Department of Health & Human Services Administration for Children and Families

Program Office:

Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Children's Bureau

Funding Targeted Grants to Increase the Well-Being of, Opportunity Title: and to Improve the Permanency Outcomes for, Children Affected by Methamphetamine or Other Substance Abuse Announcement Type: Funding Opportunity Number: CFDA Number: Due Date for Applications: Initial HHS-2007-ACF-ACYF-CU-0022

93.087 07/03/2007

Executive Summary: The Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Children's Bureau, announces the availability of competitive grant funds authorized by the Promoting Safe and Stable Families (PSSF) program. These targeted grants will be awarded to regional partnerships that provide, through interagency collaboration and integration of programs and services, activities and services that are designed to increase the well-being of, improve permanency outcomes for, and enhance the safety of children who are in an out-of-home placement or are at risk of being placed in an out-of-home placement as a result of a parent's or caretaker's methamphetamine or other substance abuse. The Child and Family Services Improvement Act (Public Law (P.L.) 109-288) reauthorizes the PSSF program, through Fiscal Year (FY 2011) and includes a new targeted grants program (42 United States Code (U.S.C.) 629g(f) which directs the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) to reserve a specified portion of the appropriation for regional partnership grants to improve the well-being of children affected by methamphetamine abuse or other substance abuse.

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Under this Program Announcement there are four Program Options: two possible Federal award amounts, $500,000 or $1,000,000 per budget period and two possible grant periods, three years or five years. Applicants should note that initial Federal awards at the $1,000,000 level will decline between the second and third year of a three-year grant period and will decline between the second and fifth year of a five-year grant period, due to the overall decline in authorized Federal funds for this grant program over these grant periods. Federal awards at the $500,000 level will remain fixed for the duration of either a three- or five-year grant period. Applicants must clearly state for which of these four program options they are applying.

I. FUNDING OPPORTUNITY DESCRIPTION Legislative Authority The Promoting Safe and Stable Families Program (section 437(f), subpart 2, title IV-B, of the Social Security Act) (42 U.S.C. 629(f)(b)) http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgibin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=109_cong_bills&docid=f:s3525enr.txt.pdf Funding Opportunity Description Background Information States and communities around the country are struggling to address the safety, permanency and well-being of children in families in which a parent's substance abuse has placed children at risk. The rise of methamphetamine abuse, in particular, has recently increased the visibility of these issues in many communities. It is estimated that 8.3 million children in the United States (U.S.) live with at least one parent who abuses alcohol or who is in need of treatment for illicit drug use. Impaired by their addiction, parents who abuse substances are less likely to engage in appropriate parenting practices thereby depriving children of basic nurturing activities and experiences. The high cost of maintaining an addiction diverts a family's financial resources from providing for basic family needs such as food, clothing, and housing. Children whose parents abuse substances are more likely to have poorer physical, intellectual, social, emotional and developmental

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outcomes and, sadly, are at risk of becoming substance abusers themselves. Parental substance abuse is also a key factor underlying the abuse or neglect experienced by many of the children who enter foster care or are at risk of entering foster care. Many studies indicate that between one-third and two-thirds of substantiated child maltreatment reports involve substance abuse. Of children exposed to drugs prenatally, approximately one-third will enter foster care within the first few years of life. Children with open child welfare cases whose parents have substance abuse problems also tend to be younger than other children in the child welfare system, are more likely to be victims of severe or chronic neglect, and are more likely than other children to be placed in foster care rather than served while remaining at home. Once in foster care, these children tend to remain in care for longer periods of time than other children. An important challenge facing both the child welfare and substance abuse treatment fields is to take a comprehensive view of families' situations and to understand the contributions of various problematic behaviors to child maltreatment. The relationship between child maltreatment and substance abuse is complicated by the presence of other personal, health, environmental, social and economic factors that confound the process of securing safe, stable homes for children, as well as hinder the treatment process. For substance abuse treatment to be effective and for children to remain safe, the full spectrum of major family problems must be addressed. Finally, as child welfare laws emphasize the need to make timely decisions regarding the permanent placement of children in foster care, parents with substance abuse disorders may have limited time to demonstrate their readiness to provide a safe home environment for children. To preserve families, child welfare workers and substance abuse treatment providers must collaborate to accurately identify substance use problems early and intervene quickly. While substance abuse treatment is often effective in assisting clients to achieve abstinence, quality treatment programs designed for parents involved with the child welfare system, especially treatment programs that target women with young children, are not widely available in many communities. Historically, a number of issues have contributed to the fragmentation of child welfare services and substance abuse treatment, including: 1. Recruitment, engagement and retention of parents or caretakers in substance abuse treatment. Many communities lack

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residential or intensive outpatient family programs that would allow children to remain with their parent(s) or caretaker(s) during substance abuse treatment. In other communities, residential or intensive outpatient family programs may exist, but may be unable to meet the demand for such services, may not be able to provide for adequate length of stay, and/or are often unable to coordinate treatment with child welfare referring agencies. The inability of many child welfare agencies to identify substance abuse problems early and accurately also makes timely recruitment of substance-abusing parents very difficult. 2. Differences in professional perspectives and policies between child welfare workers and substance abuse treatment providers. Professionals from the child welfare and substance abuse fields may hold divergent views on: (1) defining the target client (child or substance-abusing parent); (2) the treatment outcomes expected; (3) acceptable timelines for demonstrating progress in treatment; (4) responses to setbacks in treatment; and (5) other factors related to the legal and policy environments in which substance abuse treatment providers and child welfare agencies operate. State and Federal child welfare laws, for example, prescribe limited timeframes in which to offer family reunification services before alternative permanency decisions must be made. Treating substance abuse disorders, however, involves a complex and long-term recovery process. Consequently, parents may have little time to demonstrate readiness to provide safe homes for children who are in treatment. Also, confusion over the confidentiality requirements of both fields can often halt or slow the exchange of information between substance abuse treatment providers and child welfare workers. 3. Chronic service shortages in both the child welfare and substance abuse treatment systems. In the child welfare system, issues such as high caseloads, staff turnover, and inadequate caseworker training often hinder the efficiency and effectiveness of case planning and timely caseworker visitation. For families with substance abuse problems, accessing adequate treatment is also a difficult task. A 1999 HHS report noted that only 37 percent of problem drug users with children under age 18 reported receiving some form of substance abuse treatment. The report also noted a recent decline in the delivery of services often needed in conjunction with substance abuse treatment such as parenting skills training, medical services, mental health services, legal aid, and vocational training. More recent data suggest that accessing adequate treatment remains difficult. In 2005, 23.2 million persons ages 12 or older needed treatment for an illicit drug or alcohol use problem. Of these, only 2.3 million or about 4

10 percent received treatment (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2005 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National Findings; http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/nsduh/2k5nsduh/2k5results.htm#7.3). For many families addressing substance abuse alone is not likely to produce the changes in a family that are necessary to ensure a healthy home environment for children. Even if a parent achieves abstinence, other issues such as inadequate housing and poor parenting skills may continue to pose safety risks for the child. In recent years, HHS has undertaken a number of projects and activities to explore and address the issue of substance abuse among families involved with the child welfare system. A number of these projects are described below, along with links to websites containing further information. Applicants may wish to review these resources as they develop their applications. The 1999 ACF and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) report to Congress on substance abuse and child welfare, Blending Perspectives and Building Common Ground, described the extent and scope of the problem of substance abuse in the child welfare population, the types of services provided to this population, and the effectiveness of these services. The report also made recommendations for legislative changes needed to improve service coordination. Applicants are encouraged to review the full report online: http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/subabuse99/subabuse.htm. One outgrowth of the Blending Perspectives report was the creation of the National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare (NCSACW), established through a memorandum of understanding between SAMHSA and ACF. NCSACW's goals are to develop and implement a comprehensive program of information gathering and dissemination, to provide technical assistance, and to develop knowledge that promotes effective practice, and organizational and system changes at the local, state, and national levels. Substance abuse treatment providers and child welfare workers are also able to participate in free online courses on a range of practice issues, including training about how professionals from both fields can effectively collaborate to improve services to families. These courses are available online at NCSACW's website at: http://www.ncsacw.samhsa.gov. HHS has supported other approaches to identifying and addressing substance abuse issues in the child welfare population through child welfare waiver demonstrations. These waivers have allowed some States to use title IV-E foster care funds more flexibly in order to

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improve outcomes for children and families in the child welfare system. Delaware, New Hampshire, Maryland, and Illinois have participated in waiver demonstrations targeting the problem of substance abuse in the child welfare system. Outcomes and lessons from these projects were published by the Children's Bureau in 2005. Applicants are encouraged to review a synthesis of these findings online at: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/programs_fund/cwwaiver/substa nceabuse/index.htm. With the implementation of the Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) and renewed emphasis on achieving permanency for children in the child welfare system, finding effective and timely methods to address the concurrent family problems of substance abuse and child maltreatment is critical. In implementing grant-funded services or activities, applicants should understand the timelines for permanency planning prescribed by ASFA so that informed permanency decisions can be made within timeframes dictated both by children's developmental needs and the requirements of ASFA. Applicants may review the ASFA legislation online at: http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgibin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=105_cong_bills&docid=f:h867enr.txt.pdf. Finally, applicants may review a variety of print and electronic publications, websites, and online databases at Child Welfare Information Gateway. Resources covering a wide range of topics from prevention to permanency, including child welfare, child abuse and neglect, and adoption can be accessed online at: http://www.childwelfare.gov. ACF seeks to promote the development of strategies to improve collaboration between substance abuse treatment providers and the child welfare system in order to improve the safety, permanency, and well-being of children and their families. Grants awarded under this funding announcement will be expected to assist regional partnerships in establishing or enhancing a collaborative infrastructure capable of building the region's capacity to meet a broad range of needs for families involved with both substance abuse treatment and the child welfare system. Applicants may choose to test a broad-based approach to substance abuse treatment and child welfare services collaboration, or they may choose to focus their efforts on a particular point along the continuum of care from prevention to treatment to aftercare services. When considering an approach to grant-funded services and when

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anticipating program outcomes, applicants should review the conceptual framework included at the end of this announcement. Grantees are encouraged to recruit a local evaluator to assist in developing plans to monitor required performance indicators, as well as to assist in assessing the performance and impact of grant-funded services and activities. Examples of services and activities that applicants might propose to engage in or integrate into existing service delivery systems include: 1. Systems Collaboration and Improvements

Support for inter-agency and inter-organization collaboration to support management activities that will provide oversight and make ongoing improvements to the activities carried out through the grant. Comprehensive training to ensure that all partners involved in the proposed collaborative (e.g., child welfare, judges, attorneys, court professionals, community mental health and primary care providers, law enforcement professionals, school personnel) fully understand substance abuse and dependence and are trained to intervene appropriately with parents. Similarly, alcohol and drug treatment professionals may be trained to understand risk assessment, court rules, and other child welfare requirements impacting their clients. Improvements in cross-system information sharing mechanisms to ensure consistent data collection across systems, comprehensive methods to monitor outcomes are in place, and sharing of information, with appropriate releases of confidential information, across systems. While applicants must observe confidentiality requirements, substance abuse treatment providers and child welfare agencies are strongly encouraged to specify a mechanism or draft a memorandum of understanding to obtain informed consent to ensure that protected client information can be shared when necessary. Support for family drug courts to provide a system of more frequent court appearances for parents with allegations of substance use, and immediate rewards and sanctions based on compliance with court orders regarding the recovery plan. Grant funds could be used to support the capacity of the court(s) to provide increased case monitoring for cases under the jurisdiction of the dependency court.

