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Summer Internship Report 2010

LIST OF COTETS
DECLARATIO............................................................................................... 7
ACKOWLEDGEMET................................................................................ 8
ABSTRACT....................................................................................................... 9
LIST OF TABLES............................................................................................10
LIST OF FIGURES.......................................................................................13
CHAPTER-1 ITRODUCTIO.....................................................................14
1.1 ABOUT THE IDUSTRY......................................................................................14
1.2 SHORTAGE OF RAW MATERIAL....................................................................16
1.3 PORTER’S FIVE FORCE MODEL FOR COPPER IDUSTRY.....................18

CHAPTER-2 ABOUT THE COMPAY.......................................................19


2.1 VISIO 2015.............................................................................................................19

2.2 MISSIO...................................................................................................................19

2.3 STREGTHS...........................................................................................................20
2.4 HISTORY.................................................................................................................20

2.5 SWOT AALYSIS.....................................................................................................21

2.6 TQM- A WAY OF LIFE.........................................................................................22

2.7 TPM JOUREY AT SIIL.......................................................................................22


CHAPTER-3 OBJECTIVE, SCOPE AD METHODOLOGY..................23
3.1 OBJECTIVE............................................................................................................23
3.2 SCOPE OF THE PROJECTS................................................................................23
3.3 METHODOLOGY..................................................................................................23
3.4 LIMITATIOS OF THE PROJECT....................................................................23

CHAPTER-4 PROJECT I DETAIL............................................................24


4.1 DEFIITIO: TIME EFFICIECY...................................................................24
4.2 FACTORS IFLUECIG ACTUAL RUIG HOURS OF CELL .........24
HOUSE
4.2.1 CHAGE OVER....................................................................................................25

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4.2.1.1 CELLHOUSE PREPARATIO...........................................................................25
4.2.1.2 CATHODE STRIPPIG MACHIE (CSM)......................................................26
4.2.1.2.1 PURPOSE...............................................................................................................26
4.2.1.2.2 OPERATIG PROCEDURE OF CSM..............................................................26
4.2.1.2.3 STADARD MACHIE HOURS REQUIRED................................................27
4.2.1.2.4 PARETO AALYSIS OF DELAY AREAS I CSM.......................................28
4.2.1.2.5 PARETO AALYSIS OF THE DEPARTMETS I CSM.............................30
4.2.1.3 AODE PREPARATIO MACHIE (APM)....................................................31
4.2.1.3.1 OPERATIG PROCEDURE OF APM...............................................................31
4.2.1.3.2 STADARD MACHIE HOURS REQUIRED.................................................32
4.2.1.3.3 PARETO AALYSIS OF DELAY AREAS I APM........................................33
4.2.1.3.4 PARETO AALYSIS OF THE DEPARTMETS I APM.............................34
4.2.1.4 AODE SCRAP WASHIG MACHIE (ASWM)...........................................35
4.2.1.4.1 OPERATIG PROCEDURE OF ASWM...........................................................35
4.2.1.4.2 STADARD MACHIE HOURS REQUIRED.................................................36
4.2.1.4.3 PARETO AALYSIS OF DELAY AREAS I ASWM....................................37
4.2.1.4.4 PARETO AALYSIS OF THE DEPARTMETS I ASWM........................38
4.2.1.5 CRAES.................................................................................................................39
4.2.1.5.1 E. O. T. CRAES...................................................................................................39
4.2.1.5.2 PARETO AALYSIS OF DELAY AREAS I CRAE-1...............................40
4.2.1.5.3 PARETO AALYSIS OF DEPARTMETS I CRAE-1..............................41
4.2.1.5.4 PARETO AALYSIS OF DELAY AREAS I CRAE-2................................42
4.2.1.5.5 PARETO AALYSIS OF DEPARTMETS I CRAE-2..............................43
4.2.1.6 OPERATOR SKILLS AD EXPERIECE.......................................................44
4.2.1.7 FORKLIFT AVAILABILITY...............................................................................44
4.2.1.8 PREVETIVE MAITEACE........................................................................44
4.2.1.9 LABOUR AVAILABILITY AD SKILLS.........................................................44
4.2.2 STRIPPIG.............................................................................................................45
4.2.3 RECTIFIERS..........................................................................................................45
4.2.4 MISCELLAEOUS................................................................................................45
4.3 ABOUT THE FORKLIFTS...................................................................................46
4.4 FORKLIFTS I EOU.............................................................................................47
4.4.1 REFIERY..............................................................................................................48
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4.4.1.1 TIME CALCULATIOS.......................................................................................48
4.4.1.2 UTILIZATIO OF FORKLIFTS.........................................................................51

4.4.2 LOGISTICS.............................................................................................................53
4.4.2.1 TIME CALCULATIOS.......................................................................................53
4.4.2.2 UTILIZATIO OF THE FORKLIFTS................................................................55
4.4.3 CCR..........................................................................................................................57
4.4.3.1 TIME CALCULATIOS......................................................................................59
4.4.3.2 UTILIZATIO OF THE FORKLIFTS...............................................................59
CHAPTER 5 RESULTS AD SUGGESTIOS...........................................61
5.1 TIME EFFICIECY COSOLIDATED STATEMET..................................61
5.2 FOKKLIFT UTILIZATIO COSOLIDATED STATEMET.....................61
5.3 SUGGESTIOS......................................................................................................62
5.3.1 SUGGESTIO 1.....................................................................................................62
5.3.2 SUGGESTIO-2.....................................................................................................64
5.3.3 SUGGESTIO 3.....................................................................................................66
5.3.4 SUGGESTIO 4.....................................................................................................70
COCLUSIO.................................................................................................71
REFERECES.................................................................................................72

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CERTIFICATE - HEAD OF DEPARTMET

This is to certify that JOES DAVIS MATHEW (Registration #


0921120 ) is a bona fide student of Christ University Institute of
Management (MBA batch 2009-11) and has successfully completed
his Summer Internship Project at STERLITE INDUSTRIES INDIA
LIMITED, TUTICORIN in Lean Operation & System stream

………………………
Place: Prof. CKT Chandrashekara
Head of Department
Date: Christ University Institute of
Management

Bangalore

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CERTIFICATE –FACULTY GUIDE

This is to certify that this internship report on the title IMPROVIG


THE OPERATIOAL EFFICIECY AD PROFITABILITY
OF EXPORT ORIETED UIT is a bonafide work of Mr. Jones
Davis Mathew, REG o 0921120 under my guidance and support
.This report is a part of MBA course with specialization in Lean
Operation & System stream and the content and the work done is
genuine with respect to the information covered and thought
expressed.

………………………
Place:
MR SUNIL A.K
PROFESSOR
Date:

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CERTIFICATE FROM THE COMPAY

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DECLARATIO

I, Jones Davis Mathew, declare that the project entitled IMPROVING

THE OPERATIONAL EFFICIENCY AND PROFITABILITY OF EXPORT

ORIENTED UNIT (Sterlite Industries India Ltd.), done during the

period from 1stApril to 5thMay is my own effort and work.

This Project is done in partial fulfillment of the requirements for


the award of the degree of MASTER OF BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION by CHRIST UNIVERSITY, BANGALORE.

Place: Bangaluru
Date: 18th june 2010 Signature

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

My gratitude is due to Mr. S. SRIDHAR, H.O.D Refinery, who has


guided me and given his valuable time & knowledge during my stay
at the company.
I convey my gratitude to Capt. YOGESH KUMAR GAUR,
ASSOCIATE MAAGER, HR, for his guidance and support
throughout the project work during my stay at the company.
I am deeply grateful to Sri. SUIL A.K, my Faculty Guide, who
provided valuable insights and guidance at every stage of the project.
I also convey my sincere gratitude to my friends and my family for
their encouragement and support extended to me during the course of
my project. At the end I would not forget to thank other members of
SIIL, TUTICORIN who treated me with respect and helped me in the
best of their capacity.

Signature.

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ABSTRACT

This report deals with the improvement of Operational Efficiency and


Profitability of the Export Oriented Unit (EOU) of Sterlite Industries India
Limited, Tuticorin, Tamil Nadu.
Process of copper cathode production in the Refinery unit has
been studied and the time used for the production has been analyzed by
performing the time efficiency study and the various factors that influence time
efficiency. The various factors have been analyzed using Pareto analysis and the
vital few causes have been pointed out on this report.
Use of material handling equipments especially Forklifts have
been studied in this report. The various motions that the forklift takes and the
time taken for performing a particular activity has been observed. Utilization
level for each of the forklifts used in the EOU has been calculated and
accordingly suggestions have been provided to the company to improve the
utilization level and thus reduce the excess quantity of forklifts used and
contribute to the profitability of the company.

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LIST OF TABLES
2.1 CURRENT CAPACITY DETAILS OF STERLITE INDUSTRIES (I) LTD 7
4.1 MAJOR AREAS THAT CAUSE THE FUNCTIONING DELAY FOR CSM AND THE
CONSOLIDATED OCCURRENCE FOR THE PERIOD OF NOV’09-MARCH’10
4.2 CONSOLIDATED DELAY DISTRIBUTION OF THE DEPARTMENTS FOR CSM
FROM NOV’09-MARCH’10
4.3 MAJOR AREAS THAT CAUSE THE FUNCTIONING DELAY FOR APM AND THE
CONSOLIDATED OCCURRENCE FOR THE PERIOD OF NOV’09-MARCH’10
4.4 CONSOLIDATED DELAY DISTRIBUTION OF THE DEPARTMENTS FOR APM
FROM NOV’09-MARCH’10
4.5 MAJOR AREAS THAT CAUSE THE FUNCTIONING DELAY FOR ASWM AND
THE CONSOLIDATED OCCURRENCE FOR THE PERIOD OF NOV’09-MARCH’10
4.6 CONSOLIDATED DELAY DISTRIBUTION OF THE DEPARTMENTS FOR ASWM
FROM NOV’09-MARCH’10
4.7 MAJOR DELAYS OCCURRED IN CRANE-1 IN NOV-09 TO MARCH-10
4.8 CONSOLIDATED DELAY DISTRIBUTION OF THE DEPARTMENTS FOR CRANE-
1 FROM NOV’09-MARCH’10
4.9 MAJOR DELAYS OCCURRED IN CRANE-2 IN NOV-09 TO MARCH-10
4.10 CONSOLIDATED DELAY DISTRIBUTION OF THE DEPARTMENTS FROM
NOV’09-MARCH’10
4.11 FORKLIFT TIMING FOR SHIFTING FRESH ANODES FROM CHIPPING YARD
TO DESPATCH YARD
4.12 FORKLIFT TIMING FOR SHIFTING FRESH ANODES FROM DESPATCH YARD
TO ANODE YARD BY 5TON AND 3 TON FORKLIFTS
4.13 FORKLIFT TIMING FOR CARRYING THE SPENT ANODE FROM ANODE YARD
TO SMELTER YARD
4.14 FORKLIFT TIMING FOR CARRYING THE CATHODE FROM THE CSM
MACHINE TO WEIGH SCALE AND FROM THERE TO THE CSM YARD
4.15 UTILIZATION OF 3 TON FORKLIFT DEDICATED TO CSM YSRD
4.16 UTILIZATION OF 3 TON FORKLIFT DEDICATED TO CSM YSRD
CONSIDERING CHANGE OVER N STRIPPING TIME SEPERATELY
4.17 UTILIZATION OF 1-3TON AND 2-5TON FORKLIFT FOR APM YARD

