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B AY A REA L IBRARY

AND

I NFORMATION N ETWORK

B AY N ET N EWSLETTER
V OLUME 3, I SSUE 2

W INTER 2017

O NLINE L IBRARY 2.016 C ONFERENCE E XAMINES F UTURE OF L IBRARIES
On October 6, information
professionals from more than
100 countries gathered online
for the Library 2.016 virtual
conference. The third in a
series of free Library 2.016
mini-conferences, the October
event on Libraries of the Future provided more than 5,600
participating professionals
and students with information, resources and inspiration.
Sponsored by the American
Library Association’s Center
for the Future of Libraries, the
program featured opening and
closing keynotes along with
crowdsourced breakout sessions led by experts from a
variety of library and information fields. Topics focused
on community, data analysis,
education, democracy, civic
engagement, library services
and programming, and much
more.

Now in its fifth year, the
Library 2.0 Worldwide Virtual
Conference series was founded
by Dr. Sandra Hirsh, director
of the School of Information at
San José State University,
and Steve Hargadon, director
of the Learning Revolution
Project.
Innovation and Change
Management
To start off the final Library
2.016 mini-conference of the
year, Hirsh welcomed presenters and attendees and introduced the keynote speakers,
who shared their perspectives
on innovation from beyond the
library sphere.
Keynote speaker Nigel Jacob works with the Boston
Mayor’s Office of New Urban
Mechanics, which he calls “the
city’s innovation laboratory.”
Jacob and the organization
encourage builders and de-

IMG_1760
By Robert Couse-Baker
signers to innovate, learn and
become part of a community.
“We always want to choose
projects that have the capacity
to change people’s lives,” he
said.
The second keynote speaker
was Jesus Gerena, managing
partner of the Family Independence Initiative, which
serves as a national model for
recognizing and resourcing
community initiatives.
Cont. pg. 3

S PECIAL POINTS OF
INTEREST :

Looking at the
future of libraries
at Online Library
2.016

Calendar of Library events
around the Bay

Path from Librarian to Leader

Blast from the
past: Hear what
the BayNet President had to say 20
years ago!

I NSIDE

F ROM E SSENTIAL L IBRARIAN
Professional development,
continuing education, and
scholarship are my long
term goals towards becoming an all-rounded librarian.
Someone once told me in
library school: to become a
librarian is to become a
leader. As I am approaching
my 7th year in the profession, I can attest to that
remark as I continue my
journey from an essential
librarian to an essential
leader at Saint Mary’s Col-

TO

E SSENTIAL L EADER

lege of California Library.
I first learned of the
phrase “essential librarian”
from Breanne Kirsch’s essay. Since I became a newly
minted librarian at Saint
Mary’s in December 2009, I
have followed Breanne
Kirsch’s advice to “find a
mentor, read the literature,
collaborate, adapt, become a
leader, and be persistent.”
At Saint Mary’s College, an
essential librarian “must
have the ability to perform

at a high professional level
in areas which contribute to
the educational mission of
the institution.” As a newbie, I knew that I had much
to learn in order to become
an all-round and essential
librarian who excels in professional development, continuing education, and
scholarship. While my position title is Cataloging and
Reference Librarian, my
academic assignments also
cover Cont. pg. 4

THIS ISSUE :

O NLINE 2.016

1

L IBRARIAN TO

1

LEADER

E VENTS C ALEN- 2
DAR

S OCIAL M EDIA
S UCCESS

2

NOT YOUR
GRANDMA’S
KNITTING

5

ARCHIVES

6

B AY N ET N EWSLETTER

P AGE 2

T OOLS

FOR

M EASURING S OCIAL M EDIA S UCCESS

When you're new to the world
of social media analytics, it can
be quite overwhelming not only
trying to determine what to
measure, but what tool to use.
We recently published a recap of
our webinar on social media
analytics with Laura Solomon, a
librarian and social media expert. There was so much covered
in that hour that we barely
scratched the surface in our
recap and didn't have a chance
to focus on analytics tools.
As the (now former) social media wrangler for TechSoup for
Libraries for the past few years,
I've personally struggled with
sticking with an analytics tool
and making sense of it. The good
news is that analytics tools have
gotten easier to use. Most of the
major social media networks
(meaning Facebook, Twitter,
and Instagram) offer some sort

