   which   could   have   been   used   for   much   better   purposes   —  and   an   RA   consultant   projects 
proposed   exterior   improvements   will   cost   $1.2   million. 
 
 
On   the   other   side   of   the   ledger,   RA   projected   rental   income   from   a  rent   back   agreement   with   the 
Tetra   owners   of   more   than   $140,000   through   2016.   Unfortunately,   the   sloppily   written   agreement 
allowed   Tetra’s   former   owners   to   walk   away   at   the   end   of   2015,   resulting   in   an   immediate 
$100,000   loss   in   RA   revenues.   RA   scrambled   to   make   up   the   shortfall,   but   —  as   of   November 
—   expected   year­end   cash   flow   losses   reached   $902,000,   some   $515,000   more   than   RA 
projected   for   2016   during   the   Tetra   referendum. 
 
If   publicly   known   at   the   time,   these   massive   misstatements,   mistakes,   expenses   and   overruns 
would   have   doomed   the   purchase’s   narrow   community   approval. 
 
 
Indeed,   the   massive   renovation   cost   overruns   were   not   revealed   until   May   2016.  

  
When   the   cost   overruns   were   revealed,   community   pressure   built   and   the   Board   agreed   to 
contract   for   an   independent   review   of   the   purchase   and   renovation. 
  
After   choosing   to   sign   a  pro   bono   $1   review   contract   with   Mediaworld   LLC,   using   a  team   of 
Reston   volunteers   expert   in   financial   matters,   a  few   members   of   the   Board   sabotaged   its   own   by 
insisting   on   excessive   RA   control   and   contractor   liability   in   multiple,   lengthy   contract   drafts.   A 
special   Board   meeting   with   the   Mediaworld   volunteers   in   December   couldn’t   salvage   the 
negotiations   —  another   obstructionist   draft   resulted   —  and   the   volunteers   withdrew   last   week, 
explaining   the   multitude   of   reasons   why. 
 
The   increasingly   urgent   question   is:   What   are   some   members   of   RA’s   Board   and   senior   staff 
trying   to   conceal   about   the   Tetra   acquisition   and   renovation   —  and   why?   Did   they   engage   in 
illegal,   unethical   or   just   plain   stupid   behavior?   Unless   there   is   a  criminal   investigation,   the 
chances   are   dwindling   Restonians   will   ever   know   who,   how,   why   and   when   all   this   financial 
mischief   occurred   as   the   Board   and   staff   continue   to   hide   the   truth   any   way   they   can.   The   future 
of   honest,   open,   prudent   governance   in   Reston   has   never   looked   more   uncertain. 

 
https://www.restonnow.com/2017/01/11/op­ed­vote­to­put­an­end­to­the­growing­tetra­mess/ 

 

 

Historical   Background 
Reston   Land   Corporation 
Reston   Land   Corporation,   a  subsidiary   of   Mobil   Oil,   was   the   original   developer   for   Reston.1  Up 
until   the   1980’s,   most   of   the   development   took   place   south   of   Baron   Cameron   Drive.   The 
property   north   of   Baron   Cameron   was   for   the   most   part   was   undeveloped   and   would   eventually 
become   known   as   North   Reston. 

1980   rezoning 
Beginning   in   1980   Mobil   went   forward   with   a  full­scale   development   of   high­end   housing   in 
North   Reston.   The   property   at   11450   Baron   Cameron   Ave   was   located   on   Lake   Newport,   a 
prime   location   for   upper­end   housing. 
In   January   1980   the   Reston   Land   Corporation   Rezoning   and   Development   Plan   proffered   that 
the   property   at   11450   Baron   Cameron   Ave   would   initially   be   a  combination   eating   establishment 
and   Reston   sales/information   center.   They   further   proffered   that   when   the   sales/information 
center   was   no   longer   needed   for   the   marketing   of   Reston   that   the   portion   used   for   such   would 
be   converted   to   one   of   the   following: 

an   expanded   or   second   eating   establishment 
office   space2 

Reston   Land   Corporation   later   revised   the   site   plan   to   delay   construction   of   the   restaurant.   The 
restaurant   was   never   built. 

Development   of   Lake   Newport 
In   the   1990s,   the   prime   lots   around   Lake   Newport   were   developed.   In   1999   Richard   Beyer,   a 
local   entrepreneur,   purchased   one   of   the   prime   lots   and   built   a  large   house   on   the   site.   The   lot   is 
directly   across   the   lake   from   the   sales/information   center. 