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4.18 FORKLIFT TIMING FOR SHIFTING CATHODE BUNDLES FROM THE CSM
YARD TO THE WAREHOUSE
4.19 FORKLIFT TIMING FOR SHIFTING OF CATHODE BUNDLES FROM THE CSM
YARD TO THE FRONT YARD
4.20 FORKLIFT TIMING FOR LOADING THE TRUCK WITH COILS AND CATHODE
BUNDLES FROM THE WAREHOUSE TO THE TRUCK
4.21 FORKLIFT TIMING FOR SHIFTING THE CATHODE BUNDLES FROM FRONT
YARD TO THE CCR FURNACE
4.22 UTILIZATION OF THE FORKLIFTS 3TON FORKLIFT DEDICATED TO CSM
YARD
4.23 UTILIZATION OF THE FORKLIFTS FOR TRUCK LOADING (COIL, CATHODE)
AND CATHODE BUNDLES TO CCR
4.24 FORKLIFT TIMING FOR SHIFTING OF COIL FROM THE CCR TO THE
WAREHOUSE
4.25 FORKLIFT TIMING FOR FEEDING THE FURNACE WITH THE CATHODE
BUNDLES FROM THE CCR YARD TO THE FEEDER
4.26 FORKLIFT TIMING FOR ACTIVITIES INSIDE THE CCR
4.27 UTILIZATION OF THE 3TON FORKLIFT DEDICATED TO FURNACE
4.28 UTILIZATION FOR 5 TON FORKLIFT FOR SHIFTING COIL FROM CCR TO
WAREHOUSE
5.1 CONSOLIDATED TIME EFFICIENCY OF THE REFINERY
5.2 FOKKLIFT UTILIZATION CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT
5.3 RENEWD UTILIZATION WHEN 70% OF CATHODE IS SHIFTED BY 2 -5TON
FORKLIFT OF LOGISTICS
5.4 RENEWD UTILIZATION WHEN 30% OF CATHODE IS SHIFTED BY 3TON
FORKLIFT OF CSM
5.5 RENEWD UTILIZATION WHEN 100% OF CATHODE IS SHIFTED BY 2 -5TON
FORKLIFT OF LOGISTICS
5.6 RENEWD UTILIZATION FOR 3 TON FORKLIFT OF CCR
5.7 REUTILIZATION OF THE FORKLIFTS FOR TRUCK LOADING (COIL, CATHODE)
AND CATHODE BUNDLES TO CCR
5.8 RENEWD UTILIZATION FOR 5TON FORKLIFT OF CCR

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5.9 RENEWD UTILIZATION WHEN 100% OF CATHODE IS SHIFTED BY 2 -5TON
FORKLIFT OF LOGISTICS
5.10 RENEWD UTILIZATION WHEN 90% OF CATHODE IS SHIFTED BY 2 -5TON
FORKLIFT OF LOGISTICS

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LIST OF FIGURES
1.1 GROWTH OF PRODUCTION IN COPPER FROM THE YEAR 2004 TO 2008
1.2 COPPER INDUSTRY MARKET SHARE
1.3 GLOBAL DEMAND FOR COPPER BY REGION
2.1 PROCESS OF COPPER CATHODES AND RODS PRODUCTION AT SIIL
4.1 FLOW DIAGRAM OF CSM
4.2 PARETO ANALYSIS FOR CSM FOR THE PERIOD OF NOV’09-MARCH’10
4.3 PARETO ANALYSIS FOR CSM (DEPARTMENT VICE) FROM NOV’09-MARCH’10
4.4 FLOW DIAGRAM OF APM
4.5 PARETO ANALYSIS FOR APM FOR THE PERIOD OF NOV’09-MARCH’10
4.6 PARETO ANALYSIS FOR APM (DEPARTMENT VICE) FROM NOV’09-MARCH’10
4.7 PARETO ANALYSIS FOR ASWM FOR THE PERIOD OF NOV’09-MARCH’10
4.8 PARETO ANALYSIS FOR ASWM (DEPARTMENT VICE) FROM NOV’09-
MARCH’10
4.9 PARETO ANALYSIS FOR CRANE-1 FOR THE PERIOD OF NOV’09-MARCH’10
4.10 PARETO ANALYSIS FOR CRANE-1 (DEPARTMENT VICE) FROM NOV’09-
MARCH’10
4.11 PARETO ANALYSIS FOR CRANE-2 FOR THE PERIOD OF NOV’09-MARCH’10
4.12 PARETO ANALYSIS FOR CRANE-2 (DEPARTMENT VICE) FROM NOV’09-
MARCH’10
4.13 FORKLIFT
5.1 DIAGRAM OF AUTO FEEDER
5.2 DIAGRAM OF NEW RAILED CCR

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CHAPTER-1
ITRODUCTIO
1.1 ABOUT THE IDUSTRY:
The history of Indian copper industry goes back to 1967 with the incorporation of Hindustan
Copper Ltd (HCL) and thereafter acquisition of mines from the public sector National
Minerals Development Corporation (NMDC). But, the real twist in copper story took with the
opening up this sector for private sector players in 1992 which saw the involvement of Indo
Gulf Corporation (now a part of Hindalco Industries) and Sterlite Industries into copper
smelting and refining through concentrate imports from various mining-rich countries.
Copper is a special metal for industrial applications owing to its properties such as electrical
conductivity, corrosion resistance, ductility, malleability and rigidity. Specific applications
of copper include power cables and wires, jelly filled cables, building wires, air conditioning
and refrigeration tubings. Telecom, power, construction, transportation, handicrafts,
engineering, consumer durable, defence. The Indian Copper Industry was opened for private
Sector investment in 1992. Earlier the industry was dominated by Hindustan Copper Limited
(HCL), a public sector undertaking. The Industry currently has just 3 major players (Sterlite,
Hindalco and Hindustan Copper Ltd.). Jhagaria Copper (erstwhile SWIL Ltd.), which
commissioned its 50,000 tonne plant in Gujarat is reportedly facing acute shortage of raw
material. The company approximately two years before initiated the commercial production
on its plant equipped with the technology to use copper concentrates and scrap as raw
materials. But, of late companied denied procuring scrap from domestic traders and imports
remained scary for various reasons. Other players include around 1000 of SSI units but a
majority of them closed down due to unviability. These units are primarily involved in
converting scrap into ingots. While HCL is the only integrated producer, which mines and
refines copper, Hindalco Industries and Sterlite Industries are secondary producers, who
process both indigenous and imported copper concentrate to produce end products like
copper bars, rods and wires. The fully de-mutualised copper producer is largely managed
mainly by bankers.
tonnes towards the end of the current fiscal year to go up to 947500 tonnes as against the
demand of roughly 5 lakhs tonnes. The demand supply imbalance is unlikely to deteriorate
further, as the ongoing boost in the country's infrastructure is expected to appreciate the

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demand in tonnes, thus; taking the total production of beyond one million
However, the surplus position in the domestic market is not major concern for the Indian
players because the Asian region has a deficit of around 2.6 million tonnes. But it can only
threatening call from rising prices which hit the unaffordable level during the last two years.
While Japan, India and Philippines a surplus position, deficit regions comprise China,
Taiwan, South Korea, Malaysia, Thailand and parts of Middle East. About 50 per cent of the
domestic copper production is routed through secondary market through scrap imports. The
domestic generation of copper is negligible as the system is not fully organized to recover
copper scrap which is presently either burnt or dumped underground without realizing the re-
sale
Production growing at a CAGR of 15%
800

700

600

500

400

300

200

100

0
2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Fig1.1

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COPPER INDUSTRY MARKET SHARE
6% 1

47% HINDALCO
STERLITE
HCL
SWIL
46%

Fig1.2
Hindalco and Sterlite accounts for more than 90% of the production.
1.2 SHORTAGE OF RAW MATERIAL:
Indian primary and secondary copper industry has been facing tremendous raw material
shortage for which the smelters have been importing concentrates from the major mining
countries like Peru, Chile, Canada etc and secondary producers have been surviving on low
scrap imports. But, today, global industry is facing raw material supply deficit which is likely
to persist until 2009.
Increase in smelting capacity mainly in India and China and mines facing the problem of low
grade, shortages of equipment and manpower have kept the concentrate market in deficit and
have put further pressure on TcRc. During the first half of 2007, TcRc declined by almost
15%. The concentrate would continue to be short supply upto 2009; this may affect the TcRc,
adversely, in the Spot Market, Debu Bhattacharya, MD, Hindalco Industries believes.
Custom smelters are likely to remain under pressure for until new mines come on stream.
The TcRc charges have been declining during the past few months due to constraints in
concentrate availability. The TcRc charges have in fact declined from 5.64 c/ lb at the
beginning of the financial year FY2004 to 2.56 c/ lb in Q4 FY2004, a drop of about 55% due
to aggressive buying by Asian Smelters. Towards the end of the first quarter of the current
fiscal the TcRc rate further declined to 2.00 c/lb
Copper and copper products can be imported at zero duty from Sri Lanka under the Free

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Trade Agreement (FTA) with that country. Duties on copper and copper products have been
progressively reduced – for example, customs duty has been reduced from 35 per cent in
2001 to 10 per cent in 2006.
On the production front, the last few years have seen significant additions in capacities in
India and accordingly the production has increased at a CAGR of 14.8% during the last three
years. The domestic consumption, on the other earmarked for exports. Strong demand for
copper has resulted in steady rise in copper prices, which had earlier exhibited
World demand growth forecast is 4.9 % for 2007 and 4.2% 2008. Per capita during 2007-
08. India’s strong economic growth and key priority for the power sector which is major
consumer of copper will support high demand and price in the near term.
The Indian copper industry comprises 3% on the world copper map. Of late, India
turned into a net exporter of copper from the status of net importer on account of rise in
production by three companies for its applications in building, cabling for power and
telecommunications, automobiles etc. Two major states owned telecommunications service
providers – BSNL and MTNL consume 10% of the country’s copper production. Growth in
the building construction and automobile sector is
In India the users segment such as winding wire, power cables, transformers industry and
continued increased export of downstream products supporting higher demand. However, the
industry is greatly disadvantaged as non-value added imports from Sri Lanka under the free
trade agreement (FTA) continue to adversely impact the domestic sales. But, the efforts
initiated by the Sri Lankan government to curb imports, less value addition and re-exports to
India illegally brought positive results. Now, it’s a wakeup call for the government of India to
restrict unwanted imports and exports of raw material and finished products from the FTA
countries. Under, FTA the re-exports of any goods was permitted with minimum 35% of
value addition which was not practiced by the miscreants traders. But, today, the industry is
complete safe as all units have already come back to India with their plants. Only three
projects still remain in Sri Lanka with a minute production capacity of 200-250 tonnes per
annum.

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GLOBAL DEMAND FOR COPPER BY REGION

Fig 1.3

1.3 PORTER’S FIVE FORCE MODEL FOR COPPER IDUSTRY

Threat of New Entrants


• Supportive policy regime
• Growing domestic market as
well as exports across
Supplier Power Customer Power
segments • User industries experiencing
• The country has rich reserves
of minerals, ores Competitive Rivalry strong growth
• Growing, skilled manpower • Number of domestic players • Highly demanding customers
base • Highly competitive in secondary • Wide range of products,
and downstream segments specifications to meet different
needs

Threat of Substitutes
• Plastics and other substitutes being
tried out in some user segments
• No viable substitute in a majority of
usage areas

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CHAPTER2
ABOUT THE COMPAY
Sterlite Industries India Ltd. (SLT) is a subsidiary of Vedanta Resources plc, a diversified
and integrated metals and mining group. The company engages primarily in the production
of copper in India. Its products include copper cathodes; and cast copper rods, including
11 mm and 12 mm rods used in the transformer industry, and 8 mm rods used by the wires
and cables industry with applications in housing wires, electrical cables, and telecom cables.
The company also engages in the mining of bauxite, and the production
of aluminium conductors and various aluminium products, as well as in the mining
of zinc ore, and in the manufacture of zinc ingots and lead ingots. In addition, Sterlite
Industries produces various chemical products, such as sulphuric acids, phosphoric acids,
phospho gypsum, hydro fluo silicic acids, and granulated slag. Further, the company involves
in trading gold, as well as in paper business. It markets its copper products directly to original
equipment manufacturers and traders. The company is based in Mumbai, India. The
company’s main operating subsidiaries are Hindustan Zinc Limited for its zinc and lead
operations; Copper Mines of Tasmania Pty Limited for its copper operations in Australia; and
Bharat Aluminium Company Limited for its aluminium operations. The company is entering
into the commercial power generation business by setting up a large scale 2,400 MW coal
based independent thermal power plant in Jharsuguda, Orissa and a wind energy project at
Karnataka, Gujarat and Maharashtra, totalling 110.4 MW. Post completion of these projects,
the company will have a total wind power capacity of 148.8 MW.
2.1 VISIO 2015
To be the world’s leading copper producer delivering sustainable value to all stakeholders by
leveraging technology and best practices.
2.2 MISSIO
• To build a knowledge and process driven organization through TPM
• To create sustainable value through safe, clean and green processes
• To sustain leadership position in domestic and global market through market
development and customer delight.
• To be the best and most respectable corporate citizen
• To leverage technology to its full potential across the business cycle
• To harness the profitable and growing CCR/value added product from 240KMT to
600 KMT per annum.
• To achieve Zero cost and beyond
• To secure raw material through long term contracts and captive mine

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2.3 STREGTHS:
Today, our organization is growing by leaps and bounds thanks to our competitive strengths,
which include:
• High quality assets and resources that make us a low-cost producer of copper and zinc.
• Substantial market shares across the copper, zinc and Aluminium metals markets in India.
• Extensive experience in operating and expanding our business in India that allows us to
capitalize on attractive growth opportunities and resource potential in the country.
• Numerous new projects in the pipeline that will enable us to expand our production.
• Experience for entry into commercial power generation business in India with our
operations of captive power plants since 1997.
• Experienced and focused management with strong project execution and acquisition
skills.
• Ability and capacity to finance world-class project