of built-in analytics feature. I've
found that using both the builtin tools along with a third-party
tool is the best way to get a balanced look at your analytics.
Built-in Analytics Tools
Let's take a look at a few of the
built-in tools our favorite social
media networks use. In our
webinar, What Can Libraries
Count? Getting a Grip on Social
Media, Laura covered a few of
the useful features in each of
these tools.
Facebook Insights
Facebook recently updated
Insights, the analytics tool for
Facebook pages. The Overview
tab lets you see a seven-day
snapshot of the most important
activity on your page. This is a
quick way to see what's grabbing the attention of your followers and where you should be
focusing the most attention.

Are you getting a lot of comments? Do they require further
action? (Are there questions to
answer or is there feedback on a
program to consider?)
You can also drill down; you
can see how many people "like"
your page within a specific time
frame, how many people your
posts were served to, your number of page views by section, and
data on when your fans are
online. All of this data can be
used to craft posts that resonate
with your audience and help you
understand when you should be
posting content.
Twitter Analytics
If you feel pretty comfortable
with Facebook Insights, you'll
feel right at home with Twitter
Analytics. Like Insights, you can
pick and choose how deeply you
want to drill down into your
analytics. Cont. Pg 5

Instagram and other
Social Media Apps
By Jason Howie

L IBRARY E VENTS A ROUND T HE B AY
February 9

SF Librarian Meetup Roundtable Discussion @ the 1 Year Mark: Who Are We?
Expand your network and join the discussion of who we are as librarians.
https://www.meetup.com/SF-Librarian-Meetup/

ENDS

Books in the Mud: The Drowned Libraries of Florence

February 18

Celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Arno flood by looking at restoration tools and techniques!
American Bookbinder’s Museum: 355 Clementa St. San Francisco | Tues-Sat 10am-4pm

February 25

Chinatown Walking Tour
Take a walk around SF’s Chinatown with an expert guide from the Chinese Historical Society.
Sign up at http://www.baynetlibs.org!

March 1

San Francisco Librarian Meet-Up!
Expand your network and meet fellow SF Librarians
https://www.meetup.com/SF-Librarian-Meetup/

March 9

SF Librarian Meetup featuring Sarah Houghton
Expand your network while partaking in a special presentation about Operation 451.
https://www.meetup.com/SF-Librarian-Meetup/

V OLUME 3, I SSUE 2

P AGE 3

2.016 C ONT .
L IBRARIES
CAN PROVIDE
VISUALIZATION TECHNOLOGIES
FOR
REEARCHERS
TO SEE THE
TRENDS AND
IMPLICATIONS OF
DATA SPECIFIC TO
THEIR FIELD .

Future?
By Emran Kassim

The organization, said Gerena, “offers a supportive environment as well as the opportunity
to invest in the community.”
Together, the panelists
demonstrated the impact effective change management could
have on a community. What
skills did they believe helped
drive innovation? “Teachers,
engineers, designers or scientists who participated in [our
program] are all skilled at design, in one form or another,”
Jacob said. Genera lauded perseverance, patience and the
ability to stay true to one’s core
values.
Information Visualization
Meets Libraries
In one of a series of breakout
sessions, SJSU iSchool assistant
professor Dr. Michelle Chen,
who teaches courses on big data
analytics and information visualization for graduate students
enrolled in the Master of Library and Information Science
online degree program, discussed the role information visualization can have for libraries.
Chen stressed the need for
skilled professionals to create
new retrieval models, building
data sets that are useful and
accessible, designing metadata
schemes for large-scale data
sets, and creating taxonomies
for these large data sets.
Chen’s presentation highlighted how the use of visualization and searchable data could
enable libraries to increase opportunity. Libraries can provide
visualization technologies for
researchers to see the trends
and implications of data specific
to their field. In this way, researchers can collaborate with
libraries to discover new possibilities.
Libraries and Democracy
In another breakout session,
SJSU iSchool instructor Laurie
Putnam reminded listeners that
democracy is one of the core
values of American libraries.
“Libraries are centers of learning and community—people