1

  http://reston50.gmu.edu/files/original/b10d2c9dc0b91965f2e7684131f1a204.jpg 
  https://www.reston.org/Portals/3/2015%20DEVELOPMENT/Current%20Zoning%20Determiniations.pdf, 
pg.   3 
2

 
Satellite   image   of   Lake   Newport   showing   Beyer's   house   and   the   former   sales/information   center 

Purchase   by   Tetra   Properties 
After   the   development   of   North   Reston   was   completed   in   the   late   1990's,   the   sales   office   was   no 
longer   needed   and   Reston   Land   Corporation   decided   to   sell   the   property. 
In   2003   William   Lauer,   owner   of   Tetra   Properties,   was   considering   purchasing   the   property   to 
build   a  36,000   square­foot   office   building   on   the   property.   A  neighborhood   committee   called 
"Save   Lake   Newport,"   co­chaired   by   Rick   Beyer,   was   called   into   action   to   stop   Bill   Lauer   from 
purchasing   the   property.  3  
Lauer   came   up   with   a  new   plan   to   wrap   a  20,000   square­foot   restaurant   around   the   existing 
3,000   square   foot   visitors   center.   Once   again   there   was   significant   neighborhood   resistance,   led 
by   Rick   Beyer.  4    It   is   reasonable   to   assume   that   Mr.   Beyer   was   interested   in   protecting   his   view, 
his   solitude,   and   his   property   value.  

  http://www.restonevillage.org/index.cfm?action=n63&id=251,19,28  

3

 
4

 

h ttp://www.connectionnewspapers.com/news/2003/jun/11/proposal­stirs­up­lake­newpor
t/ 
 

In   Dec.   2003   Lauer,   through   Tetra   Properties'   subsidiary   Lake   Newport   LLC,   finalized   the 
purchase   of   the   former   visitors   center   for   $750,000,   well   below   the   assessed   value   of 
$1,167,3055.   In   subsequent   years   he   used   the   Lake   House   as   an   office   for   himself   and   his   staff. 

2010   appraisal 
Reston   Association   appears   to   have   had   little   interest   in   the   Tetra   office   building   until   2010.   For 
reasons   that   are   not   clear   in   the   public   record,   RA   requests   an   appraisal   of   the   property.   The 
appraiser   is   The   Robert   Paul   Jones   Company   located   in   Tyson   Corner.   Their   appraisal   report   is 
sent   to   Milton   Matthew,   the   CEO   of   Reston   Association   at   the   time. 
The   Jones’   appraisal   states   that   the   fee   simple   market   value   of   the   property   is   $1,170,000.   It 
goes   on   to   state   that   if   a  restaurant   “pad”   were   added   to   the   site   the   corresponding   fee   simple 
value   would   be   $2,760,000.  6  
The   Jones   appraisal   does,   however,   go   into   some   detail   on   the   county’s   view   on   permitting   a 
restaurant   on   the   site.   Several   pages   of   the   appraisal   summarize   and   interpret   county   rules 
based   on   2003   correspondence   between   the   former   owner,   Reston   Land   Corporation   (Mobil) 
and   county   officials.   A  careful   reading   of   this   section   of   the   report   clearly   shows   significant 
uncertainty   in   the   permitting   process.   The   report   concludes,   ”a   difference   of   opinion   existed 
concerning   the   development   of   the   property,”   which   is   hardly   a  ringing   endorsement   for   a 
restaurant.   It   is   not   known   from   the   public   record   why   Jones   considered   the   addition   of   a 
restaurant   pad   in   the   appraisal,   given   the   uncertainty   in   the   permitting   process. 

Reston   Association   purchase 
In   January   2015,   RA   publicly   announced   its   intention   to   sign   a  letter   of   intent   to   purchase   the 
Tetra   office   building.7  The   circumstances   and   events   leading   up   to   the   Board’s   consideration   are 
not   known.   Nonetheless,   RA   begins   the   process   of   purchasing   the   Lake   House.   Such   a 
purchase   must   be   approved   by   referendum   by   the   RA   membership. 