2.4 HISTORY
• 1986- Sterlite Cables Limited, acquires the Shamsher Sterling Corporation, changes the
name to Sterlite Industries (India) Limited.
• 1988- Sterlite Industries makes an initial public offering of its shares on the Indian stock
exchange.
• 1991- Sterlite Industries establishes India’s first continuous copper rod plant.
• 1997- Commissions first privately developed copper smelter in India at Tuticorin in
Tamil Nadu.
• 1999- Acquires Copper Mines of Tasmania Pty Ltd.
o Acquires Thalanga Copper Mines Pty Ltd.
• 2005- Expansion of Tuticorin Smelter to 300,000 TPA and Successful ramp up of ISA
furnace in a record period of 45 days.
• 2006- Expansion on Tuticorin smelter to 400 KTPA through innovative debottlenecking.
• 2007- Sterlite Industries primary listing on NYSE in June 2007

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Current Capacity Details


Particulars Current Capacity
Copper Mines
- Tasmania – ore mined 2.5mn tonnes
(Grade - 1.2% Copper)
Copper Cathode – Refinery
- Tuticorin 205000 tonnes
- Silvassa 195000 tonnes
Copper Rod
- Tuticorin 90000 tonnes
- Silvassa 150000 tonnes
Sulphuric Acid
- Tuticorin 1300000 tonnes
Phosphoric Acid Plant
- Tuticorin 180000 tonnes
Captive Power plant
- Tuticorin 46.5 MW

Table2.1

2.5 SWOT Analysis

STREGHTS WEAKESS

Cost of production stands at 1.8 cents/lb due to


better by-product realizations and is in the lowest No significant backward linkages in terms of
quartile i.e. 7th and 8th position in terms of global copper mines, makes the company dependent
cost of production. Hence, the prices of copper
company have a competitive edge despite on global miners and it will not benefit from
declining TcRc as it continues to generate any upturn in LME
positive cash flows.

OPPORTUITIES THREATS
Increasing demand in the domestic market Non- availability of copper concentrate would
could provide benefits in terms of savings on put pressure on TcRc rates and impact
freight cost since billing is based on the landed operating margins
cost of metal prices. Exports currently account
for 56% of its copper sales volume

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2.6 TQM- A Way of Life:


• First phase launched in 1997.
• Each phase consists 10 to 15 projects.
• 15TH phase in progress.
• 30% employee involvement
• Projects Completed: 100 + Nos.
• Sterlite is the only company with three TQM projects got selected in the ASQ 2007
• Total cost savings : $ 40 m (till date)
2.7 TPM journey at SIIL
• TPM journey started in 2007
• Manager Model Plant - CCR Plant
• Model Office TPM Area - Central Stores
• CII- TPM Club India supports the TPM implementation process.
• TPM – Kickoff held on 18Apr’08 at Tuticorin.
• 5S sustenance and Autonomous Production Rate Maintenance pillar activities are in
progress
Process of Copper Cathodes and Rods production at SIIL:

Fig 2.1

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CHAPTER-3
OBJECTIVE, SCOPE AD METHODOLOGY
3.1 OBJECTIVE:
To increase the operational efficiency and profitability of the Export Oriented Unit (EOU) at
Sterlite Industries India Limited, Tuticorin (TN).
To accomplish this objective two major projects undertaken are:
1. Time efficiency and factors influencing time efficiency in refinery unit.
2. Forklift motion study and utilization in EOU.

3.2 SCOPE OF THE PROJECTS:


The scope of project regarding time efficiency is to analyse the time used for the copper
production in the refinery unit and to find the factors which contribute to the inefficiency of
the process.
Project regarding the motion study of the Forklifts in the EOU will help to understand the
utilization level of the forklifts used and ways to improve the utilization level.
3.3 METHODOLOGY:
For the first project related to Time Efficiency, the methodology adopted is to collect data
from the Distributed Control System and the employees on the shop floor. The data collected
is then analyzed using Pareto analysis and the vital few causes that lead to the 80% of the
delay in time utilization is listed out.
For the second project related to Forklifts, the methodology adopted is to collect the primary
data by observing the forklifts motion throughout the EOU premises and the time taken by
each forklift to perform a particular activity. Various combinations of activities for each
forklift are tried and then suggestions are provided to improve the utilization of each forklift.
3.4 LIMITATIOS OF THE PROJECT:
Some of the information which comes under the confidentiality barriers are not included in
this report. Due to the limitation of the time available for the internship detailed research on
the technical aspects of the machinery has not been covered in this report.

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CHAPTER-4
PROJECT I DETAIL
PROJECT 1: TIME EFFICIECY AD FACTORS IFLUECIG TIME
EFFICIECY
4.1 DEFIITIO: TIME EFFICIECY
It is the percentage of duration by which the CELLHOUSE are in locked in position so as to
deposit copper in cathode plate with respect to the total time available for deposition.
Time Efficiency= Time current is applied *100
Total time available
STANDARD TIME EFFICIENCY IS SUPPOSED TO BE 97.2%
4.2 FACTORS IFLUECIG ACTUAL RUIG HOURS OF CELL HOUSE

ACTUAL RUNNING HOURS

CHANGE OVER STRIPPING RECTIFIERS MISCELLANEOUS

FACTORS DETERMINING STRIPPING 1. ANODE


FACTORS DETERMINING CHANGE OVER
AVAILABILITY
1. CSM PERFORMANCE *
2. DEMAND IN
2. CRANE PERFORMANCE * THE COPPER MARKET
1. CELL HOUSE PREPARATION 3. OPERATORS SKILL AND EXPERIENCE*
2. CSM PERFORMANCE *
4. FORKLIFT AVAILABILITY*
3. ASWM PERFORMANCE *
5. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE*
4. APM PERFORMANCE *
6. LABOUR AVAILABILITY AND SKILLS*
5. CRANE PERFORMANCE *
6. OPERATORS SKILL AND EXPERIENCE*
7. FORKLIFT AVAILABILITY*
8. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE*
9. LABOUR AVAILABILITY AND SKILLS*

Note: * topics are commonly discussed for both changeover and stripping.

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4.2.1 CHAGE OVER
Change over is referred to as the changing of the entire spent anode sets and cathode sets
washing of cells, cleaning of bus bars and insulators and changing of electrolyte for starting a
fresh chemical refinery process with the new set of copper anodes
Change over involves cutting the power supply off from the bank which stops
the electrolysis process and reduces the production period for copper cathodes. Thus this
leads to the reduction in time efficiency.
The major factors that influence the time required for change over are:
4.2.1.1 CELLHOUSE PREPARATIO: In cellhouse preparation for the change over there
are many activities that are to be performed so as to complete the change over process:
1. Set up tools for alignment and water hose and necessary tools are brought near the
bank which is to go through the changeover process.
2. Bank is locked out of the power supply and initially two cells are decanted of
electrolyte.
3. Cathode plates of the cell are taken to CSM for stripping and then the scrap anodes
are taken to the ASWM for washing.
4. Cells are washed thoroughly with water to remove slime.
5. Bus bar is cleaned and the insulators are cleaned and fixed.
6. Electrolyte is filled in the cells.
7. Fresh anodes are placed in the cells and aligned.
8. Fresh SS plates are placed in the cells as cathodes and aligned.
9. This process is carried out for all the cells in the bank.
10. The power is logged on to start the electrolysis process.
In cell house preparation, the common delays that occur are the delay in slime washing. This
delay occurs because sometimes the scrap anode falls inside the cell and it is to be removed
manually. Even the draining away of the slime takes time. Also labourer’s inexperience plays
a major role in cellhouse preparation.
Cleaning and fixing of insulators with acid plays a part in the delay. Broken Insulators are
replaced and aligned and alignment of the cathode and anode also causes delay in the
changeover process.
Delay in the anode and cathode delivery to the cellhouse also causes delay n the changeover
process. This delay can occur due to many reasons related to the ASWM, CSM, APM and
cranes which will be discussed further in the report.
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4.2.1.2 CATHODE STRIPPIG MACHIE (CSM):
4.2.1.2.1 Purpose:
To strip copper from mother blanks and wash copper cathodes.
4.2.1.2.2 Operating Procedure of CSM:

Crane places the set cathode plates on the loading beam. Loading wagon picks up a set of
plates and transfers into the wash conveyor. The wash conveyor transports the plates through
the wash chamber, where acid solution and impurities are washed off the cathode surface.
The water temperature is kept high enough to ensure sufficient washing of cathodes. The
wash water returned to circulation tanks.
After completed washing deposited plates moves up to the end of the conveyor
Where transfer device-1 transfers the plate to transverse conveyor. Standing on the transverse
conveyor the plate moves sideways to the flexing device. The flexing device consists of two
hydraulic cylinders, located, one on each side of the transverse conveyor. These cylinders
will one at a time flex the plate sideways & thereby open up the top portion of the deposited
copper on the stainless steel plates.
After completed flexing operation, the plates continue into the chiselling station. The chisels
are moved in to the openings obtained in the flexing operations between the copper plate and
the mother blank. This force the copper plates to fall outward app 15 degrees where the plates
are gripped by grippers mounted in the cathode downender. The down ender tilts the cathode
further 75 degrees and bring into the horizontal position.
Meanwhile the empty mother blanks moves sideways on the transverse conveyor to the
empty station where it can be inspected for any defect init. After this station it reaches
transfer device-2 which transfers the mother blanks on to the discharge conveyor. There after
unloading wagon picks up the half load & transports to the unloading beams.
After down ender has tilted cathodes into the horizontal position the cathodes are dropped on
cathode conveyor. Again down ender returns to vertical position ready to down end new
cathodes.
The cathode conveyor transports the cathodes towards the cathode stacker, during this
transport the cathode plate passes through sampling station &corrugating press. The
corrugating press will press a pattern in the cathodes. The sampling press punches out button
shaped sample for testing.

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OTE:
Usually the machine is operated in auto mode, but sometimes it can be operated in manual
mode by giving
ving pulse for each operation. This operation is carried out for the purpose of
correcting faults, maintenance, or positioning the cathode plates prior to running in auto
mode. One more mode called local mode, which is used for operating traverse conveyor to
the required distance. Also downender section can be operated with help of panel box besides
downender.
FLOW DIAGRAM OF CSM

Fig 4.1

4.2.1.2.3 STADARD MACHIE HOURS REQUIRED:


The machine speed for CSM is 500 plates/hr.
Total no of plates in one bank =55plate X 28 cells = 1540 plates
Standard time for stripping one bank = 1540/500
= 3hrs 4mins 48sec

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Major areas that cause the functioning delay for CSM and the consolidated occurrence for the
period of NOV’09-MARCH’10 is provided below:

CUMULATIVE
AREAS
TOTAL TIME PERCENTAGE PERCENTAGE
Wagon 2146 17.39341871 17.39341871
downender 2042 16.55049441 33.94391311
edge strip 1716 13.90825093 47.85216405
miscellaneous 1554 12.59523424 60.44739828
Chisel 1512 12.2548225 72.70222078
thin deposit 1147 9.296482412 81.99870319
Bottom envelope 1084 8.785864808 90.784568
transverse conveyor 292 2.36667207 93.15124007
transfer device 286 2.318041822 95.46928189
Cathode conveyor 266 2.155940995 97.62522289
stacker 211 1.710163722 99.33538661
discharge conveyor 42 0.340411736 99.67579835
weigh scale 27 0.218836116 99.89463446
hydraulic pump 13 0.105365537 100
wash conveyor 0 0 100
total delay 12338

Table 4.1
4.2.1.2.4 PARETO AALYSIS:

120
100
80
60
40
20 Series1
0 Series2

Fig 4.2

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Major delay factor for CSM is the wagon area. Problems faced in the wagon area are:
1. Unloading wagon station sensor not working.
2. Loading wagon down operation not working
3. Loading wagon hoist gear box shaft pin damaged
4. Loading wagon not working in auto-mode
5. plates were jammed at unloading wagon
6. Loading wagon was not placing the plates at wash conveyor.
Second major delay area is downender. The faults that usually occur in this area are:
1. L D/E 2 gripper hose punctured
2. R D/E2 gripper hose connector broken
3. R D/E2 tilt cylinder oil leakage
Third most significant delay area is edge strip. Major delay factors in edge strip are:
1. plate stucked at chisel
2. plate fallen at chisel
3. Nodule plate jammed in unloading wagon
4. Damaged edge strip plate fallen at chisel
5. more no. of rejects due to damaged edge strip
6. Damaged plates were stucked @ chisel unit
The delay problems are also divided among the departments as mechanical, electrical,
process, instrumentation and cranes. The consolidated delay distribution of the departments
from NOV’09-MARCH’10 is provided below:
TOTAL CUMULATIVE
DEPARTMET TIME PERCENTAGE PERCENTAGE
process 5641 45.72053817 45.72053817
Mechanical 4303 34.87599287 80.59653104
Instrumentation 1371 11.11201167 91.70854271
Electrical 1023 8.291457286 100
Table 4.2

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4.2.1.2.5 PARETO AALYSIS:

100
80
60
40
20
0 Series1

Mechanical

Electrical
process

Instrumentation
Series2

Fig 4.3
As we see in the Pareto chart, the major delay occurs in the process. Some of the process
delays are:
1. Thin Deposit- multi flexing and chiselling done
2. Edge strip- No of rejects were more
3. Wagon- plates were jammed @ unloading wagon
4. Chisel- plates were jammed
5. Bottom Envelope- fallen at chisel unit
6. Transfer Device- Damaged edge strip stucked at chisel and TD1

The second major cause of delays comes under mechanical. Some of these delays are:
1. Downender- L - D/E 1 gripper in/out cylinder hose got punctured
2. Misc- Strapping tool problem
3. transverse conveyor- L flexing unit hose got puncture
4. Cathode Conveyor- Tension got loose and adjusted
Under mechanical delays, downender is the critical area where most of the problem occurs.

