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RAMIREZ, GIO KYLE M.

BSMART 2 BRAVO

1. DANGEROUS GOODS - Covers articles or materials capable of posing significant risk to


people, health, property, or environment when transported in quantity. It includes items of
common use, such as aerosol cans, perfumes, and paints. Although most transport regulations are
now closely aligned with the UN Recommendations, the regulations for air, road, rail, and sea
transport are not identical.
2. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS - Asbestos, chemicals, pesticides, radioactive and other
substances that may pose a threat to health, safety, and/or property when stored or transported.
Also, any substance that is listed as corrosive, harmful, irritant, reactive, toxic, or highly toxic.
3. HARMFUL CARGOES This course is designed to comply with the requirements
established for the training of officers and sailors responsible for shipboard cargo handling of
ships carrying in bulk or in packaged form hazardous, and dangerous substances according to the
provisions of the international code of dangerous goods (IMDG Code)

4. CARGOES IN PACKAGES FORM The IMDG Code was developed as an international


code for the maritime transport of dangerous goods in packaged form, in order to enhance and
harmonize the safe carriage of dangerous goods and to prevent pollution to the environment. The
Code sets out in detail the requirements applicable to each individual substance, material or
article, covering matters such as packing, container traffic and stowage, with particular reference
to the segregation of incompatible substances. Mandatory provisions for the prevention of
pollution by harmful substances carried by sea in packaged form, prohibits the carriage of
harmful substances in ships except in accordance with the provisions of MARPOL Annex III,
which are also extended in the IMDG Code.
5. CLASSIFICATION OF GOODS International Classification of Goods and Services
(ICGS) Autochecker. The ICGS Autochecker helps trade mark applicants and agents search for
and classify their goods and services by verifying their list against our database of pre-approved
items.

6. SEGREGATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS Segregation rules for dangerous goods


vessels are categorized into two types, Cargo Ships and Passenger Ships. This categorization
further divides cargo ships and passenger ships for carriage of Class 1, Explosives, and Classes 2
to 9. The differentiation is for Class 1, Explosives,Cargo ships (up to 12 passengers)and
Passenger ships. For Classes 2-9Cargo ships or passenger ships carrying a number of passengers
limited to not more than 25 or to 1 passenger per 3 m of overall length, whichever is the greater
numberandOther passenger ships in which the limiting number of passengers transported is
exceeded.

7. STOWAGES Is the amount of room available for stowing materials aboard a ship, tank or
an airplane. In container shipping, stowage planning refers to the arrangement of containers on
board a container vessel.

8. CARGO OFFICER ON BOARD DOES RESPONSIBLITIES - As cargo officer, a chief


mate oversees the loading, stowage, securing and unloading of cargoes. Moreover, the chief mate
is accountable for the care of cargo during the voyage. This includes a general responsibility for
the ship's stability and special care for cargoes that are dangerous, hazardous or harmful.
Even under the best of conditions, a ship is balanced precariously upon the water and is subject
to a number of forces, such as wind, swells, and storms, which could capsize it. The cargo officer
uses tools like ballasting and load balancing to optimize the ship's performance for the expected
type of environment.

9. EMERGENCY PROCEDURE FOR SHIP CARRYING DANGEROUS GOODS


- This EmS Guide contains guidance on Emergency Response Procedures for Ships Carrying
Dangerous Goods including the Emergency Schedules (EmS) to be followed in case of incidents
involving dangerous substances, materials or articles, or harmful substances (marine pollutants),
regulated under the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG Code). The purpose
of this Guide is to provide guidance for dealing with fires and spillages (leakages) on board ships
involving the dangerous goods listed in the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code
(IMDG Code).
10. INCIDENTS OR ACCIDENTS ON HANDLING DANGEROUS GOODS A chemical
substance or preparation may be hazardous in itself when it comes into contact with other
chemicals including air, water or humidity. For example, when calcium carbide (used in the
production of acetylene and pyrotechnics) comes to contact with water, it releases the extremely
flammable gas acetylene (used in welding flame) and creates an explosion hazard.
Careful handling is also important because the magnitude of the involved risk is not always
obvious. One kilo of a certain chemical poses a hazard, but it is not necessarily true that ten kilos
creates a ten fold hazard. The danger could be the same as for one kilo or it could be higher.