2015   appraisal 
The   first   indication   that   RA   was   considering   the   purchase   of   the   Tetra   property   was   in   December 
2014,   when   RA's   outside   counsel   receives   an   engagement   letter   from   Robert   Paul   Jones   stating 
  Fairfax   County,   VA,   Dept.   of   Tax   Administration   website 

5

 
6

 
https://www.reston.org/Portals/3/2015%20DEVELOPMENT/2010%20Tetra%20Property%20Appraisal.pdf
|website=Reston   Association 
 
7
 
https://www.reston.org/Portals/3/2015%20DEVELOPMENT/2010%20Tetra%20Property%20Appraisal.pdf  
 

the   company   is   prepared   to   make   an   appraisal   of   the   Tetra   Building.   Jones   completes   the 
appraisal   in   February   2015.8   The   appraisal   looks   quite   similar   to   the   2010   appraisal.   In   fact   the 
appraised   value   is   about   the   same   as   the   2010   appraisal,   $2.65   million.   There   is,   however,   a 
notable   difference   between   the   two. 
Unlike   the   first   appraisal,   the   client   (Reston   Association)   instructed   Jones   to   appraise   the 
property   as   a  restaurant.   The   report   says,   “The   purpose   of   this   appraisal   is   to   estimate   the   “as 
is”   fee   simple   market   value   of   the   subject   assuming   by   client   instruction   that   restaurant 
uses   are   permitted .”   (emphasis   added).   There   is   nothing   in   the   public   record   as   to   why   RA 
should   instruct   the   appraiser   to   consider   a  restaurant   on   the   property.   This   is   important,   as   the 
addition   of   a  restaurant   almost   doubles   the   appraised   value.   The   appraisal   lists   the   "as   is"   value 
(no   restaurant   added)   using   an   income   approach   as   $1.1   million. 

Problems   with   building   a  restaurant   on   the   site 
Despite   the   assumption   in   the   appraisal   that   "restaurant   uses   are   permitted,"   there   would   be   a 
number   of   obstacles   to   overcome   before   a  restaurant   could   be   built   on   the   site. 

Fairfax   County   Chesapeake   Bay   Resource   Protection   Area 
Fairfax   County   Chesapeake   Bay   Resource   Protection   Area   (CBRPA)   maps9  show   Lake   Newport 
as   a  Resource   Protection   Area   (RPA)   with   a  required   100­foot   buffer   around   the   lake,   pursuant 
to   §118­1­7(b)(ii)   of   the   County   Code.10  
The   RPA   designation   places   a  number   of   restrictions   on   development.   The   lake   and   the 
shoreline   area   within   100′   of   the   lake   must   be   kept   as   is   or   restored   to   its   natural   condition   if 
changes   are   made,   to   prevent   runoff   from   polluting   the   bay.   Fairfax   County   may   consider 
waivers   to   some   of   the   RPA   requirements,   subject   to   county   staff   review/approval   and   a  public 
hearing.   The   costs   of   such   a  waiver   and   likelihood   of   county   approval   is   not   addressed   in   the 
2015   appraisal. 

Floodplain 
A   second   mechanism   that   prevents   development   on   the   Tetra   property   is   the   designation   of   all 
the   area   west   of   the   Tetra   office   building   down   through   RA's   parking   area   as   a  floodplain.   In 
general,   this   designation   as   a  floodplain   means   that   nothing   can   be   built   there   that   impedes   the 
flow   of   flood   waters   to   the   area   beneath   the   Lake   Newport   dam.   To   impede   that   flow   could 

8

 
https://www.reston.org/Portals/3/2015%20NEWS%20RELEASE%20FILES/2015%20Appriasal%20of%20
11450%20Baron%20Cameron%20Avenue.pdf 
 
9
 h
  ttps://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/gisapps/DMV/cbpa/2005/11­4 
 
10
 h
  ttp://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/dpwes/environmental/cbay/ch118aug2006.pdf 
 

10 

cause   the   dam   to   collapse   from   excess   pressure,   imperiling   the   Lake   Anne   Village   Center 
downstream.11  

Reston   Association   easements 
Finally,   and   perhaps   most   importantly,   more   than   half   of   the   property   is   under   RA   easements, 
mostly   for   parking   areas   for   RA   tennis   courts   and   trails   next   to   the   Tetra   building,   as   well   as   for 
two   access   roads   on   the   Tetra   property.   In   brief,   if   RA   just   says   "no"   to   developers,   this   area 
cannot   be   developed.  
In   addition   to   the   Reston   Association   easements,   other   easements   on   the   property   include: 



Storm   drain   and   slope   easements 
Sanitary   sewer   easement 
Phone   and   power   company   easements 
Water   and   sewer   easements 

The   easements   are   described   in   detail   in   the   2010   appraisal.12  

Neighborhood   opposition 
Given   community   outrage   over   cell   towers,   current   plans   to   redevelop   Saint   John’s   Woods,   and 
the   proposed   2003   development   at   this   same   location,   just   to   name   a  few   instances,   it   is   very 
unlikely   that   a  restaurant   of   any   type   would   pass   public   approval. 