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4.2.1.3 AODE PREPARATIO MACHIE (APM):

4.2.1.3.1 Operating Procedure of APM:


To attain verticality of the anode in the cell and smooth contact of the anodes with bus bar
The anodes to be prepared are transported by the forklift to the receiving station of APM. The
anodes are centred on the receiving station by the aligning press and they are moved to the
transfer device number (TD1) by the receiving conveyor. The TD1 lifts the anodes one by
one from the receiving conveyor to lug press. On the lug press, the lugs of the anodes are
pressed horizontally.
From the lug press, the TD1 lifts the anodes to the weighing unit. On the weighing unit the
anodes are weighed and sorted as rejected and accepted anodes. From the weighing unit, the
TD1 lifts the anodes to the beginning of the traverse conveyor. The traverse conveyor moves
the anode through the body press and accepted anode is pressed vertically.
From the end of the traverse conveyor rejected anodes are lifted to the reject conveyor by the
reject feeder. The reject feeder moves the rejected anodes to the reject removing station.
From the end of traverse conveyor the accepted anodes are lifted to the milling conveyor by
TD2. The milling conveyor moves the anodes through milling unit to the lifting conveyor. In
the milling conveyor the lugs of the anodes are milled. The lifting conveyor moves the
anodes from the milling conveyor to the spacing conveyor. The spacing conveyor and the
spacing devices space the anodes in the spacing conveyor, then the transferring wagon lifts
55 anodes at the time and moves them to the distribution beams. From the beam the anodes
are lifted by the over head cranes.

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FLOW DIAGRAM OF APM


ANODES FROM TTK

LUG PRESS (FLATTEN THE LUG)

WEGHING UNIT

REJECTION STATION (ANODES


REJECTED ON THE BASIS OF
WEIGHT, CONICAL SHAPES, LUG
THICKNESS

BODY PRESS UNIT (STRIGHTEN THE


BODY, MEASURE ANODE PHYSICAL
DIMENSION

LUG SIDE MILLING FOR ACCEPTED


ANODES (MILLS THE UNDER SIDE OF
THE LUG)

SET OF 56 OR 54 ANODES FOR A


CELLHOUSE

Fig4.4
4.2.1.3.2 STADARD MACHIE HOURS REQUIRED:

The machine speed for APM is 350 anodes /hr.


Total no of anodes in one bank =56anodes X 28 cells
= 1540 anodes
Standard time for producing anodes for one bank = 1540/350
= 4hrs 24mins

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Major areas that cause the functioning delay for APM and the consolidated occurrence for the
period of NOV’09-MARCH’10 is provided below:

CUMULATIVE
AREA TOTLA TIME PERCENTAGE PERCENTAGE
Milling conveyor 830 31.8251534 31.8251534
TD1 458 17.5613497 49.3865031
Lifting conveyor 295 11.3113497 60.6978528
Traverse conveyor 280 10.7361963 71.4340491
TD2 165 6.32668712 77.7607362
Unloading wagon 150 5.75153374 83.5122699
power pack 150 5.75153374 89.2638037
Spacing conveyor 145 5.55981595 94.8236196
reject .conveyor 60 2.3006135 97.1242331
Receiving. Conveyor 40 1.53374233 98.6579755
miscellaneous 35 1.34202454 100
total 2608

Table 4.3
4.2.1.3.3PARETOAALYSIS:
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10 Series1
0
Series2
TD1

TD2
Milling conveyor

Spacing conveyor
power pack

miscellaneous
Traverse conveyor

reject .conveyor

receiving.conveyor
Lifting conveyor

Unloading wagon

Fig 4.5

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The major factor for the delay in time is milling conveyor area. Some of the most commonly
occurring problems of this area are:
1. Milling conveyor alignment got disturbed
2. Improper milling
3. Anode side milling sensor non sensing
The second major problem area in the APM is transfer device. Some of the common
problems occurring in the TD1 are:
1. lug bend anode fallen @td1
2. Due to improper chipping anodes fallen in td 1
The third most important area which pools into the major delays in the APM is lifting
conveyor. The common problems occurring in this area is anode fallen in lifting conveyor.
The delay problems are also divided among the departments as mechanical, electrical,
process, instrumentation and cranes. The consolidated delay distribution of the departments
from NOV’09-MARCH’10 is provided below:

TOTAL CUMULATIVE
DEPARTMET TIME RECENTAGE PERCENTAGE
PROCESS 1545 59.2407975 59.2407975
ISTRUMETATIO 733 28.1058282 87.3466258
MECHAICAL 330 12.6533742 100
ELECTRICAL 0 0 100
Table 4.4
4.2.1.3.4 PARETO AALYSIS:
100
80
60
40
20
0 Series1
MECHANICAL
PROCESS

INSTRUMENTA

ELECTRICAL

Series2
TION

Fig 4.6

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As we observe the Pareto chart we find that In APM the major delay occurs under process.
Some of the most commonly occurring delays are:
1. TD1- Anode fallen at TD1 (Frequently)
2. Milling conveyor- Anode stucked at milling conveyor.
3. Receiving Conveyor- Anode lug got broken in receiving conveyor.
4. Powerpack- Cooling water outlet pipe line choke up.
5. Lifting conveyor- Anode fallen in lifting conveyor.
The second most common delay is occurring under the instrumentation department. Some of
them are as follows:
1. Milling conveyor- home position adjustment.
2. TD1- permissive sensor not sensing.
3. Unloading wagon- unloading wagon home position sensor adjusted.

4.2.1.4 AODE SCRAP WASHIG MACHIE (ASWM):


4.2.1.4.1 Operating Procedure of ASWM:
Before starting the machine, oil in power packs is to be checked. Check wash water
temperature, whether wash pump valves are opened or not. Anode scraps are placed on the
loading beam by crane. Wagon lifts the set and places it on the receiving conveyor. From the
receiving conveyor scrap is transferred to the wash conveyor by a transfer device. Wash
conveyor moves through wash chamber that consist two pipelines for washing, one on the
topside and one at the bottom side. Each line is having seven nozzles through which water is
sprayed on the scrap so that slime adhering to the scrap gets washed and goes to the tank. In
the wash conveyor scrap moves horizontally and after washing it passes through dryer so as
to wipe water from the scrap. From the wash chamber scrap is moved by stacker and stacks it
on the stacking table. The stacking table rotates 900 anti clock wise after every two stack so as
to make uniform bundle. Each stack consists of two scraps.
After completing the number of stack set in stack selector switch the table goes down. A set
of fork comes in and takes away the bundle of scraps from the table to the stack conveyor.
From the stack conveyor forklift unload the bundle and keep it scrap yard. The scraps are
weighed for individual banks to find out scrap % for the particular bank. Wash water
temperature is maintained at 800C for effective washing. Temperature is maintained with help
of steam. After one bank washing is over wash water with slime sent to storage tank and tank

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is cleaned. Fresh water is filled for next washing. Machine is usually operated in auto mode.
It can be operated in manual and local mode when ever required.
FLOW DIAGRAM OF ASWM
Scrap anode from cellhouse by crane

Washing

Stacking & bundling

To SMELTER for recasting as anodes


4.2.1.4.2 STADARD MACHIE HOURS REQUIRED:
The machine speed for ASWM is 350 anodes /hr.
Total no of SPENT ANODES in one bank =56anodes X 28 cells
= 1540 anodes
Standard time for washing spent anodes for one bank = 1540/350
= 4hrs 24mins
Major areas that cause the functioning delay for APM and the consolidated occurrence for the
period of NOV’09-MARCH’10 is provided below:

CUMULATIVE
AREAS TOTAL TIME PERCENTAGE PERCENTAGE
WAGO 880 29.38230384 29.38230384
WASH COVEYOR 580 19.36560935 48.74791319
DISCHARGE COVEYOR 318 10.61769616 59.36560935
TD 305 10.1836394 69.54924875
STACKER 290 9.682804674 79.23205342
STACK TABLE 190 6.343906511 85.57595993
COTROL PAEL 125 4.173622705 89.74958264
MISCELLAEOUS 100 3.338898164 93.0884808
RECEIVIG COVEYOR 97 3.238731219 96.32721202
FLAPPER 75 2.504173623 98.83138564
WASH CHAMBER 35 1.168614357 100
TOTAL 2995
Table 4.5

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4.2.1.4.3 PARETO AALYSIS:
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0 Series1

MISCELLANEOUS

FLAPPER
CONTROL PANEL
STACK TABLE
TD

STACKER

WASH CHAMBER
DISCHARGE CONVEYOR

RECEIVING CONVEYOR
WAGON

WASH CONVEYOR

Series2

Fig 4.7
In ASWM the most common area where the majority of the problems occur is wagon. Of the
total delay time wagon has the largest share. Some of the common and frequently occurring
problem in wagon area is:
1. Loading wagon hoist not working.
2. Loading wagon trolley damaged.
3. Anode stucked at unloading wagon.
4. Unloading wagon home position sensor malfunctioning.
Secondly, the wash conveyor area is more prone to malfunction and cause the delays. Some
of the commonly occurring delays in wash conveyor are:
1. Wash conveyor stuck up.
2. Wash conveyor link got broken.
3. Weak scrap stucked @ wash .conveyor.

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The delay problems are also divided among the departments as mechanical, electrical,
process, instrumentation and cranes. The consolidated delay distribution of the departments
from NOV’09-MARCH’10
MARCH’10 is pro
provided below:

CUMULATIVE
DEPARTMET TOTAL TIME PERCENTAGE PERCENTAGE
PROCESS 1108 36.99499165 36.99499165
MECHAICAL 977 32.62103506 69.61602671
ELECTRICAL 750 25.04173623 94.65776294
ISTRUMETATIO 160 5.342237062 100
Table 4.6
4.2.1.4.4 PARETO AALYSIS:
100

80

60
Series1
40
Series2
20

0
PROCESS MECHANICAL ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENTATION

Fig 4.8
As we see in the Pareto chart, the major delay occurs in the process. Some of the process
delays are:
1. Stacker- Week scraps stucked at stack table.
2. Wash conveyor- Week scrap stucked at wash conveyor.
3. Receiving conveyor- Bridge broken scrap stucked at receiving conveyor.
4. Stack Table- Week scrap stucked at stack table.
5. TD- scraps continuous fallen in TD.
The second major cause of delays comes under mechanical. Some of these delays are:
1. Wash conveyor- Wash conveyor link got cut.
2. Stacker- Flapper topside guider got bent.
3. Wash conveyor- wash conveyor guider bent.