2. Treatment Linkages

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Universal alcohol and drug screening using standardized alcohol and drug screening questionnaires to determine the extent to which substance abuse might be a contributing factor in ALL cases to which the child welfare agency responds. Co-location of staff to enhance cross-agency communication and provide substance abuse treatment expertise within child welfare agencies and the courts. Specialized engagement and recovery management services to be provided under a variety of possible arrangements, engagement strategies and immediate access to substance abuse assessments at the first court hearing. This function may provide for staff stationed at the family court to intervene and conduct preliminary assessments with ALL parents with substance abuse allegations; intensive management of the recovery aspect of the child welfare case plan; and/or routine monitoring and feedback to the child welfare agency and the court.

3. Services for Children and Youth

Drug Endangered Children (DEC) programs to respond to the crisis intervention needs of families involved in methamphetamine manufacturing including field medical assessments and coordination of medical and mental health follow-up service for children found at methamphetamine home laboratories. Services to substance-exposed newborns to enhance identification and intervention with infants identified as substance-exposed at birth and coordination/enhancement of services to be delivered under the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Part C. This could include programs such as home visiting services or referrals and linkages for medical and/or developmental follow-up with pediatric specialists knowledgeable about fetal alcohol spectrum disorder and exposure to other commonly abused drugs. Developmental assessment and services to provide access to screening and assessment, and intervention with children identified as needing services to address developmental delays across a spectrum of childhood development indicators, such as linguistic, motor, and cognitive processing skills. Mental health and child counseling to enhance access to appropriate mental health and counseling services for children involved in the child welfare system as a result of parental substance use disorders.

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Early intervention and preventive services for children and adolescents to provide access to participation in evidence-based programs and services for children and adolescents to address the increased risk for intergenerational abuse and dependence on alcohol and other drugs. Substance abuse treatment for adolescents to provide increased capacity to provide developmentally appropriate treatment services to adolescent family members who, like their parent(s), have a diagnosable substance use disorder.

4. Substance Abuse Treatment Services

Timely access to comprehensive substance abuse treatment to ensure that families in the child welfare system have priority access to comprehensive substance abuse treatment services (and concurrent mental health services as needed) that meet the needs of the entire family, including: Long-term residential treatment programs where children can live on-site with mothers, and where children's father and/or the mother's partner is served as well (in residence or not). Services are provided for all family members, including access to family counseling and individual care plans for the adult and child members of the family. Intensive out-patient treatment with or without a housing component (i.e., sober living homes). Services are provided for family members as well, including access to family counseling and individual care plans for the adult and child members of the family.

5. Other Services for Parents

Parenting skills training (as part of substance abuse treatment or stand alone) to provide evidenced-based strategies to promote the parenting abilities of parents who are receiving in-home child welfare services, or whose children have been removed with goals of reunification. Training for foster parents, relatives and other substitute caretakers about the special needs of children and youth who have suffered from abuse or neglect and whose parents have a substance use disorder. For example, training might focus on the support of caretakers who are caring for an adolescent with a substance abuse problem.

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Family counseling to strengthen family functioning and assist with reunification of families when children have been in out of home placements. Continuing care and recovery support services to support the ongoing recovery of parents after residential or intensive outpatient treatment, through ongoing connections to treatment and community support services such as Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous and ongoing case management. Ancillary services for families to provide assistance in securing needed services such as safe and drug-free housing, transportation and child care.

Since applicants are required to demonstrate the target region's lack of capacity for, or access to, comprehensive family treatment and services, regional partners may consider several methods of addressing service barriers. For example, a community may only have adult-only residential or intensive outpatient programs and lack the capacity to serve family members. Alternatively, a community may have residential or intensive outpatient family programs, but may not be able to meet demand for such services, provide for adequate length of stay, coordinate treatment with child welfare referring agencies, or provide services that can accommodate the linguistic and cultural experience of the family. To address these issues, applicants may consider proposing to expand the region's capacity for comprehensive family treatment by: (1) adding an array of services for children and other family members; (2) increasing capacity to serve more families referred from child welfare and/or the family drug or dependency courts; (3) extending treatment services to the family for longer periods of time; (4) providing for treatment linkage programs to increase the number of successful referrals to treatment once parents are identified as having a substance use disorder in need of intervention; or (5) enhancing existing treatment services to hire staff with the needed language skills and tailor services to the cultural background of clients. Evaluation The Evaluation portion of the Evaluation Criteria section of this announcement provides specific information about what reviewers will be measuring when they read applications for funding under this program announcement. Assistance may be found in a document titled "Program Manager's Guide to Evaluation." A copy of this document can be accessed http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/other_resrch/pm_guide_eval/r eports/pmguide/pmguide_toc.html. 10

Assurances The acceptance of funds for projects responsive to this announcement will signify the applicant's assurance that it will comply with the following requirements: 1. Have the project fully functioning within 90 days following the notification of the grant award. 2. Address all program requirements listed in this announcement. 3. Participate if the Children's Bureau chooses to do a national evaluation or a technical assistance contract that relates to this funding announcement. 4. Submit all performance indicator data, program, and financial reports in a timely manner, in recommended format (to be provided), and submit the final report on disk or electronically using a standard word-processing program. 5. Submit annual reports to the Secretary not later than September 30 of the first fiscal year in which a recipient of a grant is paid funds and a report is due annually thereafter until September 30 of the last fiscal year in which the recipient is paid funds under the grant. 6. Submit a copy of the final report, the evaluation report, and any program products to Child Welfare Information Gateway within 90 days of project end date. This is in addition to the standard requirement that the final program and evaluation report must also be submitted to the Grants Management Specialist and the Federal Project Officer. 7. Allocate sufficient funds in the budget to: a. Provide for the project director, the evaluator, and other key partners to attend an early kickoff meeting for grantees funded under this program announcement to be held within the first three months of the project (first year only) in Washington, D.C. b. Provide for the project director, the evaluator, and other key partners to attend an annual three-day grantees' meeting in Washington, D.C. c. Provide for the project director, the evaluator, and other key partners to attend one annual training meeting in Washington, D.C. Description of Funding Arrangements The legislation outlines a number of specific requirements for funds awarded under this announcement, including that: (1) the annual Federal award may not exceed $1,000,000; (2) the annual Federal 11

award may not fall below $500,000; (3) a grant period may not exceed five years; (4) the grantee's required match must increase over the course of the grant period, such that grantees must contribute 15 percent of the costs of grant-funded services and activities in FY 2007 and FY 2008, 20 percent of such costs in FY 2009 and FY 2010, and 25 percent of such costs in FY 2011; and (5) the legislatively authorized funding levels for this grant program decreases each year from $40 million in the first year (or first 12-month budget period) to $20 million in the fifth year (or final 12-month budget period). In proposing a grant program budget, applicants are encouraged to carefully review the tables below that describe the annual variations in Federal share, grantee match, and total award amount between FYs 2007-2011. There are two possible Federal award amounts, $500,000 or $1,000,000 per budget period and two possible grant periods, three years or five years. Applicants should note that initial Federal awards at the $1,000,000 level will decline between the second and third year of a three-year grant period and will decline between the second and fifth year of a five-year grant period, due to the overall decline in authorized Federal funds for this grant program over these grant periods. Federal awards at the $500,000 level will remain fixed for the duration of either a three- or five-year grant period. Applicants are required to select ONE of the following Program Options, justify their selection in terms of accomplishing their project goals and demonstrate their organizational capacity to manage the proposed project over the selected grant period: Program Option 1: Program Option 2: Program Option 3: Program Option 4: $1,000,000 annual award for 3 years (declining); $1,000,000 annual award for 5 years (declining); $500,000 annual award for 3 years (fixed); or $500,000 annual award for 5 years (fixed).

Applicants must state for which of these four program options they are applying and justify their selection in terms of accomplishing their project goals. An applicant may only apply for one Program Option. Applicants should include in their proposal a program budget for each of the award years and outline how they will satisfy the increasing match required over the selected grant period, based on the tables below.

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Applicants selecting a Federal award at the initial level of $1,000,000 should also describe how they will accommodate the declining total award amount in the second and third years of the grant period (if applying for a three-year award) or the second and fifth years of the grant period (if applying for a five-year award). The non-Federal share of the cost of services provided or activities conducted with funding under this announcement may be in cash or in-kind and must be detailed in the budget. Pre-Application Conference. The Children's Bureau will be sponsoring a pre-application conference for all parties interested in applying for the Targeted Discretionary Grants Addressing Needs of Families Affected by Methamphetamine and Other Substance Abuse. The purpose of the conference is to assist applicants to develop effective applications and respond to questions about the program announcement. A recording and transcript of the applicant conference will be posted at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/grants_cb.html following the conference and will be available until the closing date of the announcement. Information pertaining to this pre-application conference can be found at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/grantreview/ or by contacting the ACYF Operations Center, c/o The Dixon Group, Inc. ATTN: Children's Bureau, 866-796-1591 or TTY 711, cb@dixongroup.com.

II. AWARD INFORMATION Program Option 1. $1,000,000 annual award for 3 years (Declining Federal award) Funding Instrument Type: Anticipated Total Priority Area Funding: Anticipated Number of Awards: Ceiling on Amount of Individual Awards: Grant $20,600,000 1 to 8 $2,575,000

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Floor on Amount of Individual Awards:

$2,575,000 per project period

Average Projected Award Amount: $2,575,000 per project period Length of Project Periods: 36-month project period with three 12-month budget periods Total Program Funds (Federal Award + Grantee Match) 1,176,000 971,000 938,000

Fiscal Year

Federal Share

Federal Award

Grantee Share

Grantee Match

2007 2008 2009

85% 85% 80%

1,000,000 825,000 750,000

15% 15% 20%

176,000 146,000 188,000

Program Option 2. $1,000,000 annual award for 5 years (Declining Federal award) Anticipated Total Program Option 2 Funding: Anticipated Number of Awards: Ceiling of Amounts of Individual Awards: Floor on Amount of Individual Awards: $18,710,000 1 to 5 $3,742,000 $3,742,000 per project period

Average Projected Award Amount: $3,742,000 per project period Length of Project Periods: 60-month project period with five 12month budget periods Total Program Funds (Federal Award + Grantee

Fiscal Year

Federal Share

Federal Award

Grantee Share

Grantee Match

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Match) 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 85% 85% 80% 80% 75% 1,000,000 825,000 750,000 667,000 500,000 15% 15% 20% 20% 25% 176,000 146,000 188,000 167,000 167,000 1,176,000 971,000 938,000 834,000 667,000

Program Option 3. $500,000 annual award for 3 years (Fixed Federal award) Anticipated Total Program Option 3 Funding: Anticipated Number of Awards: Ceiling of Amounts of Individual Awards: Floor on Amount of Individual Awards: $15,000,000 1 to 10 $1,500,000 $1,500,000 per project period

Average Projected Award Amount: $1,500,000 per project period Length of Project Periods: 36-month project period with three 12-month budget periods” Total Program Funds (Federal Award + Grantee Match) 588,000 588,000 625,000

Fiscal Year 2007 2008 2009

Federal Share 85% 85% 80%

Federal Grantee Award Share 500,000 500,000 500,000 15% 15% 20%

Grantee Match 88,000 88,000 125,000

Program Option 4. $500,000 annual award for 5 years (Fixed Federal award)

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Anticipated Total Program Option 4 Funding: Anticipated Number of Awards: Ceiling of Amounts of Individual Awards: Floor on Amount of Individual Awards:

$75,000,000 1 to 30 $2,500,000 $2,500,000 per project period

Average Projected Award Amount: $2,500,000 per project period Length of Project Periods: 60-month project period with five 12month budget periods Total Program Funds (Federal Award + Grantee Match) 588,000 588,000 625,000 625,000 667,000

Fiscal Year

Federal Share

Federal Grantee Award Share

Grantee Match

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

85% 85% 80% 80% 75%

500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000

15% 15% 20% 20% 25%

88,000 88,000 125,000 125,000 167,000

Awards under this announcement are subject to the availability of funds.

