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CONCEPT PLAN GRAPHICS AND EVALUATION Report In Site Planning And Landscape Architecture Gonzales, Mark Daniel L

CONCEPT

PLAN

GRAPHICS AND EVALUATION

Report In

Site Planning

And

Landscape

Architecture

Gonzales, Mark Daniel L. (BSA-3B) Archt. Videl Mendoza, uap

CONCEPT PLAN GRAPHICS The concept plan is a relatively simple diagram that shows how a project’s
CONCEPT PLAN GRAPHICS The concept plan is a relatively simple diagram that shows how a project’s
CONCEPT PLAN GRAPHICS The concept plan is a relatively simple diagram that shows how a project’s

CONCEPT PLAN GRAPHICS

The concept plan is a relatively simple diagram

that shows how a project’s major program

elements relate to each other functionally and, potentially, visually. Concept plans often provide

contextual information about the site’s biophysical and cultural featuresor design determinantsthat will be integrated into the development or redevelopment project.

CONCEPT PLAN GRAPHICS The concept plan is a relatively simple diagram that shows how a project’s
Concept plans are spatially explicit, which simply means that the project’s components are shown approximately where

Concept plans are spatially explicit,

which simply means that the

project’s components are shown

approximately where they are to be located on the site. Information regarding the dimensions of streets, buildings, or other site elementsas well as the types of materials needed to build these structuresis not typically conveyed on the concept plan. These more detailed design decisions occur during the subsequent design development and construction documentation phases.

Concept plans convey information graphically with text and, typically, three basic geometric objects: polygons, lines, and

Concept plans convey information graphically with text and, typically, three basic geometric objects: polygons, lines, and points. Notes, or annotations, are also useful in conveying information about the intended functional and visual relationships among the proposed site uses. Effective graphic communication enables the efcient review of concept plans by colleagues as well as by public planning staff, elected ofcials, and other stakeholders.

Ad Showdown

Ad Showdown Who grabs more attention ? Who will sell? Who’s understandable?
Ad Showdown Who grabs more attention ? Who will sell? Who’s understandable?

Who grabs more attention? Who will sell?

Who’s understandable?

Zones

Zones On a concept plan, major uses of the site are typically portrayed diagrammatically as zones

On a concept plan, major uses of the site are typically portrayed diagrammatically as

zones or ‘‘bubbles.’’ As the concept plan is rened, these activity or land use zones may be further subdivided to show building locations and minor circulation patterns. As the planning process moves further into the design development phase, these zones or development ‘‘pods’’ are then subdivided into smaller areas and

eventually each area is designed in detail . In addition to showing the locations of proposed development zones, concept plans show the open spaces that will not be developed.

Paths and Edges Proposed activities on a site may relate to each other both functionally and

Paths and Edges

Proposed activities on a site may relate to each other both functionally and visually. Desired views between locations on the site, or between locations on and off the site, for example, can be depicted graphically with arrows and/or annotated labels. Conversely, screening of undesirable views may be warranted, and this also can be portrayed graphically. Linear elements on a concept plan may represent the following:

Axial relationships

Circulation systems (for example, pedestrian,

bicycle, and vehicles) Storm water drainage patterns

Utility lines (above ground and subsurface)

Views (favorable and unfavorable)

Edges (for example, abrupt changes in

topography)

Color, texture, and lineweight help to distinguish these disparate types of site information

• •

Nodes and Landmarks

The concept plan also may identify nodes and landmarks. These may be locations of either proposed buildings or other site features, or

signicant existing buildings that will remain on or off site. Nodes may be highlighted graphically and typically include the following:

Entrances to the site or buildings

Intersections of pedestrian and vehicle circulation systems& Scenic high points or scenic overlooks

Landmarks include the following:

Specimen trees

Bridges Unique buildings

Hilltops or other topographic features

Sections and Other Graphics On some projects, especially urban projects, the vertical organization of a project’s
Sections and Other Graphics On some projects, especially urban projects, the vertical organization of a project’s

Sections and Other Graphics

On some projects, especially urban

projects, the vertical organization of a

project’s uses is expressed at the

conceptual design phase. Conceptual sections or aerial perspectives maybe used to explain the type and arrangement of uses within buildings and in nearby areas outside of the building. Concept plans also may be supplemented with image boardsan organized set of photographs or sketches that convey the

desired ‘‘character’’ of the proposed

development or redevelopment. Typically, these are photographs of comparable

projects or precedents. A project’s ‘‘character’’ results, in part, from building

massing, scale, and placement. It also stems from the choices of forms and

materials and how they are combined (i.e., design style).

Tips for a better Concept Plan Graphics

Tips for a better Concept Plan Graphics

Lettering Tips

Lettering Tips

Symbols

Symbols

CONCEPT EVALUATION AND REFINEMENT

As communities and regions increase in population, undeveloped sites become increasingly important ecologically and hydrologically. Concern for environmental quality and community sustainability is leading to greater scrutiny, by local governments and

citizens, of the potential development impacts. The design review process at local levels of government examines the potential negative

impactsofproposeddevelopmentprojectsonpublichealth,safety,andwelfare.Someofthe questions posed by planning department staff who review site plans include the following (Wyckoff, 2003, pp. 6164):

Is the proposed use of the site consistent with the existing zoning classication of the parcel? Have any risks of natural hazards from ooding, erosion, slumping of steep slopes or sandy soils, subsidence or other natural event been adequately considered? Are the proposed locations of structures and uses relative to wetlands, groundwater recharge areas, and oodplains adequate? Would any endangered plant or animal habitat be affected? Have any signicant views and/or unique natural features been adequately considered? Does the proposedplanminimizenegativeimpacts(especiallynoise,dust,odor,light, vibrations) on adjoining land uses?