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4.2.1.5 CRAES
WMI CRAES LTD., one of the leading manufacturers of Cranes in India, has been
pioneers in the manufacture of Material Handling Equipment in the Country. Today WMI`s
name is synonymous with heavy lifting. WMI’s equipment can be found in all parts of the
Country, helping others get their jobs done faster and easier. An array of WMI cranes have
been developed, each crane a creative solution to special handling problem. These cranes are
extensively used for handling materials in machine shops, structural shops, chemical plants,
fertilizer plants, cement factories, paper plants, stock yards, Dams, and construction sites. All
WMI cranes are engineered and built to meet the requirements of all the users. Thus tailor-
made for the job, these units handle the loads with utmost ease of maintenance efficiency and
economy.
4.2.1.5.1 E. O. T. CRAES
These cranes move on the gantry rail fixed to gantry girder. In this crane 3 common motions
are incorporated - hoist, cross travel and long travel. In addition to these common motions
some time depending on duty, Aux. Hoist is incorporated. Hoist and C. T. Machineries are
fitted on common frame called crab which moves on crane girders.
In refinery, there are two EOT cranes. These cranes play major role in the overall functioning
of the refinery whether it be cellhouse, CSM, APM, or ASWM. Even in regular activities
other than processes the crane plays a significant role in the refinery. Any delay caused by the
crane causes a major delay in all the machineries and the processes.
Some of the major delays occurred in CRANE-1 in NOV-09 TO MARCH-10 are given
below:
DELAY AREAS TOTAL
LT 1292
MH 1105
DSL 730
DRIP TRAY 311
HOOK 145
COMPRESSOR 113
REMOTE PAEL 60
CT 40
AH 0
LIK 0
SPREADER BEAM 0

Table 4.7

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4.2.1.5.2 PARETO AALYSIS:
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20 Series1
10
0 Series2

HOOK

LINK
REMOTE PANEL
MH
LT

CT
COMPRESSOR

SPREADER BEAM
DSL

AH
DRIP TRAY

Fig 4.9
In crane-11 the area which has frequent problem delay is the long travel. Some of the common
delays in long travel are as follows:
1. LT got tripped.
2. LT PLC problem.
3. LT slow movement.
4. LT brake problem.
5. LT 2 drives taking delay.
The second area which causes the major delay in crane
crane-1
1 is main hoist. Some of the common
problems are as follows:
1. MH got tripped.
2. MH not getting down (Due to drip tray L/S activated).
3. MH brake not good.
Third most delay prone area is the DSL. Some common problems occurring in DSL are:
1. Remote signal cut off problem.
2. Whole crane got tripped.

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The delay problems are also divided among the departments as mechanical, electrical,
process, instrumentation and cranes. The consolidated delay distribution of the departments
from NOV’09-MARCH’10 is provided below:
DELAY AREAS TOTAL
MECHAICAL 1368
ELECTRICAL 3196
ISTRUMETATIO 12
PROCESS 178
CRAES 0
Table 4.8
4.2.1.5.3 PARETO AALYSIS:
100
80
60
40
20
0 Series1

CRANES
MECHANICAL

PROCESS

INSTRUMENTATI
ELECTRICAL

Series2
ON

Fig 4.10
Electrical problems are the major delay causes in the crane-1. Some of the common
mechanical problems faced by the crane-1 are as follows:
1. MH- M.H got tripped.
2. DSL- Remote signal cut off problem.
3. Drip tray- Drip tray got tripped.
4. CT- CT got tripped
Secondly, mechanical problems cause delay in large number for crane-1. Some of these
problems are:
1. LT- abnormal sound in rails.
2. Link- Cathode hook link got broken.
3. Hook- Anode hook struck up problem.

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Some of the major delays oc
occurred in CRANE-2 in NOV-09
09 TO MARCH-10
MARCH are given
below:
DELAY AREAS TOTAL
MH 582
COMPRESSOR 160
AH 145
DSL 135
CT 97
LT 80
HOOK 47
LIK 45
SPREADER BEAM 20
DRIP TRAY 0
REMOTE PAEL 0
Table 4.9
4.2.1.5.4 PARETO AALYSIS:
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30 Series1
20
Series2
10
0
LT

HOOK

LINK

REMOTE PANEL
MH

CT
COMPRESSOR

SPREADER BEAM
AH

DSL

DRIP TRAY

Fig 4.11
As we see the Pareto chart, it is clear that in crane -2
2 the major problem causing area is the
main hoist. Some of the problems frequently occurring in the main hoist are as follows:
1. MH brake not good.
2. M.H got tripped.

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The delay problems are also divided among the departments as mechanical, electrical,
process, instrumentation and cranes. The consolidated delay distribution of the departments
from NOV’09-MARCH’10 is provided below:
DELAY AREAS TOTAL
ELECTRICAL 1268
PROCESS 94
MECHAICAL 77
ISTRUMETATIO 0
CRAES 0
Table 4.10
4.2.1.5.5 PARETO AALYSIS:
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
Series1
10
0 Series2
PROCESS

CRANES
MECHANICAL
ELECTRICAL

INSTRUMENTATION

Fig 4.12
Electrical problems are the major delay causes in the crane-1. Some of the common
mechanical problems faced by the crane-1 are as follows:
1. MH- M.H got tripped.
2. DSL- Remote signal cut off problem.
3. Drip tray- Drip tray got tripped.
4. CT- CT got tripped
In crane-2 the second delay causing problem is process delays. Some of the common process
delays is Hook- Cathode hook link got broken/bend.

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4.2.1.6 OPERATOR SKILLS AD EXPERIECE: operators handling the various
machines mentioned above are also reponsible for the time efficiency. The higher the skill
and experience of the operator the smoother the various activities required to carry out the
process takes place. Crane operators and ASWM and CSM operators should be highly
efficient and with enough knowledge to understand the critical areas where the usual delay
occurs and try to work out ways to tackle them. Regular training and knowledge sharing
sessions are essential for them.
4.2.1.7 FORKLIFT AVAILABILITY: Forlifts availability to load the APM machine, to
remove the rejected anodes, to shift the spent anodes from ASWM, to bring the fresh anode
from the despatch yard, to carry the cathode plates from CSM to the Warehouse/front yard is
important for the time efficiency. Due to the non availability of the forklifts the processes
linked with it are also affected and this later affects the time efficiency. Proper planning is
required for the proper utilization of the forklifts and scheduling the work. This will help in
availability of the forklifts for the major activities essential and important to time effieciency.
4.2.1.8 PREVETIVE MAITEACE: For the effective functioning of all the
machinary, maintenanace is a very essential aspect. Scheduled and preventive maintenance is
necessary. Time efficiency reduces when the machines are not properly maintained and
breakdown occurs. Because of lack of preventive maintenance the machines may malfunction
during the process and this will lead to delay.
4.2.1.9 LABOUR AVAILABILITY AD SKILLS: labours are required to perform various
activities in the cellhouse preparation and machine functioning. Unavailability of labours
during the process of changeover and machine operations leads to delay and affects the time
efficiency. Also the skill set possessed by the labour to do the particular job plays a critical
role in the time delay. If the labour is new and inexperienced then the cleaning process of the
cell house and machinery gets delayed. Willingness of the labour to work also plays a very
essential role in the performance of his duties.

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4.2.2 STRIPPIG
Stripping is the process of removing the cathode copper plates from the SS plates which were
deposited during the electrolysis process. For each bank stripping process is carried out thrice
(three crop cycle). For the stripping process the machine used is CSM. For the purpose of
stripping each bank in its completion of one crop cycle is logged out and plates carried to
CSM. Stripping process on an average takes 4.3hrs which higher than the standard i.e. 3hrs
4mins. This delay in the stripping time iss due to the various factors influencing the process.
They are:
1. CSM PERFORMANCE *
2. CRANE PERFORMANCE *
3. OPERATORS SKILL AND EXPERIENCE*
4. FORKLIFT AVAILABILITY*
5. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE*
6. LABOUR AVAILABILITY AND SKILLS*
All of these factors have been discussed under the changeover. By improving the
performance of each of these factors the time delay can be reduced and the stripping time can
be brought close to its standard time and thus increase the time efficiency by logging the bank
in the circuit and starting the copper deposition by electrolysis process.
4.2.3 RECTIFIERS
In the refinery, there are four rectifiers used for the conversion of A.C to D.C for the entire
cellhouse system.rectifiers used here are: One 15KA Rectifier and other 35 KA rectifier.
Due to tripping of the rectifier the entire bank gets logged out and this tends to the stoppage
in the production of the copper and reduces the time efficiency of the refinery unit.
4.2.4 MISCELLAEOUS
There are some factors which are not in control of the refinery unit but affect the output of the
unit. Some of these factors are:
1. Anode availability: as per the availability of the anodes the cells can be utilized for
the production of copper. Due various reasons in the smelter, the production of anodes
fluctuates and thus the availability for the refinery unit also changes. This in turn
reduces the number of banks under production and the time efficiency reduces.
2. Demand for copper in the market: according to the market demand the planning for
production is done by the higher management. If the requirement fo r the copper is
reduced then the production of the copper is also reduced. Thus some of the banks are
logged off and no production takes place thus the time efficiency of the unit reduces.

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PROJECT 2: FORKLIFT MOTIO STUDY AD UTILIZATIO


4.3 ABOUT THE FORKLIFTS
A forklift (also called a lift truck, a high/low, a stacker-truck, trailer loader, sideloader, fork
truck, tow-motor or a fork hoist) is a powered industrial truck used to lift
and transport materials. The modern forklift was developed in the 1920s by various
companies including the transmission manufacturing company Clark and the hoist
company Yale & Towne Manufacturing. The forklift has since become an indispensable
piece of equipment in manufacturing and warehousing operations.

The middle 19th century through the early 20th century saw the developments that led to
today's modern forklifts. The Pennsylvania Railroad in 1906 introduced battery powered
platform trucks for moving luggage at their Altoona, Pennsylvania train station. World War
I saw the development of different types of material handling equipment in the United
Kingdom by Ransoms, Sims and Jeffries of Ipswich. This was in part due to the labour
shortages caused by the war. In 1917Clark in the United States began developing and using
powered tractor and powered lift tractors in their factories. In 1919 the Towmotor Company
and Yale & Towne Manufacturing in 1920 entered the lift truck market in the United States.

Continuing development and expanded use of the forklift continued through the 1920s and
1930s. World War II, like World War I before, spurred the use of forklift trucks in the war
effort. Following the war, more efficient methods for storing products in warehouses were
being implemented. Warehouses needed more manoeuvrable forklift trucks that could reach
greater heights. New forklift models were made that filled this need. In
1956 Toyota introduced its first lift truck model, the Model LA, in Japan and sold its first
forklift in the United States in 1967.

Forklifts are rated for loads at a specified maximum weight and a specified forward centre of
gravity. This information is located on a nameplate provided by the manufacturer, and loads
must not exceed these specifications. In many jurisdictions it is illegal to remove or tamper
with the nameplate without the permission of the forklift manufacturer.

An important aspect of forklift operation is that most have rear-wheel steering. While this
increases manoeuvrability in tight cornering situations, it differs from a driver’s traditional
experience with other wheeled vehicles. While steering, as there is no caster action, it is
unnecessary to apply steering force to maintain a constant rate of turn.

Another critical characteristic of the forklift is its instability. The forklift and load must be
considered a unit with a continually varying centre of gravity with every movement of the
load. A forklift must never negotiate a turn at speed with a raised load,

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where centrifugal and gravitational forces may combine to cause a disastrous tip-over
accident. The forklift are designed with a load limit for the forks which is decreased with fork
elevation and undercutting of the load (i.e. load does not butt against the fork "L"). A loading
plate for loading reference is usually located on the forklift. A forklift should not be used as a
personnel lift without the fitting of specific safety equipment, such as a "cherry picker" or
"cage".

FIG 4.13
4.4 FORKLIFTS I EOU:
Export Oriented Unit (EOU) of Sterlite Industries India Limited has ten Forklifts on contract
for its varied usage inside the premises. The allocation of the forklifts is done in the following
manner:
1. Refinery -3ton forklifts (2 nos.)
5ton forklifts (2 nos.)
2. Logistics -3ton forklifts (1 nos.)
5ton forklifts (2 nos.)
3. CCR -3ton forklifts (1 nos.)
5ton forklifts (1 nos.)
4. Dore -3ton forklifts (1 nos.) (*not considered in this study)

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4.4.1 REFIERY
In refinery division of EOU, the forklifts core activities are:
1. Brining the fresh anodes from despatch yard to the anode yard.
2. Taking the spent anode from anode yard to the smelter.
3. Taking the cathode from CSM to CSM yard after weighment.
Various miscellaneous activities are also performed by these forklifts. They are:
1. Handling and shifting DO Briquette from DO plant to smelter.
2. Spent anode arrangement in the yard.
3. Handling and shifting of DO powder, copper nodules, milling chips.
4. Miscellaneous scarp handling
4.4.1.1 TIME CALCULATIOS

Shifting Fresh Anodes from despatch yard to anode yard include one more activity of
weighing the anodes this activity starts from chipping yard to weigh scale and weigh scale to
despatch yard storing area and from despatch yard to anode yard.