trust libraries,” Putnam said.
This is important, especially in a
time where there is so much
information and much of it is
unreliable or taken out of context. According to Putnam, we
can inform people and teach
them how to inform themselves
through our collections and programs, and by providing community spaces for civil conversation.
Joining Putnam was panelist
and adult services librarian
Mark Hudson, who shared ways
his Pennsylvania library promotes community participation.
The Monroeville Public Library
runs a “Hot Topics” service that
provides links to reliable online
resources that represent a variety of points of view on a current
event or issue. “The goal of this
service,” said Hudson, “is to help
the community gain basic
knowledge and understanding of
a topic so they can more effectively engage in discussions and
debates, vote and engage in
electoral politics with a better
understanding of the issues, and
continue to study and learn
about the topic.”
Panelist Tasha BergsonMichelson, a graduate of the
SJSU iSchool’s Master of Library and Information Science
degree program and a librarian
at Castilleja School in Palo Alto,
California, then highlighted
three ways to support democracy within schools: provide opportunities for choice and democratic governance of school life, encourage civic engagement, and
foster an informed democracy.
Bergson-Michelson demonstrated how she incorporated these
principles by developing student
-designed and led programs and
student-developed collections.
Resources from the Libraries
and Democracy session are
available online.
The Future of Libraries
In the final session, keynote
speakers Amy Garmer of the
Aspen Institute and Susan Hildreth of the University of Washington talked about Aspen’s

work to create a dialog on public
libraries that looks at civic engagement and the information
needs of the community. The
program’s website, LibraryVision.org, provides access to
tools, news and information.
“Libraries need to align their
programs and services with the
goals and priorities of the community,” emphasized Garmer.
Moderator Miguel Figueroa,
director of the ALA Center for
the Future of Libraries, closed
the conference by talking about
how each session during the day
connected with the opening
presentation. He wrapped up
the program with a final inspiration: “Let’s look at how librarians interface with their communities and engage multiple partners to envision very positive
futures for our work going forward.”
Library 2.0 Worldwide
Virtual Conference in 2017
For those who weren’t able to
attend in October, recordings
and resources from the miniconference are available at no
cost on the Libraries of the Future resource page. Recordings
from previous Library 2.016
mini-conferences, including
Library as Classroom and Privacy in the Digital Age, are available on the Library 2.0 website,
along with archives from previous years’ conferences.
If you’d like to participate in
next year’s conference series, be
sure to join the free Library 2.0
network to get notifications
about the exciting presentations
that are currently in the planning stages. As always, recordings will be available for the
Library 2.017 conference if you
can’t attend the live sessions
By Allison Randall Gatt, an
aspiring youth librarian and
current MLIS student at the
SJSU iSchool.

N EWSLETTER T ITLE

P AGE 4

E SSENTIAL L IBRARIAN C ONT .