III. ELIGIBILITY INFORMATION 1. Eligible Applicants:
• • •

State governments County governments Local Governments

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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

City or township governments Regional Organizations U.S. Territory or Possession Independent school districts Public and State-controlled institutions of higher education Indian/Native American Tribal governments (Federally recognized) Indian/Native American Tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized) Indian/Native American Tribally Designated Organizations Public/Indian Housing Authorities Non-profits with 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education) Non-profits without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education) Private institutions of higher education For-profit organizations (other than small businesses) Small businesses Hispanic-Serving Institutions Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions Special district governments

Faith-based and community organizations that meet the statutory eligibility requirements are eligible to apply under this announcement. Foreign entities are not eligible under this announcement. Applications must represent regional partnerships formed by a collaborative agreement. Applications must identify a primary applicant responsible for administering the grant. The primary applicant MUST be one of the regional partnership organizations listed below. The primary applicant cannot be an individual. Regional partnerships may be established on an interstate or intrastate basis and must be between at least two of the following parties:

The State child welfare agency that is responsible for the administration of the State plan under title IV-B or title IV-E of the Social Security Act;

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• • • • • • • • • •

The State agency responsible for administering the substance abuse prevention and treatment block grant provided under subpart II of part B of title XIX of the Public Health Service Act; An Indian Tribe or Tribal consortium; Non-profit or for-profit child welfare service providers; Community health service providers; Community mental health providers; Local law enforcement agencies; Judges and court personnel; Juvenile justice officials; School personnel; Tribal child welfare agencies or a consortia of such agencies; or Any other providers, agencies, personnel, officials, or entities that are related to the provision of child and family services under this subsection.

As required by the legislation, if the partnership is an Indian Tribe or Tribal consortia they may not enter into a collaborative agreement only with Tribal child welfare agencies (or a consortium of such agencies). Applications must identify a lead applicant responsible for administration of the grant. Any member of the regional partnership is eligible to be a lead applicant provided that: (1) the partner is one of the eligible entities described above; and (2) the member agency or organization has the capacity to sufficiently monitor program activities or services, funding, and reporting requirements described in this announcement. While either the State child welfare agency that is responsible for the State plan under title IV-B or title IV-E of the Social Security Act or an Indian Tribe or Tribal consortium must be a member of a regional partnership it is NOT necessary that either of these entities serve as the lead agency. Any eligible entity may be a member of more than one regional partnership application, but each regional partnership may only apply for ONE of the four program options in this program announcement. 2. Cost Sharing or Matching: Yes Grantees are required to meet a non-Federal share of the project costs, in accordance with the Promoting Safe and Stable Families program (section 437(f), subpart 2, title IV-B, of the Social Security Act) (42 U.S.C. 629(f)(b)) See II Award Information for details of grantee match requirements for each of the four program options.

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3. Other: Any eligible entity may be a member of more than one regional partnership application, but each regional partnership may only apply for ONE of the four program options. Disqualification Factors Applications with requests that exceed the ceiling amount (for research projects) or the upper range value (for all other projects) will be deemed non-responsive and will not be considered for funding under this announcement. See Section II., Award Information. Any application that fails to satisfy the deadline requirements referenced in Section IV.3., Submission Dates and Times, will be deemed non-responsive and will not be considered for funding under this announcement.

IV. APPLICATION AND SUBMISSION INFORMATION 1. Address to Request Application Package: ACYF Operations Center c/o The Dixon Group, Inc. ATTN: Children's Bureau 118 Q St., NE. Washington, DC 20002-2132 2. Content and Form of Application Submission: Each application must contain the following items in the order listed: Application for Federal Assistance. (Standard Form (SF) 424). Follow the instructions below and those that accompany the form.
• • • •

In Item 5 of SF-424, put D-U-N-S number in "Organizational DU-N-S:" box. In Item 5 of SF-424, include name, phone number, and, if available, email and fax numbers of the contact person. In Item 8 of SF-424, check 'New.' In Item 10 of SF-424, clearly identify the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) program title and number for the program for which funds are being requested as stated in this funding opportunity announcement. 19

• •

In Item 11 of SF-424, identify the single funding opportunity the application addresses. Applicants must clearly state for which of the four Program Options they are applying. In Item 12 of SF-424, identify the specific geographic area to be served. In Item 14 of SF-424, identify Congressional districts of both the applicant and project.

Budget Information. Non-Construction Programs (SF-424A) and Budget Justification. Follow the instructions provided here and those in Section V, Application Review Information. Note that Federal funds provided to States and services or other resources purchased with Federal funds may not be used to match project grants. Applicants should include in their proposal a program budget for each of the award years and outline how they will satisfy the increasing match required over the selected grant period. Certifications/Assurances. Applicants requesting financial assistance for non-construction projects must file the SF-424B, "Assurances: Non-Construction Programs." Applicants must sign and return the SF-424B with their applications. Applicants must file the Certification Regarding Lobbying when applying for an award in excess of $100,000. Applicants must sign and return the certification with their applications. If applicable, applicants must disclose lobbying activities on the SFLLL. See the information on the Certification Regarding Lobbying form for further information. Applicants must make the appropriate certification regarding environmental tobacco smoke. By signing and submitting the application, the applicant is providing the certification and need not mail back the certification with the applications. Project Summary/Abstract (one page maximum, double spaced). Applicants must clearly state for which of the four Program Options they are applying. Clearly mark this page with the applicant name as shown on Item 5 of SF-424, identify the competitive grant funding opportunity and the title of the proposed project as shown in Item 11 and the service area as shown in Item 12 of SF-424. The summary description should not exceed 300 words. Care should be taken to produce a summary/abstract that accurately and concisely reflects the proposed project. It should describe the

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objectives of the project, the approach to be used, and the results or benefits expected. The Project Description. Applicants must clearly state for which of the four Program Options they are applying. Applicants should organize their project description in this sequence: 1) Objectives and Need for Assistance; 2) Approach; 3) Evaluation; 4) Organizational Profiles; and 5) Budget and Budget Justification. Non-Federal Resources. Provide a letter of commitment verifying the actual amount of the non-Federal share of project costs (see Section III.2) for each of the award years over the selected grant period. Indirect Charges. If claiming indirect costs, provide documentation that the applicant currently has an indirect cost-rate approved by HHS or another cognizant Federal agency. Third-Party Agreements. Include a letter of commitment or memorandum of understanding from each partner and/or subcontractor describing their role, detailing specific project tasks to be performed, and expressing commitment to participate if the proposed project is funded. Note: general letters of support are not required nor do the evaluation criteria ask about the extent to which there are letters of support so do not include general letters of support. Page Limit. The application limit is 100 pages total including all forms and attachments. Pages over this page limit will be removed from the application and will not be reviewed. General Content and Form Information. To be considered for funding, each application must be submitted with the Standard Federal Forms (provided at the end of this announcement or through the electronic links provided) and following the guidance provided. The application must be signed by an individual authorized to act for the applicant agency and to assume responsibility for the obligations imposed by the terms and conditions of the grant award. The application must be typed, double spaced, printed on only one side, with at least 1-inch margins on each side and 1 inch at the top and bottom, using standard 12-point fonts (such as Times New Roman or Courier). All pages must be numbered. When spacing, margins, and font instructions are not followed, ACF will remove and not review excess pages. All copies of an application must be submitted in a single package, and a separate package must be submitted for each funding opportunity. 21

The package must be clearly labeled for the specific funding opportunity it is addressing. Because each application will be duplicated, do not use or include separate covers, binders, clips, tabs, plastic inserts, maps, brochures, or any other items that cannot be processed easily on a photocopy machine with an automatic feed. Do not bind, clip, staple, or fasten in any way separate subsections of the application, including supporting documentation. Use a clip (not a staple) to securely bind the application together. Applicants are advised that the copies of the application submitted, not the original, will be reproduced by the Federal Government for review. Tips for Preparing a Competitive Application. It is essential that applicants read the entire announcement package carefully before preparing an application and include all of the required application forms and attachments. The application must reflect a thorough understanding of and support the purpose and objectives of the applicable legislation. Reviewers expect applicants to understand the goals of the legislation and the Children's Bureau's interest in each topic. A "responsive application" is one that addresses and follows all of the evaluation criteria in ways that demonstrate this understanding. Applications that are considered to be "unresponsive" or do not clearly address the evaluation criteria or program requirements generally receive very low scores and are rarely funded. The Children's Bureau's website (http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb) provides a wide range of information and links to other relevant websites. Before you begin preparing an application, ACF suggests that the applicant learn more about the mission and programs of the Children's Bureau by exploring the website. Organizing An Application. Reviewers will use the specific evaluation criteria in Section V of this funding announcement to review and evaluate each application. The applicant should address each of these specific evaluation criteria in the project description. Applicants should organize their project description in this sequence: 1) Objectives and Need for Assistance; 2) Approach; 3) Evaluation; 4) Organizational Profiles; and 5) Budget and Budget Justification. The applicant must use the same headings as these criteria, so that reviewers can readily find information that directly addresses each of the specific review criteria. . Protection of Human Subjects. Evaluation plans that include obtaining identifiable private information about clients may involve 22

non-exempt human subjects research and require compliance with HHS Protection of Human Subjects regulations (45 CFR Part 46). Applicants proposing such research are asked to describe (a) the procedures for protecting the privacy of clients and ensuring the confidentiality of data collected about clients; and (b) the process for obtaining institutional review board (IRB) review of the proposed evaluation plans. While IRB approval is not required at the time of award, applicants proposing non-exempt human subjects research will be required, as a condition of award, to hold a Federal-wide Assurance (FWA) approved by the Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) and to provide certification to ACF that an IRB designated under the FWA has reviewed and approved the research prior to enrolling any subjects in the proposed evaluation. Certifications of IRB approval may be submitted to ACF using the form at http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/humansubjects/assurance/OF310.rtf. General information about the HHS Protection of Human Subjects regulations can be obtained on the web at http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp. You may also contact OHRP by e-mail (ohrp@csophs.dhhs.gov) or by phone (240-453-6900). D-U-N-S Requirement All applicants must have a D&B Data Universal Numbering System (DU-N-S) number. On June 27, 2003, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) published in the Federal Register a new Federal policy applicable to all Federal grant applicants. The policy requires Federal grant applicants to provide a D-U-N-S number when applying for Federal grants or cooperative agreements on or after October 1, 2003. The D-U-N-S number will be required whether an applicant is submitting a paper application or using the government-wide electronic portal, Grants.gov. A D-U-N-S number will be required for every application for a new award or renewal/continuation of an award, including applications or plans under formula, entitlement, and block grant programs, submitted on or after October 1, 2003. Please ensure that your organization has a D-U-N-S number. You may acquire a D-U-N-S number at no cost by calling the dedicated toll-free D-U-N-S number request line at 1-866-705-5711 or you may request a number on-line at http://www.dnb.com. Proof of Non-Profit Status Non-profit organizations applying for funding are required to submit proof of their non-profit status.