(FRESH AODE)
TOTAL
TIME

CHIPPIG WEIGH WEIGH DESPATCH


YARD TO SCALE SCALE TO ZOE TO
LIFTIG WEIGH WAITIG DESPATCH LAYIG CHIPPIG
S.O TIME SCALE TIME ZOE TIME YARD MI SEC
1 12 40 15 25 8 35 2 15
2 10 45 10 35 7 30 2 17
3 10 50 10 15 15 40 2 20
4 15 40 15 20 15 35 2 20
5 20 47 12 25 10 40 3 34

AVERAGE 2 21.2
Table 4.11

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TOTAL
5-TO FORKLIFT TIME

DESPATCH AODE
ZOE TO YARD TO
LIFTIG AODE LAYIG DESPATCH
S.O TIME YARD TIME ZOE MI SEC
1 15 70 30 50 3 45
2 10 80 15 45 2.5 30
3 5 55 20 40 2 0
4 10 50 15 45 2 0
5 15 60 17 50 2 22
TOTAL 2 19
TOTAL
3-TO FORKLIFT TIME

DESPATCH AODE
ZOE TO YARD TO
LIFTIG AODE LAYIG DESPATCH
S.O TIME YARD TIME ZOE MI SEC
1 20 60 20 40 2 20
2 10 65 45 45 2.8 45
3 15 50 45 40 2.5 30
4 10 70 20 50 2.5 30
5 20 75 20 45 3 40
TOTAL 2 33
Table 4.12
Presently no weighment is done in the anode yard due to some problem in weigh scale.

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Shifting Spent Anode includes carrying the spent anode from anode yard to smelter yard
passing three check posts.
TOTAL
TIME AVERAGE

SMELTER YARD TO
WAITING TIME IN

WAITING TIME IN

WAITING TIME IN

WAITING TIME IN
CHECKPOST-1 TO

CHECKPOST-2 TO

CHECKPOST-3 TO
WEIGH SCALE TO
ANODE YARD TO

SMELTER YARD
FORKLIFT TYPE

CHECK POST-1

CHECKPOST-1

CHECKPOST-2

CHECKPOST-2

CHECKPOST-3

CHECKPOST-3
WEIGH SCALE

WEIGH SCALE

ANODE YARD
S.NO

MIN

MIN
SEC

SEC
1 25 5 30 50 8 25 50 1 30 120 5.7 44
2 22 8 30 55 7 23 47 3 24 106 5.4 25 35
3-TON 5.8
.5
3 28 7 28 45 10 35 60 1 30 115 6.0 59
4 30 10 32 60 11 25 50 3 28 125 6.2 14
5 20 8 20 45 8 30 40 1 25 105 5.0 2
6 15 10 25 60 10 35 45 2 20 110 5.5 32
5-TON 5 17
7 20 7 27 50 10 30 60 3 20 105 5.5 32
8 20 10 25 40 5 30 45 2 20 105 5.0 2
Table 4.13

Shifting Cathode includes carrying the cathode from the CSM machine to weigh scale and
from there to the CSM yard

3-TON FORKLIFT of CSM TOTAL TIME

WAITING
CSM TO TIME AT WEIGH
LIFTING WEIGH WEIGH SCALE TO
S.NO TIME SCALE SCALE CSM YARD MIN SEC
1 15 10 80 50 2.6 35
2 10 15 90 45 2.7 40
3 10 17 80 40 2.45 27
4 10 20 70 45 2.42 25
5 15 15 65 50 2 25
TOTAL 2.51 30.4

Table 4.14

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4.4.1.2 UTILIZATIO OF FORKLIFTS

3-TON FORKLIFT DEDICATED TO CSM YARD HR MIN SEC

MAXIMUM OUTPUT IN ONE STRIPPING(BUNDLES) 84


TIME FOR SHIFTING 1 BUNDLE FROM MACHINE TO CSM YARD 150
NO OF STRIPPING IN A DAY 3
TIME FOR SHIFTING 84 BUNDLES IN EACH STRIP(3) 37800 10.5 30 0
-8.5E-
20% OF TOTAL AVAILABLE HOUR FOR MISCELLANEOUS 17280 4.8 48 13
30 MIN PER SHIFT REFRESHMENT TIME 5400 1.5 30 0
30 MIN PER SHIFT BREAKDOWN TIME 5400 1.5 30 0
2.56E-
TOTAL TIME 65880 18.3 18 12
UTILIZATION OF FORKLIFT (%) 76.25
Table 4.15

CONSIDERING CHANGE OVER N


STRIPPING TIME SEPERATELY

MAXIMUM OUTPUT IN ONE STRIPPING(BUNDLES) 84 HR MIN SEC


2.56E-
AVERAGE SECONDSS USED FOR 2 STRIPPING 31680 8.8 48 12
AVERAGE STRIPPING TIME FOR A CHANGEOVER 30600 8.5 30 0
-4.3E-
10% OF TOTAL AVAILABLE HOUR FOR MISCELLANEOUS 8640 2.4 24 13
30 MIN PER SHIFT REFRESHMENT TIME 5400 1.5 30 0
30 MIN PER SHIFT BREAKDOWN TIME 5400 1.5 30 0
TOTAL TIME 81804 22.72333 43.4 24
UTILIZATION OF FORKLIFT (%) 94.68056
TOTAL TIME FOR 84 BUNDLES OF CHANGE OVER 12600 3.5 30 0
IDLE TIME FOR FORKLIFT DURING CHANGE OVER 18000 5 0 0
Table 4.16

During the stripping time the forklift may have to take small delays of one minute or more in
multiple chances and these times cannot be utilized for any other purpose and so stripping
time has to be taken as complete for the forklift usage even if it is not utilized. In the same
way during changeover there are some delays which cannot be utilized but some big delays
can be used for shifting cathode from the CSM yard to the front yard or warehouse.

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1-3TON AND 2-5TON FORKLIFT FOR APM YARD

SPENT ANODE HR MIN SEC


NO OF BUNDLES TO BE SHIFTED IN A DAY 50
YTIME FOR SHIFTING 1 BUNDLE 334
TIME FOR SHIFTING 50 BUNDLES 16700 4.6 38.3 20.0
FRESH ANODE
NO OF BUNDLES TO BE SHIFTED FROM DESPATCH TO ANODE
YARD IN A DAY 268
TIME TAKEN FOR SHIFTING 1 BUNDLE 141
TIME TAKEN FOR SHIFTING 268 BUNDLE 37788 10.5 29.8 48.0
FRESH ANODE WEIGHMENT
TIME TAKEN TO WEIGH ONE BUNDLE 140
NO OF BUNDLES TO BE WEIGHED 268
TIME TAKEN FOR WEIGHING 268 BUNDLE 37520 10.4 25.3 20.0
20% OF TOTAL AVAILABLE HOUR FOR MISCELLANEOUS 17280 4.8 48.0 0.0
30 MIN PER SHIFT REFRESHMENT TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
30 MIN PER SHIFT BREAKDOWN TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
AVERAGE APM RUNNING HRS IN A MONTH 900000 250
AVERAGE APM RUNNING HRS IN A DAY 30000 8.333333
AVERAGE RUNNING HRS FOR ASWM IN A MONTH 900000 250
AVERAGE RUNNING HRS FOR ASWM IN A DAY 30000 8.333333
TOTAL TIME FOR 3 FORKLIFTS 180088 50.0 1.5 28.0
UTILIZATION (%) 69.4784
Table 4.17

In APM yard the utilization of forklifts keep on shifting as per the running of the APM
machine and ASWM machine. Placing the spent anode from the machine to the yard is
included in the miscellaneous activities other than this shifting of heavy materials and
products from D/O plant. In this the average running hours of the two machines are also
included because when the machines are running then the forklifts are engaged in feeding the
APM emptying the ASWM and weighment of spent anodes.

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4.4.2 LOGISTICS
In logistics the core activities that the forklifts perform are:
1. Shifting of cathode bundles from CSM yard to front yard or warehouse.
2. Shifting the cathode bundles from front yard to CCR furnace.
3. Loading the truck with cathode plate bundles.
4. Loading the trucks with coils.
Various miscellaneous activities of the forklifts at logistics are:
1. Shifting of coils as per the truck loading requirements.
2. Arrangement of the warehouse according to the sections.

4.4.2.1 TIME CALCULATIOS


Shifting Cathode Bundles from the CSM yard to the warehouse by going through one check
post.
CSM YARD TO WAREHOUSE
3-ton TOTAL TIME
WAREHOUSE CSM YARD WAITIG LAYIG
TO CSM LIFTIG TO TIME AT THE
S.O YARD TIME WAREHOUSE CHECKPOST PLATE MI SEC
1 45 15 70 1 5 2 16
2 55 10 75 1 3 2 24
3 65 10 70 2 5 2.5 32
4 70 13 65 3 5 2.6 36
5 60 12 75 1 7 2.6 35
6 58 10 72 2 4 2 26
7 50 15 70 1 5 2 21
8 56 15 70 1 6 2 28
9 59 10 75 3 4 2.5 31
10 70 12 73 3 5 2.7 43
AVERAGE 2.5 29.2
Table 4.18

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Shifting of Cathode Bundles from the CSM yard to the front yard. The security check occurs
only after keeping the cathode bundles in the yard as these bundles are meant to be fed in the
CCR furnace for making coils

CSM YARD TO FROT YARD


TOTAL
3-ton TIME
CSM
FROT YARD TO WAITIG LAYIG
YARD TO LIFTIG FROT TIME AT THE
S.O CSM YARD TIME YARD CHECKPOST PLATE MI SEC
1 60 15 75 1 3 3 34
2 60 10 70 1 2 2 23
3 70 15 70 1 5 2.7 41
4 65 13 80 2 8 2.8 48
5 67 11 78 3 3 2.7 42
6 70 16 75 1 7 3 49
7 63 10 65 1 5 2 24
8 65 15 70 2 5 3 37
9 59 13 80 3 8 2.7 43
10 70 10 75 3 10 2.8 48
AVERAGE 2.6 38.9
Table 4.19

Loading The Truck With Coils And Cathode Bundles from the warehouse to the truck by
passing though the weigh scale and the check post. These coils are meant to for the export
and trucks come to the front yard for loading.
WAREHOUSE TO TRUCK
TOTAL
5-ton TIME
STORAGE WAITIG WEIGH TRUCK
MI

SEC

LIFTIG AREA TO TIME AT SCALE TO


S. THE WEIGH WEIGH TO TRUCK STORIG
O BUDLE SCALE SCALE TRUCK LOADIG SPACE
1 3 10 20 20 3 20 1 16
2 4 10 5 25 3 25 1 12
3 3 14 8 20 2 25 1 12
4 2 15 7 25 5 20 1 14
5 4 12 10 25 8 20 1 19
Table 4.20 AVERAGE 1 15

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Shifting The Cathode Bundles from front yard to the CCR furnace for feeding the cathodes
into the furnace to make coils. The bundles have to go through one check post.
FROT YARD TO CCR
TOTAL
5-ton TIME

FROT YARD WAITIG CHECKPOST PLATE


LIFTIG TO TIME AT TO PLATE LAYIG STACKIG
THE CHECKPOST- CHECKPOST- STACKKIG THE AREA TO
S.O BUDLE 1 1 AREA PLATE FROT YARD MI SEC
1 5 45 1 60 3 90 3 24
2 5 50 3 65 5 105 3.9 53
3 4 47 2 55 4 96 3 28
4 6 55 3 70 5 95 3.9 54
5 8 50 1 65 3 100 3.8 47
6 5 45 2 70 4 90 3.6 36
Table 4.21 AVERAGE 3.7 44

4.4.2.2UTILIZATIO OF THE FORKLIFTS

3TO FORKLIFT DEDICATED TO CSM YARD

HR MI SEC
TIME FOR SHIFTIG OE BUDLE CATHODE
FROM CSM YARD 159
O OF BUDLES TO BE SHIFTED FROM 1
STRIPPIG 84
O OF BUDLES TO BE SHIFTED FROM 3
STRIPPIGS I A DAY 252
TIME FOR SHIFTIG TOTAL BUDLES I A
DAY 40068 11.1 7.8 48.0
20% OF TOTAL AVAILABLE HOUR FOR
MISCELLAEOUS 17280 4.8 48.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT REFRESHMET TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT BREAKDOW TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
TOTAL TIME 68148 18.9 55.8 48.0
UTILIZATIO (%) 78.875
Table 4.22
The 3-ton forklift is dedicated to the shifting of cathode bundles from the CSM yard to the
Warehouse or the front yard. Other miscellaneous works that this forklift performs is to take
the bundles for repacking if required. The forklift is utilized for 78.87% throughout a day.