Photo courtesy of the
U.S. National Archives

O NCE I

HAVE

MET THE
EXPECTATIONS
OF
ACCOMPLISHING
MY
PROFESSIONAL
ASSIGNMENTS
AND THUS
QUALIFIED AS
AN ESSENTIAL
LIBRARIAN , MY
NEXT STEP IS TO
BECOME AN
ESSENTIAL
LEADER

Collection/Resources Development and Instruction. My
colleagues are more than willing to mentor me in my learning process. Courses and
workshops are part of my
continuing education, in order
for me to become proficient at
my various responsibilities.
Because my background was
primarily in Cataloging, I was
eager to improve my expertise
beyond Technical Services. I
took advantage of every available professional development
opportunity, networked with
other librarians, and shared
some of the fruits of my learning through conferences, committee work and research
activities.
Once I have met the expectations of accomplishing my
professional assignments and
thus qualified as an essential
librarian, my next step is to
become an essential leader.
While I was serving as an
officer at local, regional, and
nationwide library committees, (e.g. Northern California
Technical Processes Group,
California Library Association, and Association for Library Collections & Technical
Services), not only did I learn
a great deal about program
planning, mentoring, and
teamwork, but I also came to
understand what it takes for
someone to become an essential leader. Although I have
not come across a lot of literature on essential leadership
per se, there is a lot of discussion pertaining to the qualities of an essential leader. For
me, the definition of an essential leader is a leader who
possesses flexible and relevant leadership qualities at
the point of need.
Many authors and researchers on leadership have defined leadership in their own
way but the essential qualities of a leader remain the
same. I was particularly inspired by the attributes of

leadership described by Annie
McKee, Daniel Coleman, Joseph Janes and Steven Bell in
their respective works.
McKee’s “resonant leader” is
one who “develops emotional
intelligence, renews relationships, and sustains effectiveness”; Daniel Coleman’s
“focused leader” is another
who focuses on strategies,
expands awareness, and
builds relationships. While
Joseph Janes’s “effective leader” is a mover and shaker who
leads from the middle, Steven
Bell’s “grassroots leader” is
someone who accepts challenges to lead from the bottom
-up. I would like to follow in
the footsteps of these experts
and become an essential leader who knows when to act
during pertinent situations
and to respond with which
appropriate actions. The
ACRL ULS Committee on the
Future of University Libraries listed five traits that describe successful library reorganizations: set priorities,
create efficiencies, follow aspirations, overcome constraints,
and take advantage of opportunities. I think these traits
could be adapted into the
qualities of an essential leader. My ultimate goal is to become an essential leader who
is proficient in the art of communicating, interacting, and
influencing people at work.
To be an essential leader in
an academic library is to align
one’s behaviors and actions
with the mission of the library
and the college. Saint Mary’s
College Library’s mission to
foster excellence in teaching
and learning, intellectual
discovery, respect for inquiry
and diverse points of view, as
well as dedication to service,
are consistent with the College’s Strategic Plan. As a
Lasallian educator, I need to
know how my future responsibilities and ambitions reflect
the Strategic Plan.

I hope to continue to reposition my responsibilities beyond Cataloging and become a
technical expert in institutional repositories, open access, and digital scholarship.
For the Strategic Plan theme
1 “Discovery in Dialogue”: I
would like to further develop
my administrative role as the
project starter for the College’s institutional repository,
which aims to further enhance the College’s academic
distinction among our peer
institutions. For theme 2
“Access to Success”: I want to
be more proficient in using
discipline-specific databases
so that graduate students as
well as faculty could benefit
from expert research assistance. For theme 3
“Expanding Responsibility for
Lasallian Higher Education”:
I welcome any opportunities
to participate in campus initiatives that promote dialogues
on sustainability and building
an inclusive community. For
theme 4 “Defining our ‘Place’
”: As the library is known for
our upgraded infrastructure
and 24/7 hours during finals,
I would not hesitate to undertake additional responsibilities to ensure that the library
is an accessible, safe, and
respectful place to study and
learn at all times.
Leadership is listed as one
of the top ten academic library issues for 2015. The
journey from essential librarian to essential leader is an
ongoing process. I will no
doubt continue to cultivate
my leadership qualities, focusing my service and contribution to the library profession and distinctive excellence
of the College. My challenge is
to become an inclusive, adaptive, and empowering leader
who makes a difference in
changing lives.
By Elise Y. Wong

