MUSCLE GROWTH

Podcast hosts: Brad Howard and John Barban http://blog.adonislifestyle.com Page 1 of 17 ______________________________________________________________________________

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MUSCLE GROWTH
Podcast hosts: Brad Howard and John Barban http://blog.adonislifestyle.com Page 2 of 17 ______________________________________________________________________________

Muscle Growth

And Determining Life After AI…

This document Copyright 2010 Adonis Lifestyle LLC. All Rights Reserved. You have our explicit permission to distribute this document as long as the document, remains wholly intact and unchanged.
(In other words, spread the wealth, just don’t change the message)

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MUSCLE GROWTH
Podcast hosts: Brad Howard and John Barban http://blog.adonislifestyle.com Page 3 of 17 ______________________________________________________________________________

From The Desk of Brad Howard

Dear Friend, Welcome to the Adonis Lifestyle Podcast! Inside this transcript, you’ll find a lot of actionable information that you’ll be able to put to use TODAY to help develop your body for maximum visual impact. With that said, here are a few things to remember as you’re reading through this document. 1. Our trainings and opinions are based solely on the end goal of creating a body based on proportions and social influence. Just as baseball players, powerlifters, and MMA fighters train for a specific purpose, the techniques, tactics, and strategies we talk about revolve around “looks based” training and not “performance based” training. (although your average performance across most all regimes will, in fact, increase as a whole with our advice) 2. “Health” based training takes a backseat as the recommendations we give create bodies that fall within all of the generally accepted “parameters” for good health (blood pressure, heart health, etc) by default. And, although we do talk about health and aging from time to time, realize that “health” comes with the package, without having to FOCUS on it. 3. Our opinions are strictly our own and sometimes are about as un-PC as you can get, but we’ll never hide from the truth or try to sugar coat reality. Our job is to help you get in the exact shape you want, with all the BS aside. So, if you think we’re a little harsh sometimes… just know we’ve got your best interest at heart. So, with all of that said, dive in and enjoy. If you’d like more information on our workout systems, just click this link. We guarantee you’ll save a bunch of time and energy in the process. Your friend, Brad Howard

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MUSCLE GROWTH
Podcast hosts: Brad Howard and John Barban http://blog.adonislifestyle.com Page 4 of 17 ______________________________________________________________________________ Brad Howard: All right guys, welcome once again to your Adonis Lifestyle podcast. I’m Brad Howard and I’ve got John Barban on the phone. And today, we’re going to go into a little bit about the state of muscle because we’re getting a lot of questions in the customer forums and even on his blog about the different states that a muscle can actually be in based on what’s going on with your body and what kind of work you’re doing and things like that. So John, why don’t you go ahead and start out with this because I know you’ve got a lot of things you want to talk about along this topic.

John Barban: Sure. It seems that people aren’t understanding what muscle is or how it’s built. And I think one of the problems is the word ‘build’. The term ‘building muscle’ I think makes people think that muscles are like bricks, and I know we’ve used this analogy before. So the word build makes people think you’re actually building something like a building, and I know that’s kind of a redundant term. But with ‘brick’, like stacking bricks on top of each other, or like hammering wood together like lumber. And building is probably the worst word ever used for muscle because you don’t build them. I suppose you could say you inflate them, or you expand them, but building is the wrong word. You wouldn’t think to yourself ‘I inflate a house’ or ‘I expand a house’. But what you do with a muscle is you inflate it or expand it.

So ‘build’ makes sense for solid fixed structures. You don’t build muscle. Muscles are in a transient state all the time. So what I mean by transient state is you’ve got to view the size of your muscle as falling on a spectrum. The smallest your muscle could be is due to complete wasting away from total disuse and complete and total starvation. Those are the two ways to waste a muscle away to the smallest it could possibly be. It won’t completely disappear, but it will waste all the way to the point where you would eventually die. I mean, I don’t think you could necessarily die from the loss of skeletal muscle, but whatever state you’d be in that would cause the muscles to get that small

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MUSCLE GROWTH
Podcast hosts: Brad Howard and John Barban http://blog.adonislifestyle.com Page 5 of 17 ______________________________________________________________________________ would also cause your heart and lungs to atrophy to the point where you actually eventually would die.