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TRUCK LOADIG (COIL) HR MI SEC


TIME TAKE FOR LOADIG OE COIL 90
O OF COILS I OE TRUCK 8
O OF TRUCKS I A DAY 15
TIME FOR LOADIG ALL TRUCKS 10800 3.0 0.0 0.0
TIME FOR COIL ADJUSTMET PER TRUCK 1200
TIME FOR COIL ADJUSTMET FOR ALL TRUCKS 18000 5.0 0.0 0.0
TOTAL TIME FOR COIL LOADIG 28800 8.0 0.0 0.0
SET UP TIME(FORKLIFT ARM CHAGE)10 TIMES FOR 10 MI 6000
TRUCK LOADIG (CATHODE)
TIME FOR LOADIG OE BUDLE CATHODE 90
O OF CATHODE BUDLES I OE TRUCK 10
O OF TRUCKS I A DAY 15
TIME FOR LOADIG ALL TRUCKS 13500 3.8 45.0 0.0
CATHODE BUDLES TO CCR
TIME FOR SHIFTIG OE BUDLE CATHODE TO CCR
FURACE 222
O OF CATHODE BUDLES SHIFTED I A DAY 144
TIME FOR SHIFTIG ALL BUDLES I A DAY 31968 8.9 52.8 48.0
20% OF TOTAL AVAILABLE HOUR FOR MISCELLAEOUS 17280 4.8 48.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT REFRESHMET TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT BREAKDOW TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
TOTAL TIME 108348 30.1 5.8 48.0
TOTAL AVAILABLE HRS OF TWO FORKLIFTS 172800 48.0 0.0 0.0
UTILIZATIO (%) 62.70139
Table 4.23
Shifting the Cathode Bundles and Coil from the warehouse to the trucks is done by 5-ton
forklifts. For loading the coils a prior shifting of coils inside the warehouse is required
according to the requirement of the exports as per weight and batch no. The utilization of the
two 5ton forklifts is low as 62.701%.

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4.4.3 CCR
In CCR the core activities for the forklifts are:
1. Shifting the coils from the CCR to the warehouse.
2. Loading the feeder of the furnace with cathode bundles.
3. Shifting the coils inside the CCR for various processing activities.
Apart from this the other miscellaneous activities that the forklifts perform are:
1. Shifting of the wooden pallets from the CCR front yard to inside.
2. Shifting the necessary cylinders from the stores to the plant.
3. Carrying the copper bars from the cutting area to the feeder yard.
4. Shifting of heavy materials in the plants.
4.4.3.1 TIME CALCULATIOS
Shifting Of Coil from the CCR to the warehouse by passing through two check posts, one at
CCR and the other at Warehouse.
CCR TO WAREHOUSE( COIL)
TOTAL TIME
LIFTIG
THE
COIL
FROM WEIGH WAITIG LAYIG
WEIGH SCALE TO TIME AT THE WAREHOUSE
S.O SCALE WAREHOUSE CHECKPOST COIL TO CCR MI SEC
1 5 90 5 5 75 3 0
2 8 80 10 3 65 2.8 46
3 7 85 3 4 45 2.4 24
4 5 82 4 4 60 2.6 35
5 7 85 4 5 70 2.9 51
6 7 80 8 5 80 3 0
7 5 90 10 4 65 2.9 54
8 8 75 5 3 70 2.7 41
9 5 85 7 4 50 2.5 31
10 6 83 4 7 75 2.9 55
Table 4.24 AVERAGE 2.8 33.7

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Feeding The Furnace with the cathode bundles from the CCR yard to the feeder. Activities
like cutting of strap and washing of cathode is done prior to feeding the cathode to the
furnace.
FEEDIG THE FURACE
TOTAL
TIME
LIFTIG CCR YARD WAITIG
THE TO TIME AT WASHIG WAITIG FEEDER
CATHODE WASHIG WASHIG AREA TO TIME AT TO CCR
S.O BUDLE AREA AREA FEEDER FEEDER YARD MI SEC
1 5 10 10 8 75 13 2 1
2 8 12 10 7 65 14 2 56
3 7 15 10 9 45 15 2 41
4 5 11 15 8 60 10 2 49
5 7 10 15 7 70 15 2 4
6 7 13 14 7 80 13 2 14
7 5 15 13 9 65 12 2 59
8 8 13 16 8 70 14 2 9
9 5 12 15 9 50 15 2 46
10 6 12 10 7 75 15 2 5
AVERAGE 2.0 28.4
Table 4.25
Activities inside the CCR

COILER COOLIG
LIFTI TO LAYIG LIFTI AREA TO LAYIG LIFTI
G THE COOLI THE G THE COMPACTO THE G THE
S.O COIL G AREA COIL COIL R COIL COIL
1 4 10 5 4 8 10 5
2 5 11 5 4 10 7 6
3 6 15 3 6 13 10 4
4 4 13 6 4 9 9 5
5 5 12 7 5 11 8 5
STRECH
COMPACT PACKI PACKI
OR TO LAYG LIFTIG G TO LAYI G TO LAYI
STRECH THE THE PACKI G THE LIFTIG WEIGH G THE
PACKIG COIL COIL G COIL THE COIL SCALE COIL
10 4 5 10 5 4 12 4
10 3 4 14 6 7 15 5
13 6 6 11 5 6 14 5
15 5 4 15 5 3 16 4
14 5 5 12 4 5 15 6

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WEIGH PALLET WEGH


SCALE AREA WAITIG SCALE TO PALLET
TO EW LIFTIG TO TIME AT PALLET LIFTIG STORAGE LAYIG
PALLET THE WEIGH WEIGH STORAGE THE AREA TO THE
STORAGE PALLET SCALE SCALE AREA PALLET COILER PALLET MI SEC
15 3 15 10 14 5 13 5 3 0
13 5 15 9 14 4 14 5 3.2 11
14 4 14 14 15 4 13 5 3.4 26
20 5 17 15 17 5 16 4 3.6 36
17 5 15 10 15 6 15 6 3.5 28
Table 4.26 AVERAGE 3.336667 20.2
Inside the CCR plant the forklift has to take the coil bundle to the cooler for cooling and then
to the compactor for compacting the coil bundle and then to the stretch packing section so as
to pack the coil with this plastic film and then to the final packing section where it is strapped
and then packed. After the final packing the coil taken to the weigh scale where it is weighed
and then send to warehouse.
4.4.3.2 UTILIZATIO OF THE FORKLIFTS
3TO FORKLIFT DEDICATED TO FURACE HR MI SEC
TIME TAKE TO FEED I THE FEEDER 148
O OF FEEDS I A DAY 120
TOTAL TIMEE FOR FEEDIG 17760 4.9 56.0 0.0
50% OF TOTAL TIME FOR MISCELLAEOUS
ACTIVITIES 43200 12.0 0.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT REFRESHMET TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT BREAKDOW TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
TOTAL TIME 71760 19.9 56.0 0.0
UTILIZATIO (%) 83.05556
Table 4.27
3 TON forklift dedicated to the feeder to feed cathode bundles to the furnace as the utilization
of 83.1%. Other than feeding the furnace, other activities make the major share of the
activities in a day. These activities include carrying materials from store and carrying copper
bars from the cutting area to the feeder yard.

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5TO FORKLIFT HR MI SEC


TIME FOR SHIFTIG COIL AD PALLET ISIDE
CCR 200
O OF COILS PRODUCED I A DAY 96
TOTAL TIME FOR COIL 19200 5.3 20.0 0.0
COIL TO WAREHOUSE
TIME TAKE TO SHIFT OE COIL 158
O OF COILS PRODUCED I A DAY 96
TIME TO SHIFT ALL COILS TO WAREHOUSE 15168 4.2 12.8 48.0
20% OF TOTAL AVAILABLE HOUR FOR
MISCELLAEOUS 17280 4.8 48.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT REFRESHMET TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT BREAKDOW TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
TOTAL TIME 62448 17.3 20.8 48.0
UTILIZATIO (%) 72.27778
Table 4.28
5-TON forklift is used majorly for shifting the coils from CCR to warehouse. Shifting of coils
inside CCR for other processes is also performed by it. Bring the wooden pallet from the
CCR front yard to inside and weighment are some other activities included in the
miscellaneous activities of this forklift.

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CHAPTER 5
RESULTS AD SUGGESTIOS

5.1 TIME EFFICIECY:


COSOLIDATED TIME EFFICIECY
OV’09-MARCH’10
TOTAL EXPECTED
TOTAL O OF RUIG TOTAL TIME
MOTH BAKS HRS RUIG HRS EFFICIECY
OVEMBER 677.14 12073.45 12490.97 96.65742532
DECEMBER 699.71 14417.36 14965.4 96.33795288
JAUARY 699.71 10346.94 10746.3 96.28374417
FEBRUARY 632 9283.44 9614.95 96.55214016
MARCH 699.71 11645.09 12053.09 96.61497591
57766.28 59870.71 96.48504252
Table 5.1
5.2 FOKKLIFT UTILIZATIO

COSOLIDATED STATEMET

AVAILABL
RUIG E RUIG
HOURS HOURS PRESET PROPOSED UTILIZATIO (%)
HR MI HR UTILIZATIO SUGGESTIO SUGGESTIO SUGGESTIO
FORKLIFT/AREA S  S MI  -1 -2 -3
3TO/CSM YARD 18 18 24 0 76.25 90.1625 .A .A
3TO/LOGISTIC-
CSM 18 55 24 0 78.88 ELIMIATED ELIMIATED ELIMIATED
(1)3TO+(2)5TO/A
PM YARD 50 01 72 0 69.48 .A .A .A
(2)5TO/LOGISTIC (70%) 78.93 (100%) 85.88
38 5 48 0 62.7 67.38
S
(100%) 85.88 (90%) 84.04
(0%) 90.05
5TO/CCR 17 21 24 0 72.27 .A .A
(10%) 93.75
3TO/CCR
FURACE 19 56 24 0 83.05 .A 99.5 ELIMIATED
Table 5.2

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5.3 SUGGESTIOS
5.3.1 SUGGESTIO 1
PERFORMIG THE TASK OF CATHODE SHIFTIG FROM CSM (70%)
TO WAREHOUSE/YARD TO CCR (100%) AD TRUCK LOADIG (100%) BY 2
FORKLIFTS OF LOGISTICS (5TO)
1. Proper coordination to be established between csm ccr and logistics such that
requirement of forklifts could be planned.
2. Timing of stripping to be well communicated to logistics prior so that it can make
forklifts to do rest of the work in a planned manner
3. 70% of the cathode bundles can be shifted by logistic forklift and 30% can be stored
in the csm yard and later can be shifted by csm forklift during the changeover.
RENEWD UTILIZATION WHEN 70% OF CATHODE IS SHIFTED BY 2-5TON FORKLIFT OF LOGISTICS
TIME FOR SHIFTIG 70% FROM CSM BUDLES I A DAY 28047.6 7.8 47.5 27.6
TOTAL TIME FOR COIL LOADIG 28800 8.0 0.0 0.0
TIME FOR LOADIG CATHODE BIUDLES I TRUCK 13500 3.8 45.0 0.0
SET UP TIME(FORKLIFT ARM CHAGE)10 TIMES FOR 10
MI 6000 1.7 40.0 0.0
TIME FOR SHIFTIG ALL BUDLES I A DAY TO CCR 31968 8.9 52.8 48.0
20% OF TOTAL AVAILABLE HOUR FOR
MISCELLAEOUS 17280 4.8 48.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT REFRESHMET TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT BREAKDOW TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
TOTAL TIME 136395.6 37.9 53.3 15.6
TOTAL AVAILABLE HRS OF TWO FORKLIFTS 172800 48.0 0.0 0.0
UTILIZATIO (%) 78.93264
Table 5.3

RENEWD UTILIZATION WHEN 30% OF CATHODE IS SHIFTED BY 3TON FORKLIFT OF CSM


TIME FOR SHIFTIG 30% FROM CSM BUDLES I A
DAY 12020.4 3.3 20.3 20.4
MAXIMUM OUTPUT I OE STRIPPIG(BUDLES) 84
TIME FOR SHIFTIG 1 BUDLE FROM MACHIE TO
CSM YARD 150
O OF STRIPPIG I A DAY 3
TIME FOR SHIFTIG 84 BUDLES I EACH STRIP(3) 37800 10.5 30 0
20% OF TOTAL AVAILABLE HOUR FOR -8.5E-
MISCELLAEOUS 17280 4.8 48 13
30 MI PER SHIFT REFRESHMET TIME 5400 1.5 30 0
30 MI PER SHIFT BREAKDOW TIME 5400 1.5 30 0
TOTAL TIME 77900.4 21.639 38.34 20.4
UTILIZATIO OF FORKLIFT (%) 90.1625
Table 5.4