V OLUME 3, I SSUE 2

P AGE 5

S OCIAL M EDIA C ONT .
T HE

BEST

WAY TO
DETERMINE
WHICH
ANALYTICS
TOOLS TO
USE IS TO
FIND OUT
EXACTLY
WHAT
METRICS
YOUR
ADMINISTRA
TION IS
LOOKING
FOR

On your account's analytics
home page, you'll see a 28-day
summary at the top as well as
some highlights from the month,
such as your top tweet and top
mention.
You can also look at the performance of specific tweets and
see a breakdown of analytics
such as
-Impressions — the number of
times users saw the tweet on
Twitter.
-Engagements — the number of
times a user clicked, retweeted,
replied, followed, or liked a
tweet.
-Engagement rate — the number of engagements divided by
the total number of impressions.
Twitter also has an Audiences
tab where you can learn about
the people who follow you. Naturally, followers of
@TechSoup4Libs have a top
interest of "Books, news, and
general info." Our audience is
also mainly female with professional or technical backgrounds.
These are some very basic demographics, but it at least gives
us an idea of whom we're talking to.
Third-Party Analytics
At TechSoup, we primarily
use Hootsuite to manage our

C ROCHETTING AND KNITTING
YOUR G RANDMA ’ S K NITTING
On the afternoon of December
4th, librarians congregated in
the Community Room at the
Tarea Hall Pittman South
Branch of the Berkeley Public
Library to get their crocheting
and knitting on. Led by Monica
Ruck and Michele Grim, the
attendees learned more about
yarn bombing and craftivism in
the Bay Area and beyond before
turning their attention to crafting. Ruck and Grim explained
their own craftivism work—
using crafting as a form of activism—and showed examples of
their work. While most have
probably seen examples of yarn
bombing before—yarn or knitted
projects attached to various
public structures such as fences,

FOR

social media accounts — analytics, posts, responses, etc. We
have the enterprise version,
which gives us real-time analytics in which we can see the engagement level of a post over the
course of the day. It also allows
us to generate analytics reports
and customize them in case our
board or administration requests to see specific numbers.
We've also found Hootsuite
Insights, another feature in the
enterprise version, to be useful
for learning about our audience
beyond what the built-in tools
can do. Our senior online community and social media manager, Lewis Haidt, uses Hootsuite
Insights with Excel pivot tables
to see who has been active
around a certain hashtag or
particular conversations.
Hootsuite Insights lets you
gauge the sentiment around
your brand. You can also set up
a stream that lets you see where
people are talking about your
brand — whether it's on social
media, blogs, forums, and so on.
Hootsuite offers four plans:
free, pro, team (suitable for a
small business), and enterprise.
The pro plan offers a 30-day
trial so you can see if a deeper
analytics tool is useful for your

organization.
Audiense is another social
media analytics and listening
tool that some of us at TechSoup
have used before. It also has
a free version (only for Twitter
analytics) that's worth trying
out.
So What Works Best?
The best way to determine
which analytics tools to use is to
find out exactly what metrics
your administration is looking
for. What goals would they like
to accomplish through social
media? Do you simply need to
provide numbers for followers,
likes, and retweets? If so, you
will probably do just fine with
the built-in tools.
Does your administration
want demographic data on your
social media audience? Or do
they want detailed reports on
the growth and success of your
social media? Then you might
consider a third-party tool for
your social analytics.
Whatever you route you
choose, you want to make sure
the tool can help you make sense
of your social media numbers so
your organization can continue
to do great work.
By Ginny Mies

G OOD C AUSES : N OT

lampposts, benches, etc.—you
may have not considered how
craftivism could align with library programming. The attendees discussed the possibility
of yarn bombing events and
crafting workshops to benefit
organizations that take knitted
and crocheted pieces as potential ways for libraries to partner
with local crafters and make a
positive difference in the wider
world.
Ruck and Grim’s slideshow,
which is available for download
on the BayNet Website, contains
links to many tutorials to learn
more about crocheting and knitting, as well as links to organizations where you can donate
your crafted pieces.