So on the one end of the spectrum, it’s as small as a muscle would ever shrink up to from not using it at all and from starving it of nutrients. Or you could even sever the nerves that innervate that muscle so you could never actually contract it. That’s the smallest it can be.

And then the biggest it can be would be with as many genetic and chemical stimulus and mechanical stimulus from working out that you could introduce it to. So that would be working out all the time and taking any kind of anabolic and androgenic steroids as well as growth hormone, perhaps gene therapy. Like all the different things that would cause it to just constantly grow, so that’s the other end of the spectrum. And then every where, everybody else, every human is somewhere on that spectrum, somewhere in the middle. So you’ve got guys who go to the gym, but they don’t take any drugs. The only thing that is “inflating” their muscles is the workout and whatever they’re eating and perhaps some supplements. And then to make them bigger than that, you would actually have to add in some kind of drugs and combine that with a workout.

S that’s kind of the way to look at what’s the stimulus that’s causing a muscle to be any given size at any given moment. So there’ no such thing as how big your muscle is. It’s how big your muscle is given the stimulus at that moment. So for instance, when we’re just sort of standing around, not working out, never worked out, just how you would be without working out; You’re only that big because you still get up and move around in a day. If you fell and broke your arm and you put it in a cast, you’d find out as soon as the cast came off that all of the muscles in that arm shrunk, shrunk to even smaller than their normal size. So that means those muscles are only that size when they can move. They’re a different size when they can’t move. And then they’re an even bigger size

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MUSCLE GROWTH
Podcast hosts: Brad Howard and John Barban http://blog.adonislifestyle.com Page 6 of 17 ______________________________________________________________________________ when they can move with heavy weights pushing against them. And then they are an even bigger size when they are moving with heavy weights pushed against them, as well as drugs. So that’s what I’m trying to say, muscles are in transient state. It’s dependent on the stimulus.

Brad Howard: Yeah, it’s obvious that you’re getting a lot of the questions, but what kind of questions are people is asking you that just made you want to think about it and just kind of talking about this in general. Because it kind of seems like we covered it a little bit before, but not really talked about the actual state of it. There must be some questions that are just coming across that just really are triggering kind of your little radar and saying, “Hold on, there’s kind of this fundamental understanding that people just don’t have.”

John Barban: Yeah, guys are asking me things like, “Is muscle building different than muscle hydration.” And I would say that they are very similar. It’s the word build. The word build is a poor choice of words to explain what’s happening to a muscle when you place it against mechanical stress, I guess, even chemical stress. Like if you take steroids, you’re not necessarily building a muscle as much as you are inflating it. So I guess what this really comes down to is a lack of understanding of what even the structure of a muscle is.

So a muscle is somewhere in the area of 80-85% water.

Brad Howard: Right.

John Barban: So those cells, the actual wall of the cell have some protein in it and some lipid and some carbohydrate but the bulk of it is water. So when muscle store

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MUSCLE GROWTH
Podcast hosts: Brad Howard and John Barban http://blog.adonislifestyle.com Page 7 of 17 ______________________________________________________________________________ glycogen, which is a reaction to training. For every 1 gram of glycogen stored, you have to store about two grams of water. Same with protein, the protein content of a muscle is about a 1:2 ratio of protein to water. So no matter how much “matter,” actual protein or glycogen matter you’re adding to the bulk of what we would call the muscle cell, you’re adding twice as much water, so it’s a transient state.

The best way to describe it (and I know I have described this before) is water balloons. Making a muscle bigger is like filling a water balloon larger. The material of the balloon stretches a bit, just a little bit more material but the inside of the balloon is what really expands. The difference between starving and malnutrition and at least getting enough protein and carbs, and exercise and/or drugs, all of those things stimulate the muscle to uptake glycogen and uptake more amino acids and turn over more amino acids and more protein. So those processes stimulate the muscle to draw more water in it and to lay down a little bit more protein tissue and to hold more glycogen.