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Proof of non-profit status is any one of the following:

• •

• •

A reference to the applicant organization's listing in the IRS's most recent list of tax-exempt organizations described in the IRS Code. A copy of a currently valid IRS tax-exemption certificate. A statement from a State taxing body, State attorney general, or other appropriate State official certifying that the applicant organization has non-profit status and that none of the net earnings accrue to any private shareholders or individuals. A certified copy of the organization's certificate of incorporation or similar document that clearly establishes non-profit status. Any of the items in the subparagraphs immediately above for a State or national parent organization and a statement signed by the parent organization that the applicant organization is a local non-profit affiliate.

When applying electronically, we strongly suggest that you attach your proof of non-profit status with your electronic application. Private, non-profit organizations are encouraged to submit with their applications the survey titled "Survey on Ensuring Equal Opportunity for Applicants" found under the "Survey" heading at: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/grants_resources.html. Forms, Assurances, and Certifications The project description should include all the information requirements described in the specific evaluation criteria outlined in this program announcement under Section V. Application Review Information. In addition to the project description, the applicant needs to complete all of the Standard Forms required as part of the application process for awards under this announcement. Applicants seeking financial assistance under this announcement must file the appropriate Standard Forms (SFs) as described in this section. All applicants must submit an SF-424, Application for Federal Assistance. For non-construction programs, applicants must also submit an SF-424A, Budget Information and an SF-424B, Assurances. For construction programs, applicants must also submit SF-424C, Budget Information and SF-424D, Assurances. For research programs that involve human subjects, the Protection of Human Subjects Assurance Identification/IRB Certification/Declaration of Exemption form must be submitted. All forms may be reproduced for

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use in submitting applications. Applicants must sign and return the standard forms with their application. Applicants must furnish, prior to award, an executed copy of the Certification Regarding Lobbying. Applicants must sign and return the certification with their application. The Certification Regarding Lobbying may be found at: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/grants_resources.html. (If any funds have been paid or will be paid to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan, the applicant shall complete and submit Standard Form (SF)-LLL, "Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying," in accordance with its instructions.) Applicants must also understand that they will be held accountable for the smoking prohibition included within Public Law (P.L.) 103-227, Title XII Environmental Tobacco Smoke (also known as the Pro Children Act of 1994). A copy of the Federal Register notice that implements the smoking prohibition is included with this form. By signing and submitting the application, applicants are providing the necessary certification and are not required to return it. Applicants must make the appropriate certification of their compliance with all Federal statutes relating to nondiscrimination. By signing and submitting the application, applicants are providing the necessary certification and are not required to return it. Complete the standard forms and the associated certifications and assurances based on the instructions on the forms. The forms and certifications may be found at: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/grants_resources.html. Private, non-profit organizations are encouraged to submit with their applications the survey titled "Survey on Ensuring Equal Opportunity for Applicants" found under the "Survey" heading at: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/grants_resources.html. Please see Section V.1 for instructions on preparing the full project description. Please reference Section IV.3 for details about acknowledgement of received applications. Electronic Submission

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Applicants to ACF may submit their applications in either electronic or paper format. To submit an application electronically, please use the http://www.Grants.gov site. When using www.Grants.gov, applicants will be able to download a copy of the application package, complete it off-line, and then upload and submit the application via the www.Grants.gov site. ACF will not accept grant applications via facsimile or email. Acceptable electronic formats for the application attachments (narratives, charts, etc.) must use the following standard technologies, i.e., Microsoft (Word and Excel), Word Perfect, Adobe PDF, Jpeg, and Gif. IMPORTANT NOTE: Before submitting an electronic application, applicants must complete the organization registration process as well as obtain and register "electronic signature credentials" for the Authorized Organization Representative (AOR). Since this process may take more than five business days, it is important to start this process early, well in advance of the application deadline. Be sure to complete all www.Grants.gov registration processes listed on the Organization Registration Checklist, which can be found at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/registration_checklist.html. Please note the following if planning to submit an application electronically via www.Grants.gov:
• •

Electronic submission is voluntary, but strongly encouraged. Applicants may access the electronic application for this program at http://www.Grants.gov. There applicants can search for the downloadable application package by utilizing the www.Grants.gov FIND function. It is strongly recommended that applicants do not wait until the application deadline date to begin the application process through www.Grants.gov. Applicants are encouraged to submit their applications well before the closing date and time so that if difficulties are encountered there will still be sufficient time to submit a hard copy via express mail. It is to an applicant's advantage to submit 24 hours ahead of the closing date and time in order to address any difficulties that may be encountered. To use www.Grants.gov, you, the applicant must have a D-U-NS number and register in the Central Contractor Registry (CCR). Applicants should allow a minimum of five days to complete the CCR registration. REMINDER: CCR registration

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• •

expires each year and thus must be updated annually. Applicants cannot upload an application to www.Grants.gov without having a current CCR registration AND electronic signature credentials for the AOR. The electronic application is submitted by the AOR. To submit electronically, the AOR must obtain and register electronic signature credentials approved by the organization's E-Business Point of Contact who maintains the organization's CCR registration. Applicants may submit all documents electronically, including all information typically included on the SF-424 and all necessary assurances and certifications. Though applying electronically, the application must still comply with any page limitation requirements described in this program announcement. After the application is submitted electronically, the applicant will receive an automatic acknowledgement from www.Grants.gov that contains a www.Grants.gov tracking number. ACF will retrieve the electronically submitted application from www.Grants.gov. ACF may request that the applicant provide original signatures on forms at a later date. Applicants will not receive additional point value for submitting a grant application in electronic format, nor will ACF penalize an applicant if they submit an application in hard copy. If any difficulties are encountered in using www.Grants.gov, please contact the Grants.gov Contact Center at: 1-800-5184726, or by email at support@grants.gov to report the problem and obtain assistance. Checklists and registration brochures are maintained to assist applicants in the registration process and may be found at: http://www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp. When submitting electronically via www.Grants.gov, applicants must comply with all due dates AND times referenced in Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times. For applicants that must demonstrate proof of non-profit status before the award date, ACF strongly suggests that proof of nonprofit status be attached to the electronic application. Proof of non-profit status and any other required documentation may be scanned and attached as an "Other Attachment." Acceptable types of proof of non-profit status are stated earlier in this section.

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The Grants.gov website complies with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Grants.gov webpages are designed to work with assistive technologies such as screen readers. If an applicant uses assistive technology and is unable to access any material on the site, email the www.Grants.gov contact center at support@grants.gov for assistance.

Hard Copy Submission Applicants that are submitting their application in paper format should submit one original and two copies of the complete application. The original and each of the two copies must include all required forms, certifications, assurances, and appendices, be signed by an authorized representative, and be unbound. The original copy of the application must have original signature(s). Non-Federal Reviewers Since ACF will be using non-Federal reviewers in the review process, applicants have the option of omitting from the application copies (not the original) specific salary rates or amounts for individuals specified in the application budget as well as Social Security Numbers, if otherwise required for individuals. The copies may include summary salary information. If applicants are submitting their application electronically, ACF will omit the same specific salary rate information from copies made for use during the review and selection process. 3. Submission Dates and Times: Due Date for Applications: 07/03/2007 Explanation of Due Dates The due date for receipt of applications is referenced above. Applications received after 4:30 p.m., eastern time, on the due date will be classified as late and will not be considered in the current competition. Applicants are responsible for ensuring that applications are mailed or hand-delivered or submitted electronically well in advance of the application due date and time. Mail

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Applications that are submitted by mail must be received no later than 4:30 p.m., eastern time, on the due date referenced above at the address listed in Section IV.6. Hand Delivery Applications hand carried by applicants, applicant couriers, other representatives of the applicant, or by overnight/express mail couriers must be received on or before the due date referenced above, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., eastern time, at the address referenced in Section IV.6., between Monday and Friday (excluding Federal holidays). Electronic Submission Applications submitted electronically via Grants.gov must be submitted no later than 4:30 p.m., eastern time, on the due date referenced above. ACF cannot accommodate transmission of applications by facsimile or email. Late Applications Applications that do not meet the requirements above are considered late applications. ACF shall notify each late applicant that its application will not be considered in the current competition. ANY APPLICATION RECEIVED AFTER 4:30 P.M., EASTERN TIME, ON THE DUE DATE WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED FOR COMPETITION. Extension of Deadlines ACF may extend application deadlines when circumstances such as acts of God (floods, hurricanes, etc.) occur; when there are widespread disruptions of mail service; or in other rare cases. A determination to extend or waive deadline requirements rests with the Chief Grants Management Officer. Receipt acknowledgement for application packages will not be provided to applicants who submit their package via mail, courier services, or by hand delivery. Applicants will receive an electronic acknowledgement for applications that are submitted via http://www.Grants.gov. Checklist

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You may use the checklist below as a guide when preparing your application package.
What to Submit SF-424 Required Content See Section IV.2 Required Form or Format See http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/grants_resou rces.html See http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/grants_resou rces.html See http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/grants_resou rces.html See http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/grants_resou rces.html See http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/grants_resou rces.html Found in Sections IV.2 and V When to Submit By application due date. By application due date. By application due date. By date of award.

SF-424A

See Section IV.2

SF-424B

See Section IV.2

Certification Regarding Lobbying

See Section IV.2

SF-LLL if applicable

See Section IV.2

By date of award.

Project Summary/Abstract

See Sections IV.2 and V See Sections IV.2 and V See Sections IV.2 and V See Section IV See Sections IV and V See Section V

By application due date. By application due date. By application due date. With application By application due date. By application due date.