Asking   price 
Given   the   difficulties   with   the   site,   it   is   unlikely   that   a  restaurant   would   be   a  viable   option   for   the 
Tetra   Property.   So   why   would   RA   require   the   appraiser   to   assume   that   restaurant   uses   are 
permitted?   The   answer   may   be   in   one   of   the   more   telling   sections   of   the   appraisal,   which   states: 
“The   property   contact,   Mr.   Bill   Lauer,   reports   that   the   property   has   not   been   listed   for 
sale,   but   that   he   has   had   discussions   with   Mr.   McBride   (RA’s   land   use   lawyer)   and   the 
Reston   Association   about   the   Association’s   potential   acquisition   of   the   subject.   He 
reports   that   his   asking   price   is   $2,700,000   and   that   he   would   not   be   interested   in   selling 
unless   his   price   is   met.”13 
The   2015   Jones   appraisal   values   the   Lake   House,   assuming   it   can   be   used   as   a  restaurant,   at 
close   to   Mr.   Lauer’s   demand   for   $2.7   million.   Without   the   “assumption”   of   a  restaurant   at   Lake 
House,   the   appraised   value   drops   to   $1.3   million   or   less,   assuming   the   building   is   in   good 

11

 
https://www.reston.org/Portals/3/2015%20DEVELOPMENT/2010%20Tetra%20Property%20Appraisal.pdf 
12
 
https://www.reston.org/Portals/3/2015%20DEVELOPMENT/2010%20Tetra%20Property%20Appraisal.pdf 
13
 
https://www.reston.org/Portals/3/2015%20NEWS%20RELEASE%20FILES/2015%20Appriasal%20of%20
11450%20Baron%20Cameron%20Avenue.pdf   pg.   15 
 

11 

condition,   well   below   Mr.   Lauer’s   asking   price.   There   are   no   public   records   or   RA   Board 
statements   about   the   nature   or   content   of   the   discussions   between   Mr.   Lauer   and   RA.  

Purchase   proposed   at   the   Reston   Association   Board   meeting 
The   RA   Board   meets   in   its   regular   meeting   to   begin   the   process   of   approving   the   purchase   of 
the   Lake   House   Property   on   January   22,   2015.14  To   discuss   the   purchase,   the   Board   first   goes 
into   a  closed   executive   session   to   “discuss   and   consult   with   our   legal/land   use   counsel   on   a 
probable   contractual   matter.”   The   Board   discusses   the   purchase   in   executive   session   for   almost 
2   hours   and   provides   no   information   on   their   deliberations. 
The   executive   sessions   ends   and   the   Board   proceeds   to   propose   in   public   session   the   addition 
of   the   Lake   House   to   RA’s   property.   The   only   comments   made   in   the   minutes   of   the   meeting 
regarding   the   purchase   are:   “Over   a  year   ago,   our   CEO   was   approached   by   the   owner   of   the 
Tetra   property   (abutting   Brown’s   Chapel   Park   and   the   Lake   Newport   Tennis   Complex)   and   a 
third   party   regarding   the   possibility   of   purchasing   a  portion   of   the   parcel   owned   by   Tetra. 
Recently,   the   third   party   dropped   out   of   the   discussion   and   the   Association   was   offered   the 
opportunity   to   purchase   the   entire   parcel.” 
Neither   the   minutes   of   the   meeting   nor   its   video   reveal   any   of   the   information   related   to   the 
discussions   between   the   CEO,   Cate   Fulkerson,   or   any   other   member   of   the   RA   Board   and   the 
owner   of   the   Lake   House   (Tetra)   property.  
The   following   questions   remain   unanswered: 









Who   suggested   the   purchase? 
What   need   did   the   purchase   serve? 
Who   conducted   the   initial   negotiations   with   the   owner? 
Did   RA's   representatives   discuss   the   price   demanded   by   Lauer   of   $2.7   million   or   try   to 
negotiate   for   a  lower   price? 
Did   the   CEO   make   any   commitments   to   Bill   Lauer   that   obligated   RA? 
Who   was   the   third   party   who   dropped   out,   and   why?  
Was   the   feasibility   of   having   a  restaurant   on   the   site   discussed? 
What   was   discussed   during   the   executive   session? 
What   demands,   if   any,   were   made   of   the   board   members? 
What   promises,   if   any,   were   made? 

14

 
https://www.reston.org/Portals/3/2015%20GENERAL/FINAL%20January%2022%202015%20BOD%20M
eeting%20Minutes.pdf 
 

12 

Resolution   to   buy   the   Tetra   Property  
After   coming   out   of   executive   session,   the   President   of   the   RA   Board,   Ken   Kneuven,   made   a 
resolution   to   add   the   Lake   House   to   the   RA’s   property.   The   motion   carries   and   includes   a 
schedule   to   put   the   proposal   to   the   members   of   RA   in   a  referendum.  