But those are all transient states. If you take away the drugs, if you starve the person or if you stop working out, the muscle doesn’t have the signal anymore to fix more water, to hold more water and to store more glycogen and to cause more protein synthesis. Do you see what’s I’m saying? The bulk size of the muscle is never really dependent on like things like protein content per se. The way to think of it is you’re stimulating the muscle to want to hold more water.

Brad Howard: Got you. So what kind of the response should people expect if they have muscle memory? Where does that fit in?

John Barban: A friend of mine who has been training for fifteen years now ripped his bicep tendon right off at the elbow and his arm was casted for a while, and it shrunk. He looked like he had a little girl’s arm by the time the cast came off, (and he’s got well-

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MUSCLE GROWTH
Podcast hosts: Brad Howard and John Barban http://blog.adonislifestyle.com Page 8 of 17 ______________________________________________________________________________ developed arms). He’s got type of musculature most guys would want. He has goodsized arms, I don’t know how else to say it. But the one arm completely shrunk, the other arm stayed its full size. And then within six months, the arm that he ripped up came all the way back to full size. So it didn’t just go back to the size he would have been without weight training. It came all the way back to the size it was after fifteen years of training.

So there definitely is some lasting response from weight training over time, which may be the true measure of growth. If you take somebody who’s been training for ten or fifteen years, completely immobilize the limb like this guy, like cut the tendon, immobilize it, reattach it, and the thing shrinks all the way up to what his arm looked like when he must have been twelve years old, like it was tiny. And then it came all the way back past his normal growth rate all the way back up to his full fifteen-year weight training size. So there’s definitely some lasting reaction there or some lasting remodeling of the muscle such that it only took him six months to come back to its full size, and match how big it was after fifteen years of training. It’s not like you have to train fifteen more years to get there.

So all of that chronic training does change something at the genetic level or at the actual material level, but I don’t know exactly what those mechanisms are. I don’t think anyone really understands what the mechanisms are to get it all the way to that degree.

Brad Howard: Interesting. So it’s really not necessarily known, but we know it exists and now, all I’m saying is that it just seems it’s like it’s more of a potential that’s being laid down than anything because I can go three months and not train and then be lifting about the same amount of weight within thirty days of starting back relatively quickly

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MUSCLE GROWTH
Podcast hosts: Brad Howard and John Barban http://blog.adonislifestyle.com Page 9 of 17 ______________________________________________________________________________ John Barban: Yeah, so there are some neuromuscular changes. It’s at the nervous system as well as probably at the genetic or at the nuclear level in the muscle, for nonscientific-sounding terms, where it’s very primed to get back to its full size or its biggest state, I guess you could say. The interesting thing is you can get all the way back to as big as you manage to build it but not much bigger. So there are limits. There are upper limits to how big we can get. And the interesting thing with that is it proves to you that nutrition has nothing to do with it because his other arm stayed the same size, and the arm that got ripped up and put in the cast and came out of the cast, he was eating the same food all along, and then all he could manage to do is come back to that size, but not beyond it.

Brad Howard: How much is it neurological, just overall? Not necessarily the atrophy coming back and the muscle memory, but just overall just getting stronger? How much is that actually with people, they’re just become more efficient and the signaling systems just work better, that type of thing?

John Barban: That’s part of it. I mean, that’s part of the ongoing adaptation to strength training, the neuromuscular unit, meaning the nerve as well as the muscle put together as a unit, becomes more efficient. So the muscle doesn’t necessarily need to get that much bigger to get stronger. And so that’s why we see guys who can constantly get stronger in a particular lift, but not necessarily expanding bigger and bigger. You see, carrying around more muscles is not all that efficient, and the human system doesn’t really want to be that inefficient. So it’s only going to lay down muscle if it really has to. So it will find other ways to adapt without necessarily building more and more muscle. There’s an upper limit. That’s why you need to turn to drugs to force the body to get even bigger and even bigger because those are basically unsustainable states. The body’s not meant to be that big and carry that much extra mass.