Project Description

Found in Sections IV.2 and V

Budget and Budget Justification

Found in Sections IV.2 and V

Non-Federal Resources Third-Party Agreements

Found in Section IV

Found in Sections IV and V

Indirect Charges

Found in Section V

Additional Forms

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Private, non-profit organizations are encouraged to submit with their applications the survey titled "Survey on Ensuring Equal Opportunity for Applicants" found under the "Survey" heading at: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/grants_resources.html.
What to Submit Required Content Required Form or Format When to Submit

Survey on See form. See By Ensuring http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/grants_resources.html application Equal due date. Opportunity for Applicants

4. Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs: State Single Point of Contact (SPOC) This program is covered under Executive Order (Exec. Order) 12372, "Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs," and 45 CFR Part 100, "Intergovernmental Review of Department of Health and Human Services Programs and Activities." Under the Exec. Order, States may design their own processes for reviewing and commenting on proposed Federal assistance under covered programs. As of August 1, 2006, the following jurisdictions have elected to participate in the Exec. Order process: Arkansas, California, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, New Hampshire, New York, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wisconsin, American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and U.S. Virgin Islands. As these jurisdictions have elected to participate in the Executive Order process, they have established SPOCs. Applicants from participating jurisdictions should contact their SPOC, as soon as possible, to alert them of prospective applications and receive instructions. Applicants must submit all required materials, if any, to the SPOC and indicate the date of this submittal (or the date of contact if no submittal is required) on the Standard Form 424, item 16a. Under 45 CFR 100.8(a)(2), a SPOC has 60 days from the application deadline to comment on proposed new or competing continuation awards. SPOCs are encouraged to eliminate the submission of routine endorsements as official recommendations. Additionally, SPOCs are requested to clearly differentiate between mere advisory comments

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and those official State process recommendations, which may trigger the "accommodate or explain" rule. Comments submitted directly to ACF should be addressed to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Grants Management, Division of Discretionary Grants, 370 L'Enfant Promenade SW., 6th Floor, Washington, DC 20447. Although the remaining jurisdictions have chosen not to participate in this process, entities that meet the eligibility requirements of the Program Announcement are still eligible to apply for a grant even if a State, Territory, or Commonwealth, etc., does not have a SPOC. Therefore, applicants from these jurisdictions, or for projects administered by Federally-recognized Indian Tribes, need take no action in regard to Exec. Order 12372. The official list, including addresses, of the jurisdictions that have elected to participate in Exec. Order 12372 can be found on the following URL: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/grants/spoc.html. 5. Funding Restrictions: Fundraising is not an allowable cost under this program. Grant awards will not allow reimbursement of pre-award costs. Construction and purchase of real property are not allowable activities or expenditures under this grant award. 6. Other Submission Requirements: Please see Sections IV.2 and IV.3 for deadline information and other application requirements. Submit applications to one of the following addresses: Submission by Mail ACYF Operations Center c/o The Dixon Group, Inc. ATTN: Children's Bureau 118 Q St., NE. Washington, DC 20002-2132 Hand Delivery ACYF Operations Center c/o The Dixon Group, Inc. 32

ATTN: Children's Bureau 118 Q St., NE. Washington, DC 20002-2132 Electronic Submission Please see Section IV.2 for guidelines and requirements when submitting applications electronically via http://www.Grants.gov.

V. APPLICATION REVIEW INFORMATION The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (P.L. 104-13) Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 40 hours per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, gathering and maintaining the data needed and reviewing the collection information. ACF currently has a pending request for OMB approval of the information collection requirements included in this program announcement and we anticipate approval of that request. However, given the importance of the work covered by this program announcement and the need to ensure that available FY2007 funds appropriated for such work are awarded before the end of this fiscal year, we have chosen to issue this announcement while our request with OMB is pending. An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. (This information collection is currently under OMB review for extension of the expiration date. According to OMB policy, the approval will not expire while the collection is under its review.). 1. Criteria: Part I THE PROJECT DESCRIPTION OVERVIEW

PURPOSE The project description provides the majority of information by which an application is evaluated and ranked in competition with other applications for available assistance. The project description should be concise and complete. It should address the activity for which Federal funds are being requested. Supporting documents should be included

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where they can present information clearly and succinctly. In preparing the project description, information that is responsive to each of the requested evaluation criteria must be provided. Awarding offices use this and other information in making their funding recommendations. It is important, therefore, that this information be included in the application in a manner that is clear and complete. GENERAL EXPECTATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS ACF is particularly interested in specific project descriptions that focus on outcomes and convey strategies for achieving intended performance. Project descriptions are evaluated on the basis of substance and measurable outcomes, not length. Extensive exhibits are not required. Cross-referencing should be used rather than repetition. Supporting information concerning activities that will not be directly funded by the grant or information that does not directly pertain to an integral part of the grant-funded activity should be placed in an appendix. Pages should be numbered and a table of contents should be included for easy reference. Part II GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING A FULL PROJECT DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION Applicants that are required to submit a full project description shall prepare the project description statement in accordance with the following instructions while being aware of the specified evaluation criteria. The text options give a broad overview of what the project description should include while the evaluation criteria identify the measures that will be used to evaluate applications. PROJECT SUMMARY/ABSTRACT Provide a summary of the project description (one page or less) with reference to the funding request. OBJECTIVES AND NEED FOR ASSISTANCE Clearly identify the physical, economic, social, financial, institutional, and/or other problem(s) requiring a solution. The need for assistance must be demonstrated and the principal and subordinate objectives of the project must be clearly stated; supporting documentation, such as letters of support and testimonials from concerned interests other than the applicant, may be included. Any relevant data based on planning

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studies should be included or referred to in the endnotes/footnotes. Incorporate demographic data and participant/beneficiary information, as needed. In developing the project description, the applicant may volunteer or be requested to provide information on the total range of projects currently being conducted and supported (or to be initiated), some of which may be outside the scope of the program announcement. APPROACH Outline a plan of action that describes the scope and detail of how the proposed work will be accomplished. Account for all functions or activities identified in the application. Cite factors that might accelerate or decelerate the work and state your reason for taking the proposed approach rather than others. Describe any unusual features of the project such as design or technological innovations, reductions in cost or time, or extraordinary social and community involvement. Provide quantitative monthly or quarterly projections of the accomplishments to be achieved for each function or activity in such terms as the number of people to be served and the number of activities accomplished. When accomplishments cannot be quantified by activity or function, list them in chronological order to show the schedule of accomplishments and their target dates. If any data is to be collected, maintained, and/or disseminated, clearance may be required from the OMB. This clearance pertains to any "collection of information that is conducted or sponsored by ACF." Provide a list of organizations, cooperating entities, consultants, or other key individuals who will work on the project along with a short description of the nature of their effort or contribution. EVALUATION Provide a narrative addressing how the conduct of the project and the results of the project will be evaluated. In addressing the evaluation of results, state how you will determine the extent to which the project has achieved its stated objectives and the extent to which the accomplishment of objectives can be attributed to the project. Discuss the criteria to be used to evaluate results, and explain the methodology that will be used to determine if the needs identified and discussed are being met and if the project results and benefits are being achieved. With respect to the conduct of the project, define the procedures to be employed to determine whether the project is being 35

conducted in a manner consistent with the work plan presented and discuss the impact of the project's various activities that address the project's effectiveness. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION The following are requests for additional information that must be included in the application: ORGANIZATIONAL PROFILES Provide information on the applicant organization(s) and cooperating partners, such as: organizational charts; financial statements; audit reports or statements from Certified Public Accountants/Licensed Public Accountants; Employer Identification Number(s); contact persons and telephone numbers; names of bond carriers; child care licenses and other documentation of professional accreditation; information on compliance with Federal/State/local government standards; documentation of experience in the program area; and, other pertinent information. If the applicant is a non-profit organization, it should submit proof of its non-profit status in its application. The non-profit agency can accomplish this by providing any one of the following: a) a reference to the applicant organization's listing in the IRS's most recent list of tax-exempt organizations described in the IRS Code; b) a copy of a currently valid IRS tax exemption certificate; c) a statement from a State taxing body, State attorney general, or other appropriate State official certifying that the applicant organization has a non-profit status and that none of the net earnings accrues to any private shareholders or individuals; d) a certified copy of the organization's certificate of incorporation or similar document that clearly establishes nonprofit status; or e) any of the items immediately above for a State or national parent organization and a statement signed by the parent organization that the applicant organization is a local non-profit affiliate. THIRD-PARTY AGREEMENTS Provide written and signed agreements between grantees and subgrantees, or subcontractors, or other cooperating entities. These agreements must detail the scope of work to be performed, work schedules, remuneration, and other terms and conditions that structure or define the relationship. BUDGET AND BUDGET JUSTIFICATION

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Provide a budget with line-item detail and detailed calculations for each budget object class identified on the Budget Information Form (SF-424A or SF-424C). Detailed calculations must include estimation methods, quantities, unit costs, and other similar quantitative detail sufficient for the calculation to be duplicated. If matching is a requirement, include a breakout by the funding sources identified in Block 15 of the SF-424. Provide a narrative budget justification that describes how the categorical costs are derived. Discuss the necessity, reasonableness, and allocation of the proposed costs. GENERAL Use the following guidelines for preparing the budget and budget justification. Both Federal and non-Federal resources (when required) shall be detailed and justified in the budget and budget narrative justification. "Federal resources" refers only to the ACF grant funds for which you are applying. "Non-Federal resources" are all other non-ACF Federal and non-Federal resources. It is suggested that budget amounts and computations be presented in a columnar format: first column, object class categories; second column, Federal budget; next column(s), non-Federal budget(s); and last column, total budget. The budget justification should be in a narrative form. PERSONNEL Description: Costs of employee salaries and wages. Justification: Identify the project director or principal investigator, if known at the time of application. For each staff person, provide: the title; time commitment to the project in months; time commitment to the project as a percentage or fulltime equivalent; annual salary; grant salary; wage rates; etc. Do not include the costs of consultants, personnel costs of delegate agencies, or of specific project(s) and/or businesses to be financed by the applicant. FRINGE BENEFITS Description: Costs of employee fringe benefits unless treated as part of an approved indirect cost rate. Justification: Provide a breakdown of the amounts and percentages that comprise fringe benefit costs such as health insurance, FICA, retirement insurance, taxes, etc. TRAVEL

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Description: Costs of project-related travel by employees of the applicant organization. (This item does not include costs of consultant travel). Justification: For each trip show: the total number of traveler(s); travel destination; duration of trip; per diem; mileage allowances, if privately owned vehicles will be used; and other transportation costs and subsistence allowances. Travel costs for key staff to attend ACF-sponsored workshops should be detailed in the budget. EQUIPMENT Description: "Equipment" means an article of nonexpendable, tangible personal property having a useful life of more than one year and an acquisition cost that equals or exceeds the lesser of: (a) the capitalization level established by the organization for the financial statement purposes, or (b) $5,000. (Note: Acquisition cost means the net invoice unit price of an item of equipment, including the cost of any modifications, attachments, accessories, or auxiliary apparatus necessary to make it usable for the purpose for which it is acquired. Ancillary charges, such as taxes, duty, protective in-transit insurance, freight, and installation, shall be included in or excluded from acquisition cost in accordance with the organization's regular written accounting practices.) Justification: For each type of equipment requested provide: a description of the equipment; the cost per unit; the number of units; the total cost; and a plan for use on the project; as well as use and/or disposal of the equipment after the project ends. An applicant organization that uses its own definition for equipment should provide a copy of its policy, or section of its policy, that includes the equipment definition. SUPPLIES Description: Costs of all tangible personal property other than that included under the Equipment category. Justification: Specify general categories of supplies and their costs. Show computations and provide other information that supports the amount requested. CONTRACTUAL Description: Costs of all contracts for services and goods except for those that belong under other categories such as equipment, supplies, construction, etc. Include third-party evaluation