11. PRECAUTION OF LOADING AND DISCHARGING OF EXPLOSIVES As a deck


officer who is in charge of cargo loading/ dischargin and the overall safety of the cargo while it is
carried on ships, he must know the following points to avoid any kind of accidents that can cause
because of such sensitive cargo.
1. Know the Classification of Dangerous Cargo:The dangerous cargoes are segregated in to
various sub-categories so as to plan the carriage as per the requirements of the cargo. This avoids
mistakes and proper preventive actions that can be taken in case of any incidence or accident.

2. Check the Cargo for Correct Packaging:If the IMDG cargo is loaded in a package,
3. Know the Cargo Groups:IMDG cargoes are divided in to three main groups and each has a
specific plan to store, transport and handling in case of accident or spill:
4. Check the Labels:Check that all the labels on the packages are visible and clearly indicate the
type and characteristics of cargo.Appropriate labels indicating the hazard (Flammable, toxic,
Corrosive etc.) are also pasted over the package.The label must be water resistant such that even
in case of immersion, it should be readable for at least 3 months.
5. Check the Documents of the Cargo:Ensure that before loading any IMDG cargo, the agent or
shipper has handed over:
6. Check When Loading Cargo:While loading the IMDG cargo, following things must be
checked:
7. Inspect Loading Explosive Cargo:If the IMDG cargo is with explosive label, ensure to check
8. Know the Emergency Procedure:It is very important for the OOW to prepare himself for any
kind of accidents while handling such dangerous cargo. The deck officer must read and
understand

12. CARGO HOLD - The space in a ship or aircraft for storing cargo.

13. CARGO COMPARTMENT A goods carried by a ship, aircraft, or other vehicle; freight.
a cargo vessel. 2 any load. the train pulled in with its cargo of new arrivals.

14. TANKER SHIP - Is a merchant vessel designed to transport liquids or gases in bulk. Major
types of tankship include the oil tanker, the chemical tanker, and gas carrier.

15. TYPES OF SHIPS


* CONTAINER SHIPS
- Which carry most of the world's manufactured goods and products, usually through scheduled
liner services.
*CULK CARRIERS
- The work horses of the fleet, these transport raw materials such as iron ore and coal.
Identifiable by the hatches raised above deck level which cover the large cargo holds.
*FERRIES AND CRUISE SHIP
- Ferries usually perform short journeys for a mix of passengers, cars and commercial vehicles.
Most of these ships are Ro-Ro (roll on - roll off) ferries, where vehicles can drive straight on and
off, making it a speedy and easily accessible way to travel.
*SPECIALIST SHIPS

- Such as anchor handling and supply vessels for the offshore oil industry, salvage tugs, ice
breakers and research vessels.
-Demand for cruise ships expanded rapidly during the 1980s, leading to a new generation of
large and luxurious 'floating hotels'.

16. IMDG CODE (INTERNATIONAL MARITIME DANGEROUS GOODS CODE) is


accepted as an international guideline to the safe transportation or shipment of dangerous goods
or hazardous materials by water on vessel.

17. ISGOTT (INTERNATIONAL SAFETY GUIDE FOR OIL TANKERS AND


TERMINALS) is the definitive guide to the safe carriage and handling of crude oil and
petroleum products on tankers and at terminals.

18. IMO (INTERNATIONAL MARITIME ORGANIZATION) A specialized agency of the


United Nations that is responsible for measures to improve the safety and security of
international shipping and to prevent marine pollution from ships.

19. MFAG (MEDICAL FIRST AID GUIDE) Guide use in accidents involving dangerous
goods. It gives information regarding safety, first aid, and emergency procedures to be followed
and action to be taken in the event of an accident involving certain dangerous goods.

20. IMGS (INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL GUIDE FOR SHIPS) The third edition of the
International Medical Guide for Ships shows designated first-aid providers how to diagnose treat
and prevent the health problems of seafarers on board ship.Since its first publication in 1967, the
International Medical Guide for Ships has been a standard reference for medical care on board
ships. The second edition written in 1988 was translated into more than 30 languages and has
been used in tens of thousands of ships. This is the third edition contains fully updated
recommendations aimed to promote and protect the health of seafarers and is consistent with the
latest revisions of both the WHO Model List of Essential Medicines and the International Health
Regulations.