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MUSCLE GROWTH
Podcast hosts: Brad Howard and John Barban http://blog.adonislifestyle.com Page 10 of 17 ______________________________________________________________________________ Brad Howard: Right, yeah, that’s interesting, the other day I was doing an exercise I hadn’t done in a while, and it was funny because it didn’t feel like it normally did. And then I came back and did it this week. I mean, this is probably last week to this week, and just the movement itself felt a lot more fluid. And it was just weird because it felt so foreign, even though I have done it before months and months ago. It felt so foreign but this time, coming around it felt a lot more natural to do as far as just overall stabilization, being able to actually lift it, pull it, all that type of jazz. It was interesting how just the feel of it was different.

John Barban: Well, any movement you go through has a specific pattern, and a specific activation pattern of muscles that all activate in a particular order. It doesn’t take much to switch the activation pattern. Like for instance if you’re walking, you have a very specific activation pattern of all the different muscles that get you to walk. If I just tie a one or two-pound weight to one of your knees, now you’re entire activation pattern changes. Like the order in which certain muscles fire will switch. That’s why when you are in the gym and if you just switch where your hands are on the bar, or if you just slightly change your stance, your activation pattern is different.

So that’s why we have basically limitless variations we can put into our workouts and to continually force your body to adapt to some degree. If you just stay in the same position constantly, you’re not forcing a whole lot more adaptation, but if you’re constantly slightly altering your positions, the adaptation changes, same with the speed, same with the weight. That’s why all of those things matter, the neuromuscular pattern, the order in which the muscle’s fire is different.

And the other thing there to remember is there’s no such thing as working one muscle. It’s impossible to flex one specific muscle. There is no such thing, there are always muscle groups. To make a joint move, there are always groups of muscles, never one.

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MUSCLE GROWTH
Podcast hosts: Brad Howard and John Barban http://blog.adonislifestyle.com Page 11 of 17 ______________________________________________________________________________ There are twenty muscles just in your forearm, and you can’t pick one out and make one work without the others. So it’s a fallacy to think you can isolate any one muscle. You can involve more or less muscles, but you can never pick one of them out.

Brad Howard: Interesting. Yeah, I never really thought about that. Okay, so what’s the typical conditioning? What I would think is like a conditioning kind of threshold for you being able to kind of acclimate yourself to a specific exercise or a specific movement or something like that. Like for me it feels like that I can jump up pretty quickly to where it feels comfortable doing, so maybe after the first time I do it in a workout, it kind of feels different. The second time, it feels better. The third time, the actual movement part of it feels pretty solid, and then after that there’s, I guess, a different conditioning for me where as I can just start adding more weight and things like that. I’m not sure if that makes sense but

John Barban: Yeah, even from set to set in a given day, you get better at it. So if we went in and did six sets in a row of a new exercise we’ve never done before. I guarantee your sixth set will look six times better that your first set. And then if we did that again later this week, all six of those sets would look better than the first six. And then next week, you’d basically have it in a groove where you’re just knocking them out unconscious. You don’t have to really think about your form anymore.

And the learning curve is fast. It’s set-to-set and rep-to-rep, you learn fast. When I was working with some various sports teams with some of our coaches, we were talking about why certain pro athletes are just way better than other athletes, and one of the theories postulated was just the biomechanical set of coordination learning theory of athletes when growing up. Humans in general have an average of how many reps it takes to master a skill to the point where it’s unconscious, so you don’t think about it,

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MUSCLE GROWTH
Podcast hosts: Brad Howard and John Barban http://blog.adonislifestyle.com Page 12 of 17 ______________________________________________________________________________ you just do it. It’s kind of like a lay-up in basketball or a jump shot. You take enough of them, that you don’t think anymore. You just go in and you shoot. And you don’t have to think, “Where is my foot? Where’s my elbow?” Like a lot of things and it just goes, right, so it takes a certain number of reps for the average human to switch that from a conscious thinking action to an unconscious ‘it just happens’ action. It’s kind of like riding a bike. You think about it in the beginning and then after a while, you don’t think. You just get on and go.

So the amount of moves in a sport that a pro athlete has, it’s just going through enough reps to move the skill from a conscious action to an unconscious action where it just happens. And what they were saying, the idea was perhaps the best athletes, the Hall of Fame types, it takes them significantly less reps to move a skill from the conscious realm to the unconscious realm. So for example, a guy like Michael Jordan, maybe when he was growing up, it only took him fifty thousand reps to master a jump shot where as all the kids around him, it took them a hundred thousand reps. So by the time he’s got the jump shot mastered, he’s already moved on to a fade-away jump shot, or a leaning one. Do you know what I mean? Like some other skill.