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contracts, if applicable, and contracts with secondary recipient organizations, including delegate agencies and specific project(s) and/or businesses to be financed by the applicant. Justification: Demonstrate that all procurement transactions will be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. Recipients and subrecipients, other than States that are required to use 45 CFR Part 92 procedures, must justify any anticipated procurement action that is expected to be awarded without competition and exceeds the simplified acquisition threshold fixed at 41 USC 403(11), currently set at $100,000. Recipients might be required to make available to ACF pre-award review and procurement documents, such as requests for proposals or invitations for bids, independent cost estimates, etc. Note: Whenever the applicant intends to delegate part of the project to another agency, the applicant must provide a detailed budget and budget narrative for each delegate agency, by agency title, along with the required supporting information referred to in these instructions. OTHER Enter the total of all other costs. Such costs, where applicable and appropriate, may include but are not limited to: insurance; food; medical and dental costs (noncontractual); professional services costs; space and equipment rentals; printing and publication; computer use; training costs, such as tuition and stipends; staff development costs; and administrative costs. Justification: Provide computations, a narrative description and a justification for each cost under this category. INDIRECT CHARGES Description: Total amount of indirect costs. This category should be used only when the applicant currently has an indirect cost rate approved by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) or another cognizant Federal agency. Justification: An applicant that will charge indirect costs to the grant must enclose a copy of the current rate agreement. If the applicant organization is in the process of initially developing or renegotiating a rate, upon notification that an award will be made, it should immediately develop a tentative indirect cost

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rate proposal based on its most recently completed fiscal year, in accordance with the cognizant agency's guidelines for establishing indirect cost rates, and submit it to the cognizant agency. Applicants awaiting approval of their indirect cost proposals may also request indirect costs. When an indirect cost rate is requested, those costs included in the indirect cost pool should not be charged as direct costs to the grant. Also, if the applicant is requesting a rate that is less than what is allowed under the program, the authorized representative of the applicant organization must submit a signed acknowledgement that the applicant is accepting a lower rate than allowed. PROGRAM INCOME Description: The estimated amount of income, if any, expected to be generated from this project. Justification: Describe the nature, source and anticipated use of program income in the budget or refer to the pages in the application that contain this information. NON-FEDERAL RESOURCES Description: Amounts of non-Federal resources that will be used to support the project as identified in Block 15 of the SF-424. Justification: The firm commitment of these resources must be documented and submitted with the application so that the applicant is given credit in the review process. A detailed budget must be prepared for each funding source. TOTAL DIRECT CHARGES, TOTAL INDIRECT CHARGES, TOTAL PROJECT COSTS EVALUATION CRITERIA: In considering how applicants will carry out the responsibilities addressed under this announcement, competing applications for financial assistance will be reviewed and evaluated against the following criteria: OBJECTIVES AND NEED FOR ASSISTANCE - 20 points In reviewing the objectives and need for assistance, reviewers will consider the extent to which: 1. The applicant demonstrates an understanding of the goals and objectives of the relevant legislation, Child and Family Services Improvement Act (P.L. 109-288), Section 437(f), subpart 2,

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title IV-B, of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 629(f)(b) and how the proposed project will contribute to achieving those legislative goals and objectives, and the goals stated in the purpose and background sections of this funding opportunity announcement. 2. The applicant provides data to describe the nature of the problem being targeted and extent of the need for proposed services and activities in the target population. The applicant provides recent evidence demonstrating that methamphetamine or other substance abuse has had a substantial impact on the number of out-of-home placements for children, or the number of children who are at risk of being placed in an out-of-home placement, in the partnership region. The statement of need includes a clearly established baseline for the project. Documentation for this gap analysis may come from a variety of qualitative and quantitative sources. Quantitative data may come from local data or trend analyses, State data (e.g., from State needs assessments), and/or national data (e.g., from ACF's Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFCARS), National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS), and Child and Family Services Review (CFSR) data and SAMHSA's National Household Survey on Drug Abuse and Health or related sources). For data sources that are not well known, the applicant provides sufficient information on how the data were collected so reviewers can assess the reliability and validity of the data. The applicant clearly describes the scope of the problem with methamphetamine and substance abusing parents in their defined targeted community, its impact on the child welfare system, and their proposal to address that problem in their defined targeted community. 3. The applicant describes existing activities that coordinate services for and facilitate a community's response to families with a substance abuse problem and involved in or at risk for involvement in the child welfare system. The applicant describes any existing inter-agency bodies, communication mechanisms, co-location of staff, or other changes in agency or cross-agency practices and procedures that have been established to address this need. 4. The applicant describes existing services to family members that support the goals and objectives of this announcement, such as number and type of current substance abuse and mental health treatment services; family and children's treatment, intervention, and prevention services; drug court services, drug endangered children's programs, staff training, parent and foster parent training; and any other service in place to address the needs of families with both a

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substance abuse problem and involvement in the child welfare system. The applicant describes the availability of family treatment services in the geographic area of the regional partnership, as well as the number and type of current treatment services, slots, or beds available and the number of people currently being served in the target area. The applicant states the average wait time for treatment, if any. 5. The applicant demonstrates a thorough understanding of the characteristics and provides a description of the target population, as well as the geographic area to be served, and justifies the selection of both, including the numbers to be served, their demographic information, and the socioeconomic and cultural factors to be considered in delivering programs to this population. 6. The applicant clearly states the purpose, goals and objectives of the proposed project; and describes how achievement of the goals will produce meaningful and relevant results such as increased access, availability, and outreach to promote services or activities that enhance child and family well-being. The project will: (a) enhance the well-being of children receiving services or taking part in activities conducted with funds provided under the grant; (b) lead to safety and permanence for such children; and (c) decrease the number of out-ofhome placements for children, or the number of children who are at risk of being placed in an out-of home placement, in the partnership region. 7. Data provided should include the nature and prevalence of substance use, numbers of children in the child welfare system, status of collaboration between the child welfare and substance abuse treatment agencies for the target population in the geographic area selected, and demonstrate that substance use by parents has had a substantial impact on numbers of children in out-of-home placement or at risk for out- of-home placement. 8. The applicant demonstrates that the geographic area of the regional partnership currently has limited capacity for comprehensive family treatment services or limited capacity to link families to relevant treatment services. BONUS POINTS - 5 points When considering awarding Bonus Points under this section, reviewers will consider the extent to which: 1. The applicant has identified and described the impact of methamphetamine abuse and addiction (alone or in combination with

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other drug abuse and addiction) on child welfare in the geographic area and population targeted by the regional partnership. 2. The applicant has proposed grant-funded services and activities that appropriately address methamphetamine abuse and addiction (alone or in combination with other drug abuse and addiction) in the geographic area and population targeted by the regional partnership. APPROACH - 35 points In reviewing the approach, reviewers will consider the extent to which: 1. The applicant demonstrates how the proposed approach will enable the project to meet the goals and objectives stated. The applicant demonstrates strong links between proposed grant-funded activities or services and intended short- and long-term outcomes described in the conceptual framework provided at the end of this announcement. 2. The applicant provides a reasonable timeline for implementing the proposed project. The timeline (chart or graph) shows key activities, milestones, target dates and responsible staff. Timelines include phase-in activities that will be implemented no later than three months (90 days) after award. Phase-in activities may include milestones such as hiring and training staff, cross-training the network of service providers, and admissions of first clients. The applicant describes the factors that could speed or hinder project implementation and explains how these factors would be managed. 3. The applicant provides a detailed description of the selected services to be provided to the target population that are allowable under this funding announcement. The applicant provides a detailed description of the joint activities to be funded in whole or in part with the funds provided under the grant, including the sequencing of the activities proposed to be conducted under the funding period for the grant. The program will bridge gaps or substantially improve the current service delivery system and benefit the target population. The applicant provides a detailed description of the strategies for integrating programs and services determined to be appropriate for the child and where appropriate, the child's family.

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4. The applicant's approaches for recruiting and retaining participants for proposed grant-funded activities or services reflect a good understanding of the target population and are appropriate given the allowable activities to be included in the project. These approaches identify potential barriers that would prevent individuals, families, or communities from taking advantage of the services offered and include strategies for overcoming those barriers. 5. The applicant describes how the proposed service or practice will be implemented, including plans for providing services at residential treatment sites and those that will be provided in the community. 6. The applicant describes the development of a comprehensive and individualized array of activities or services tailored to the needs of targeted individuals, families, or communities. The applicant demonstrates the extent to which individualized family case plans include individual, group, and family counseling, follow-up relapse prevention, and supplemental treatment services for all family members, as necessary, if offering treatment services. The applicant demonstrates the extent to which the project plans include a description of how these activities have been adapted to meet the unique training or collaboration needs of targeted individuals, families, or communities, if implementing activities such as training or establishing collaborative service linkages. 7. The project will be culturally-responsive to the target population. Proposed grant-funded services and activities accommodate the linguistic and cultural experience of targeted individuals, families, and communities. The applicant describes how proposed activities and services demonstrate sensitivity to other issues of diversity including gender, age, ethnicity, and special needs of the population served (e.g., cognitive disabilities, illiteracy) 8. There is a clear and reasonable plan for how to refer individuals to appropriate services when the nature of their service needs (e.g., job training, housing, transportation) is beyond the scope of this grant. 9. The proposed services will involve the collaboration of appropriate partners for maximizing the effectiveness of service delivery. The applicant describes the process to be used to achieve service coordination and integration among the network of providers. The applicant provides a detailed description of the strategies for collaborating with: (a) the State child welfare agency that is responsible for the administration of the State plan under Title IV-B or Title IV-E of the Social Security Act (unless that agency is the lead

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applicant for the regional partnership); (b) the State agency responsible for administering the substance abuse prevention and treatment block grant provided under subpart II of part B of title XIX of the Public Health Service Act as appropriate; and (c) the State law enforcement and judicial agencies as appropriate. If the lead applicant is an Indian Tribe or Tribal consortia, they do not need to include the State Child Welfare agency. There are letters of commitment or memoranda of understanding from regional partners and other organizations, agencies, and consultants that will be partners or collaborators in the proposed project. These documents describe the role of the agency, organization, or consultant and detail specific tasks to be performed. 10. The design of the proposed project is evidence-based, reflects upto-date knowledge from the research and literature on known effective practices, and builds on current theory, research, evaluation data and best practices. The applicant describes the evidence base for the proposed services or practices. The applicant justifies any adaptations or modifications to an evidence-based practice if such changes are necessary to meet the needs of the target population. The project will contribute to increased knowledge or understanding of the problems and issues addressed by this funding announcement. 11. The applicant describes a sound plan for continuing this project beyond the period of Federal funding. The plan for sustainability includes a discussion of plans to leverage other available funds to continue services and activities. The applicant describes how program continuity will be maintained when there is a change in the operational environment (e.g., staff turnover, change in project leadership) to ensure stability over time. EVALUATION - 15 points In reviewing the evaluation, reviewers will consider the extent to which: 1. The applicant has selected a set of performance indicators from those provided in the List of Proposed Performance Indicators section of this funding announcement, provides justification for the indicators selected, and relates them to the goals identified in the conceptual framework provided at the end of this announcement.