Referendum 
About   two   weeks   later   the   Jones   appraisal   is   made   available   and   the   RA   Board   of   Directors 
holds   a  special   meeting   to   approve   the   Tetra   Property   purchase   referendum   question,   factsheet 
and   letter   of   intent   to   purchase   the   property.15  
At   the   time   of   the   referendum,   the   following   was   known: 



The   referendum   commits   RA   to   paying   $2.65   million.  
The   County   puts   the   value   of   the   Tetra   property   at   $1.20   million   as   of   Jan.   1,   2015. 
The   County   is   obligated   under   state   law   to   assess   real   estate   at   its   fair   market   value. 
The   Jones   appraisal   using   a  comparable   sales   and   income   valuations,   “as   is”   fair 
market   value   of   $1.3   million. 
The   Lake   House   was   not   in   good   repair.   An   engineering   company   hired   by   RA 
estimated   the   needed   repairs   at   about   one­quarter   million   dollars;   specifically, 
$257,410   over   the   next   decade,   including   $144,364   that   needs   to   be   done   right 
away. 
The   “as   is”   value   of   the   Lake   House   if   the   repairs   were   made   would   be   $1.3   million 
less   the   needed   repairs   of   $257,410   to   put   it   in   good   condition.   That   results   in   a 
value   of   about   $1   million   dollars.   The   committed   sale   price   in   the   referendum   is   more 
than   two   and   half   times   this   “as   is”   value. 
The   owner   of   the   property,   Mr.   Lauer,   insisted   on   $2.7   million   or   he   would   not   sell. 
Getting   to   that   appraised   value   required   the   assumption   that   the   property   include   a 
restaurant.   RA   directed   Jones   to   add   the   restaurant,   perhaps   to   inflate   the   appraisal 
and   bring   the   appraised   value   to   $2.65   million,   just   under   the   owner’s   price,   without 
the   intention   of   using   it   as   a  restaurant. 

As   a  result   of   this,   RA   members   ended   up   paying   $2.7   million   for   an   asset   that   was   worth   little 
more   than   $1   million.  
 

Referendum   passes 
RA   staff   and   Directors   urged   voters   to   approve   the   referendum.   RA   staff   and   Directors   manned 
a   booth   at   the   Reston   Farmers   Market   at   Lake   Anne   handing   out   brochures   and   encouraging 
visitors   to   the   market   to   vote   for   the   referendum.   The   Directors   wrote   editorials   and   made 
15

 
https://www.reston.org/Portals/3/2015%20GENERAL/FINAL%20February%209%202015%20BOD%20M
eeting%20Minutes.pdf 
 

13 

comments   in   favor   of   the   referendum   in   the   local   newspapers.   A  Voter   Fact   Sheet   painted   a 
rosy   picture   of   the   purchase   and   was   widely   disseminated   to   RA   members.16  Contrary   views   and 
analyses   were   simply   overwhelmed   by   the   RA   campaign   in   favor   of   the   purchase.  
Despite   the   one­sided   RA   campaign,   the   margin   of   victory   was   narrow,   with   the   referendum 
passing   by   fewer   than   300   votes   out   of   about   5600   votes   cast.   Only   about   a  third   of   all   eligible 
voters   cast   votes.  
The   Board   announced   the   results   of   the   referendum   in   a  special   meeting   on   May   11,   2015.  
At   this   point   RA   had   purchased   the   property,   the   Board   and   staff   congratulated   themselves   with 
a   hearty   well   done   and   most   members   moved   on   with   their   lives.   And   a  few   months   later,   Ken 
Kneuven,   the   former   president   of   the   RA   Board   and   the   major   Board   cheerleader   for   this 
purchase,   would   wound   up   with   a  job   working   for   Rick   Beyer,   one   of   the   major   beneficiaries   of 
the   purchase.  