Or he’s got his crossover down, now he’s got his other hand down because it’s taking him half the amount of time to master each skill. So as his list of unconscious skills that he can just do whenever he wants without thinking about it grows, it’s growing twice as fast as everybody else’s list. So by the time he’s got twenty skills mastered, every one around him is still working on skill number ten. So he can pull out moves in a game that other people can’t even try it yet. So it’s like, “Oh, my God, what was that?” They also don’t have the skill to defend it because they’re still working on that, too.

That’s the theory of why guys like Mario Lemieux and Wayne Gretzky in hockey were so much better than everybody else because they are twenty skills ahead of everybody

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MUSCLE GROWTH
Podcast hosts: Brad Howard and John Barban http://blog.adonislifestyle.com Page 13 of 17 ______________________________________________________________________________ else. And for a career, if your fifty thousand reps takes a couple of years to master, (and most pro athletes are done their careers in their 30’s or 40’s), well you’re going to be ahead of every one, every year, all the time. Because by the time you make it to pro, you’re literally ten years ahead of everybody else on all of the skill that you’ve mastered into your unconscious domain and don’t even have to think about. So that kind of explains why guys like Jordan and Kobe are pulling out moves that others guys will say, “I’ve never even seen that before. I wouldn’t even know how to try that. And I also don’t know how to defend it.”

Brad Howard: Right, that actually makes sense. I mean, it’s all compounding. I’ve read a couple of books on outliers where they talk about stuff like that. And people being identified at an early age and as far as being bigger than the other kids, maybe they’re just a tad bit older but they got identified faster so they get compounding levels of coaching that the other kids don’t get.

John Barban: Yeah, you’re compounding the coaching, compounding the amount of skills that they can master into the unconscious domain at a quicker rate to the point where they’re always ahead. So the same thing with muscle memory, the number of reps it takes to master a movement, everyone’s got their number. The average people’s numbers are very similar and then as you move up to the genetic gifted athletes, they probably master stuff way quicker.

Brad Howard: Yeah you never see somebody breaking into a sport like basketball as a guard at an older age. Like you see that with like forwards and centers because it’s mainly about height.

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MUSCLE GROWTH
Podcast hosts: Brad Howard and John Barban http://blog.adonislifestyle.com Page 14 of 17 ______________________________________________________________________________ John Barban: Well, yeah, because the only thing you need out of them is just the height.

Brad Howard: Right. So I guess the big thing on the topic of muscle building, we kind of go around and around and people are skeptical every which way because we’re basically saying the exact opposite of what is being talked about in the mainstream. And we talk about this all the time. But I mean, you’ve seen it, you’ve been there. You have seen what drugs actually do. You have a size right now which is pretty big. You mentioned the other day how you actually met another blogger who kind of thought that he was going to be on par with you and Pilon when you met and he was like, “Wow, I got a ways to go.” So yeah, I’m not really sure how big people think they can actually get overall. And why you’re saying that there is a limit here? Why it’s such a downer for people?

John Barban: Yeah, well, I guess it cuts to the root of why guys want to be big in the first place. It cuts through their insecurity and sort of looking at your self from being awkward. What do you think bigger muscles are going to do for you anyways? It’s not that simple. I mean, people are like, “Yeah, I want to build muscle.” And every other guy is, “Yeah, of course you do.” But then when you actually stop and think, why? Why do I? And then, what’s the limit? What would I actually think is going to happen if I happen to have bigger muscles? And then, that’s actually a way trickier question to answer. And then it usually ends with, “Oh, because I’m not confident.” There’s some kind of insecurity underlying the need to be bigger. Otherwise there’s no other need. What is it doing for you? What is having a 19-inch arm going to actually do besides just force you to buy bigger t-shirts?

Brad Howard: I don’t know.

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MUSCLE GROWTH
Podcast hosts: Brad Howard and John Barban http://blog.adonislifestyle.com Page 15 of 17 ______________________________________________________________________________ John Barban: Well, that’s what I’m saying.