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The applicant demonstrates the capacity to collect and report on the selected performance indicators and specifies and justifies any additional measures planned for use with this project. 2. The applicant proposes a clear and convincing plan for evaluating the project and satisfies the requirements for the evaluation published in this funding announcement. The plan includes data collection, management, analysis, interpretation and reporting. 3. The methods of evaluation are feasible, comprehensive, and appropriate to the goals, objectives, and context of the project and show how the evaluation will be integrated with requirements for collection and reporting of performance indicator data required by this funding announcement. The evaluation plan is strongly guided by the applicant's logic model and by the conceptual framework provided at the end of this funding announcement. The methods of evaluation include process and outcome analyses for assessing the effectiveness of program strategies and the implementation process. The proposed evaluation will assess the regional impact of grantfunded services and activities on child and family well-being. The applicant describes the methods to be used to determine the extent to which the project has achieved its stated objectives and the extent to which the accomplishment of objectives can be attributed to the project; discusses the criteria used to evaluate results and how the performance indicators selected will be incorporated into the evaluation; and defines the monitoring procedures used to determine whether the project is being carried out in a manner consistent with the work plan presented. 4. The applicant proposes a sound plan for collecting high-quality data on the services or activities provided, including the total costs, cost effectiveness, and outcomes of these services or activities. This plan should include data collection, management, analysis, interpretation and reporting. The applicant's evaluation plan includes an appropriate comparison group for determining the influence of the project activities on outcomes. If a comparison group is not proposed, the applicant provides a reasonable explanation for not using a comparison group and offers another, equally rigorous approach to evaluating the influence of the strategy/intervention on outcomes. 46

The comparison group and the program/treatment group are assigned at random or matched on key characteristics. If not assigned at random or matched on key characteristics, the applicant provides a reasonable explanation of how it will identify and address pre-existing differences between the comparison group and treatment group. 5. There is a sound plan for securing informed consent and implementing an IRB review, if applicable. 6. The applicant either demonstrates that they have the in-house capacity to conduct an objective, comprehensive evaluation of the project (including collecting and analyzing the performance indicator data), or presents a sound plan for contracting with a third-party evaluator specializing in social science or evaluation, or a university or college, to conduct the evaluation. 7. The proposed evaluator has sufficient experience with research and/or evaluation, understands the population of interest, and demonstrates the necessary independence from the project to assure objectivity. 8. The applicant provides an appropriate, feasible, and realistic plan for using evaluation findings to produce ongoing documentation of project activities and results. The evaluation plan includes performance feedback and periodic assessment of program progress that can be used to modify the program, as necessary, and serve as a basis for program adjustments. 9. The applicant thoroughly addresses the following points related to performance indicators: In order to meet the statutory requirement for developing performance indicators while also allowing adequate time for applicants to develop their proposals, ACF in coordination with SAMHSA has developed a conceptual framework (included at the end of this announcement) and a preliminary set of performance indicators for review. Both the indicators and the conceptual framework were based on a thorough review of preexisting child welfare and substance abuse treatment performance measures, previous child welfare and substance treatment demonstration projects, and other discussions between the fields of substance abuse treatment and child welfare pertaining to the collection and analysis of relevant data. Applicants are to: (1) Review both the list of indicators provided and the conceptual framework included at the end of this announcement;

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(2) Select indicators relevant to their proposed grant-funded activities or services from the four categories of outcomes (child/youth, adult, family/relationship, and regional partnership/service capacity); (3) Demonstrate the appropriateness of each selected indicator in measuring performance of proposed grant-funded activities or services, including commenting on the regional partnership's capacity to track such indicators (i.e., describing data sources or data collection methods such as administrative data, surveys); and, if applicable, (4) Suggest revisions to the proposed indicators or propose additional indicators that may be appropriate to measure other selected grantfunded activities or services. In order to describe their capacity to monitor selected performance indicators, applicants may chose to provide information on current data collection systems and instrumentation, as well as qualitative data or narrative information related to performance measurement and program evaluation. The selection and description of appropriate indicators will serve as the initial consultation between ACF and potential grantees on the development of the required performance indicators. Regional partnerships that are awarded grants provided under this announcement will work with the Children's Bureau to refine and finalize the development of performance indicators used to evaluate grant-funded services and activities. Finally, all grant recipients will be required to incorporate information related to selected performance indicators into their first annual report, and subsequent progress reports (see Reporting Requirements under Section VI, Award Administration Information). Timely submission of all semiannual and annual reports is required. List of Proposed Performance Indicators Select and comment on those performance indicators from the following list that would best measure the achievement of child, adult, family, and regional partnership/service capacity outcomes of proposed grant-funded services or activities. Applicants will be evaluated, in part, on their selection of appropriate indicators, their ability to demonstrate the indicators' relevance to their program and their demonstration of their program's capacity to report on the selected indicators. Child/Youth Outcomes 1. Children identified as at risk of removal from the home due to a parent or caretaker's substance abuse problem that are able to remain

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in the custody of a parent or caretaker during substance abuse treatment: Of all such in-home children associated with a "substantiated" or "indicated" finding of maltreatment that placed a child at risk of removal, what percentage remained with a parent or caretaker through treatment completion? 2. Recurrence of child maltreatment in families with an identified substance-abusing parent or caretaker: Of all such children associated with a "substantiated" or "indicated" finding of maltreatment, what percentage had another "substantiated" or "indicated" finding of maltreatment within six months? 3. Average length of stay in foster care of children removed from the home due to the substance abuse problems of a parent or caretaker: Of all such children discharged from foster care, what was the average length of stay (in days) from the date of the most recent entry into foster care until the date of discharge? 4. Re-entries to foster care of children removed from the home due to the substance abuse problems of a parent or caretaker: Of all such children discharged from foster care to reunification, what percentage re-entered foster care in less than 12 months? 5. Timeliness of reunification of children removed from the home due to the substance abuse problems of a parent or caretaker: Of all such children discharged from foster care to reunification, what percentage was reunified in less than 12 months from the date of the most recent entry into foster care? 6. Timeliness of adoption or guardianship of children removed from the home due to the substance abuse problems of a parent or caretaker: Of all such children discharged from foster care to a finalized adoption or legal guardianship, what percentage was discharged in less than 24 months from the date of the most recent entry into foster care? 7. Prevention of subsequent births of substance-exposed newborns: What proportion of mothers identified as having a substance abuse problem had a subsequent birth of a substance-exposed newborn during the grant period? 8. Children connected to supportive or treatment services: Of those children identified as at risk of removal from the home due to a parent's or caretaker's substance abuse problem, how many were assessed for their individual needs? Of those assessed, what percentage was connected to appropriate services to address the

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needs highlighted in the assessment? Of such children, what percentage received referrals and intakes for developmental services, mental health or counseling, early intervention and prevention services, or crisis intervention services as a result of a child welfare investigation? Adult Outcomes 1. Access, timeliness, and appropriateness of substance abuse treatment for parents of families involved with the child welfare system: Of all such parents or caretakers with a substance abuse problem identified during a child welfare investigation, what percentage received an alcohol and drug screening at first intake? Of all such parents or caretakers, what was the average time between identification of a possible substance use disorder and a follow-up assessment? Of all such parents or caretakers, what was the average time between identification of a substance use disorder and first receipt of substance abuse services? Of such parents referred to substance abuse treatment, what percentage participated in comprehensive family substance abuse treatment? 2. Parents retained in substance abuse treatment: Of all families referred to substance abuse treatment as a result of a child welfare investigation, what percentage and how many remained in the treatment program until completion? What was the average length of stay in treatment for these referred families? 3. Length of abstinence: Of all such parents or caretakers in substance abuse treatment, what percentage and how many maintain abstinence for three, six, or nine months after entering treatment? Of all such parents or caretakers in substance abuse treatment, what percentage and how many maintain abstinence for three, six, or nine months after completing treatment? Of all such families from which children have been removed, what percentage maintains abstinence for three, six, or nine months following reunification of children after completion of the treatment program? (Note: Applicants are invited to comment on the feasibility of tracking parental abstinence or sobriety for the various proposed lengths of time and the events to which the tracking of this outcome is tied, e.g., treatment completion, reunification of children) 4. Parents connected to supportive services in response to assessed needs: Of all parents referred to substance abuse treatment as a result of a child welfare investigation, what percent received services for their assessed needs before completion of treatment?

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5. Parents participating in continuing care and recovery support services: Of those parents for whom a child welfare investigation identified a substance abuse problem that subsequently completed a substance abuse treatment program, what percentage and how many received aftercare services to support abstinence? Of such parents or caretakers receiving aftercare services, what percentage received continuing care such as relapse prevention, recovery coaching, selfhelp support groups, spiritual support, and/or housing assistance? Of such parents or caretakers, what percentage was visited by a child welfare caseworker or other professional offering supportive services at least once a month? Family/Relationship Outcomes 1. Parental capacity to provide for children's needs: Of those parents or caretakers with a substance abuse problem identified by a child welfare investigation, how many were connected to services that enhanced the parent's or caretaker's ability to provide for their family's well-being? Of such parents or caretakers, what percentage is employed full time? Of such parents or caretakers, what percentage is enrolled in educational or vocational training? What percentage of such families was screened for the existence of domestic violence? What percentage of such families received a domestic violence assessment and treatment referral? 2. Decrease in risk factors associated with reasons for service and increase in protective factors to prevent child maltreatment: Of those families with both an identified substance abuse problem and a child welfare investigation, what percentage demonstrated a reduction in risk factors or an increase in child maltreatment protective factors? Risk factors may include:
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Criminal behaviors such as manufacturing or selling of drugs; or Mental health issues such as parental depression, child behaviors problems.

Protective factors may include:
• • • •

Bonding and attachment; Parental resilience; Social connections; or Concrete support in times of need or crisis.