Financial   projections 
RA   used   financial   information   which   assumed   the   property   would   last   for   more   than   three 
decades,   doubling   the   life   of   the   current   building.   Using   RA’s   assumptions   about   the   revenues 
and   expenses,   losses   are   expected   to   peak   at   $2.0   million   in   20   years,   about   the   time   RA 
makes   its   last   loan   payment. 
Extending   this   analysis   out   to   2050   shows   that   the   cumulative   loss   begins   to   shrink   after   the 
loan   is   paid   off,   but   does   not   reach   break   even   or   better   until   2048   —  33   years   from   now. 
By   then   the   Lake   House   will   be   66   years   old,   a  full   26   years   beyond   the   typical   40   year   lifetime 
of   a  stick­built   office   building.   If   it   does   need   to   be   torn   down,   it   cannot   be   rebuilt   under   current 
environmental   restrictions.   The   County’s   Chesapeake   Bay   Preservation   Ordinance   calls   for   the 
return   to   a  natural   state   of   all   Resource   Protection   Areas   (RPAs),   such   as   this   one,   at   the   end   of 
the   natural   life   of   existing   structures. 
If   the   building   is   still   standing   and   usable   in   2050,   the   analysis   shows   RA’s   cumulative   annual 
return   on   investment   will   be   0.5   percent   over   the   next   35   years.   And,   in   real   terms,   assuming   a  3 
percent   inflation   rate   as   RA   does,   it   will   still   be   a  losing   investment,   with   a  negative   2.5   percent 
return   annually   for   the   next   3  1/2   decades. 

Rent­back   agreement   and   Bill   Lauer's   death 
Mr.   Lauer,   the   previous   owner,   died   quite   unexpectedly   just   as   the   referendum   measure   was 
passing.   RA   had   signed   an   agreement   with   Mr.   Lauer   to   rent   back   the   Lake   House   for   a  year 
with   an   option   for   an   additional   year.   RA   included   this   rental   income   in   their   financial   projections 
that   they   used   to   convince   members   to   vote   for   the   referendum.   Unfortunately,   the   RA   contract 
for   the   lease   was   not   typical,   in   that   the   renter   had   the   option   to   opt   out   every   six   months.   Mr. 
16

 

https://www.reston.org/Portals/3/2015%20GENERAL/Tetra%20Guide_FINAL_Cutlines
%20Removed.pdf 
 

14 

Lauer's   widow   chose   not   to   renew   the   lease,   leaving   RA   revenues   short   by   about   $100,000   in 
2016 . 

Renovation   budget   and   cost   overruns 
This   was   only   the   beginning   of   the   Lake   House   financial   difficulties.   In   late   May   2016,   about   a 
year   after   the   referendum   narrowly   passed,   RA   CEO   Cate   Fulkerson   told   the   RA   Board   of 
Directors   publicly   that   renovations   for   the   interior   of   the   Tetra   building   were   more   than   $428,000 
over   budget.   Prior   to   the   referendum,   RA   had   estimated   the   renovation   costs   at   $259,000.   By 
May   2016,   the   actual   costs   had   tripled.   Any   estimate   of   renovation   costs   is   subject   to 
uncertainty;   however,   underestimating   by   a  factor   of   three   is   grossly   incompetent.   Furthermore, 
waiting   a  full   year   to   tell   anyone   is   grossly   negligent.   Finally,   if   the   estimated   renovation   costs 
had   been   closer   to   the   actual   costs,   it   is   likely   the   referendum   would   not   have   passed,   given   its 
narrow   margin   of   approval. 
To   make   matters   worse,   the   RA   Board   of   Directors   approved   an   additional   $430,000   for   the 
Lake   House   renovation   to   cover   the   cost   of   overruns.   In   light   of   the   Board’s   not   officially   knowing 
of   the   overrun   ­­   a  significant   oversight   error   by   itself   ­­   perhaps   the   approval   was   necessary   to 
pay   for   work   already   completed.   A  more   prudent   course   of   action   would   have   been   for   the 
Board   to   stop   all   work,   demand   a  full   accounting   of   the   causes   of   the   overrun,   suggest   remedies 
to   preclude   future   overruns,   and   produce   estimates   of   future   spending   requirements   and   likely 
cost   recovery.   The   Board   made   none   of   those   demands   when   it   approved   the   additional   funding. 
More   grievously,   however,   the   Board   failed   to   hold   accountable   those   who   were   responsible   for 
the   overrun. 
Unfortunately,   the   financial   hole   for   the   Lake   House   project   was   even   deeper   than   the   RA   Board 
admitted   at   the   time.   A  thorough   cash   flow   analysis   showed   the   following: 


The   Tetra   budget   was   expected   to   be   $624,640   over   budget   by   end   of   2016.   That’s 
$28­$30   per   RA   household.   RA’s   fact   sheet   claimed   there   would   be   no   impact   on 
assessment   fees. 
The   entire   Tetra   effort   was   expected   to   be   in   the   hole   more   than   $562,000   by 
year­end,   compared   to   the   surplus   of   more   than   $208,000   as   stated   on   the   factsheet. 
By   the   end   of   2020   (the   final   date   presented   in   the   factsheet),   RA   will   probably   be 
more   than   $1,000,000   in   the   hole,   costing   Restonians   $40­$50   per   household, 
instead   of   the   $10­$12   projected   by   RA. 
Beyond   that   timeframe,   RA   will   likely   not   operate   the   Lake   House   in   the   black   until 
2048,   using   RA’s   own   assumptions   and   other   conservative   ones   beyond   2020. 