It was a great crafting event
and everyone came away with
new or refreshed skills and the
desire to incorporate more time
for crocheting and knitting in
their lives—any hopefully some
ideas for library craftivism
events, too! Hopefully BayNet
will be able to sponsor more
craftivism events in the future
and if you have an idea for a
future workshop or event, please
contact anyone on the board.
Happy crafting!
By Diana Thormoto

Photo courtesy of
Diana Wakimoto

B AY A REA L IBRARY AND
I NFORMATION N ETWORK

As a multi-type library association, BayNet represents librarians
and information professionals from all varieties of organizations.
Our mission is to strengthen connections among all types of San
Francisco Bay Area Libraries and Information Centers, and to
promote communication, professional development, cooperation,
and innovative resource sharing.
If you would like to know more about what we do, contact us via
email at baynetlibs@gmail.com

J OIN BAYNET ONLINE:
WWW. BAYNETLIBS. ORG

BUSINESSES
Want to advertise in the BayNet Newsletter? Contact Collin
Thormoto at collin.thormoto@gmail.com for rates and details.

SUBMIT A STORY:
HTTP://BAYNETLIBS.ORG/NEWS/
SUBMISSION-GUIDELINES/

F ROM

THE

A RCHIVES : P RESIDENT ’ S M ESSAGE W INTER 1997

I am optimistic about the
future of computer technology
but as I think about this, I am
actually rebooting my PC for
the second time today! (Was it
not enough memory? Was it my
network? Was it some software
bug?) While I wait for my PC
system to come up again, I
stare at my screen, anxiously
awaiting the several prompts
that will require entering my
passwords. I feel frustrated and
locked into using computer
processes that I don’t always
fully understand, but that I rely
on to do my job. I realize how
my workdays have become
totally dependent on fully functioning computer software and
technology, whether it is doing
my administrative work, communicating to my colleagues
and co-workers or doing research and gathering information for library customers.
If I feel frustrated as a veteran information professional
who has actually managed to

adapt very well to the fast moving information technology
roller coaster, what about our
library customers? These are
the end users not only targeted
by America Online, other internet providers, and CD-ROM
database producers directly,
but who are expected to use
many of the library’s computer
resources on their own, with
minimal training by a downsized staff. If you take a cross
section of library customers,
how are they faring with selfservice access?
Here is where reason takes
over (Ah! My PC system is back
up and I can access Netscape
again!) and I actually feel confident that I am knowledgeably
balanced on top of the information technology wave. I have
placed heavy personal emphasis on professional development
and training so I know how to
use the latest software and
computer technology to access
information fast and effectively.

Although I am still struggling to keep up with the latest
developments, I have firsthand
experience and training that
gives me confidence in my expertise. I have practical
knowledge about the current
state of computer technology,
know the limitations of html, as
well as the differences between
Yahoo and Lycos—and still
know without apology when to
pull a reference book off the
shelf (not digitized yet!) to find
information that a library customer could never find on the
World Wide Web.
If you haven’t made an effort
to look after your own computer
training needs, you cannot
remain effective in helping your
library customers use the new
computer tools. This is why I
feel so strongly that BayNet
fills an important need for
many libraries. For one thing,
BayNet provides access to affordable training.

We also have an informative
web page. We are encouraging
communication through our
listserv. Are you taking advantage of these inexpensive
BayNet resources? Check them
out! You will find colleagues to
learn from, and also strengthen
your connections to other Bay
Area Libraries—and who
knows, maybe you’ll learn why
your computer crashes twice a
day or at least be able to share
your own frustrations about
computer technology!
By Mary Ann Whitney, 1997

Photo courtesy of SDASM
Archives