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3. Appropriateness of substance abuse treatment for families involved with the child welfare system: Of the target population, what percentage of families involved with substance abuse treatment and the child welfare system was connected with services related to the needs identified in the case plan? Of such parents or caretakers, what percentage was actively involved in case planning? 4. Families receiving appropriate, coordinated case management services: Of those families with both an identified substance abuse problem and a child welfare investigation, what percentage of children and families report active involvement in various aspects of the case planning process, including identifying strengths, needs, and needed services, and establishing and evaluating progress toward goals? Of such families, what percentage received joint case management services coordinated between a substance abuse treatment provider and a child welfare agency (i.e., a single case plan coordinated across systems)? What percentage of such cases received a cross-agency assessment conference every 90 days or less? 5. Foster care parents and other substitute caretakers receiving substance abuse training: Among homes where children have been placed in foster care due to a parent's or caretaker's substance abuse, what percentage of such children's foster parents or substitute caretakers received education and training about addiction, substance abuse treatment, special needs of children who have suffered from maltreatment and whose parents have a substance use disorder, and about family recovery issues? Regional Partnership/Service Capacity Outcomes 1. Regions have a new or increased ability to address parental/caretaker substance abuse and its affect on children: What percentage of employees and caseworkers across agencies report an increased understanding of services and policies of their partners? What percentage of workers report an increased knowledge of the cross-agency referral process, and what percentage report making appropriate referrals due to this increased knowledge? Among member agencies in the regional partnership, has the number of cross-agency or cross-partner trainings increased? What percentage of caseworkers reported an increase in coordinated case management and planning across agencies? 2. Regions have a new or increased ability to serve families with both an identified substance abuse problem and a child welfare investigation: Of the agencies participating in the regional partnership, what percentage has increased the number of appropriate 52

treatment programs for the targeted region? Among such agencies, what was the increase in the number or percentage of families served or the number or percentage of treatment slots available in the targeted region? 3. Collaboration between regional partners: As a result of the agencies participating in grant-funded activities or services, how many have developed or enhanced memoranda of understanding regarding treatment coordination? What percentage of funding for these programs can be described as blended? What other collaborative activities (e.g., co-location of workers, data-sharing systems) demonstrate enhanced collaborative efforts of substance abuse treatment providers and child welfare agencies? ORGANIZATIONAL PROFILES - 20 points In reviewing the organizational profiles, reviewers will consider the extent to which: 1. The applicant is the lead agency in a regional partnership composed of at least two of the organizations/entities listed in the Eligibility Information section of this funding announcement. The regional partnership includes either the State child welfare agency that is responsible for the administration of the State plan under title IV-B or title IV-E of the Social Security Act OR an Indian Tribe or Tribal consortium. The regional partnership includes at least one non-State entity if the lead applicant is one of the three State agencies described in the Eligibility Information section of this announcement. The regional partnership includes at least one non-Tribal entity if the lead applicant is a Tribal entity as described in the Eligibility Information section of this funding announcement. The members of the regional partnership and any other partnering organizations collectively have sufficient relevant experience and expertise with development or replication, implementation, management, and evaluation of similar projects and capability and experience working with the target population and meeting the needs identified through the gap analysis. The applicant, its regional partners, and other partner organizations demonstrate capability and experience with similar projects and populations, have linkages to the target population, and ties to

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grassroots/community-based organizations that are rooted in the culture of the target population. The applicant includes letters of commitment and/or memoranda of understanding from regional partners and other partnering organizations that state the agreed upon roles, responsibilities, and time commitments. Agreements demonstrate that the financial relationships of the partners will ensure proper stewardship of Federal funds. 2. Each participating organization possesses the organizational capability to fulfill its assigned roles and functions effectively. Each direct service provider organization has at least two years experience (as of the due date of the application) providing services in the geographic area(s) covered by the application and to the same or similar target populations. The applicant has provided a list of staff who will participate in the project, showing the role of each and their responsibilities, time commitment, and qualifications demonstrating appropriateness to the successful implementation of the proposed program. The applicant has described the cultural characteristics of key staff and indicated if any are members of the target population or community. The applicant provides a staffing pattern that includes bilingual and bicultural individuals to align with the cultural and linguistic characteristics of the target population. The applicant's proposed project director and key project staff demonstrate sufficient relevant knowledge, experience and capabilities (as demonstrated in a resume, curriculum vitae or related document) to institute and manage a project of this size, scope, and complexity effectively. The applicant includes a biographical sketch for the project director and other key positions. The applicant includes a position description and/or a letter of commitment with a current biographical sketch of these individuals if they have not yet been hired. 3. There is a sound management plan for achieving the objectives of the proposed project on time and within budget, including clearly defined responsibilities, timelines, and milestones for accomplishing project tasks and ensuring quality. The plan clearly defines the role and responsibilities of the lead agency and its regional partners.

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The plan clearly describes the effective management and coordination of activities carried out by the Regional partners and any other partners, subcontractors, and consultants if applicable. 4. There is a mutually beneficial relationship between the proposed project and other work planned, anticipated, or underway with Federal assistance by the applicant. 5. The applicant has demonstrated the availability of resources for the proposed project (e.g., facilities, equipment), and provided evidence that services will be provided in a location that is adequate, accessible, compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and amenable to the target population. BUDGET AND BUDGET JUSTIFICATION - 10 points In reviewing the budget and budget justification, reviewers will consider the extent to which: 1. The budget presentation is clear and detailed. The budget narrative clearly explains and justifies the budget information presented on SF-424 and SF-424A. The applicant has provided complete project budgets for each year of grant funding requested (either three-year or five-year grant period). The costs of the proposed project are reasonable, thoroughly justified, and appropriate in view of the activities to be conducted and expected results and benefits. The applicant's budgets demonstrate a clear understanding of the decreasing Federal funding levels over the life of the project and the increasing match levels required. The applicant provides clear and detailed information on the sources from which the project match will be provided for each year of the project. The budget narrative clearly explains how and what sources will be used to meet the match requirement. The budget describes the procedures for documenting program income to ensure that it is added to the Federal funds committed to the project and used to further the objectives of the project. The applicant has allocated an adequate portion of the total grant award to satisfactorily collect and evaluate the data necessary for monitoring selected performance indicators and to conduct a local evaluation of proposed grant-funded activities and services.

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2. The applicant's fiscal controls and accounting procedures would ensure prudent use, proper and timely disbursement, and accurate accounting of funds received under this program announcement. 2. Review and Selection Process: No grant award will be made under this announcement on the basis of an incomplete application. Each application will be screened to determine whether it was received by the closing date and time (Section IV.3.) and whether the requested amount exceeds the ceiling or upper range value, whichever is appropriate (Section II.) Each application will be screened to determine whether it was received by the closing date and time (Section IV.3) and whether the requested amount exceeds the ceiling or upper range value, whichever is appropriate (Section II) A panel of at least three reviewers (primarily experts from outside the Federal Government) will use the evaluation criteria described in this announcement to evaluate each application. The reviewers will determine the strengths and weaknesses of each application, provide comments about the strengths and weaknesses, and give each application a numerical score. The results of the competitive review are a primary factor in making funding decisions. In addition, Federal staff conducts administrative reviews of the applications and, in light of the results of the competitive review, will recommend applications for funding to the ACYF Commissioner. ACYF reserves the option of discussing applications with other funding sources when this is in the best interest of the Federal Government. ACYF may also solicit and consider comments from ACF Regional Office staff in making funding decisions. ACYF may take into consideration the involvement (financial and/or programmatic) of the private sector, national, or State or community foundations; a favorable balance between Federal and non-Federal funds for the proposed project; or the potential for high benefit from low Federal investment. ACYF may elect not to fund any applicants having known management, fiscal, reporting, programmatic, or other problems that make it unlikely that they would be able to provide effective services or effectively complete the proposed activity. With the results of the peer review and the information from Federal staff, the Commissioner of ACYF makes the final funding decisions. The Commissioner may give special consideration to applications proposing

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services of special interest to the Federal Government and to achieve geographic distributions of grant awards. Applications of special interest may include, but are not limited to, applications focusing on underserved or inadequately served clients, service areas and programs addressing diverse ethnic populations, or activities and services that address the problem of methamphetamine use in the child welfare system. Since ACF will be using non-Federal reviewers in the process, applicants have the option of omitting from the application copies (not the original), specific salary rates or amounts for individuals specified in the application budget and Social Security Numbers if otherwise required for individuals. The copies may include summary salary information. Available Funds. Applicants should note that grants to be awarded under this program announcement are subject to the availability of funds. Please reference Section IV.2 for information on non-Federal reviewers in the review process. Approved but Unfunded Applications Applications that are approved but unfunded may be held over for funding in the next funding cycle, pending the availability of funds, for a period not to exceed one year. 3. Anticipated Announcement and Award Dates: Applications will be reviewed no later than Summer 2007. Grant awards will have a start date no later than October 1, 2007.

VI. AWARD ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION 1. Award Notices: The successful applicants will be notified through the issuance of a Financial Assistance Award document, which sets forth the amount of funds granted, the terms and conditions of the grant, the effective date of the grant, the budget period for which initial support will be given, the non-Federal share to be provided (if applicable), and the total project period for which support is contemplated. The Financial Assistance Award will be signed by the Grants Officer and transmitted via postal mail. 57

Following the finalization of funding decisions, organizations whose applications will not be funded will be notified by letter, signed by the Program Office head. 2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements: Grantees are subject to the requirements in 45 CFR Part 74 (nongovernmental) or 45 CFR Part 92 (governmental). Direct Federal grants, sub-award funds, or contracts under this ACF program shall not be used to support inherently religious activities such as religious instruction, worship, or proselytization. Therefore, organizations must take steps to separate, in time or location, their inherently religious activities from the services funded under this program. Regulations pertaining to the Equal Treatment for FaithBased Organizations, which includes the prohibition against Federal funding of inherently religious activities, can be found at the HHS web site at: http://www.hhs.gov/fbci/waisgate21.pdf. A faith-based organization receiving HHS funds retains its independence from Federal, State, and local governments, and may continue to carry out its mission, including the definition, practice, and expression of its religious beliefs. For example, a faith-based organization may use space in its facilities to provide secular programs or services funded with Federal funds without removing religious art, icons, scriptures, or other religious symbols. In addition, a faith-based organization that receives Federal funds retains its authority over its internal governance, and it may retain religious terms in its organization's name, select its board members on a religious basis, and include religious references in its organization's mission statements and other governing documents in accordance with all program requirements, statutes, and other applicable requirements governing the conduct of HHS funded activities. Faith-based and community organizations may reference the "Guidance to Faith-Based and Community Organizations on Partnering with the Federal Government" at: http://www.whitehouse.gov/government/fbci/guidance/index.html. HHS Grants Policy Statement The HHS Grants Policy Statement (GPS) is the Department of Health and Human Services new single policy guide for discretionary grants and cooperative agreements. Unlike previous HHS policy documents, the GPS is intended to be shared with and used by grantees. It became effective October 1, 2006 and is applicable to all Operating

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Divisions (OPDIVS), such as the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), except the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The GPS covers basic grants processes, standard terms and conditions and points of contact as well as important OPDIV-specific requirements. Appendices include a glossary of terms and a list of standard abbreviations for ease of reference. The GPS may be accessed at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/grants_resources.html. 3. Reporting Requirements: Grantees will be required to submit program progress and financial reports (SF-269 found at: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/grants_resources.html) throughout the project period. Program progress and financial reports are due 30 days after the reporting period. Final programmatic and financial reports are due 90 days after the close of the project period. Final reports may be submitted in hard copy to the Grants Management Office Contact listed in Section VII of this announcement. Program Progress Reports: Semi-Annually Financial Reports: Semi-Annually

VII. AGENCY CONTACTS Program Office Contact: Catherine Nolan Children's Bureau Portals Office Building, 8th Floor 1250 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20024 Phone: (202) 260-5140 Email: catherine.nolan@acf.hhs.gov Grants Management Office Contact: Daphne Weeden, Grants Management Officer ACYF Operations Center c/o The Dixon Group, Inc. ATTN: Children's Bureau 118 Q St., NE Washington, DC 20002-2132 Phone: 866-796-1591 Email: cb@dixongroup.com 59

VIII. OTHER INFORMATION Additional information about this program and its purpose can be located at: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/. For general information regarding this announcement please contact: ACYF Operations Center c/o The Dixon Group, Inc. ATTN: Children's Bureau 118 Q St., NE. Washington, DC 20002-2132 Phone: 866-796-1591

Date: 05/03/2007

Joan E. Ohl Commissioner Administration on Children, Youth and Families

Conceptual Framework (pdf - 52kb)

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