In   retrospect,   RA’s   pre­referendum   promises   related   to   the   costs   of   renovation   and   operating 
income   proved   to   be   wildly   over­optimistic   at   best,   and   outright   falsehoods   at   worst.   There   has 
been   no   accountability   to   date,   either   at   the   staff   level   or   at   the   Board   level.  
Tetra   will   likely   never   be   profitable.   RA   operates   a  number   of   facilities,   from   swimming   pools   to 
the   Nature   House,   which   are   core   to   RA’s   mission,   but   are   not   expected   to   be   profitable   on   their 
own.   RA   recovers   27%   of   the   costs   related   to   those   facilities   through   usage   fees   and 
15 

assessments   cover   the   remaining   73%.   The   activities   for   which   the   Lake   House   is   used, 
however,   are   not   core   to   RA’s   mission.   Such   investments   need   to   stand   on   their   own   and   not   be 
subsidized   by   RA   members.  

Independent   review   of   the   Lake   House   purchase 
In   the   summer   of   2016,   the   financial   mismanagement   and   outright   incompetence   of   the   RA   staff 
and   the   Board   were   in   full   view.   Faced   with   the   need   for   approving   a  new   budget   and   an 
increase   in   assessment   fees,   the   Board   needed   to   show   it   was   now   serious   about   being   fiscally 
responsible.   On   July   23,   2016,   the   RA   Board   approved   a  “process”   to   conduct   an   independent 
review   of   the   Lake   House   purchasing   decision   and   its   aftermath.   Following   a  seemingly   endless 
discussion   of   the   meaning   of   “independent”   and   a  debate   on   the   appropriate   time   period   for 
such   a  review,   the   Board   approved   a  scope   of   work   for   the   review   and   appointed   a  selection 
committee   of   Association   members   to   review   and   recommend   a  consultant   for   the   review.  

Mediaworld   bids   on   project 
The   Request   for   Proposals   was   issued   on   July   15,   2016.17  The   board­appointed   committee 
reviewed   12   proposals   and   recommended   the   contract   be   awarded   to   Mediaworld   Ventures. 
Mediaworld   offered   to   do   the   study   for   $1,   essentially   volunteering   the   team’s   time,   expertise 
and   the   company’s   support.   Mr.   Sridhar   Ganesan   heads   the   company   and   is   also   president   of 
the   Reston   Citizens   Association.   Mediaworld’s   review   team   consisted   of   Reston   citizens   with 
relevant   professional   backgrounds.   On   September   8,   2016,   the   selection   committee   met   with 
the   firms   submitting   proposals.   The   committee   recommended   acceptance   of   Mediaworld’s 
proposal,   and   on   September   22   the   Board   approved   this   proposal. 
At   this   point,   it   seemed   like   a  robust   and   evenhanded   process   was   finally   in   place   for   getting   to 
root   causes   of   the   Lake   House   financial   disaster.   Perhaps   corrective   measures   would   be   put   in 
place   to   assure   it   does   not   happen   again.   That,   however,   failed   to   happen. 

17­page   contract 
On   October   5,   RA’s   legal   counsel   sent   Mediaworld   a  draft   “Contractor’s   Agreement”   for   their 
review.   The   agreement   set   forth   conditions   in   the   contract   unrelated   to   the   scope   of   work, 
sometimes   referred   to   as   “standard   conditions.”   The   17­page   contract   contained   many 
unreasonable   provisions,   including   the   following:  
1. RA   had   the   right   to   remove   or   replace   any   of   the   team   members.  
2. RA   would   own   the   final   report.  
3. RA   had   the   explicit   right   to   modify   the   report   and   publish   the   altered   report.  
17

 

http://www.reston.org/Portals/3/2016%20News%20Releases/071516%20RA%20RFP%
20for%20Tetra%20Lake%20House%20Independent%20Review.pdf 
16 

