HISTORY OF ENGLISH

English is West Germanic Language that originated in Anglo-Saxon English. As a result of military, economic, scientific, political and cultural influence of the British Empire during the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries of the United States. Since the late 19th century, it has become the Lingua Franca (Frankish language) in many parts of the world. It is used extensively as a Second Language and as an Official Language in commonwealth countries and many international organizations. Historically, English originated from several dialects, now called Old English (Anglo-Saxon; an early form of English language that was spoken and written in parts of what are now England and South-eastern Scotland between the mid-5th century and the mid-12th century) which were brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon Settlers (Anglo-Saxon is the term used to describe the Germanic-speaking tribes in the South and east of Great Britain from their arrival in the 5th to 6th centuries and throughout the Early Middle Ages. Their Anglo-Saxon language derives from ³Ingvaeonic´ [Ingvaeonic is also known as North Sea Germanic. It is a postulated grouping of West Germanic language that would fork into Old English, Old Frisian and Old Saxon, and according to some of dialects of West-Flanders] West Germanic dialects and transforms into Middle English from the 11th century. Anglo-Saxon was divided into four main dialects that are West Saxon, Mercian, Northumbrian and Kentish) beginning in the 5th century. The language was heavily influenced by Old Norse language of Viking invaders. After the Norman Conquest, Old English developed into Middle English, borrowing heavily from the Norman (Anglo-French) vocabulary and spelling conventions. Modern English develop from there and continues to adopt foreign words from a variety of languages, as well as coining new words. A significant number of English words, especially technical words, have been constructed based on roots from Latin and ancient Greek.

Source: Wapedia; For Wikipedia on Mobile Phones

Thursday, 14 May, 2009

English is a West Germanic language that originated from the Anglo-Frisian and Lower Saxon dialects brought to Britain by Germanic Settlers and Roman Auxiliary Troops from the Northern Netherland in the 5th century. One of these Germanic tribes was the Angles, who may have come from Angeln, and Bede wrote that their whole nation came to Britain, leaving their former land empty. The names England or ³Aenglaland´ and English are derived from the name of this tribe. The Anglo-Saxon began invading around 449 AD from the regions of Denmark and Jutland. Before the Anglo-Saxon arrived in England the native population spoke Brythonic, a Celtic language. Although the most significant changes in the dialect occurred after Norman Invasion of 1066, the language retained its name and the pre-Norman invasion dialect is now known as Old English. Initially, Old English was a diverse group of dialects, reflecting the varied origins of the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Great Britain. One of these dialects, Late West Saxon, eventually came to dominate. The original Old English language was influenced by two waves of invasions. The first was by language speakers of the Scandinavian branch of the Germanic family; the conquered and colonized parts of the British Isles in the 8th and 9th centuries. The second was the Normans in the 11th century who spoke Old Norman and developed an English variety of this called Anglo-Norman. (Over the centuries, this lost the significally Norman element under the influence of Parisian French and, later, of English, eventually turning into a distinctive dialect of Anglo-French.) These two invasions caused English to become ³mixed´ to some degree (though it was never a truly mixed language in the strict linguistic sense of the word; mixed languages arise from the cohabitation of speakers of different languages, who develop a hybrid tongue for basic communication). Cohabitation with the Scandinavians resulted in a significant grammatical simplification and lexical supplementation of the Anglo-Frisian core of English; the later Norman occupation led to the grafting onto that Germanic core of a more elaborate layer of words from the Italic branch of European languages. This Norman influence entered English largely through courts and government. Thus, English developed into a ³borrowing´ language of great flexibility and with a huge vocabulary. The emergence and spread of British Empire as well as the emergence of United States as a superpower helped to spread English language around the world.

Source: Wapedia; For Wikipedia on Mobile Phones

Thursday, 14 May, 2009

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