Brad Howard: I guess people start really losing focus. I guess this is kind of the first mistake that people make is just losing focus on what they actually want. I mean, it’s okay to admit that you want your body to do something for you other than just be able to lift stuff and push it around.

John Barban: Well, it better not be just that because that’s a pretty pathetic goal.

Brad Howard: Right, I mean, if it doesn’t mean anything, if it doesn’t help you do something else. I feel like the only reason people work out is because they assume that the body they’re going to get is going to translate with people building the body that they want. Ultimately when they start out, they want to build a body or to kind of grow muscles and things like that. They want that actual body to translate into something else, whether it being some type of financial gain or some type of relationship improvement, self-confidence, respect. Maybe they feel like it will help not get taken advantage of as much. All these other things and realms of influence that this is what people really want out of this, and very rarely is it really about health or any type of strength or performance until it gets pushed on them by somebody else, pushing some other agenda.

John Barban: Or they happen to actually be an athlete, in which case that’s their career anyways.

Brad Howard: Right, yeah, exactly. Like I say, it’s kind of a strange phenomenon. I really don’t know where else to go with this. You’ve got to say what you want to say about this. I don’t know if there’s a reason to really drag it out. Do you have anything else that you wanted to touch on?

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MUSCLE GROWTH
Podcast hosts: Brad Howard and John Barban http://blog.adonislifestyle.com Page 16 of 17 ______________________________________________________________________________ John Barban: No, not really. I mean, I guess just to kind of bring it back around and reinforce the point that you’ve got to view the size of your muscles as a state. It’s a transient state and to maximize their size, you have to be training regularly and you have to be doing a significant amount of work, and most of that work has to be heavy. Heavy, meaning the difference between going for a walk or doing squats, and that has to be consistent. Nutrition plays a minimal role, if at all, as long as you are getting some kind of regular food intake, that won’t be limiting. There’s a size you can get to without drugs and then that’s it. There’s just nothing you can do about it. And then if you are not satisfied with that size, the only other thing you can do is add in drugs.

And it’s a transient state. It’s not like bricks, it’s like balloons. It’s transient because it’s a matter of inflating the muscle and keeping it inflated by constantly training. And that’s about the best way you can think of it. And if you stop training, you’ll just go back down to the size you were before you ever started training. And for some reason, based on what we are talking about with muscle memory, it seems as though over time, if you’ve done a lot of training and then you stop for a while and then come back, you can build yourself right back up to the biggest size you ever got to much quicker than it took you to get there in the first place.

Brad Howard: Right, which is pretty encouraging, and because we all have different things that come up in life with travels, bad moments and things like that, it’s kind of nice to know that all of your previous work doesn’t just kind of get washed under the rug if something happens in your life and you’re not able to train for a month or year whatever it is. That you are able to bounce back and kind of recover a lot faster.

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MUSCLE GROWTH
Podcast hosts: Brad Howard and John Barban http://blog.adonislifestyle.com Page 17 of 17 ______________________________________________________________________________ John Barban: Yeah, I’m sure that changes over time. I’m sure when you’re sixty or seventy you can’t get back to how big you were when you were thirty or forty, but you can still be bigger at sixty and seventy with weight training than if you didn’t weight train.

Brad Howard: Right, yeah, it makes total sense to me like I say. Anything you want to close out with?

John Barban: No, that’s about it.

Brad Howard: Yeah, yeah it’s a good short one, kind of got to the point really quick on this one.

John Barban: That’s new for us.

Brad Howard: Yeah, exactly. But normally we kind of go off on tangents that kind of pop-up, but this one was a pretty specific topic that you wanted to talk about, so that’s pretty cool.

If you guys have questions or stuff, make sure you put them in the forums and we’ll get to them and we make sure we get them answered for you. But I can say for John Barban, I am Brad Howard, and that’s your Adonis Lifestyle podcast.

Here are a few links for you to check out:
1. Adonis Lifestyle Podcast (iTunes subscription link) 2. Listen to the audio version of “Muscle Growth” 3. Get the body you deserve and invest in the Adonis Index Systems today!

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