4. RA   required   each   member   of   the   team   to   sign   a  confidentiality   agreement   making 
everything   confidential   and   indemnifying   RA   from   any   and   all   damages   RA   might   suffer 
as   a  result   of   the   team’s   work.  
5. Each   team   member   would   be   liable   to   pay   damages   for   any   breach   of   confidentiality   by 
any   of   the   team   members.   These   conditions   would   last   in   perpetuity. 
The   Mediaworld   team   “redlined”   the   draft   and   eliminated   most   of   the   objectionable   language, 
such   as   individual   liability   for   contract   breaches   of   other   team   members.   The   team   forwarded 
the   revised   draft   on   October   24,   2016.   On   November   24,   2016,   Mediaworld   received   a  note 
from   RA’s   counsel   basically   rejecting   all   the   substantive   changes. 
The   Board   met   on   December   7  to   discuss   the   contract.   Mediaworld   explained   the   problems   with 
the   original   draft   conditions   and   objected   to   the   onerous   conditions   in   the   contract.   They   insisted 
that   any   final   contract   1)   could   not   impair   the   team’s   ability   to   conduct   the   work   independently,   2) 
could   not   have   onerous   punitive   clauses,   and   3)   could   not   allow   RA   to   alter   the   report   and 
present   a  revised   version   to   the   public   as   Mediaworld’s   work.  
During   the   discussion,   one   board   member   produced   a  four­page   consulting   contract   that   RA 
had   recently   signed   with   another   firm,   Quantum   Governance,   doing   similar   work   on   governance 
issues.   This   four­page   contract   contained   none   of   the   punitive   clauses   of   the   17   page   draft 
given   to   Mediaworld.   After   the   discussion,   the   Board   went   into   executive   session   to   obtain 
further   guidance   from   its   counsel. 
On   December   16,   2016,   Mediaworld   received   a  revised   draft   contract.   The   revision   eased   some 
the   concerns;   however,   one   onerous   liability   provision   remained.   RA   would   pay   for   liability 
insurance   up   to   $1   million,   but   a  liquidated   damages   clause   required   Mediaworld   to   pay   $2,000 
for   each   breach   of   confidentiality   by   any   team   member,   plus   any   other   available   remedy. 
Basically,   the   new   draft   eased   the   punitive   burdens   on   individual   team   members   but   increased 
the   risk   to   Mediaworld. 
Mr.   Ganesan   was   not   willing   for   Mediaworld   to   assume   such   risk   for   a  pro­bono   project.   Other 
team   members   felt   that   the   revised   draft   was   still   over­reaching,   especially   for   a  pro­bono 
project.   On   December   22,   Mr.   Ganesan   wrote   to   the   RA   Board   that   they   could   not   accept   the 
contract,   although   they   would   consider   a  shorter,   less   punitive   version   such   as   the   contract   RA 
signed   with   Quantum   Governance.   Not   hearing   from   RA   or   its   attorney,   Mr.   Ganesan   withdrew 
Mediaworld   from   negotiations   on   January   4,   2017.  

Conclusion 
 
The   RA   Board   and   staff   have   rejected   the   selection   committee’s   choice   of   a  well­qualified   firm 
willing   to   do   the   work   on   a  pro­bono   basis   by   imposing   unreasonable   constraints   and   penalties 
on   the   firm   and   its   members.   By   doing   so,   the   Board   and   RA   staff   have   stopped   an   investigation 
of   the   flawed   decision­making   processes   involved   in   the   Lake   House   purchase   and   the   lessons 

17 

it   could   provide   in   modifying   processes   for   making   similar   capital­spending   decisions   in   the 
future.  
The   Board   has   an   obligation   to   keep   a  failure   like   the   Lake   House   purchase   from   happening 
again.   For   starters,   the   RA   Board   should   immediately   change   the   bylaws   to   prohibit   the 
purchase   of   a  facility   that   receives   the   majority   of   its   revenue   from   activities   that   are   unrelated   to 
the   primary   purpose   of   the   Reston   Association,   which   is   to   promote   the   peace,   health,   comfort, 
safety,   and   general   welfare   of   its   Members.  
 
At   this   point,   it   does   not   make   sense   for   RA   to   hire   expensive   consultants   to   do   the   work   that 
Mediaworld   was   willing   to   do   on   a  pro­bono   basis.   Any   report   coming   from   such   an   effort   will   be 
produced   too   late   for   RA   members   to   make   informed   voting   decisions   in   the   next   Board   election. 
The   public   record   contains   enough   information   to   establish   that   there   were   multiple   problems   as 
well   as   a  potential   conflict   of   interest.  
 
Nonetheless,   the   RA   Board   should   remove   the   onerous   restrictions   and   engage   Mediaworld   to 
do   a  forensic   analysis   of   the   decision   making   that   went   into   the   Lake   House   purchase   and 
recommend   changes   to   decision­making   processes   that   will   help   avoid   making   similar   mistakes 
in   the   future   and   better   serve   RA   members.  
 

18