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RENEWD UTILIZATION WHEN 100% OF CATHODE IS SHIFTED BY 2 -5TON FORKLIFT OF LOGISTICS


TIME FOR SHIFTIG 100% FROM CSM BUDLES I A DAY 40068 11.1 7.8 48.0
TOTAL TIME FOR COIL LOADIG 28800 8.0 0.0 0.0
TIME FOR LOADIG CATHODE BIUDLES I TRUCK 13500 3.8 45.0 0.0
SET UP TIME(FORKLIFT ARM CHAGE)10 TIMES FOR 10 MI 6000 1.7 40.0 0.0
TIME FOR SHIFTIG ALL BUDLES I A DAY TO CCR 31968 8.9 52.8 48.0
20% OF TOTAL AVAILABLE HOUR FOR MISCELLAEOUS 17280 4.8 48.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT REFRESHMET TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT BREAKDOW TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
TOTAL TIME 148416 41.2 13.6 36.0
TOTAL AVAILABLE HRS OF TWO FORKLIFTS 172800 48.0 0.0 0.0
UTILIZATIO (%) 85.88889
Table 5.5

4. Before loading one truck if we can supply 6 bundles of cathode to ccr then we can
easily manage with the two 5ton forklifts.
5. One forklift will be used to bring the cathode from csm to yard and other will be used
to supply cathode to ccr, and after supplying 6 bundles the forklift will be used to load
one truck.
6. During break down of csm the csm forklift can also be used to transfer cathodes to
yard/warehouse.
7. Ccr 3-ton forklift can also take some of the cathode supply to the furnace while not on
other works.
8. Before the starting of the csm coils to be loaded in the truck must be sorted out in
advance so as to gain time during the machine running and shifting of cathodes.
9. If two to three trucks is to be loaded one after the other then initial supply of cathode
is to be provided to the ccr and then one truck is to be loaded and then the ccr forklift
can be utilized to supply the cathode at regular intervals until all the trucks are loaded
and also if 70-30 system is used then the 5ton forklift used in csm can be used to load
the truck at a later stage.

RESULT: 3 TO FORKLIFTS OF LOGISTICS CA BE ELIMIATED


UTILIZATIO OF 5TO FORKLIFTS CA BE ICREASED

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5.3.2 SUGGESTIO-2
ISTALLIG THE AUTO FEEDER I THE CCR FURACE AREA
1. Install an auto feeder
eder as shown in the diagram of auto feeder for feeding the cathodes
cat to the
furnace at ccr

Cathode lifting arm

Fig 5.1
2. Time which was earlier used for feeding the fu
furnace
rnace can be utilized for bringing
bring the
cathode from yard to ccr.

3-TO
TO FORKLIFT OF CCR HR MI SEC
TIME FOR SHIFTIG OE BUDLE CATHODE TO CCR FURACE 222
O OF CATHODE BUDLES SHIFTED I A DAY 144
TIME FOR SHIFTIG ALL BUDLES I A DAY 31968 8.9 52.8 48.0
50% OF TOTAL AVAILABLE HOUR FOR MISCELLAEOUS 43200 12.0 0.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT REFRESHMET TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT BREAKDOW TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
TOTAL TIME 85968 23.9 52.8 48.0
TOTAL AVAILABLE HRS 86400 24.0 0.0 0.0
UTILIZATIO (%) 99.5
Table 5.6
4. Time used for shifting the cathode to ccr can be used to shift the cathode from csm yard
to yard/warehouse.

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TRUCK LOADIG (COIL) HR MI SEC


TIME TAKE FOR LOADIG OE COIL 90
O OF COILS I OE TRUCK 8
O OF TRUCKS I A DAY 15
TIME FOR LOADIG ALL TRUCKS 10800 3.0 0.0 0.0
TIME FOR COIL ADJUSTMET PER TRUCK 1200
TIME FOR COIL ADJUSTMET FOR ALL TRUCKS 18000 5.0 0.0 0.0
TOTAL TIME FOR COIL LOADIG 28800 8.0 0.0 0.0
SET UP TIME(FORKLIFT ARM CHAGE)10 TIMES FOR 10 MI 6000
TRUCK LOADIG (CATHODE)
TIME FOR LOADIG OE BUDLE CATHODE 90
O OF CATHODE BUDLES I OE TRUCK 10
O OF TRUCKS I A DAY 15
TIME FOR LOADIG CATHODE BUDLES 13500 3.8 45.0 0.0
CATHODE BUDLES TO YARD
TIME FOR SHIFTIG TOTAL BUDLES I A DAY FROM CSM TO YARD 40068 11.1 7.8 48.0
20% OF TOTAL AVAILABLE HOUR FOR MISCELLAEOUS 17280 4.8 48.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT REFRESHMET TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT BREAKDOW TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
TOTAL TIME 116448 32.3 20.8 48.0
TOTAL AVAILABLE HRS OF TWO FORKLIFTS 172800 48.0 0.0 0.0
UTILIZATIO (%) 67.38889
Table 5.7
5. Utilization of logistics forklift can further be improved by engaging it into miscellaneous
and supporting activities of other forklifts.

RESULT: 3 TO FORKLIFTS OF LOGISTICS CA BE ELIMIATED


UTILIZATIO OF 5TO FORKLIFTS CA BE ICREASED

MOEY MATTERS:
INVESTMENT FOR THE CONVEYOR=RS.20 LAKHS (APPROX)
(MACHINE AND INSTALLATION)
MONEY SAVED PER MONTH ON 1 FORKLIFT= RS.1 LAKH
ESTIMATED PAYBACK PERIOD= 20 MONTHS I.E. 1 YR 8 MOTHS

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5.3.3 SUGGESTIO 3:
RESEQUECIG THE CCR WORKFLOW AD ISTALLATIO OF AUTO
FEEDER
1. Present arrangement of ccr plant and forklift movements are shown as below:

COILER COILER

COMPACTOR

COOLER

WEIGHED
PALLET

PACKER

STRECH
PACKER
PALLET
STACKIG
AREA

WEIGH
SCALE

FORK
LIFT

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2. Workstations of the ccr is to be arranged in a sequential manner as shown in the diagram of new
railed ccr and rail system to be implemented to shift the coil.

Cooler

Rails
Coiler

Compactor

Pallet

Stretch packer

Packer

Weigh scale

Delivery for forklift


Fig 5.2
2. Installing an auto feeder system as shown in the diagram (auto feeder) will feed the ccr
furnace with the cathodes.
3. Time gained by 5ton forklift can be utilized to do the miscellaneous work at ccr and to
shift the coils to warehouse.

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5TO FORKLIFT OF CCR HR MI SEC


TIME TAKE TO SHIFT OE COIL 158
O OF COILS PRODUCED I A DAY 96
TIME TO SHIFT ALL COILS TO WAREHOUSE 15168 4.2 12.8 48.0
60% OF TOTAL AVAILABLE HOUR FOR
MISCELLAEOUS 51840 14.4 24.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT REFRESHMET TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT BREAKDOW TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
TOTAL TIME 77808 21.6 36.8 48.0
UTILIZATIO (%) 90.05556
Table 5.8

5TO FORKLIFT OF CCR HR MI SEC


TIME TAKE TO SHIFT OE COIL 158
O OF COILS PRODUCED I A DAY 96
TIME FOR SHIFTIG 10% CATHODE TO THE CCR 3196.8 0.9 53.3 16.8
TIME TO SHIFT ALL COILS TO WAREHOUSE 15168 4.2 12.8 48.0
60% OF TOTAL AVAILABLE HOUR FOR
MISCELLAEOUS 51840 14.4 24.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT REFRESHMET TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT BREAKDOW TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
TOTAL TIME 81004.8 22.5 30.1 4.8
UTILIZATIO (%) 93.75556

RENEWD UTILIZATION WHEN 100% OF CATHODE IS SHIFTED BY 2 -5TON


FORKLIFT OF LOGISTICS

TIME FOR SHIFTIG 100% FROM CSM BUDLES I A DAY 40068 11.1 7.8 48.0
TOTAL TIME FOR COIL LOADIG 28800 8.0 0.0 0.0
TIME FOR LOADIG ALL TRUCKS 13500 3.8 45.0 0.0
TIME FOR SHIFTIG ALL BUDLES I A DAY TO CCR 31968 8.9 52.8 48.0
SET UP TIME(FORKLIFT ARM CHAGE)10 TIMES FOR 10 MI 6000 1.7 40.0 0.0
20% OF TOTAL AVAILABLE HOUR FOR MISCELLAEOUS 17280 4.8 48.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT REFRESHMET TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT BREAKDOW TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
TOTAL TIME 148416 41.2 13.6 36.0
TOTAL AVAILABLE HRS OF TWO FORKLIFTS 172800 48.0 0.0 0.0
UTILIZATIO (%) 85.88889

Table 5.9

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RENEWD UTILIZATION WHEN 90% OF CATHODE IS SHIFTED BY 2 -5TON


FORKLIFT OF LOGISTICS
TIME FOR SHIFTIG 100% FROM CSM BUDLES I A DAY 40068 11.1 7.8 48.0
TOTAL TIME FOR COIL LOADIG 28800 8.0 0.0 0.0
TIME FOR LOADIG ALL TRUCKS 13500 3.8 45.0 0.0
TIME FOR SHIFTIG ALL BUDLES I A DAY TO CCR 28771.2 8.0 59.5 31.2
SET UP TIME(FORKLIFT ARM CHAGE)10 TIMES FOR 10
MI 6000 1.7 40.0 0.0
20% OF TOTAL AVAILABLE HOUR FOR MISCELLAEOUS 17280 4.8 48.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT REFRESHMET TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
30 MI PER SHIFT BREAKDOW TIME 5400 1.5 30.0 0.0
TOTAL TIME 145219.2 40.3 20.3 19.2
TOTAL AVAILABLE HRS OF TWO FORKLIFTS 172800 48.0 0.0 0.0
UTILIZATIO (%) 84.03889
Table 5.10
4. Time during the starting of the coiling process can be used to shift 10% of the cathodes to
the ccr furnace.
5. Time gained by 5ton forklifts of logistics can be used for other miscellaneous purpose.

RESULT: 3 TO FORKLIFTS OF LOGISTICS CA BE ELIMIATED


3TO FORKLIFT OF CCR CA BE ELIMIATED
UTILIZATIO OF 5TO FORKLIFTS CA BE ICREASED

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5.3.4 SUGGESTIO 4

ESTABLISHIG A CETRALIZED FORKLIFT COTROLIG UIT

1. Central controlling unit is to be established where in all the forklifts report.


2. Planning should be regarding each shift activities and the requirements of forklifts by
the controlling unit.
3. During reporting of the forklift, each forklift is to be checked for the status card issued
by the maintenance unit of forklifts which specifies the overall condition of the
forklift and fitness for its usage.
4. After the verification by the in-charge the forklifts are to be issued to the various jobs
in hand which are preplanned by all the plants and informed prior.
5. Job cards are to be issued by the controlling unit for each job to be done.
6. After the completion of the particular job the job handling officer should relieve the
forklift by signing on to the job card.
7. The forklifts must report to the controlling unit after completion of each job.
8. Breakdowns and refreshment breaks are also to be informed to the controlling unit
with starting and ending time.
9. Rules must be formulated to take actions against the improper performance of the
forklifts and intentional delay.
10. Progress of each job should be reported to the controlling unit by the job handling
officer and estimated job completion time also to be communicated.

RESULT: MORE SYSTEMATIC FORKLIFT MAAGEMET CA BE DOE


AD UTILIZATIO OF EACH FORKLIFT CA BE IMPROVED.

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COCLUSIO:

The project regarding the time efficiency of the refinery plant has prominently highlighted
with the help of Pareto analysis that CSM, ASWM, APM and CRANES play a vital role in
the production of copper cathodes. And the delays which occur during their functioning are
majorly caused due to various technical reasons in the machine parts and operational
inefficiency. Steps should be taken to bring in control and efficient usage of machines by
regular checkups and maintenance and training and knowledge sharing activities for the
operators.
The project regarding the forklift motion study in the EOU has clearly identified the under
utilization of the forklifts and the unproductive motion that the forklifts take to perform an
activity. By the implementation of the provided suggestions the utilization of the forklifts can
be increased and the excess forklift can be removed and the profitability of the EOU can be
increased.

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REFERECES:
1. Http://www.sterlite-industries.com
2. En.wikipedia.org/wiki/pareto_analysis
3. Documents from the company which are confidential.
4. Daily reports of the refinery plant
5. En.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_and_motion_study

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